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Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS

2016/17

www.elliotthudsoncollege.ac.uk


Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

CONTENTS Welcome Teaching and Learning Support and Wellbeing Experiences and Enrichment EHCSU The Curriculum EPQ EHC 10 Bursary Facilities Partnership Bucket List Student Voice Admission Procedure

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THE COURSES Accounting Art and Design Biology Business Chemistry Classical Civilisation Computer Science Drama and Theatre Studies Economics English Language English Literature Ethics and Philosophy Film Studies French Geography German Government and Politics Health and Social Care (Single) Health and Social Care (Double) History ICT Law Mathematics Mathematics (Further) Media Studies Music Music Technology Physical Education Physics Product Design Psychology Sociology Spanish Travel and Tourism

30 32 34 36 38 40 42 44 46 48 50 52 54 56 58 60 62 64 66 68 70 72 74 76 78 80 82 84 86 88 90 92 94 96 98

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Elliott Hudson College

WELCOME On behalf of everyone connected to The GORSE Academies Trust I should like to take the opportunity to welcome you to Elliott Hudson College. The development of the College is one of the most exciting developments that we have seen within the Trust in recent years.

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

Elliott Hudson College

We were amazed to have so many students choose to join us in September 2015 and we know that there will be even more interest for the year to come. In developing the concept of Elliott Hudson College we were determined to ensure that we established an institution which would challenge the status quo across the city region. The college is unashamedly academic and will, we believe, play a significant part in raising standards of achievement for 16 to 18 year olds and in ensuring that young people from our city, including those from areas of significant deprivation, secure qualifications which unlock the doors of the best universities and employers in the world. Sir John Townsley Executive Principal

It is with a sense of pride that I present to you the academic and personal development opportunities that will exist for you at this College. I know that making the choice of destination for sixth form study is a significant step in any young person’s life. At Elliott Hudson College you will join a community of young people positive about their ability to shape their own future, personally ambitious, and committed to the traditional values of community and society.

Our students are at the heart of everything we do; their success, happiness, care and development drive our work. We are hugely ambitious for the academic achievement of all our young people and we know that outstanding results do not come from a random gift of ‘talent’ but from hard work, perseverance, commitment and patience. We know that self-esteem does not come from superficial work or compliments but from making the effort to do your very best: demonstrating pride, challenging yourself, and proving to yourself what you are capable of. At Elliott Hudson College we know that there are no shortcuts or easy fixes. We aim to provide the very best academic education possible and I hope that you wish to join us. With my best wishes David G. Holtham Principal

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Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

TEACHING AND LEARNING Teaching and learning at EHC is built on three pillars: engagement, personalisation and assessment. By ensuring that these sit at the heart of what we do, we can ensure that all students achieve the progress needed to suceed in their post-18 aspirations. All leaders, teachers and support staff at EHC benefit from sitting within The GORSE Academies Trust, and from the array of professional development opportunities offered from two teaching schools which form the Leeds City Teaching School Alliance. This, coupled with regular sharing of good practice and partnership meetings across the Trust, means that teaching practice remains current, innovative and effective. A key strand of our partnership work relates to research and development. Projects linked to key priorities are developed with colleagues from a variety of schools who come together to develop new teaching methods. These, supported by academic research and reliable data, can then be shared to engage learners from across the Trust. By supporting such initiatives the Trust will develop leaders of learning who can ensure that teaching and learning is world class for all students.

Ongoing assessment is a core element of EHC. It ensures that there is a consistent and regular identification of and intervention for students’ needs, and it pervades all aspects of the College. Every two weeks, individual teaching staff, Heads of Faculty, Heads of Alliance, Progress Tutors and the Senior Leadership Team collaboratively review the progress of each individual student towards meeting their targets and learning goals. Assessment data is used to drive conversation with Progress Tutors so that progress can be reviewed, and to set goals for improvement. Two years is a relatively short time period to prepare students for university, higher level apprenticeships and the world of work. However, EHC is confident that by engaging students, personalising their experience, and setting relevant targets based upon regular assessment, the progress they make will be exceptional.

A college can only meet the needs of its students if it understands their individual context: what drives and motivates them; what their interests and goals are; and how to stretch and challenge them appropriately to achieve the highest levels of success. EHC prides itself on personalising the learning experience for all students. The Personal Progress Tutor plays a pivotal role in achieving this. However, each classroom teacher compiles and regularly shares information on where students are succeeding and strategies that are successful in improving their outcomes. By sharing such information across subject areas and teaching staff, all learning is personalised for each student, and his or her progress is ultimately enhanced.

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Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

STUDENT SUPPORT AND WELLBEING OUR PLEDGE Elliott Hudson College is committed to supporting its students in achieving their full potential, both in terms of qualifications and their future opportunities. We therefore pledge that we will: • care for your son’s/daughter’s safety and happiness • support your son/daughter to achieve his or her full potential • achieve high standards of work and behaviour through building positive relationships and developing a sense of responsibility • keep you informed about College matters and your son’s/daughter’s progress

• be open and welcoming at all times and offer opportunities for you to become involved in the daily life of the College

Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

ALLIANCES Each student at EHC is placed in an Alliance. The Alliances were named by the first EHC college students last year after inspirational figures: Luther King, Earheart, Yousafzai and Hawking. Inspiring students through community spirit lies at the heart of the Alliance System. Each Alliance has a Head of Alliance who is integral to day-to-day College life, and will ensure that students are provided with an exciting range of opportunities within the Alliance System. By becoming an active member of their Alliance students will find that they will make new friends, enjoy College to the full, and gain skills that are imperative for their future career aspirations. The Student Alliance Body will also be critical in supporting ‘Alliance events’. These encompass a range of academic and sporting challenges designed to seek out and reward the Alliance which ultimately demonstrates all-round ability and, most importantly, outstanding participation and team-work.

• provide opportunities for your son/daughter to discuss his or her future with experienced, wellinformed, qualified and impartial careers staff • keep students and parents/carers up to date with relevant information regarding national changes to the educational landscape

THE SUPPORT NETWORK – WHO’S WHO?

Vice Principal Mr Styles

Principal Mr Holtham

Assistant Principal Mrs Quashie Student Services Mrs Chadwick

Head of Alliance

STUDENT

PERSONAL PROGRESS TUTOR Personal Progress Tutor

Learning Support

Financial Support Subject Staff

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Careers Guidance Mrs Medlock

A student’s time throughout sixth form can be extremely demanding and students need someone to help in supporting, guiding and tracking their progress. At the EHC each student has a Personal Progress Tutor. This is a member of staff who is solely dedicated to the pastoral care and wellbeing of students at EHC. They act as the first port of call for both parents/carers and students regarding progress, attainment and behaviour. In addition to monitoring student progress and wellbeing in lessons, the Progress Tutor team analyse student progress data regularly to assess whether students are on track. They also work very closely with all teaching staff to help provide effective and swift intervention, to get students back on track as soon as possible.

The Progress Tutor will also: • deliver key messages regarding attendance, praise, and cause for concerns • support and guide students regarding their post-18 choices • review and set targets every two weeks • collate comments from other staff to produce the first draft of the UCAS or employment reference • meet students/parents/carers where appropriate • undertake professional development opportunities to ensure they are experts in the field of post-18 progression • help maintain all standards expected from our students, e.g. EHC10 (see page 18)

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Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

Elliott Hudson College

STUDENT SERVICES

FINANCIAL SUPPORT

Students have a dedicated Student Services desk that is ‘womanned’ at all times by Mrs Chadwick. Her role is to support the College in administering attendance, praise, discipline and achievement data, and she is often the first port of call for all students’ and parents’/carers’ enquires. As a key component of the team, Student Services supports all applications for: bus passes; the 16-19 Bursary; jobs and apprenticeships; University entrance via UCAS; and all applications made by students for a place at EHC.

EHC recognises that supporting students financially through post-16 education can be difficult for a number of families. We therefore can offer financial support through the 16-19 Bursary scheme to support students with their educational needs. These needs will vary greatly from student to student, but could include some/all of the following: transport, food, educational books and materials, laptops, courserelated trips, UCAS applications and Open Day costs, exam re-sit fees, sport activities, and professional membership fees.

LEARNING SUPPORT

Entitlement to the bursary is linked to household income, benefits received, or any form of financial hardship. Full details of the 16-19 Bursary can be found later in the prospectus and on the College website (www.elliotthudsoncollege.ac.uk).

All teaching and support staff at EHC are trained in supporting learners with additional learning needs and we have specialist leaders who have expertise in supporting students with: Autistic Spectrum Disorders, dyslexia, dyspraxia, ADHD, mobility difficulties, and other learning difficulties. Please can we ask that any additional needs of students are declared at the start of the course so that the College can fulfil its responsibilities in making any adjustments needed.

CAREERS GUIDANCE EHC recognises that all students require expert advice in planning for their future and therefore we provide guidance from a team of qualified and experienced advisors. All students are provided opportunities for one-to-one guidance sessions with a member of the Careers team. The personalised advice and guidance for students includes: • one-to-one guidance • personal coaching, including how to write a CV and interview techniques and practice • help with applications to further/higher education • support for both students and their parents on key transition and option choices • careers information and advice on all available options, including apprenticeships, work-based learning and traditional pathways at both 16 and 18+

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• support following exam results, to help students decide what to do next • workshops for students and parents on key career issues (which could include weighing up the costs and benefits of various post-18 choices, such as higher education and its alternatives) • working in partnership with our universities to widen participation in higher level education

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Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

EXPERIENCES AND ENRICHMENT Beyond the qualifications curriculum, EHC provides an exceptional enrichment package for all our students. At EHC we believe that students should have plenty of opportunities to access a range of activities that will enrich a traditional academic curriculum. A student’s time in post-16 is one that we hope they will look back on fondly, primarily due to the different experiences they have. We work closely with different curriculum areas, and local, national and international communities to make a student’s experience as rich as possible.

Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

Providing trips and excursions for students can not only boost academic success but also inspire life-long passion and enthusiasm in a given area. Throughout our first couple of years, EHC is planning to provide some truly outstanding experiences for students outside of the classroom. As well as some of the once-in-a-lifetime experiences detailed below, EHC will aim to offer the following visits throughout curriculum areas: • Oxford University labs and the Jodrell Bank observatory

• Leeds Crown Court

• Big Bang Science Fair, Birmingham NEC

• Snowdonia

• Media City, Manchester

• Malham Tarn Field Studies Centre, Malham

• Houses of Parliament

• Music-led trip in Europe

• West Yorkshire Playhouse

• Universities such as Leeds, Leicester, Cambridge, Oxford and Huddersfield

• The Supreme Court

• London Art Gallery Tour

Taking part in these experiences not only develops personal and social skills, but provides opportunities for students to expand their social circle and benefit from being part of a team and the wider EHC community. In the competitive higher education and employment market, successful students are often the ones who have gained such a broad experience, and really demonstrated that they have made the most of their time in sixth form.

WORLD CHALLENGE Each Wednesday afternoon, the timetable is dedicated to enrichment opportunities and the following will give you a flavour of some of the opportunities on offer at EHC: • Choir • Creative photography • Student investor challenge • Young Enterprise • Bank of England Challenge

• Junior and Senior Maths Challenge • Languages • School drama production: this year, ‘Oedipus’ • EHC magazine

• AMP Awards

• EHC TV

• Table tennis

• Dance

• Chemistry club

• Applying for a career in health and clinical professions

• Men’s football • World Challenge 10

• Public speaking • European board games

• ‘Fight Club’: how to fight your worries • Fitness classes

• Running club

• V-inspired – the power of volunteering

• Women’s football

• Basketball

• Debate society

• Women’s rugby

• Badminton

• Duke of Edinburgh – Bronze/Silver/Gold

• Spoken word poetry

• Men’s rugby • Netball

Here at EHC we truly believe the world is your oyster. In the summer of 2017 we intend to take a team of intrepid challengers on an expedition to Vietnam. As the name suggests this is a challenge in every respect: from the planning, fundraising and preparation, to the actual event itself. Students will form an itinerary with World Challenge to incorporate an acclimatisation and trekking phase (there will be camping!), a community project, and some well-earned rest and relaxation. Highlights could include Ho Chi Minh City, Hanoi, Sa Pa and Hue; students will have the opportunity to decide where the trip takes them. During enrichment, students will research travel options, organise fundraising, learn camp-craft, improve fitness, pack kit and discuss travel, health and hygiene. This is a truly remarkable, life-changing experience.

SKI TRIP In February 2017, we are running a ski trip to Sunday River on the East Coast of the USA for over 40 students. It will involve five days’ skiing across 820 acres of ski area and evenings packed full of activities such as bowling and ice skating. We will then head to New York City (via a shopping mall outlet) to have an evening meal at Bubba Gump’s shrimp restaurant followed by a night/day to explore the city. We will take in various tourist sites such as the Empire State Building and Times Square.

• National Citizenship Service

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Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

ELLIOTT HUDSON COLLEGE STUDENTS’ UNION (EHCSU) The EHCSU is the organisation that represents the interests of all students within the College. Through the elected student officers and professional staff the EHCSU’s main purpose is to work with College staff to better the educational experience of all students. As the students’ union belongs to the students it is theirs to shape, mould and direct in a way that works best for the student body. The EHCSU exists to improve the experience of all students by: • Representing students’ views, concerns and aspirations • Campaigning, educating and advising on student issues • Delivering quality social space and service in the College • Encouraging students to interact through cultural, recreational and social groups and activities The structure of the EHCSU Committee is outlined below. However, all students are encouraged to get involved and become a representative of the Union throughout their time at EHC by representing the College at sporting, cultural and promotional events.

President

Sports and extracurricular

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Vice President

Secretary

Treasurer

Social and welfare

Fundraising and charities

Curriculum and facilities

IMAGE

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Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

THE CURRICULUM In the past students would typically take four AS Levels during Year 12 and would then choose three of these subjects to complete an A Level in; the AS Level grade would contribute 50% of the overall marks for the A Level grade. However, 2015 marked a change in Level Three qualifications, which continues into 2016, 2017 and beyond. A number of AS Levels are now stand-alone qualifications where a student’s performance at AS Level will have no bearing on their final A Level grade in these subjects. The qualifications that have been reformed include: • English Language

• Computer Science

• English Literature

• Fine Art

• Biology

• Drama and Theatre Studies

• Chemistry

• Geography

• Physics

• French

• History

• German

• Psychology

• Spanish

• Sociology

• Music

• Business Studies

• Physical Education

• Economics

• Religious Studies

For these subjects the AS and A2 qualifications have been ‘decoupled’. Therefore, content that is assessed at the end of Year 12 in the AS will be assessed again at the end of Year 13 as part of the A Level. At EHC students who study the new A Level will still sit the AS exam but the achieved grade at the end of Year 12 will not contribute to the overall A Level. The achieved grade will, however, provide an accurate assessment of their performance at AS Level, inform universities of potential, and indicate to the school potential for full A Level study. Students at Elliott Hudson College will still be able to study four AS Levels in the first year before selecting three A Levels in the second year. In exceptional circumstances, students may apply to study more than four AS Levels. In addition to this, students will also gain the Extended Project Qualification during their first year at EHC and have an hour on their timetable to enhance their writing skills for advanced level writing (see page 16 for more details).

TYPICAL YEAR 12 TIMETABLE • 4 courses – 5 hours contact time per course

• Fortnightly meeting with Progress Tutor – 15 minutes

• Extended Project Qualification – 1 hour contact time

• Enrichment – 1-3 hours each Wednesday

• Advanced writing skills – 1 hour contact time

• Private study

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Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

EXTENDED PROJECT QUALIFICATION (EPQ) All students at Elliott Hudson College will complete the EPQ within their first year. We believe that equipping students with this qualification will help to make them a competitive applicant for universities, higher level apprenticeships and employment opportunities.

WHAT IS THE EPQ?

Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

WHAT BENEFITS DOES THE EPQ HAVE? FOR STUDENTS

FOR EMPLOYERS

FOR UNIVERSITIES

Students can research something they are really interested in but would not normally study. It develops research, study and project management skills. It can be a chance to explore possible career or university options.

It shows that students have wider interests and gives them something to discuss in interviews. It can be based around career interests. It demonstrates considerable project management skills.

To ‘show off’ to universities, particularly where interviews are involved or on competitive courses. It will always be looked on favourably. It may form part of an offer, particularly an offer based on points.

The EPQ is a project management qualification. It is the equivalent of half an A level with an A* grade available. The project is chosen, planned, managed, researched and evaluated completely independently by the student. They have a choice of writing a 5000 word essay on a topic of their choice, or producing an artefact and writing a 1000 word supporting report outlining the project process. Almost any topic that a student is interested in can become a project. Past examples of questions are given below.

ESSAYS:

ARTEFACTS:

• Do video games cause violence?

• Chapter 1 of a horror novel comparison to Iain Macarthur

• How has technology changed the modern world? • Is time travel possible? • What does it take to be a Police Officer? • Should euthanasia be legalised?

• Can student wargame players make their own gameboard to industry standard? • Can a classically trained singer give a convincing performance of a pop song? • What is the best way to create a scale model of a Formula 1 racing car?

HOW IS THIS ASSESSED? Project management skills are the most important part of the assessment of this qualification. A good final product is evidence that you have managed the project well, but the essay or artefact is not marked on its own. Marks are awarded for many aspects of project management including: • Planning

• Critical reading and thinking skills

• Preparation

• Review and evaluation

• Research

• Presentation skills

CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY: ‘We welcome the introduction of the Extended Project and would encourage students to undertake one. This support is because of the clear educational benefit of doing an EP. EPs might be submitted as an example of written work and/or discussed at interview’. Source: Dr Geoff Parks - Director of Admissions – Cambridge University, April 2009

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Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

Elliott Hudson College

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Student/College Agreement The EHC 10 is your agreement – your contract with us. We expect that every single one of you will not only sign the agreement, but also promote these values. Our desire is to see each and every person in the College reach their goals, whatever they may be. It is only through the highest expectations that this can happen. All EHC students will be required to sign this agreement. Please read your commitment carefully and take your responsibility very seriously. Success at college is the result of a strong partnership. We will go the extra mile to get you where you want to be, but we expect you to embrace the spirit of this agreement.

The Student Commitment to Elliott Hudson College:

Nothing is more important to your success than the culture that exists at Elliott Hudson College. It is a feature of all outstanding schools and colleges that a positive culture drives the behaviour, the beliefs and the characteristics o  f students and staff. At EHC we expect that you will not only sign our agreement but, more importantly, live the values and principles upon which the College is founded.

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The Elliott Hudson Core Values:

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Quality of Teaching

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High Challenge

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Exam Focused You will receive a model of sixth form teaching that is focused upon the requirements of your examinations.

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Developing Independence

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Wider Reading You will be provided with an essential reading list, for each subject that you study, to expand the breadth of your understanding.

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Commitment I will show commitment to my studies. I will complete independent work on time, to the right standard, and will devote the required time to my wider reading.

Organisation My student file is the clearest demonstration of my attitude to my studies and, ultimately, the grade I will achieve. I will ensure that I take pride in the presentation, organisation and quality of the work in my file. In simple terms, Grade A students have Grade A files.

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Attendance I will ensure that I do not book holidays in term time and I am clear that missed attendance for any reason will cost me grades. If I am absent I understand that it is my responsibility to notify the College before my first lesson or before 9am (whichever is earlier).

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Independence I will ensure that part-time work will not affect my grades. A part-time job can be a great experience but if I do too many hours, my grades will suffer. Each A Level studied will require 4 hours of independent study per week to be successful. More than 8 hours per week of parttime work will affect my results.

Environment The environment we live in is important. I will ensure that I treat the College with respect, as an effective learning environment needs everybody to look after it.

Safety I will ensure that I wear my ID badge at all times to ensure the safety of everybody at EHC.

Respect I will treat all members of the College community with the respect that I have a right to receive myself. I am committed to the traditional British values of honesty, democracy and the rule of law. I will demonstrate tolerance and respect to all people regardless of their faith, race, culture, sex, sexuality or gender.

You will be given challenging, independent work to do which will deepen your understanding of each subject you study.

Developmental Feedback Feedback will be clear about the strengths that you h  ave and the steps that you need to take to improve.

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Progression Focused You will receive the support of a Personal Progress Tutor who will work with you to ensure you achieve your minimum expected grades. Your Tutor will also assist with your progression to your post-18 destination of choice.

Supportive Assessment Very regular assessment will ensure that you are clear about the progress that you are making and the standard of your work. Examples of A*, A and B grade work will be used to reinforce the characteristics of high-grade performance.

Personalised Provision

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The Basics I understand the foundations of success: I will attend all lessons, on time, prepared, and with the right equipment to participate. These three things will be known as ‘The Basics’ and it is my responsibility to get these right. I will also ensure that I attend all Alliance Assemblies and scheduled meetings with my Personal Progress Tutor.

Positive Support

The staff at EHC will treat you as an individual and take the time to get to know you. You will be offered t he opportunity to complete an Extended Project Qualification that is personal to you.

You will be set challenging and aspirational minimum g  rade expectations. 03

I will respect the right of all students to learn and all teachers to teach. My behaviour and actions in the College will have a positive effect on the learning of others.

You will be given support and encouragement to overcome any barriers you experience.

We will ensure that your teaching is of the highest possible quality in all subject areas.

Learning

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Attitude I am clear that my attitude is my responsibility. It is my attitude which determines my behaviour; it is my behaviour that controls what I do or do not do. How I act, what I do, each moment of every day, will determine whether or not I will be successful.

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Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

STUDENT BURSARY The 16-19 Bursary is available to provide financial support to 16- to 19-year-olds who continue in full-time education, where they might otherwise struggle. There are two types of bursary that can be accessed at Elliott Hudson College.

VULNERABLE BURSARY Young people in the defined vulnerable groups are eligible for a bursary of up to £1,200 a year. The defined vulnerable groups are: • Young people in care or care leavers (EFA class ‘care leavers’ as young people aged 18-21 who have been looked after for more than 13 weeks or since the age of 14; or young people who cease to be looked after or accommodated, including unaccompanied asylum-seeking children) • Young people claiming Income Support or Universal Credit (in their own name) • Young people getting both Disability Living Allowance (and Personal Independence Payments) and Employment Support Allowance (ESA), in their own name

DISCRETIONARY BURSARY The fund is used to assist students who may be experiencing financial hardship to complete their course and it is only able to make contributions towards costs incurred for attending college. For example, this might cover transport, text books or equipment. It is cash-limited and priority will be given to certain groups (e.g. students who are economically disadvantaged). • Low priority – net household income between £20,000-£25,000 per year • Medium priority – net household income between £18,000-£19,999 per year • High priority – net household income below £18,000 per year Students who should consider applying for a Discretionary Bursary may: • Be a student whose parents/carers are currently claiming other means-tested benefits including Income Support, Working Tax Credit/Child Tax Credit or Income Based Employment and Support Allowance (ESA), who is not entitled to free school meals • Be a student who is a young carer and is not in receipt of a carer’s allowance • Be a student who does not fall under the categories listed above, but considers themselves to be in financial hardship To be eligible you must: • Be an enrolled student on a full time course at Elliott Hudson College • Provide evidence of household income below £25,000 • Be aged under 19 on 31st August 2016 • Maintain good attendance

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PROSPECTUS 2016/17

Elliott Hudson College

FACILITIES Creating a purposeful and creative learning environment for students is a priority for Elliott Hudson College, and the transformation of Phoenix House to a college environment has been truly outstanding. In addition to spacious, well-equipped teaching areas, Elliott Hudson has facilities that promote academic learning, as well as providing more relaxing spaces for students to enjoy. The whole campus is equipped with Wi-Fi and we encourage students to connect to this with their own devices to facilitate their learning.

LIBRARY The library is a bright, spacious and quiet environment where students are provided with space to focus on their studies. It is equipped with private work booths, computers and large desks to facilitate academic learning. Each subject taught at EHC has filled the library with accompanying texts to support and extend classroom learning so that students are able to research in depth the subjects they are studying. A section of the Library is a dedicated careers library which is the hub for information regarding progression routes, including universities, other further and higher education, apprenticeships, and career opportunities.

RESTAURANT Studying at Advanced Level is challenging and, from time to time, students will need an environment to unwind and relax with friends. With a mixture of soft furnishing and more traditional tables and chairs, the furniture in the Restaurant is as high a quality as the food on offer. A dedicated catering team provides a vast range of food and drink for a whole host of dietary requirements. Resident chef, Charlie, ensures that all of our students’ needs are met and the students are always complimentary of the quality of food on offer at break and lunch time. Having been trained by a coffee barista, the team provides a mixture of hot and cold drinks throughout the day. Breakfast and regular snacks mean that our students have the nutrition needed to focus on their studies.

BREAKOUT ZONES One of the biggest needs of sixth form students is the space to work, be that independently or with the support of peers and colleagues. Throughout the building, ‘breakout zones’ have been developed which consist of PCs and small and large tables to enable students to work in a collaborative way. By locating these near faculty work rooms and offices, students are able to access their teaching staff throughout the day so they feel supported in independent study.

MAC SUITE In addition to the 140 PCs we have within the college, there is also a dedicated Apple Mac suite to support the design work needed within the Art, Design, Media, Music and Film courses. Each Mac is equipped with the latest design, music and media technology, including Adobe Creative Cloud (Illustrator CC, Photoshop CC, Indesign CC), to ensure that work produced by students is of the highest professional standard.

MUSIC STUDIO The range of pianos, guitars, amps and recording equipment at EHC is remarkable in quality. Providing students with high-spec equipment will increase the professionalism of the work they produce and ultimately the grades they attain. Even the least experienced of musicians and technicians will be able to produce high-quality music.

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Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

UNIVERSITY PARTNERSHIPS Working in partnership with universities is key for preparing and equipping students appropriately for the challenges they face when they leave Elliott Hudson College. The more students are exposed to the culture of universities, and the more frequently they work with university professors and their colleagues, the easier the next step in their progression will be. Furthermore, with competition for university places being higher than ever before, encouraging students in all curriculum areas to take part in university partnership projects will provide them with experiences to make them highly competitive in their applications.

UNIVERSITY OF LEICESTER The College has a developing relationship with the University of Leicester which is centred around Medicine and related biological sciences. Our links will enable students to spend time at the University, getting a thorough understanding and awareness of the requirements of this highly competitive but diverse range of courses. We hope that students will be able to work with professionals from the University of Leicester during visits to the University but also at the EHC campus. We are excited for the potential benefits this will give to EHC students when applying for these extremely competitive courses.

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UNIVERSITY OF LEEDS The partnership with the University of Leeds will benefit EHC students immensely. Within their first term, all EHC students will be inducted in the University of Leeds libraries. As part of this induction students will also be given a University of Leeds library card so that they can access all of their libraries and online e-books and journals 24 hours a day. The EHC staff have ensured that the reading lists they provide for all their courses are linked to books stocked in the university’s libraries, to encourage students to delve deeper into their chosen subjects. The use of these libraries also proves invaluable for students’ EPQ research, as access to the wealth of books and journals will put their projects at the cutting edge of academic research. The University of Leeds are also providing opportunities to work with students in a number of outreach projects. An example of this includes the Health Sciences and STEM outreach programme know as Reach for Excellence. This invites students to a wide variety of events and activities throughout their Year 12 and Year 13 studies. The programme is designed to enhance their current studies through subject taster sessions and study skills sessions. In addition, they have the opportunity to attend workshops and information sessions in careers, finance and UCAS amongst others. The Arts outreach also gives opportunities for students to sample university workshops on subjects such as History, Languages, English and Communications. Meanwhile the Social Science programme enables students to spend the morning “Bail Bashing” with the School of Law; the afternoon debating the Asian century with Politics and International Studies; and to finish off with a thought provoking session with the School of Sociology and Social Policy on the Dichotomies of the Mixed Race Subject.

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BUCKET LIST

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Undertake some charity/ humanitarian work on a local, national or international scale

STAND OUT

ON A UCAS APPLICATION 1

Attend a

Enrol and use the library facilities at the University of Leeds 4

Take part in more than one work experience 26

Go on at least one school trip in each of your subject areas

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UCAS Convention 2

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TAKE PART IN FUND RAISING ACTIVITIES

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Be an ambassador for Elliott Hudson College at an event 9

Regularly take part in enrichment activities

Take part in

volunteer work

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TAKE PART IN ONE OR MORE

MOCK INTERVIEW(s) 27


voice

STUDENT

“The lessons are really engaging. You can tell that the teacher really loves his subject.” “The level of support from teachers is brilliant. Everyone is willing to help you. it doesn’t matter what subject you are doing, they’re all there when you need it.” “I thought the EPQ would be quite tough but because you get to do it on a topic of your choice, I’m actually really enjoying it. Because I want to go into sociology, it will give me loads to talk about at an interview.”

PARENT voice

In October 2015, 106 parents/carers gave us the following feedback:

98% of students are happy at EHC 99% of students like the ethos and culture of EHC

“My daughter has been inspired by Mr Holtham’s direction for the students and enthusiasm he has generated for students achieving their goals.”

“Elliott Hudson College has given an opportunity of a lifetime to my daughter.” 28

94% thought that the teaching at EHC is outstanding 100% would recommend EHC to another parent/carer

“My child has transitioned well. I’m very happy with progress and how she has settled down. A massive thank you to all the team.” “The determination my son is showing towards his studies is evidence of the encouragement and teaching techniques he is receiving at the College.” 29


THE COURSES Accounting Art and Design Biology Business Chemistry Classical Civilisation Computer Science Drama and Theatre Studies Economics English Language English Literature Ethics and Philosophy Film Studies French Geography German Government and Politics Health and Social Care (Single) Health and Social Care (Double) History ICT Law Mathematics Mathematics (Further) Media Studies Music Music Technology Physical Education Physics Product Design Psychology Sociology Spanish Travel and Tourism

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Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

ACCOUNTING COURSE CONTENT AS LEVEL Unit 1 - Introduction to Financial Accounting This unit is designed as a foundation for the course and covers double-entry procedures as applied to the accounting systems of sole traders.

Unit 2 - Financial and Management Accounting This unit provides students with the opportunity to develop their knowledge and understanding of financial accounting and introduces them to some of the ways in which financial accounting can provide valuable information for measuring and monitoring business performance and for planning future business operations.

A LEVEL Unit 3 - Further aspects of Financial Accounting In this unit, students will have the opportunity to develop their understanding of financial accounting techniques which can be applied where a business does not maintain a complete accounting system.

Unit 4 - Further aspects of Management Accounting This unit provides an opportunity for students to develop further the ways in which accounting techniques can be used to aid the management of a business and contribute to effective decision-making.

ASSESSMENT COURSE DESCRIPTION A level Accounting helps students to develop knowledge and understanding of the purposes of accounting and apply this to a variety of accounting problems. The A level will develop students’ ability to acquire a range of important and transferable skills such as: • data skills • presenting arguments and making judgements and justified recommendations

AS Level

A Level

Assessment is 100% examination.

Assessment is 100% examination.

Each unit exam is a one and a half hour paper. The course is examined externally by two unit exams in the summer.

Each unit exam is a two hour paper. The course is examined externally by two unit exams in the summer.

ACCN1 Introduction to Financial Accounting. ACCN2 Financial and Management Accounting.

ACCN3 Further aspects of Financial Accounting. ACCN4 Further aspects of Management Accounting.

• recognising the nature of problems, solving problems and making decisions • planning work, taking into account the demands of the task and the time available to complete it This specification has no coursework or controlled assessment

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

FUTURE OPPORTUNITIES

Attain 5 A*-C grades at GCSE including a C grade in English/English Language and a C grade in Mathematics.

Even the best business ideas get nowhere without sound financial management; so whether you want to work in big business, be the next Richard Branson or have your own small business, knowledge of financial management is vital.

If a student is applying for an A Level course that they have studied at GCSE it is expected that a student would attain a minimum of a C grade in this subject.

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A whole host of Level 3 qualifications and apprenticeships are available in Accounting once you have completed the A Level course.

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Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

A LEVEL

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

Unit 3 - Coursework

Attain 5 A*-C grades at GCSE including a C grade in English/English Language and a C grade in Mathematics.

This is a practical unit with a discrete written element. Students develop a personal investigation based on an idea, issue, technique, concept or theme of interest to them, building on their strengths from year one. They develop a 20003000 word written commentary on the project, analysing their approaches and the sources that they have used for inspiration. The topic or theme for this unit is very much of personal choice and is based on strengths and interests developed at AS Level.

ART AND DESIGN COURSE DESCRIPTION Work produced on this course will demonstrate the use of creative skills to develop individual thoughts, feelings, observations and ideas. Students will be trying to extend their own and others’ ways of seeing the world. This course allows students to explore fine art, photography, art/craft and design, textile design, three-dimensional design or graphic communication in the first term and then following this they will be asked to choose a specialism as they progress in the second term. Students will learn traditional skills but they will also combine this with the use of alternative media.

COURSE CONTENT AS LEVEL Unit 1 - Coursework

Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

Students are also asked to complete a Marketing and Advertising project. This part of the course focuses on integrated management of marketing, communications and advertising. Students will develop an in-depth and practical knowledge of marketing principles, understanding marketing communications and advertising from the perspective of owners and advertising agencies.

Unit 4 - Externally Set Assignment Students will practically respond to a topic set by the examination board where they will develop work which concludes in an in-depth final piece which will be constructed within 15 hours under examination conditions. After the examination period, students display their work professionally within an exhibition space, and this creates the opportunity for success to be celebrated.

If a student is applying for an A Level course that they have studied at GCSE it is expected that a student would attain a minimum of a C grade in this subject.

ASSESSMENT AS Level Unit 1 Will be assessed through a portfolio assignment including a 1000 word essay (60%). Unit 2 Will be assessed through an External set assignment which includes a preparatory period + 10 hours supervised time and is worth 40% of AS.

A2 Level Unit 3 Will be assessed through a portfolio assignment including a 2000 word essay (60%). Unit 4 Will be assessed through an examination (40%).

FUTURE OPPORTUNITIES All Art subjects can lend themselves to a variety of future opportunities. The skills learnt and developed throughout the course are extremely important if students wish to progress onto courses offered by Higher Education institutions or obtain a career within the creative industry. Career opportunities may include fashion designer, architect, jewellery design, illustrator, stylist and photographer.

During this unit students will explore ideas and develop both skills and practical approaches. They will begin to understand how artists use a visual language of selected ideas and they will have the opportunity to investigate a range of sources. Students will explore and experiment with a range of practical materials and approaches and produce a personal outcome based on one subject area.

Unit 2 - Externally Set Assignment Students will practically respond to a topic set by the examination board where they will develop a body of work on a theme that that they have selected. After the Externally Set Assignment, students display their work professionally within an exhibition space, and this creates the opportunity for success to be celebrated.

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Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

A LEVEL 3.5 Energy transfers in and between organisms

3.7 Genetics, populations, evolution and ecosystems

Students will study photosynthesis and respiration.

Students study inheritance, variation in populations and natural selection.

3.6 Organisms respond to changes in their internal and external environments Students study the nervous system and how responses to changes in the internal or external environment are coordinated.

3.8 The control of gene expression Students will study how cells are able to control their metabolic activities by regulating transcription and translation of their genome.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS Attain 5 A*-C grades at GCSE including a C grade in English/English Language and a C grade in Mathematics. Students must have taken the higher tier examinations for Additional Science (and/or Further Additional Science) and achieved a grade B (with a minimum of a grade B in Core Science). If a student has studied separate Sciences students should have achieved a grade B overall in the higher tier examinations for the subject they wish to take at A Level.

ASSESSMENT During the AS and A Level course, assessment will be through external examinations only.

BIOLOGY COURSE DESCRIPTION Biology is the natural science concerned with the study of life and living organisms, including their structure, function, growth, origin, evolution, distribution, and taxonomy.

COURSE CONTENT AS LEVEL 3.1 Biological Molecules Students will study the biochemistry shared by all life on Earth.

3.2 Cells Students will study the structure of different types of cells, in particular, that of the cell surface membrane and its role in cell signalling, communication, recognition and immunity.

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3.3 Organisms exchange substances with their environment Students will be studying how the internal environment of a cell or organism is different from its external environment.

3.4 Genetic information, variation and relationships between organisms Students will be examining biological diversity and how differences between species reect genetic differences.

AS Level

A Level

Paper 1 65 marks: short answer questions. 10 marks: comprehension question. 50% of AS grade.

Paper 1 2 hours, 91 marks.

Paper 2 65 marks: short answer questions. 10 marks: extended response questions. 50% of AS grade. 10% of the overall assessment of AS Biology will contain mathematical skills equivalent to Level 2 or above. At least 15% of the overall assessment of AS Biology will assess knowledge, skills and understanding in relation to practical work.

35% of A Level. Questions; 76 marks: a mixture of short and long answer questions; 15 marks: extended response questions. Paper 2 2 hours, 91 marks. 35% of A Level. Questions: 76 marks: a mixture of short and long answer questions; 15 marks: comprehensive question. Paper 3 2 hours, 78 marks. 30% of A Level. Questions: 38 marks: structured questions, including practical techniques; 15 marks: critical analysis of given experimental data; 25 marks: one essay from a choice of two titles.

FUTURE OPPORTUNITIES Biology is a great choice of subject for people who want a career in health and clinical professions, such as medicine, dentistry, veterinary science, physiotherapy, pharmacy, optometry, nursing, zoology, marine biology or forensic science.

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Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

Elliott Hudson College

COURSE CONTENT AS LEVEL The skills, knowledge and experience gained on the AS Level course will enable students to develop a broad understanding of business principles and to focus on a specific pathway, e.g. Marketing, Finance, Human Resources and Administration. Students will study business in a variety of contexts including large and small businesses. They will consider the competitive environment and the markets in which businesses operate.

A2 LEVEL

BUSINESS COURSE DESCRIPTION The course begins with an introduction to what business is and understanding the nature and purpose of business. Students will then go on to study Managers, Leadership Styles and Decision Making Techniques and how these could lead to improvements in marketing, operational, financial and human resource performance. Courses based on this specification should encourage students to develop an enthusiasm for studying business and gain a holistic understanding of business in a range of contexts. It will also test their numerical skills in a range of business contexts.

The A Level course will enable students to develop further knowledge and understanding of the practices and techniques used within marketing, finance, operations management and human resource management, and the links between them. The A Level course will involve more analysing of the strategic position and performance of a business. The A Level study material is designed to build upon the existing knowledge from the AS course. It involves analysing the strategic position of a business in terms of its objectives and strategy. Students will study the strengths and weaknesses of the financial performance and highlight any opportunities and threats that may arise within a competitive market. There is also the chance to examine the international market and the use of digital technology in a modern world.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS Attain 5 A*-C grades at GCSE including a C grade in English/English Language and a C grade in Mathematics. If a student is applying for an A Level course that they have studied at GCSE it is expected that a student would attain a minimum of a C grade in this subject.

ASSESSMENT AS Level During the AS course, assessment is through two written external examinations: Paper 1 Written exam: 1 hour 30 minutes. 80 marks in total. Weighting is 50% of AS. Paper 2 Written exam: 1 hour 30 minutes. 80 marks in total. Weighting is 50% of AS.

A Level During the A2 course, assessment is through three external examinations: Paper 1 Written examination: 2 hours. 100 Marks in total. 33.3% of A Level weighting. Paper 2 Written examination: 2 hours. 100 Marks in total. 33.3% of A Level weighting. Paper 3 Written examination: 2 hours. 100 Marks in total. 33.3% of A Level weighting.

FUTURE OPPORTUNITIES. This course provides a suitable basis for entry to degree courses in business, accounting, law, environmental studies, marketing and management. Careers are possible in any area of business and many of our students go on to study at university in business related degrees.

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Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

COURSE CONTENT AS LEVEL

A LEVEL

3.1 Physical chemistry

3.1 Physical chemistry

Atomic structure, amount of substance, bonding, energetics, kinetics, chemical equilibria and Le Chatelier’s principle.

Thermodynamics, rate equations, equilibrium constant for homogeneous systems, electrode potentials and electrochemical cells.

3.2 Inorganic chemistry Periodicity, Group 2 and Group 7.

3.2 Inorganic chemistry

3.3 Organic chemistry

Properties of Period 3 elements and their oxides, transition metals, reactions of ions in aqueous solutions.

Introduction to organic chemistry, alkanes, halogenoalkanes, alkenes, alcohols and organic analysis.

Chemistry is concerned with the science of matter, particularly its structure, properties and reactions. Chemistry is of central importance to the sciences as a whole as the chemical reactions that it governs are fundamental to all of science.

3.3 Organic chemistry Optical isomerism, aldehydes and ketones, carboxylic acids and derivatives, aromatic chemistry, amines, polymers, amino acids, proteins and DNA, organic synthesis, NMR spectroscopy and chromatography.

CHEMISTRY COURSE DESCRIPTION

Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS Attain 5 A*-C grades at GCSE including a C grade in English/English Language and a C grade in Mathematics. Students must have taken the higher tier examinations for Additional Science (and/or Further Additional Science) and achieved a grade B (with a minimum of a grade B in Core Science). If a student has studied separate Sciences students should have achieved a grade B overall in the higher tier examinations for the subject they wish to take at A Level.

ASSESSMENT During the AS and A Level course, assessment will be through external examinations only.

AS Level

A Level

Students will sit two 1 hour 30 minute written exam papers worth 80 marks. Each paper is worth 50%.

Students will sit three 2 hour written exam papers. The content, assessment and questions differ for these papers; please see the information below for more detail.

Paper 1 65 marks: short answer questions 15 marks: multiple choice questions. Paper 2 65 marks: short answer questions 15 marks: multiple choice questions. 20% of the overall assessment of AS Chemistry will contain mathematical skills equivalent to Level 2 or above. At least 15% of the overall assessment of AS Chemistry will assess knowledge, skills and understanding in relation to practical work.

Paper 1 2 hours; 105 marks. 35% of A Level Questions. 105 marks: a mixture of short and long answer questions. Paper 2 2 hours; 105 marks. 35% of A Level Questions. 105 marks: a mixture of short and long answer questions. Paper 3 2 hours, 90 marks. 30% of A Level Questions. 40 marks: structured questions, including practical techniques; 20 marks: testing across the speciďŹ cation; 30 marks: multiple choice questions.

FUTURE OPPORTUNITIES Chemistry is a great choice of subject for people who want a career in health and clinical professions, such as medicine, nursing, biochemistry, dentistry or forensic science. It will also equip participants for a future career in industry, for example the petrochemical or pharmaceutical industries. 40

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Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

CLASSICAL CIVILISATION COURSE DESCRIPTION Interested in drama, politics, sociology or philosophy? History, literature, anthropology, science, or mathematics? All of these are Greek or Latin words, and all first developed in ancient Greece or Rome. Their study is all part of Classical Civilisation, where students are introduced to the history, society and literature of these societies from around 500 BC–100 AD. It gives students the unique chance to study topics they may never have encountered, using skills and ideas from a wide range of subjects. It will help students understand the past, the modern world, western history and English literature; and it will even help them understand themselves.

COURSE CONTENT AS LEVEL Unit 1 - Women in Athens and Rome During the AS Level, students study women’s lives in Athens and Rome, viewing these patriarchal societies from a different perspective, and seeing how women were represented in texts written overwhelmingly by men. Through letters, legal texts, philosophy, history, and myth, we will study wives and daughters; mothers and sisters; concubines, slaves, prostitutes, and priestesses.

Unit 2 - The Second Punic War In our second unit, we study Hannibal’s invasion of Rome in 218BC through the work of the historians Livy and Plutarch. We explore how he nearly crushed the developing Roman Empire before it had achieved greatness; yet how, after a titanic struggle, Rome emerged to survive and flourish.

A LEVEL Unit 3 - The Persian Wars At A2 Level, students will study the Persian Wars, the epic confrontation between the world’s only superpower and a ragtag band of Greek city-states. Students will seek to explain how the Greeks were able to survive the war, studying in detail the battles of Marathon, Thermopylae (with its famous ‘300’), and Salamis. They will see how the war gave the impetus to the first ever work of ‘history’: our main source for the unit, Herodotus.

Unit 4 - Roman Epic (the Aeneid) Students also explore the Roman epic poem the Aeneid: a celebration of Rome, its history, and its emperor, but above all, a superb story thrillingly told.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS Attain 5 A*-C grades at GCSE including a C grade in English/English Language and a C grade in Mathematics. If a student is applying for an A Level course that they have studied at GCSE it is expected that a student would attain a minimum of a C grade in this subject.

ASSESSMENT AS Level

A Level

The AS Level is assessed by two exam papers, Women in Athens and Rome and The Second Punic War, at the end of Year 12. Each exam lasts one hour and 30 minutes, and both are similarly structured, with an exploration of a given extract of our set texts followed by longer essays. There is no coursework element.

The A Level is assessed by two further exam papers, the Persian Wars and Roman Epic, at the end of Year 13. Each exam lasts one hour and 30 minutes, and both are similarly structured, with an exploration of a given extract of our set texts followed by longer essays. There is no coursework element.

FUTURE OPPORTUNITIES A Level Classical Civilisation offers a fantastic range of options for the future, both in employment and in higher education. Because it uses so many different skills, it can help students onto many educational courses and into many careers, and it also develops critical thinking and literacy abilities which are helpful in any walk of life.

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Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

COMPUTER SCIENCE COURSE DESCRIPTION Students who study Computer Science will be challenged and inspired to apply the knowledge they gain with the creative and technical skills that they acquire. The qualification will be focused on programming and computational thinking and will build on the knowledge base acquired on the GCSE course.

COURSE CONTENT AS LEVEL Unit 1 - Computing Principles This unit will introduce students to the internal workings of the Central Processing Unit (CPU) and will provide them with the opportunity to study how data is represented and stored in different structures. It will also offer the opportunity for students to analyse and design a range of algorithms, and to study different types of software together with the methodologies that are used to develop them.

Unit 2 - Algorithms and Problem Solving This unit will incorporate and build upon the knowledge and understanding gained in the Computing Principles unit. In addition students will study what is meant by computational thinking and begin to understand the benefits of applying computational thinking to solve problems. Students will investigate how specific programmes can be written for this purpose which will include looking at topics like global and local variables and debugging a program. Finally you will have the opportunity to explore the use of algorithms to effectively describe problems. 44

A LEVEL The A Level Computer Science programme consists of three significant components which focus on Computer Systems, Algorithms and Programming, and the completion of a programming project.

Unit 3 - Programming project Within this unit students will examine how different input, output and storage devices are used. They will also examine the waterfall lifecycle, extreme programming and writing and following algorithms. Students will look at how data is exchanged between different systems and how it is represented within a range of structures. As part of a programming project they will be expected to analyse, design, develop, test, evaluate and document a program written in a suitable programming language.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS Attain 5 A*-C grades at GCSE including a C grade in English/English Language, a C grade in Mathematics and a C grade in Science. If a student is applying for an A Level course that they have studied at GCSE it is expected that a student would attain a minimum of a C grade in this subject.

ASSESSMENT AS Level

A Level

Paper 1 Computing Principles 01 (50% of AS). Assessed by a written examination of 70 marks which will take 1 hour and 15 minutes.

Paper 1 Computer System (40% of A Level). Assessed by a written examination worth 140 marks in total taking 2 hours and 30 minutes.

Paper 2 Algorithms and problem solving 02 (50% of AS). Assessed by a written examination of 70 marks which will take 1 hour and 30 minutes.

Paper 2 Algorithms and programming (40% of total A level). Assessed by a written examination worth 140 marks in total taking 2 hours and 30 minutes. Paper 3 Programming Project (20% of A level). Internally assessed project worth 70 marks in total.

FUTURE OPPORTUNITIES Computer Science opens the door to a wide range of careers both within specialist IT companies and companies who use computers in industry, commerce, government service and the universities. Roles span technical innovation, management, analysis, consultancy, training and research. Jobs such as web designers, engineers and software developers all rely on a sound knowledge of Computer Science. It is also a highly regarded subject when it comes to entry for competitive places at higher education institutions. 45


Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

DRAMA AND THEATRE STUDIES COURSE DESCRIPTION Drama and Theatre Studies is an exciting course that explores both the practical and theoretical aspects of theatre history. This is an extremely rigorous course and students will need to rise to the challenge.

COURSE CONTENT AS LEVEL

ASSESSMENTS AS LEVEL

AS level is divided into 2 main components.

Component 1

Component 1 - Interpreting drama

Written exam: 1 hour 45 minutes.

We will gain knowledge and understanding of drama and theatre, study one set play and analyse and evaluate the work of live theatre makers.

Component 2

Component 2 - Process and performance (practical). We will practically explore two extracts of published plays, each taken from a different play. Within this, we will extensively analyse the work of prescribed practitioners and incorporate this knowledge in the second extract.

A LEVEL The subject content for A Level Drama and Theatre is divided into three components.

Component 1 - Drama and Theatre We will explore the knowledge and understanding of drama and theatre, study two set plays and analyse and evaluate the work of live theatre makers.

Component 2 - Creating original drama Creating devised drama; performance of devised drama.

Extract 2 is to be performed as a final assessed piece. Portfolio evidencing interpretive process and analysis and evaluation of performance.

A LEVEL Component 1 Written exam: 3 hours.

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Component 2 Devised performance and written notebook.

Component 3 Making theatre (practical). Performance of Extract 3 and a reflective report.

FUTURE OPPORTUNITIES The Drama and Theatre Studies A Level will prepare students well for a course at degree level. The practical and academic qualities that it will develop, such as public speaking and presentation, leadership and group skills will support students in any area of future employment or further course of study.

Devised piece must be influenced by the work and methodologies of one prescribed practitioner.

Component 3 - Making theatre Practical exploration and interpretation of three extracts, each taken from a different play. Methodology of a prescribed practitioner must be applied.

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Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

ECONOMICS COURSE DESCRIPTION

A LEVEL

Students will develop the knowledge and skills needed to understand and analyse current economic issues and make informed decisions as to how these issues may be resolved. The course involves looking into individual consumers, firms, markets and market failure and then moves on to examine the national and international economies.

Unit 3 - Business Economics and the Distribution of Income

Unit 4 - The National and International Economy

This unit introduces students to the objectives of firms, such as profit maximisation, and considers the different markets in which they operate. This involves the study of monopoly and oligopoly markets which are made up of different concentrations of firms. This unit also looks at the issues in the labour market and examines wage determination in terms of why people are paid varying amounts for their labour. Ever wondered why footballers are paid so much? To end the unit, students will examine the methods of government intervention to correct any market failures.

The course subsequently moves onto the National and International Economy. It is assumed that the knowledge and skills candidates have acquired at AS level will be used to consider concepts, theories and issues introduced in this unit. Students are expected to develop further their critical approach to economic models such as UK government fiscal and monetary policies. They should be able to analyse and evaluate the causes of changes in macroeconomic indicators in greater depth than expected at AS Level. The course content involves looking into globalisation, exchange rates and the benefits and drawbacks of the European Union for the UK.

COURSE CONTENT AS LEVEL Unit 1 - Markets and Market Failure The unit introduces students to Microeconomics. This involves the study of individual markets within the economy, the behaviour of individual consumers and producers, and why they make the decisions which they do. Basic microeconomic models such as demand and supply, the operation of the price mechanism, and causes of market failure are central to this module.

Unit 2 - The National Economy in a Global Context This unit introduces candidates to the concept of Macroeconomics. Macroeconomics looks at how the economy functions as a whole. Students will be required to acquire knowledge and understanding of aggregate demand and aggregate supply. They will then be provided with opportunities to use this knowledge to explore recent and current economic behaviour. They should understand, and be able to analyse and evaluate government macroeconomic policy. Students will develop a good knowledge of recent developments in the UK economy and government policies over the past ten years.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS Attain 5 A*-C grades at GCSE including a C grade in English/English Language and a C grade in Mathematics. If a student is applying for an A Level course that they have studied at GCSE it is expected that a student would attain a minimum of a C grade in this subject.

ASSESSMENT AS Level

A Level

Paper 1 Operation of Markets and Market Failure (50% of AS). Assessed by an examination of 70 marks which will take 1 hour and 30 minutes.

Paper 1 Markets and Market Failure (33.3% of A Level). Assessed by an examination worth 80 marks in total taking 2 hours.

Paper 2 The National Economy in a Global context (50% of AS). Assessed by an examination of 70 marks which will take 1 hour and 30 minutes.

Paper 2 The National and International Economy (33.3% of A Level). Assessed by an examination worth 80 marks in total taking 2 hours. Paper 3 Economic principles and issues (33.3% of A Level). Assessed by an examination worth 80 marks in total taking 2 hours.

FUTURE OPPORTUNITIES Economics is a versatile subject that can help students in a number of careers. Not only could they find themselves working for big corporations, banks or the government, but their qualification in economics could also be valuable support in a career like marketing, law, journalism or teaching. It is also a very highly regarded subject when it comes to entry for competitive university places. 48

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Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

Elliott Hudson College

A LEVEL Language and Society The aim of this part of the subject content is to introduce students to language study, exploring textual variety and children’s language development (0-11 years). This area of study introduces students to methods of language analysis to explore concepts of audience, purpose, genre, mode and representation.

Language, Diversity and Change The aim of this area of study is to allow students to explore language diversity and change over time. Students will study the key concepts of audience, purpose, genre and mode and will explore language in its wider social, geographical and temporal contexts. They will explore processes of language change. This part of the subject content also requires students to study social attitudes to, and debates about, language diversity and change in texts from 1600 to the present day.

Language in Action The aim of this area of study is to allow students to explore and analyse language data independently and develop and reflect upon their own writing expertise. It requires students to carry out two different kinds of individual research:

ENGLISH LANGUAGE

• A language investigation (2,000 words excluding data) • A piece of original writing and commentary (750 words each). Students can choose to pursue a study of spoken, written or multimodal data, or a mixture of text types, demonstrating knowledge in areas of individual interest.

COURSE DESCRIPTION At AS Level this course will enable students to explore the fundamental structures, functions and diversity of writing, speech and conversation, and how language functions in different social contexts. Students will also learn the methods of language analysis which will underpin their learning throughout the whole course. At A Level students will build on their AS study and explore variations in written texts and how children’s language develops from birth. There is also a coursework unit which will enable students to investigate a language area of their choice as well as giving them an opportunity to write creatively.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS Attain 5 A*-C grades at GCSE including a C grade in English/English Language and a C grade in Mathematics. If a student is applying for an A Level course that they have studied at GCSE it is expected that a student would attain a minimum of a C grade in this subject.

ASSESSMENT AS Level

COURSE CONTENT

Paper 1 Written exam. 1 hour 30 minutes (70 marks - 50% of AS). Three essay style questions on two texts. Paper 2 Written exam. 1 hour 30 minutes (70 marks - 50% of AS). Two sections, each with an essay style question to answer.

AS LEVEL

A Level

Language and the Individual

Paper 1 Written exam. 2 hours 30 minutes (100 marks - 40% of A Level). Paper 2 Written exam. 2 hours 30 minutes (100 marks - 40% of A-level). Section A - Diversity and Change. Section B - Language Discourses.

The aim of this part of the subject content is to introduce students to language study, exploring textual variety. This area of study introduces students to methods of language analysis to explore concepts of audience, purpose, genre, mode and representation.

Language Varieties The aim of this area of study is to allow students to explore language variety. Students will study the key concepts of audience, purpose, genre and mode and will explore language in its wider social and geographical contexts. Students will study varieties of English within the British Isles. This part of the subject content also requires students to study social attitudes to, and debates about, language diversity, including language in relation to social and occupational groups, ethnicity, class, age, gender, sexuality and disability.

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Non-exam assessment Language in Action. Word count: 3,500 (100 marks - 20% of A Level).

FUTURE OPPORTUNITIES English Language is a subject which is very well regarded by higher education institutions. Because it is the study of the language used across the United Kingdom and beyond, it complements any educational course that a student might follow and provides a new perspective on most professions. It is widely accepted for careers in teaching, journalism, the media, social work, marketing and publicity, and many more.

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Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

Elliott Hudson College

ENGLISH LITERATURE COURSE DESCRIPTION The aim is for all students to experience a diverse and interesting collection of texts throughout the two year course. Students will learn how to structure and redraft essays effectively; this is a valuable skill for any university course. English Literature will encourage all students to learn challenging and new ways to study a variety of writing styles. At the heart of the course is the hope to develop and enhance students’ love of reading, giving opportunities to debate themes, issues and questions raised by the texts studied.

A LEVEL

COURSE CONTENT

Texts and Genres - Crime writing

AS LEVEL

For this unit, within all the texts, a significant crime drives the narrative and the execution and consequences of the crime are fundamentally important to the way the text is structured. All set texts are narratives which focus on transgressions against established order and the specific breaking of either national, social, religious or moral laws. The focus in this component must be on ‘Elements’ and students need to consider the elements that exist in each of their texts.

Literary Genres - Drama In Literary Genres, the texts are connected through the mainstream literary genre of Tragedy. Tragedy and comedy have a long tradition in literature, with their origins in the ancient world and with a specific emphasis on drama. Working with genre involves looking at ways in which authors shape meanings within their texts. It also involves thinking about a wide range of relevant contexts: some of them to do with the production of the text at the time of its writing; some (where possible) to do with how the text has been received over time; and most of all in this specification contexts to do with how the text can be interpreted by readers now.

Students study three texts: one post-2000 prose text, one poetry and one further text, one of which must be written pre-1900. They also respond to an unseen passage in the examination.

Theory and Independence

Students study two texts for this unit: one Shakespeare play, Othello, and one further drama text, Death of a Salesman (Miller).

This component is designed to allow students to read widely, to choose their own texts (if appropriate), and to understand that contemporary study of literature needs to be informed by the fact that different theoretical and critical methods can be applied to the subject.

Literary Genres - Poetry and Prose

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

Students will study one poetry text, which will be a collection of poetry by John Keats, and one prose text, The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald. These texts will also follow the same genre as the two dramatic texts studied for paper 1 (Literary Genres: Drama).

Attain 5 A*-C grades at GCSE including a C grade in English/English Language and a C grade in Mathematics. If a student is applying for an A Level course that they have studied at GCSE it is expected that a student would attain a minimum of a C grade in this subject.

ASSESSMENT AS Level Paper 1: Literary Genres: Drama Written exam: 1 hour 30 minutes. Closed book. 50 marks. 50% of AS level. Paper 2: Literary Genres: Poetry and Prose Written exam: 1 hour 30 minutes. Open book. 50 marks. 50% of AS level.

A Level Paper 2: Texts and Genres Written exam: 3 hours. Open book. 75 marks. 40% of A-level. Non-exam assessment: Theory and Independence Two essays of 1250-1500 words, each responding to a different text and linking to a different aspect of the Critical Anthology (50 marks - 20% of A-level).

FUTURE OPPORTUNITIES This course will prepare students to study English Literature at university level. Skills of independent study, as well as the ability to research and apply critical opinions, are vital in working at degree level in this subject. Careers using English Literature include teaching, journalism, marketing, social work, publishing, working in public relations and many more.

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Elliott Hudson College

ETHICS AND PHILOSOPHY

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

COURSE CONTENT

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

Philosophy of Religion

Attain 5 A*-C grades at GCSE including a C grade in English/English Language and a C grade in Mathematics.

Topics include:

COURSE DESCRIPTION The skills, knowledge and experience gained on the AS course will enable students to develop a deeper understanding of key Ethical, Philosophical and Religious issues which are relevant in the 21st century. On both the AS and the A Level course students will study three modules from the OCR Religious Studies course.

Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

• Ancient philosophical influences on the philosophy of religion, including Plato and Aristotle • Arguments about the existence or non-existence of God • The nature and impact of religious experience. • The challenge for religious belief of the problem of evil • The nature of the soul, mind and body • The possibility of life after death • Ideas about the nature of God • Issues in religious language

Religion and ethics Topics include: • Normative ethical theories – theories which attempt to set rules for what is right and what is wrong, e.g. Virtue Ethics and Natural Law • The application of these theories to issues of sex and sexuality and to euthanasia • Issues in ethical language • Free will – are our choices determined by factors outside our control? • Do we need religion to be able to set ethical rules?

Developments in Christian Thought This unit looks at the way that Christian teaching on philosophical and ethical issues has changed over time. Students will not only learn what Christianity has taught about these issues over time, they will also evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of these teachings.

If a student is applying for an A Level course that they have studied at GCSE it is expected that a student would attain a minimum of a C grade in this subject.

ASSESSMENT The exact format of assessments is still to be confirmed by the exam boards. However, the course will be examined fully by end of year exams. These will be largely essay based.

FUTURE OPPORTUNITIES Ethics and Philosophy is a sought-after subject amongst employers and higher education institutions because it equips students with a wide range of different skills. It enables students to understand a variety of belief systems and, most importantly, to be able to evaluate beliefs and arguments. A Level Ethics and Philosophy students will develop skills in literacy and ICT as well as more subject-specific skills such as text analysis, critical thinking, logical reasoning and personal evaluation. Ethics and Philosophy students enter a wide range of careers including journalism, policing, finance (accountancy, banking, management and consultancy), education, marketing, sales, advertising, law and social work. In addition, many Ethics and Philosophy students choose degrees in any humanities subject.

• Human nature and the purpose of life • The self and immortality • Knowledge and revelation of God • The Bible • Beliefs about Jesus • Responses to secularism • Responses to the existence of more than one religion in the world • Gender

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Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

FILM STUDIES

Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

COURSE CONTENT AS LEVEL Unit 1 FM1 - Exploring Film Form This unit introduces candidates to Film Studies and demonstrates how meaning is communicated in films. Students will study micro features and use them to analyse film and identify how these micro features construct meaning and contribute to the sensory impact of film. Students will reflect on individual response to micro features by exploring the relationship between film and spectator as well as create a sequence to demonstrate their understanding of how meanings and responses are produced. Students will engage in a creative project, choosing to produce a film sequence, storyboard or step outline supported by a written reflection and analysis of a film extract.

Unit 2 FM2 - British and American Film This unit introduces students to the relationship between producers and audiences as well as the macro features of film and how they contribute to constructing meanings. Study is focused around UK and US film industries, exploring distribution, audience behaviour, narrative, genre and representations in film. Students will learn to debate issues in the film industry to respond to stimulus material in the exam as well as study two British films and two American films in great depth.

A LEVEL Unit 3 FM3 - Film Research and Creative Projects This unit develops the knowledge gained at AS level requiring students to complete a small scale research project within the framework of the critical approaches studied. Students will also develop their creative skills and deepen their understanding of the medium chosen for their creative project. Students will choose their own topic for the research project which is submitted as a portfolio. The creative project should demonstrate their engagement with issues found in research by producing a short film or extract, screenplay or extended step outline for a documentary film, supported by a reflective analysis.

Unit 4 FM4 - Creative Investigation in Film This unit explores film from a variety of contexts extending knowledge of the diversity of film and its effects. Students build on their knowledge of spectatorship issues and apply key concepts and critical approaches to film. The students will study world cinema, spectatorship and a single film critical study for the exam.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS Attain 5 A*-C grades at GCSE including a C grade in English/English Language and a C grade in Mathematics.

COURSE DESCRIPTION Students will develop knowledge and appreciation for film as an art form and the construction of film. Students will explore film form through extended analysis of a film of their choice and a creative project to apply techniques found through exploration and analysis. Students will focus on British and American film, comparing films from a variety of perspectives including: genre, distribution, new technology, marketing and finance.

If a student is applying for an A Level course that they have studied at GCSE it is expected that a student would attain a minimum of a C grade in this subject.

ASSESSMENT AS Level

A Level

Unit 1 Exploring Film Form will be assessed through a portfolio assignment (40% of AS, 20% of A Level).

Unit 3 Film Research and Creative Projects will be assessed through a portfolio assignment (25% of A Level).

Unit 2 British and American Film in Film will be assessed through an examination (60% of AS, 30% of A Level).

Unit 4 Varieties of Film Experience (Issues and Debates) will be assessed through an examination (25% of A Level).

FUTURE OPPORTUNITIES Film Studies is a subject with many skills attached to it, which are extremely useful in the outside world. Students can move onto Film School afterwards to further their interest in the subject, which in turn can lead onto a career in the film industry. Potential careers include directing and producing film, scriptwriting or camera operating amongst a whole host of other opportunities. 56

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Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

FRENCH COURSE DESCRIPTION In a recent CBI survey 73% of employers are actively seeking to recruit workers with language skills. A-level French helps students develop confident, effective communication skills in French and a thorough understanding of the culture of countries and communities where French is spoken. It develops an interest in, and enthusiasm for, language learning and encourages students to consider their study of the language in a broader context.

COURSE CONTENT Theme 1 - Social issues and trends

Theme 2 - Political and artistic culture

Students will study the themes and sub-themes below in relation to at least one French-speaking country. Where France is not specified, students may study the themes in relation to any Frenchspeaking country. Students will study the themes and sub-themes using a range of sources, including material from online media.

Students will study the themes and sub-themes below in relation to at least one French-speaking country.

Aspects of French-speaking society: current trends (Year 1 – AS Level) • The changing nature of family (La famille en voie de changement) • The ‘cyber-society’ (La « cyber-société ») • The place of voluntary work (Le rôle du bénévolat)

Aspects of French-speaking society: current issues (Year 2 – A Level) • Positive features of a diverse society (Les aspects positifs d’une société diverse) • Life for the marginalised (Quelle vie pour les marginalisés) • How criminals are treated (Comment on traite les criminels)

Artistic culture in the French-speaking world (Year 1 – AS Level) • A culture proud of its heritage (Une culture fière de son patrimoine) • Contemporary francophone music (La musique francophone contemporaine) • Cinema: the 7th art form (Cinéma: le septième art)

Aspects of political life in the Frenchspeaking world (Year 2 - A Level) • Teenagers, the right to vote and political commitment (Les ados, le droit de vote et l’engagement politique) • Demonstrations, strikes – who holds the power? (Manifestations, grèves – à qui le pouvoir? ) • Politics and immigration (La politique et l’immigration) Students will also study from a range of literary texts and films throughout the course.

ASSESSMENT AS Level Students will be assessed on all four skill areas through 3 external exams: Paper 1 Listening, Reading and Writing (1 hour 45 minutes - 80 marks). Paper 2 Writing based on literary text or film (1 hour 15 minutes – 60 marks). Paper 3 Speaking (30 minutes including 15 minutes preparation time - 50 marks).

A Level Students will be assessed on all four skill areas through 3 external exams: Paper 1 Listening, Reading and Writing (2.5 hours - 160 marks). Paper 2 Writing based on literary texts or films (2 hours – 90 marks). Paper 3 Speaking (25 minutes including 5 minutes preparation time - 50 marks). 58

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS Attain 5 A*-C grades at GCSE including a C grade in English/English Language and a C grade in Mathematics. If a student wishes to study a Modern Foreign Language at A Level a student must achieve a grade B in the chosen language at GCSE.

FUTURE OPPORTUNITIES An A Level in Modern Languages is both highly regarded and highly sought after as an academic discipline by universities. It is also an extremely useful tool for the modern business world in such areas as engineering, sales, import and the hotel and leisure industries. Careers in Modern Languages are many and varied. 59


Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

GEOGRAPHY COURSE DESCRIPTION Geography is the study of Earth’s landscapes, people, places and environment and therefore bridges the social sciences (Human Geography) with the natural sciences (Physical Geography) and forms the backbone of the Humanities Faculty at Elliott Hudson College. A Level Geography will enable students to develop an understanding and knowledge of different geographical concepts. Geography is highly valued by universities and the discipline is referred to as a facilitating subject (Russell Group, 2011): one that gives A Level students the skills to succeed in Higher Education and the world of work. Please be aware that Geography is a subject undergoing A Level reform for first teaching in 2016 and therefore students who choose to study Geography at A Level will be following a new course. This final decision on what course best suits Elliott Hudson College students will be confirmed once the examination boards officially release their new specifications. Based on the draft release, we will be studying the AQA course.

COURSE CONTENT AS LEVEL/A LEVEL The skills, knowledge and experience gained on the AS course will enable students to develop a broad understanding of key geographical issues relevant in the 21st century. Students will study a variety of academic modules from the AQA Geography specification over the two year course.

Component 1 - Physical Geography The Physical Geography component is made up of the following: Section A Water and carbon cycles Section B either Hot desert environments and their margins or Coastal systems and landscapes

All Geography students at Elliott Hudson College will be studying Water & Carbon Cycles, Global Systems and Global Governance; however, optional modules, such as Hazards or Ecosystems, will be confirmed at a later date.

Component 3 - Geographical Investigation

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

FUTURE OPPORTUNITIES

Students complete an individual investigation which must include data collected in the field. The individual investigation must be based on a question or issue defined and developed by the student relating to any part of the specification content. The investigation will be approximately 3-4000 words in length and can focus on an individual student’s area of interest in Geography.

Attain 5 A*-C grades at GCSE including a C grade in English/English Language and a C grade in Mathematics.

Geography is a sought-after subject amongst employers because it equips students with a wide range of different skills. As an A Level geographer students will develop skills in numeracy, literacy and ICT as well as more subject-specific skills such as the use of maps and Geographical Information Systems. Geographers enter a wide range of careers including finance (accountancy, banking, management and consultancy), education, marketing, sales, advertising, law and social/health services. In addition, many geographers choose degrees leading to careers directly related to the subject such as town planning, surveying and environmental management.

If a student is applying for an A Level course that they have studied at GCSE it is expected that a student would attain a minimum of a C grade in this subject.

ASSESSMENT

Section C either Hazards or Ecosystems under stress or Cold environments

AS Level

Component 2 - Human Geography

During the course students will be assessed through two external examinations and one centre-marked investigation.

The Human Geography component is made up of the following: Section A Global systems and global governance Section B Changing places Section C either Contemporary urban environments or Population and the environment or Resource security

Component 1 Physical Geography will be assessed through a 2 hour 30 minute examination worth 40% of the overall A Level award. Component 2 Human Geography will be assessed through a 2 hour 30 minute examination worth 40% of the overall A Level award. Component 3 Geographical Investigation will be marked internally and moderated by AQA worth 20% of the overall A Level award.

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Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

GERMAN COURSE DESCRIPTION In a recent CBI survey 73% of employers are actively seeking to recruit workers with language skills. A-level German helps students develop confident, effective communication skills in German and a thorough understanding of the culture of countries and communities where German is spoken. It develops an interest in, and enthusiasm for, language learning and encourages students to consider their study of the language in a broader context.

COURSE CONTENT Theme 1 - Social issues and trends Students will study the themes and sub-themes below in relation to at least one German-speaking country. Where Germany is not specified, students may study the themes in relation to any German speaking country. Students will study the themes and sub-themes using a range of sources, including material from online media.

Aspects of German-speaking society: current trends (Year 1 – AS Level) • The changing nature of family • The ‘cyber-society’ • The place of voluntary work

Aspects of German-speaking society: current issues (Year 2 – A Level) • Positive features of a diverse society • Life for the marginalised • How criminals are treated

Theme 2 - Political and artistic culture Students will study the themes and sub-themes below in relation to at least one German-speaking country.

Artistic culture in the German-speaking world (Year 1 – AS Level) • A culture proud of its heritage • Contemporary francophone music • Cinema: the 7th art form

Aspects of political life in the German-speaking world (Year 2 A Level) • Teenagers, the right to vote and political commitment • Demonstrations, strikes – who holds the power? • Politics and immigration Students will also study from a range of literary texts and films throughout the course.

ASSESSMENT

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

AS Level

Attain 5 A*-C grades at GCSE including a C grade in English/English Language and a C grade in Mathematics.

Students will be assessed on all four skill areas through 3 external exams: Paper 1 Listening, Reading and Writing (1 hour 45 minutes - 80 marks). Paper 2 Writing based on literary text or film (1 hour 15 minutes – 60 marks). Paper 3 Speaking (30 minutes including 15 minutes preparation time - 50 marks).

A Level Students will be assessed on all four skill areas through 3 external exams: Paper 1 Listening, Reading and Writing (2.5 hours - 160 marks). Paper 2 Writing based on literary texts or films (2 hours – 90 marks). Paper 3 Speaking (25 minutes including 5 minutes preparation time - 50 marks).

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If a student wishes to study a Modern Foreign Language at A Level a student must achieve a grade B in the chosen language at GCSE.

FUTURE OPPORTUNITIES An A Level in Modern Languages is both highly regarded and highly sought after as an academic discipline by universities. It is also an extremely useful tool for the modern business world in such areas as engineering, sales, import and the hotel and leisure industries. Careers in Modern Languages are many and varied.

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Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS COURSE DESCRIPTION A Level Government and Politics is designed to prepare students for active engagement as citizens in the world around them. You will be required to immerse yourself in the political process, and begin to think like a politician, by regularly watching political interest programmes and becoming involved in party politics. This course looks to open your mind and expand your horizons, ensuring that you develop a lifelong passion for all things political.

COURSE CONTENT AS LEVEL At AS Level, students are introduced to the essential groundwork of UK government and politics. They study the driving forces and key mechanisms of the British political system, including the political parties, pressure groups, elections, and voting. They also explore the complex power-relationships between the Houses of Parliament, the Prime Minister and his Cabinet, and the ever-controversial European Union. The AS course gives students a critical insight into the law-making process and the constitution, elements of our nation which are little understood, but which affect all of our lives, every day.

Unit 1 - Political parties, protest movements, electoral systems. The convoluted yet fascinating mechanisms of politics in the UK today.

A LEVEL At A Level we study the fundamental principles of political ideas such as fascism, Marxism, feminism, and nationalism, and concepts including democracy, power, justice, and punishment. We explore the ideas of key political thinkers such as Plato, Aristotle, Rousseau, JS Mill, Karl Marx and Fukuyama. As well as studying political ideas and concepts in theory, we analyse these in practice, with examples ranging as widely as North Korea, the Arab Spring, and Hitler’s Nazi state. Students will develop a grasp of the theory and practice of political thought in the past, the present, and the future.

Unit 3 - Political ideas and concepts in theory. The crucial political ideas and ideologies that have shaped history and still affect the world today.

Unit 2 - Governance of the United Kingdom in the 21st Century.

Unit 4 - Political ideas and concepts in practice.

The inner workings of UK democracy and where power is located, through a study of the constitution, the executive, and the UK Parliament.

How political ideas and ideologies have been brought to life – and death.

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PROSPECTUS 2016/17

Elliott Hudson College

ASSESSMENT AS Level Unit 1 - Political parties, protest movements, electoral systems. Source and essay based exam. One hour 30 minutes. 50% of AS, 25% of A Level course. Unit 2 - Governance of the United Kingdom in the 21st Century. Source and essay based exam. One hour 30 minutes. 50% of AS, 25% of A Level course.

A2 Level Unit 3 - Political ideas and concepts in theory. Source and essay based exam. Two hours. 50% of A2, 25% of A Level. Unit 4 - Political ideas and concepts in practice. Essay based exam. Two hours. 50% of A2, 25% of A Level.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS Attain 5 A*-C grades at GCSE including a C grade in English/English Language and a C grade in Mathematics. If a student is applying for an A Level course that they have studied at GCSE it is expected that a student would attain a minimum of a C grade in this subject

FUTURE OPPORTUNITIES A Level Politics offers a fantastic range of options for the future, both in employment and in higher education. It is a hugely respected and greatly rewarding academic course, recognised as a challenging and relevant qualification in the modern world. You will develop skills of debate, research, analysis, evaluation, and extended and persuasive writing. You will hone your skills in critical thought and argument, synthesising theory and practice, exposition and example to become a genuinely flexible and rigorous thinker. The awareness of the political world in which we operate will be invaluable in whatever walk of life students choose to pursue.

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Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

HEALTH AND SOCIAL CARE (SINGLE) COURSE DESCRIPTION

ASSESSMENT

FUTURE OPPORTUNITIES

As a part of the AS Level Health and Social Care course students will develop an understanding of the diverse and complex nature of the health and social care sector and will study a total of three different modules over the academic year.

AS Level

By studying for an A Level in Health and Social Care students will develop skills which will enable them to make an effective contribution to the different care sectors, including skills of research, evaluation and problem solving. In terms of progression, this subject gives a solid foundation for a range of careers in the health, medical or social care industries such as childcare, social work or nursing.

Students will be assessed through two coursework-based assignments (33.3% each) and one external examination (worth 33.3%).

COURSE CONTENT AS LEVEL

A LEVEL

A Level

Human Growth and Development

Meeting Individual Needs

This unit allows learners to develop an understanding of the various aspects of human growth and development throughout the life stages; from infancy into later adulthood. Students will learn about the range of factors that can influence growth and development, for example: diet, smoking, the family and the environment.

This unit aims to assess a student’s knowledge and understanding of how the UK health and social care sector is organised to best meet the needs of the public. Students will gain an insight into the framework of the health, medical and social care industries and a greater understanding of some of the key issues faced by our care system today.

Students will be assessed through two coursework-based assignments (33.3% each) and one external examination (worth 33.3%).

Communication and Values

Promoting Health and Wellbeing

This unit will give students a deep understanding of the importance of effective communication within care and other professional settings. Students will get the opportunity to demonstrate their communication skills and investigate the possible barriers to effective communication, and the impact this can have on the professional environment.

This unit aims to build a picture of the diverse world of ‘health promotion.’ Students will find out why we, as a nation, need health promotion and how health campaigns are planned and carried out with the goal of improving the health of everyone in our society.

Positive Care Environments In this unit students will study the role of care environments and organisations in promoting effective and healthy relationships between care professionals and their patients. Students will have the opportunity to conduct an investigation into a care setting in the local area.

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ENTRY REQUIREMENTS Attain 5 A*-C grades at GCSE including a C grade in English/English Language and a C grade in Mathematics. If a student is applying for an A Level course that they have studied at GCSE it is expected that a student would attain a minimum of a C grade in this subject.

Investigating Disease Students will learn about the nature of disease and the serious implications it can have on our health; as individuals and as a nation. Students will be expected to carry out an investigation into TWO diseases of their choice.

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Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

Elliott Hudson College

HEALTH AND SOCIAL CARE (DOUBLE) COURSE DESCRIPTION As a part of the Health and Social Care course students will develop an understanding of the diverse and complex nature of the health, social and medical care sectors.

COURSE CONTENT AS LEVEL Students will study 6 equally weighted units at AS and 6 equally weighted units at A2. The AS is the first half of the A Level and contributes to 50 percent of the A level. The A2, the second half of the A Level comprises the other 50 percent of the total A Level mark.

ASSESSMENT AS Level Students will be assessed through four courseworkbased assignments and two external examinations.

A Level Students will be assessed through four courseworkbased assignments and two external examinations.

Unit 1 – Human Growth and Development

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

Unit 2 – Communication and Values

Attain 5 A*-C grades at GCSE including a C grade in English/English Language and a C grade in Mathematics.

Unit 3 – Positive Care Environments Unit 4 – Social Aspects and Lifestyle Choice Unit 5 – Activities for Health and Wellbeing Unit 6 – Public Health

If a student is applying for an A Level course that they have studied at GCSE it is expected that a student would attain a minimum of a C grade in this subject.

A LEVEL

FUTURE OPPORTUNITIES

As a part of the A Level Health and Social Care course students will further their understanding over a range of more advanced topics, all within the remit of the Health and Social Care industry.

By studying for an A Level in Health and Social Care Double Award students will develop skills which will enable them to make an effective contribution to the different care sectors, including skills of research, evaluation and problem solving. In terms of progression, this subject gives a solid foundation for a range of careers in the health, medical or social care industries such as childcare, social work or nursing.

Unit 7 – Meeting Individual Needs Unit 8 – Promoting Health and Well-Being Unit 9 – Investigating Disease Unit 10 – Using and Understanding Research Unit 11 – Social Issues and Welfare Needs Unit 12 – Understanding Human Behaviour

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Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

HISTORY

A LEVEL

COURSE DESCRIPTION Our History course is a fascinating study of the making of the modern world: modern Britain; modern Europe; and modern America. Two main Units comprise 80% of the final A Level: the British Empire, 1857-1967, and Germany 1918-45. Finally, 20% of the qualification is made up of a coursework unit on the origins of America.

Unit 1 - Breadth study, Part Two: the decline and fall of the British Empire, 1914-1967

Unit 2 Depth study, Part Two: Nazi Germany, 1933-1945

World War One marked both the high-point of the Empire, and the start of its decline. We will study how the Empire rose to the challenge of world warfare, and even expanded after 1918; yet we will also see how war drove forces of nationalism and modernisation that would eventually bring the empire crashing down.

After 1933 Germany, and Europe, entered the darkest phase in its history, as Hitler and the Nazi party set about extending their grip over a shattered country. We will explore what the new Nazi state meant for different groups, and why so many were willing to support it; how the machineries of terror and indoctrination spread throughout the nation; and eventually how Hitler carried his country from a war against his internal enemies, to a war against the world, and to genocide.

COURSE CONTENT AS LEVEL Unit 1 - Breadth Study, Part One: the high water mark of the British Empire, 1857-1914

Unit 2 - Depth Study, Part One: Weimar Germany, 1918-1933

This unit looks at the making of modern Britain through the development of its empire, the largest the world has ever seen. We explore the topic through key questions such as - What drove imperial expansion? How much changed over time? Who benefitted from empire and who lost out? Specific focus falls on the British government in London, on British India, and the ‘scramble for Africa’.

This unit examines the making of modern Europe through a critical phase in the history of Germany. We will explore the revolution at the end of World War One; the political chaos and violence that followed; the moment of hope in the 1920s; and the ultimate demise of the Weimar system. Students will explore questions such as: what was the impact of the First World War? Why did Germany not collapse into a dictatorship earlier than it in fact did? How ‘golden’ was the ‘Golden Age’ of the 1920s, and could it ever have led to lasting recovery?

Unit 3 - Coursework: From the thirteen colonies to the Thirteenth Amendment: the United States of America, 1763-1865 This unit will study the making of modern America in the time period from 1763 to 1865: from British imperial wars, through the War of Independence, to the cataclysmic Civil War in the 1860s, and the assassination of Abraham Lincoln. In the shadows of this bright young nation’s rise lie the dark realities of slavery, and the treatment of Native Americans. After the taught course students set a question of their own choosing, covering an issue in the context of these 100 years, and research both primary and secondary sources on the topic to create an essay of 3000-3500 words.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS Attain 5 A*-C grades at GCSE including a C grade in English/English Language and a C grade in Mathematics. If a student is applying for an A Level course that they have studied at GCSE it is expected that a student would attain a minimum of a C grade in this subject.

ASSESSMENT

FUTURE OPPORTUNITIES

AS Level

A Level History offers unique and exhilarating opportunities for both further education and employment. It is a highly respected academic qualification because of the rigorous training it gives in critical thought, research, and discursive writing; yet it is also greatly valued by employers because of the transferrable skills it cultivates.

Unit 1 and Unit 2 are each assessed by an examination lasting an hour and a half, and each comprises 50% of the final grade.

A Level Unit 1 and Unit 2 are each assessed in an examination lasting two and a half hours, each of which comprises 40% of a student’s final grade. Unit Three is the coursework element of the course and is worth 20% of the overall A Level grade.

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Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

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PROSPECTUS 2016/17

Elliott Hudson College

ICT COURSE DESCRIPTION Students are encouraged to become discerning users of ICT and to develop a broad range of ICT skills and knowledge and understanding of ICT. Specifically it encourages students to develop the capacity for thinking creatively, innovatively, logically and critically. Students will also develop an understanding of the consequences of using ICT on individuals, organisations and society and of social, legal and ethical issues surrounding ICT.

COURSE CONTENT AS LEVEL

A LEVEL

Unit IT1 - Information Systems

Unit IT3 - Systems, application and implications

This unit requires students to use ICT hardware and spreadsheet modelling software to solve a realistic problem and answer questions on their solution in the written examination. The spreadsheet solution must be prepared under supervised conditions as it will be taken into the written part of the examination. In researching potential solutions to the spreadsheet problem, students will have the opportunity to work collaboratively. Solutions produced by students will be used during the examination to answer questions in Section B of the paper.

Unit IT2 - Presenting information This unit requires students to use ICT hardware and software applications to solve a problem involving three separate tasks: the production of (i) a document such as a leaflet or magazine (ii) a document containing automated routines, such as a mail merged letter (iii) a presentation to an audience, such as a web page or slide type show. Students will be asked to design and plan each solution, implement and evidence the solution and finally evaluate the solution.

This unit is about the development and integration of new ICT systems. It looks at different software and hardware components and how they are used in society. In this unit students will examine the types of networks used in organisations as well as looking at the impact of the Internet upon businesses and moral, social and ethical issues surrounding the Internet. Throughout the unit, students will understand the main components of the system development life cycle and how they may be applied to the development of a computerised solution.

Unit IT4 - Project This unit requires students to create a relational database system for a specific client, for example an appointment booking system for a hairdresser. Students will identify a specific client for whom they are making the new database system. Students will plan, design, implement, test and evaluate the final system. Students will also have to show evidence of planning and managing the project as a whole. This will mean creating time plans and carrying out meetings with their selected client.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS Attain 5 A*-C grades at GCSE including a C grade in English/English Language and a C grade in Mathematics. If a student is applying for an A Level course that they have studied at GCSE it is expected that a student would attain a minimum of a C grade in this subject.

ASSESSMENT AS Level Unit IT1 This is a written paper with two sections, A and B, presented in a question and answer booklet. Students will be required to prepare a spreadsheet on a specific topic, defined by the exam board, in advance of the written paper. Hard copies of the spreadsheet are taken into the examination and used to answer questions in Section B. Unit IT1 is worth 60% of the AS course. The examination is 1 hour 15 minutes long. Unit IT2 This will be assessed through a portfolio assignment. Unit IT2 is worth 40% of the AS course.

A Level Unit IT3 This is a written paper with two sections, A and B, presented as a question paper requiring a separate answer booklet. Unit IT3 is worth 60% of the A2 course. The examination is 1 hour 30 minutes long. Unit IT4 This will be assessed through a portfolio assignment. Unit IT4 is worth 40% of the A Level course.

FUTURE OPPORTUNITIES An A Level in ICT will equip students with the skills and knowledge needed for any industry. The in-depth knowledge gained about ICT and organisations will aid students who wish to go into a degree in Business or Information Communication Technology related qualifications.

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Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

Elliott Hudson College

LAW COURSE DESCRIPTION This interesting and challenging course will provide a grounding in the main principles of English and Welsh law. We will explore their development and develop knowledge, understanding and critical awareness of the structure, personnel and functions of the English legal system. For Advanced GCE we will study the principles of criminal liability as well as a range of offences and defences. It also encourages candidates to develop the skills necessary to analyse and solve problems by applying legal rules, and to develop the ability to communicate legal arguments and conclusions clearly and succinctly.

COURSE CONTENT AS LEVEL

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

Unit 1 - The English Legal System

Attain 5 A*-C grades at GCSE including a C grade in English/English Language and a C grade in Mathematics.

• Civil Courts and other methods of dispute resolution • Criminal process, criminal courts and the penal system • The Judiciary • The Legal Profession

If a student is applying for an A Level course that they have studied at GCSE it is expected that a student would attain a minimum of a C grade in this subject.

• Lay people in the legal system

ASSESSMENT

• Provision of legal services

AS Level

Unit 2 - Sources of Law

One 2 hour external written exam (60% of the AS) and one 1 hour written exam (40% of the AS).

• The Doctrine of Precedent • Legislation

A Level

• European Union Law

One 2 hour external written exam (60% of the A2) and one 1 hour 30 minutes written exam (40% of the A2).

• Law Reform

A LEVEL Unit 1 - Criminal Law • Principles of Criminal Liability • Attempted Crimes • Offences against the person • General Defences • Non-fatal offences against the person

FUTURE OPPORTUNITIES Law provides a discipline and skills base which prepares students for an extremely wide variety of career opportunities such as work as solicitors or barristers and careers in the police force. It is ideal for students who wish to go on to study Law at degree level. In addition many students go on to study subjects such as History and Politics.

• Offences against property

Unit 2 - Criminal Law Special Study This is a synoptic module based on pre-released materials. Students will study the material on a particular area of law and use legal method and reasoning to analyse legal material.

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Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

Elliott Hudson College

MATHEMATICS COURSE DESCRIPTION

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

A Level Mathematics offers students with a good understanding of Mathematics the chance to study it at a higher level. It provides a thorough grounding in the mathematical tools and techniques often needed in the workplace. Techniques covered include algebra, geometry, trigonometry and calculus, which together form the fundamental building-blocks of the subject.

Students wishing to study A Level mathematics should have at least a grade B at GCSE.

COURSE CONTENT

AS Level

ASSESSMENT Unit 6663 Core 1 will be assessed through a 1.5 hour exam equating to 33.3% of the AS qualification.

AS LEVEL

A LEVEL

Core 1 (C1)

Core 3 (C3)

Initially, the course builds on higher level GCSE Algebra with for example, solving quadratic equations by factorising and completing the square/quadratic formula. Surds and trigonometry are also studied. This then moves onto geometry, arithmetic sequences, differentiation and integration. The use of fractions and the ability to manipulate algebraically is important.

The vast majority of the C3 module focuses on trigonometry, using the trigonometric functions, including the reciprocal trigonometric functions and their graphs. Differentiation is extended significantly in this module including differentiating trigonometric functions, functions given as a product or a quotient and the exponential and log function.

Unit 6664 Core 2 will be assessed through a 1.5 hour exam equating to 33.3% of the AS qualification.

Core 4 (C4)

Unit 6665 Core 3 will be assessed through a 1.5 hour exam equating to 33.3% of the A2 qualification.

Core 2 (C2) Students will study geometric progressions. Additionally the geometry includes circles and trigonometry develops into measuring angles in radians rather than in degrees, and to finding all solutions rather than just one. Calculus will present new ways of using differentiation and integration. Two new topics of exponentials and logarithms develop an understanding of indices, their inverses and how to manipulate them.

Statistics (S1) In S1, students will build on the skills studied at GCSE level by revising the representation of data such as histograms, stem and leaf diagrams and scatter graphs. In addition, students will study, correlation, probability and regression.

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In C4 students will extend their knowledge of calculus; rates of change and integration. They will also be able to manipulate complex fractions into partial fractions. The topic of vectors, covered in M1, will be studied further.

Mechanics 1 (M1) Mechanics 1 will be new to many students and has a lot of overlap with A Level Physics. It includes mathematical modelling, kinematics, statics, dynamics, vectors and moments.

Unit 6683 Statistics 1 will be assessed through a 1.5 hour exam equating to 33.3% of the AS qualification.

A Level

Unit 6666 Core 4 will be assessed through a 1.5 hour exam equating to 33.3% of the A2 qualification. Unit 6677 Mechanics 1 will be assessed through a 1.5 hour exam equating to 33.3% of the A2 qualification. In order to achieve an A* in Mathematics at A2, students need to secure an average of 80%+ in all modules including those at AS level and an average of 90%+ over the A Level modules.

FUTURE OPPORTUNITIES Students with an A Level in Mathematics earn on average 10% more than those with other A Levels. It is a well respected and sought after A Level which will open many doors to future careers, such as Finance, Engineering, Market Research and Computing. Many Arts students also enjoy Mathematics A Level. Product Design, Architecture and Music have mathematical elements to them.

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Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

A2 LEVEL Mechanics 2 (M2)

Further Pure 2 (FP2)

Further Pure 3 (FP3)

This will introduce a number of new topics as well as following on from the work studied in M1. It includes kinematics in a straight line or plane centres of mass, dynamics collisions and statics.

Now we go beyond ordinary Maths A Level. We take inequalities beyond C1 and modulus expressions beyond C3. We extend series and complex numbers beyond FP1. Then we introduce solutions of first and second order differential equations, a method from calculus, and form expressions of increasing powers called Taylor Series. The final topic studied will be polar co-ordinates.

There is a lot more calculus in FP3. We introduce hyperbolic functions and their inverses, and extend differentiation and integration beyond the level of C4. We look at two more special curves, the ellipse and hyperbola, and how lines which touch or cross them produce interesting effects. Finally there are two linked topics, a more advanced look at matrices, extending to 3x3, and use of vectors.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS Students wishing to study further mathematics should have at least a grade A at GCSE.

ASSESSMENT

FURTHER MATHEMATICS COURSE DESCRIPTION A Level Further Mathematics is designed to broaden and deepen the mathematical knowledge and skills developed when studying A Level Mathematics. The three Further Pure units build upon the techniques in Algebra, Geometry, Trigonometry and Calculus developed from the Pure Core units as well as introducing topics such as complex numbers, matrices, proof, hyperbolic functions, polar coordinates and differential equations.

AS Level

A Level

Unit 6667 Further Pure 1 will be assessed through a 1.5 hour written exam equating to 33.3% of the AS qualification.

Unit 6668 Further Pure 2 will be assessed through a 1.5 hour written exam equating to 33.3% of the A2 qualification.

Unit 6689 Decision 1 will be assessed through a 1.5 hour written exam equating to 33.3% of the AS qualification.

Unit 6669 Further Pure 3 will be assessed through a 1.5 hour written exam equating to 33.3% of the A2 qualification.

Unit 6684 Statistics 2 will be assessed through a 1.5 hour written exam equating to 33.3% of the AS qualification.

Unit 6678 Mechanics 2 will be assessed through a 1.5 hour written exam equating to 33.3% of the A2 qualification. In order to achieve an A* in Further Mathematics at A2, students need to secure an average of 80%+ in all modules overall including those at AS level and an average of 90%+ over three of the A2 level modules.

COURSE CONTENT AS LEVEL Further Pure 1 (FP1)

Decision 1 (D1)

Statistics 2 (S2)

FUTURE OPPORTUNITIES

FP1 is designed to be challenging, but does not require prior knowledge beyond GCSE. There is exploration of numbers created by allowing square rooting of negative values, numerical solutions of equations, special curves – the parabola and rectangular hyperbola, basics of 2x2 matrices, series sums of sequences and proof by induction.

In Decision Maths 1 you will be using a series of algorithms. Initially, you will look at sorting algorithms, graphs and networks along with Dijkstra’s algorithm which finds a shortest route. Eventually you will look at Critical Path Analysis. Mathematically you are expected to combine good logic with sound algebraic skills.

Statistics 2 focuses on using statistical models to represent real life situations and calculate the chances of an event happening. The Poisson, binomial, uniform and normal distributions are covered in depth. Students will study hypothesis testing and its uses. You will look at types of possible errors and places in which models can go wrong.

Further Mathematics is arguably the hardest and therefore the most highly respected and prized A Level. Further Mathematicians are actively head hunted by universities and by some employees. For students thinking of studying for a Mathematics degree there is a massive advantage in studying Further Mathematics. As an A Level Further Mathematician students will significantly enhance their problem solving skills, the ability to think logically and methodically and construct rigorous mathematical arguments and proofs. Students will develop the ability to recall, select and apply their knowledge of standard mathematical models to represent life situations in the real worldand use results of calculations to make contextualised predictions. It is also looked on very favourably by other subject areas which additionally require Mathematics; Engineering, Physics, Economics, Psychology and Computer Science being examples.

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Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

MEDIA STUDIES COURSE DESCRIPTION Students will gain a solid understanding of the purposes, principles, concepts, and techniques of media products across three key platforms including new and digital media. They will both investigate and create media through extended study of the contemporary media landscape; students will look at the changing ways and contexts in which media texts are produced and consumed. Students will focus on how representations are constructed and how audiences respond to media texts.

COURSE CONTENT AS LEVEL Unit 1 MEST 1 - Investigating media This unit introduces students to the media and the key concepts which underpin the whole subject. Every day we are exposed to hundreds of different pieces of media from different sources. Media Studies allows students to analyse and understand these media products from a more informed point of view. Students will develop their knowledge of the media and understand how to analyse the media using the key concepts. Students will also create their own case study focusing on Broadcast Fiction in preparation for the exam, which also builds on their independent research skills.

Unit 2 MEST 2 - Creating Media This unit introduces students to media production. Students have to create a piece of media from concept to production. This involves the skills of researching, planning, producing and evaluating. Students will have access to cameras, editing software, tripods and other media technology which they may need to assist them. The aim of this unit is to create a media product to professional standards and show how it has been produced. Students use their knowledge from MEST 1 to help inform their media product.

A LEVEL Unit 3 MEST 3 - Critical Perspectives This unit develops students’ knowledge of media theories, critical debates and media contexts. Following on from MEST 1, students develop their understanding of the media and how it affects us day to day. They will study different media theories and look at many different media examples to inform their knowledge. Students will also create two case studies concentrating on New and Digital Media and Media Identities, which will be used in the exam.

Unit 4 MEST 4 - Research and Production This unit allows students to build on their research and production skills. Students have to write a 2000 word investigation essay on a topic of their choice and create their own media product which has a link to their investigation. This can be print, moving-image or e-media as students will develop their skills from MEST 2.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS Attain 5 A*-C grades at GCSE including a C grade in English/English Language and a C grade in Mathematics. If a student is applying for an A Level course that they have studied at GCSE it is expected that a student would attain a minimum of a C grade in this subject.

ASSESSMENT AS Level Unit 1 Investigating Media will be assessed through an examination (50% of AS, 25% of A Level). Unit 2 Creating Media will be assessed through a portfolio assignment (50% of AS, 25% of A Level).

A Level Unit 3 Critical Perspectives will be assessed through an examination (25% of A Level). Unit 4 Research and Production will be assessed through a portfolio assignment (25% of A Level). 80

FUTURE OPPORTUNITIES Media Studies is a versatile subject, which can lend itself to a variety of future opportunities. The skills learnt and developed throughout the course are extremely important for students who wish to obtain a career within the media industry. Careers vary from journalism, broadcasting, graphic design, marketing and advertising, amongst other things. 81


Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

Elliott Hudson College

MUSIC COURSE DESCRIPTION

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

This course will equip students with the fundamental skills required to progress to advanced musicianship. Students will develop their skills as performers and composers, as well as learning how to analyse music from a variety of styles. Music is a multi-faceted subject and involves a variety of contrasting skills ranging from practical music making, to creating and analysing music.

Attain 5 A*-C grades at GCSE including a C grade in English/English Language and a C grade in Mathematics.

COURSE CONTENT AS LEVEL Component 1 - Appraising music (40% of AS) This looks at all aspects of how music is organised. Students will learn the vocabulary of musical analysis as well as the aural skills required to identify fundamental musical concepts by ear. Students will study the Western Classical Tradition as well as a contextual topic from a choice of seven, including Pop Music, Music for Theatre and Jazz.

Component 2 - Performance (30% of AS) This unit gives students the opportunity to perform as an instrumentalist and/or singer. Students will be given specialist one-to-one tuition in order to ensure they are fully equipped for this part of the course. There is also an option to perform using music technology.

Component 3 - Composition (30% of AS) This unit gives students an opportunity to compose their own music in any appropriate style they choose. Students will acquire the necessary skills and techniques to complete two compositions; one to an exam board set brief, and one free composition.

A LEVEL Component 1 - Appraising music (40% of A level) In this unit students will look at how more complex pieces of music are organised. They will learn an advanced vocabulary which will be applied to music from several different genres. Students will develop all the skills necessary to analyse a 20th century symphonic work as well as a contextual topic chosen from English choral music in the 20th century, four decades of jazz or chamber music from Mendelssohn to Debussy.

Component 2 - Performance (35% of A level) This unit gives students the opportunity to perform as an instrumentalist and/or singer. Students will be given specialist one-to-one tuition in order to ensure they are fully equipped for this part of the course. There is also an option to perform using music technology.

Component 3 - A Musical Performance (25% of A Level)

If a student is applying for an A Level course that they have studied at GCSE it is expected that a student would attain a minimum of a C grade in this subject.

ASSESSMENT AS Level Component 1 Inuences on Music is assessed through an examination of listening and essay questions. Component 2 Creating musical ideas is assessed through a coursework assignment. Component 3 Interpreting Musical ideas: internally assessed coursework, recorded during the spring term.

A Level Component 4 Music in Context will be assessed through an examination of listening and essay questions. Component 5 Developing Musical Ideas is assessed by externally assessed coursework. Component 6 A Musical Performance is assessed by externally assessed coursework.

FUTURE OPPORTUNITIES The AQA music course makes for great preparation for any further form of musical study at undergraduate level. It also gives students the fundamental skills required for any serious career in music as a performer or composer.

This unit gives students an opportunity to compose their own music in any appropriate style they choose. Students will acquire the necessary skills and techniques to complete two compositions; one to an exam board set brief, and one free composition.

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Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

MUSIC TECNOLOGY COURSE DESCRIPTION Students will learn to use dedicated music technology software in order to record, edit and manipulate music. They will cover a wide range of topics such as the physics of sound, recording equipment (microphones, mixing desks etc.), inputting and editing musical data. Students will also study the development of popular music styles since 1910 and will learn how each decade in music has influenced succeeding genres.

COURSE CONTENT AS LEVEL Unit 1 – Portfolio The portfolio is worth 70% of the overall AS Level and requires the student to produce a portfolio of three separate pieces of work. This work consists of: the recreation of a popular piece of music using computer music software, a multi-track recording using at least 8 separate parts and a creative arrangement of a popular song. Students will also submit a logbook that details information on the processes and techniques used throughout the production of the portfolio.

Unit 2 – Listening And Appraising

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS Attain 5 A*-C grades at GCSE including a C grade in English/English Language and a C grade in Mathematics. If a student is applying for an A Level course that they have studied at GCSE it is expected that a student would attain a minimum of a C grade in this subject.

ASSESSMENT

The examination is worth 30% of the overall marks and will test knowledge on popular music styles since 1910, the development of technology-based music, mixing, editing and producing music, as well as two special focus styles prescribed by the exam board. Students will also be expected to comment perceptively on the musical features of music ranging from 1910 to the present day.

AS Level

A LEVEL

A Level

Unit 3 – Portfolio 2 Portfolio 2 is worth 30% of the A Level and requires students to produce three separate pieces of work. The work is of similar style to the AS portfolio, however students are required to show advanced skills in music technology and to submit work of near professional quality. The portfolio consists of: a recreation of a popular piece of music using computer software and live studio recordings, a multi-track recording using at least 12 separate parts and a creative composition based around either film music, political soundscapes or a song based on a poem.

Unit 1 Portfolio and Logbook (70%).

FUTURE OPPORTUNITIES

Unit 2 Listening and Analysing (30%).

The course provides students with skills that will enhance their abilities as a musician and will allow them to create and produce their own music. It will also provide an insight into how audio equipment functions and operates which will enable students to have greater understanding and control when dealing with live and recorded musical performances.

Unit 3 Portfolio 2 and Logbook (30% of total A Level). Unit 4 Analysing and Producing (20% of the total A Level).

Unit 4 – Analysing And Producing The examination is worth 20% of the A Level grade and is a 2 hour exam. This is partially a practical exam and requires students to process, edit and mix audio data and to create a professional sounding product. Students will also be tested on their knowledge of recording techniques, styles and development, on their aural musical abilities, and on their analysis of music recording whilst discussing the development and impact of technology on popular music.

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Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

PHYSICAL EDUCATION COURSE DESCRIPTION Physical Education is a great subject to study at A level for those that are interested in the world of sport. We look at the body in detail through two physiology units looking at topics covering areas such as the respiratory system, sports injuries and biomechanics/movement analysis. There are also topics such as leisure provision and equal opportunities that look into the wider role sport plays in society.

COURSE CONTENT AS LEVEL Paper 1 - Factors affecting participation in physical activity and sport During this unit the emphasis is placed upon learning the basics of skill acquisition, sports psychology, anatomy and physiology and ways in which a performer can train in order to maintain a healthy lifestyle. Students will look in more detail at the ways in which exercise impacts upon the circulatory and respiratory systems as well as ways in which a performer can learn new skills. The unit will also look into biomechanical movement and technology used in physical activity and sport.

Non-exam assessment Practical performance in physical activity and sport Students are assessed as a performer or coach in the full sided version of one activity. Therefore it is imperative that the student is actively taking part in a fully competitive version of their chosen physical activity. They will also have to produce a written/verbal analysis and evaluation of their performance.

A LEVEL Paper 1 - Factors affecting participation in physical activity and sport During this unit the emphasis is placed upon learning the basics of skill acquisition, sports psychology, anatomy and physiology and ways in which a performer can train in order to maintain a healthy lifestyle. Students will look in more detail at the ways in which exercise impacts upon the circulatory and respiratory systems as well as ways in which a performer can learn new skills. The unit will also look into biomechanical movement and technology used in physical activity and sport.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

AS Level

Attain 5 A*-C grades at GCSE including a C grade in English/English Language and a C grade in Mathematics.

Paper 1 Written external examination. (2 hours/ 84 marks). This examination accounts for 70% of the final AS grade. Practical performance 90 marks. Students are internally assessed on their performance by members of the PE department and are externally moderated. This equates to 30% of the AS grade.

A Level Paper 2 - Optimising performance, technology and evaluating sport and society issues There are 3 key components to this unit applied physiology, sports psychology, and sport, society and technology. These three aspects are taught separately and make up the final examination in this subject. All of the work done relates these three, very different areas, back to sport and sports performances and can be intriguing and beneficial to sports people of all standards.

Non-exam assessment - Practical performance in physical activity and sport Students are assessed as a performer or coach in the full sided version of one activity. Therefore it is imperative that the student is actively taking part in a fully competitive version of their chosen physical activity. They will also have to produce a written/verbal analysis and evaluation of their performance.

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ASSESSMENT

Paper 1 Written external examination. (2 hours/ 105 marks). This examination accounts for 35% of the overall A Level grade.

If a student is applying for an A Level course that they have studied at GCSE it is expected that a student would attain a minimum of a C grade in this subject. To meet the practical criteria of this course, students need to be competing regularly in their chosen physical activity.

FUTURE OPPORTUNITIES The subjects students learn about will be invaluable at a personal level and will help them to be better at sport, no matter what the individual standard. This A Level also opens up a whole number of career options, for example, as a PE teacher, sports coach, personal trainer, sports scientist, physiotherapist, nutritionist or jobs within sports development.

Paper 2 Written external examination. (2 hours/105 marks). This examination accounts for 35% of the final A Level grade. Practical performance 90 marks. Students are internally assessed on their performance and written/verbal analysis of their performance, by members of the PE department and are externally moderated. This equates to 30% of the A Level grade. 87


Elliott Hudson College

PHYSICS COURSE DESCRIPTION The Physics A Level course offers students the opportunity to lay the groundwork for future studies at university for example, in science and engineering. There is a good coverage of a range of physics topics such as quantum phenomena, waves, mechanics, electricity, fields, radioactivity and thermal physics.

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

COURSE CONTENT AS LEVEL

A LEVEL

Measurements and their errors

Further mechanics and thermal physics

This is a continuing study for a student of physics. It comprises of a working knowledge of the fundamental units of measurement; the nature of errors in practical work and their numerical treatment.

The earlier study of mechanics is further advanced through consideration of circular motion and simple harmonic motion. Thermal properties, the nature of ideal gases and molecular kinetic theory are introduced and studied in depth.

Particles and radiation

Fields and their consequences

An introduction into the fundamental properties of matter, electromagnetic radiation and quantum phenomena.

Fields is one of the great unifying ideas in physics and here it is developed in detail. The ideas of gravitational, electrostatics and magnetic field theory are studied and unifying links to other earlier parts of the course are emphasised here.

Waves GSCE studies of wave phenomena are extended through a development of knowledge of the characteristics, properties and applications of traveling and standing waves.

Mechanics and materials This comprises of an extension of forces, energy and momentum that were studied at GCSE along with bulk properties and tensile strength.

Nuclear physics This builds on the earlier work done on particles and radiation that link to the properties of the nucleus and the production of nuclear power.

One of five option choices are studied • Astrophysics • Medical physics

Electricity

• Engineering physics

This builds and develops upon GCSE studies and lays the groundwork for later study of electrical applications.

• Turning points in physics • Electronics

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS Attain 5 A*-C grades at GCSE including a C grade in English/English Language and a C grade in Mathematics. Students must have taken the higher tier examinations for Additional Science (and/or Further Additional Science) and achieved a grade B (with a minimum of a grade B in Core Science). If a student has studied separate Sciences students should have achieved a grade B overall in the higher tier examinations for the subject they wish to take at A Level.

ASSESSMENT

FUTURE OPPORTUNITIES

AS Level

Physics is ideal for students who want to study a wide variety of related subjects at university or to follow a career in science. There are many careers which utilise the knowledge and skills in physics; these include medicine, engineering, technology, medical physics, computer science, nuclear technology, space science, geological surveys, weather forecasting, accounting and finance, patent attorney, product development scientist and systems developer.

Students will sit two 1 hour 30 minute written exam papers worth 70 marks. Each paper is worth 50% of the AS grade.

A Level Students will sit three 2 hour written exam papers worth 85 marks. Each paper is worth approximately one third of the A Level grade.

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Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

PRODUCT DESIGN COURSE DESCRIPTION This course is a natural progression for students who wish to develop their designing skills further. Throughout the course students are encouraged to develop and demonstrate a knowledge and understanding of the design process and its implication in the design, manufacture and marketing of products. Product Design enables students to gain confidence and to develop their own personal skills to solve problems for the process of meeting design and manufacture challenges by producing quality solutions, using a wide range of materials and processes.

COURSE CONTENT AS LEVEL Unit 1 - Materials, Components and Application Throughout this unit students will explore materials and their properties along with manufacturing methods used to create everyday products. Students will strengthen their knowledge of polymers, metals, timbers and compliant materials through product analysis as well as understand industrial methods of production.

Unit 2 - Learning through Design and Manufacture Students will further improve their own creativity, design and manufacturing ability within this unit of work. They will be supported through three design activities which will investigate client needs, relevant research methods, design development and ultimately the manufacture of quality prototypes to satisfy the project briefs. Students will be given the opportunity to work with a range of materials, tools and equipment, including CAD and CAM. Possible project outcomes include sustainable seating solutions, storage and lighting solutions.

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A LEVEL Unit 3 - Design and Manufacture Throughout this unit of work students continue to build their knowledge of the design process and understand the work of past and present designers. They study the impact of product design on the environment and the influence of design upon society, in addition to drawing upon their own experiences to analyse examples of ‘good design’. Clear links are maintained with the AS units of work in order to consolidate the students’ knowledge of materials and the manufacturing process.

Unit 4 - Designing and Making Practice Throughout this unit students adopt a single project approach which allows them the freedom to design and manufacture a quality prototype for a client of their choice.

ASSESSMENT AS Level: Unit 1 Materials, Components and Application (50% of AS marks) will be assessed through an external examination. Unit 2 Learning through Design and Manufacture. This unit is assessed through the creation of a portfolio of design work accompanied by models and prototypes. Students can select their most successful pieces of work to go into their portfolio and upon submission this portfolio of work accounts for 50% of the AS Level course.

A Level: Unit 3 Design and Manufacture (25% of the entire A Level course) will be assessed through an external examination. Unit 4 Designing and Making Practice. A Design portfolio along with a final practical outcome must be submitted which accounts for 25% of the entire A Level course.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS Attain 5 A*-C grades at GCSE including a C grade in English/English Language and a C grade in Mathematics. If a student is applying for an A Level course that they have studied at GCSE it is expected that a student would attain a minimum of a C grade in this subject.

FUTURE OPPORTUNITIES A Level Product Design is an ideal qualification for students wishing to progress onto a range of related Higher Education courses at leading institutions and careers including industrial design and architecture. 91


Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

PSYCHOLOGY COURSE DESCRIPTION Throughout the AS and A Level courses students will have the opportunity to develop skills of interpretation, evaluation and application in the ever changing field of Psychology. Experimentation is crucial in Psychology and so the new courses encourage practical investigations, leading to the students working as part of a group to develop their own research project.

COURSE CONTENT AS LEVEL Paper 1 - ‘Introductory topic in Psychology’

Paper 2 - ‘Psychology in context’

Social Influence Students will be exploring why some people conform to a majority influence, and why people obey authority. Students also examine explanations for resisting pressure to conform and obey.

Approaches in Psychology Students will consider the different approaches taken in Psychology, both historically and today. These will include the learning, cognitive and biological approaches.

Memory Students will have the opportunity to explore cognitive explanations of memory. During this they will learn about different models of memory, different explanations for forgetting and how we use our memory in everyday life. Attachment Students will explore developmental explanations for early development of children and how babies form attachments, who they form them to and what happens if they do not form attachments.

Psychopathology Students will apply the knowledge gained from the ‘approaches’ topic to explanations and treatments of modern psychological abnormalities, including phobias, depression and OCD. Research Methods Students will develop their knowledge and understanding of modern research methods, including the scientific process and data handling and analysis.

A LEVEL

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

Psychology at A Level builds upon and develops the learning from the AS course.

Attain 5 A*-C grades at GCSE including a C grade in English/English Language and a C grade in Mathematics.

Paper 1 - ‘Introductory topic in Psychology’ Social Influence, Memory, Attachment and Psychopathology:

Paper 2 - ‘Psychology in context’ Approaches in Psychology, Research Methods and Biopsychology: Students will learn about the nervous system, neurons, neurotransmitters and the synapse. Students will also examine the functions of the endocrine systems. The fight or flight response and how the brain works including localisation of function in the brain.

Paper 3 - ‘Issues and options in Psychology’ Issues and debates in Psychology: Students will consider issues and debates in Psychology, including gender and culture; free will and determinism; the nature-nurture debate; holism and reductionism; and the ethical implications of research. • Alongside one of the following three options: Relationships, Gender, or Cognition and development • Alongside one of the following three options: Schizophrenia, Eating behaviour or Stress • Alongside one of the following three options: Aggression, Forensic Psychology or Addiction

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If a student is applying for an A Level course that they have studied at GCSE it is expected that a student would attain a minimum of a C grade in this subject.

ASSESSMENT AS Level Paper 1 72 marks (24 marks on each section) that lasts 1 hour 30 minutes. This is worth 50% of the AS. Paper 2 72 marks (24 marks on each section) that lasts 1 hour 30 minutes. This is worth 50% of the AS.

A2 Level Paper 1 96 marks (24 marks on each section) that lasts 2 hours. This is worth 33.3% of the A Level. Paper 2 96 marks (24 marks on each section and 48 marks on research methods) that lasts 2 hours. This is worth 33.3% of the A Level. Paper 3 96 marks (24 marks on each section) that lasts 2 hours. This is worth 33.3% of the A Level.

FUTURE OPPORTUNITIES An A Level in Psychology prepares students for a wide variety of degrees, including English, Law, Philosophy and some sciences. Careers in this field include in Clinical Psychology, Educational Psychology, Health Psychology, Forensic Psychology and working as a counsellor.

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PROSPECTUS 2016/17

Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

SOCIOLOGY A LEVEL Unit 1 - Education with Theory and Methods With regards to content, this unit will consist of revision from the AS Level module however the demands of the exam are slightly different. Students will be coached to deal with the differences in expectations for this exam.

Unit 2 - Topics in Sociology (Families and households & Beliefs in Society)

COURSE DESCRIPTION Sociology is the study of how social forces shape and mould human behaviour usually without our consent or acknowledgement. It’s an ever-changing subject area that makes you question how the world works and often shines the spotlight on many different forms of inequality that exist in our world today.

The education section studies the role of education in today’s society from a variety of theoretical perspectives. Students will also study how the education system has evolved from its origin in 1880 to its present state and the factors that affect educational achievement on different social groups. The second part of the module applies knowledge of research methods to the context of the education system in order to enhance a student’s understanding of how Sociological research takes place.

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Students will explore different sociological theories of crime and social control (such as the success of prisons). Students will examine the distribution of crime by age, ethnicity, gender and social class and identify trends and patterns, as well as consider the impact that globalisation has had on crime, crime control and prevention. In the second part of the unit, students will examine the core elements of sociological study, examining and commenting on consensus, conflict, structural and social-action theories, the concepts of modernity and post modernity, the nature of science and the extent to which sociology can be considered scientific.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

COURSE CONTENT AS LEVEL Unit 1 - Education with Methods in context

Similarly to the education module, the families and households content will be examined again in the second year exams at a higher level in terms of the skills that are being assessed. The second topic, beliefs in society - will be exclusive to the second year of the course in which students will analyse the role that religion plays in society and the impact it has on the individual. This global module highlights the relevancy of religious belief to our world today and discusses the way in which belief may be changing over time.

Unit 3 - Crime and Deviance with Theory and methods

Attain 5 A*-C grades at GCSE including a C grade in English/English Language and a C grade in Mathematics.

Unit 2 - Research methods and Topics in Sociology (Families and households)

If a student is applying for an A Level course that they have studied at GCSE it is expected that a student would attain a minimum of a C grade in this subject.

Students will explore the wide range of research methods used by modern sociologists, for example, quantitative and qualitative methods, different sources of data, positivism versus interpretivism as well as looking at the theoretical, practical and ethical considerations a practicing sociologist must take into account when conducting academic research. The second part of the unit looks at how influential the family unit can be on the development of the individual. This fairly varied module starts with looking at how different theoretical perspectives view the family and then progresses to look at more controversial themes such as domestic violence, divorce and family diversity that make this module a fascinating aspect of the subject area.

ASSESSMENT AS Level

A Level

Two end of year written exams. Paper 1 Education with Methods in context (1 hour 30 minutes) - 50% of AS mark. Paper 2 Research methods with topics in Sociology - Families and households (1 hour 30 minutes) – 50% of AS mark.

Paper 1 Education with Theory and Methods (2 hours) – 33.3% of A Level mark. Paper 2 Topics in Sociology - Families and households & Beliefs in Society (2 hours) – 33.3% of A Level mark. Paper 3 Crime and Deviance with Theory and methods (2 hours) – 33.3% of A Level mark.

FUTURE OPPORTUNITIES An A Level in Sociology prepares students for a wide range of degrees, including English, Classics, Philosophy, Politics and Law. A broad range of career options are available with a degree in Sociology including social researcher, counsellor, primary or secondary teacher, and probation officer to working in human resources.

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SPANISH COURSE DESCRIPTION In a recent CBI survey 73% of employers are actively seeking to recruit workers with language skills. A Level Spanish helps students develop confident, effective communication skills in Spanish and a thorough understanding of the culture of countries and communities where Spanish is spoken. It develops an interest in, and enthusiasm for, language learning and encourages students to consider their study of the language in a broader context.

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

COURSE CONTENT Theme 1 - Social issues and trends

Theme - 2 Political and artistic culture

Students will study the themes and sub-themes below in relation to at least one Spanish-speaking country. Where Spain is not specified, students may study the themes in relation to any Spanish speaking country. Students will study the themes and sub-themes using a range of sources, including material from online media.

Students will study the themes and sub-themes below in relation to at least one Spanish-speaking country.

Aspects of Spanish-speaking society: current trends (Year 1 - AS Level)

• Contemporary francophone music

• The changing nature of family

Aspects of political life in the Spanishspeaking world (Year 2 - A Level)

• The ‘cyber-society’ • The place of voluntary work

Aspects of Spanish-speaking society: current issues (Year 2 - A Level) • Positive features of a diverse society • Life for the marginalised • How criminals are treated

Artistic culture in the Spanish-speaking world (Year 1 - AS Level) • A culture proud of its heritage • Cinema: the 7th art form

• Teenagers, the right to vote and political commitment • Demonstrations, strikes – who holds the power? • Politics and immigration Students will also study from a range of literary texts and films throughout the course.

ASSESSMENT AS Level

A Level

Students will be assessed on all four skill areas through 3 external exams:

Students will be assessed on all four skill areas through 3 external exams:

Paper 1 Listening, Reading and Writing (1 hour 45 minutes - 80 marks). Paper 2 Writing based on literary text or film (1 hour 15 minutes – 60 marks). Paper 3 Speaking (30 minutes including 15 minutes preparation time - 50 marks).

Paper 1 Listening, Reading and Writing (2.5 hours - 160 marks). Paper 2 Writing based on literary texts or films (2 hours – 90 marks). Paper 3 Speaking (25 minutes including 5 minutes preparation time - 50 marks).

ENTRY REQIREMENTS Attain 5 A*-C grades at GCSE including a C grade in English/English Language and a C grade in Mathematics. If a student wishes to study a Modern Foreign Language at A Level a student must achieve a grade B in the chosen language at GCSE.

FUTURE OPPORTUNITIES An A Level in Modern Languages is both highly regarded and highly sought after as an academic discipline by universities. It is also an extremely useful tool for the modern business world in such areas as engineering, sales, import and the hotel and leisure industries. Careers in Modern Languages are many and varied.

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PROSPECTUS 2016/17

Elliott Hudson College

PROSPECTUS 2016/17

TRAVEL AND TOURISM COURSE DESCRIPTION

A LEVEL

The Travel and Tourism A Level course offers students the opportunity to develop and sustain an interest in travel and tourism and the issues affecting the industry and its potential effect on employment opportunities. The course addresses the scale and importance of the travel and tourism industry and the interdependence of its sectors.

Tourist development

Event management

Students will investigate why tourism development needs to be managed effectively to ensure longterm sustainability through study of:

Students carry out an event or a business project related to travel and tourism that includes:

• Agents of tourism development

• Teamwork

• Objectives of tourism development

• Marketing the event

• Impacts of tourism development

• Financing the event

COURSE CONTENT AS LEVEL

• Feasibility of the project

Introducing travel and tourism

Travel destinations

Within this unit, students will develop vocational skills related to the travel and tourism industry: in particular, selecting and interpreting appropriate data, problem solving and understanding and applying industry-related terminology. This unit covers:

This unit will enable students to build a sound knowledge of the major short-haul and long-haul destinations for UK tourists by researching a variety of destinations. This unit covers:

• Nature of travel and tourism

• Key features of major destinations

Attain 5 A*-C grades at GCSE including a C grade in English/English Language and a C grade in Mathematics.

• Scale of the travel and tourism industry

• Why different destinations appeal to different tourist groups

If a student is applying for an A Level course that they have studied at GCSE it is expected that a student would attain a minimum of a C grade in this subject.

• Development of the modern travel and tourism industry • Structure of the travel and tourism industry

• Geographical locations of major short-haul and long-haul destinations for UK tourists

• Changes in popularity of tourist destinations

• Occasion management • Carrying out the project • Evaluation of the project

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

ASSESSMENT AS Level

A Level

Introducing travel and tourism paper This paper has structured questions based on pre-released stimulus material. 40% of the total AS Level.

Tourism development paper Examination. 20% of the total A Level.

Travel destinations portfolio This unit is assessed through portfolio work. 60% of the total AS Level.

Event management portfolio This unit is assessed through portfolio work. 30% of the total A Level.

FUTURE OPPORTUNITIES Travel and Tourism is ideal for students wishing to develop broad skills, knowledge and understanding of the travel and tourism industry and should prepare candidates for further study or training in travel and tourism related occupations. 98

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PROSPECTUS 2016/17

ADMISSIONS POLICY Elliott Hudson College follows the Admissions policy which can be accessed on the College website (www.elliotthudsoncollege.ac.uk). In summary, the policy assesses students on the following: • Current school • Success at GCSE level • Performance at interview

CURRENT SCHOOL Priority will be given to those students that are currently studying within The GORSE Academies Trust: this currently includes students from The Morley Academy, The Farnley Academy and The Bruntcliffe Academy. After this, students from our formal partner schools namely Cockburn High School and Swallow Hill Community College, will be prioritised. This should not deter applications from students studying in schools that are not named above, as we will endeavour to support applications from all students who meet the entry criteria and who pass the interview process. Please note that current place of study does not grant an automatic place: students must also meet other entry criteria and pass the interview process before a place is offered.

SUCCESS AT GCSE In general, students are expected to demonstrate considerable success at GCSE level. This level is generally set as 5 A*-C grades at GCSE including a C grade in English/English Language and a C grade in Mathematics. However criteria from subject to subject do vary. Ensure you consult subject pages for more detail. Please note courses ‘equivalent to GCSE’ will be accepted at the college’s discretion and will be counted as one C (or above) GCSE grade depending on the ‘volume’ and suitability of the qualification.

PERFORMANCE AT INTERVIEW In order to gain a Conditional Offer, students must be successful (‘Pass’) the interview. The interview is designed to assess the student’s aptitude in their chosen subjects and to assess the extent to which the college is likely to add value in terms of making a difference to the student’s future career. This will be known as a student’s ‘propensity’ and will be specifically scored during the interview process using the following ratings: 1) no evidence of propensity, 2) some evidence, 3) strong evidence.

TIMETABLE FOR APPLICATIONS AND ADMISSIONS

2015-2016

Students attend Open Event Deadline for applications Interviews of students who meet the application deadline Offer letters sent Transition Event/Taster Days Publication of GCSE results Enrolment Induction

November January November-February March July August August September

All applications should be made using UCAS Progress. This is a Common Application Process (CAP) that is followed by most education and training providers across England to support students and parents in meeting the conditions set out under the Raising of Participation Age (RPA) agenda.

Design & production: Freckle Creative Ltd / www.freckleonline.com Photography: Lindsay Broadley / www.lindsaybroadley.co.uk

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Elliott Hudson College Elliott Hudson College Phoenix House Global Avenue Leeds LS11 8PG 0113 323 9777 info@elliotthudsoncollege.ac.uk

www.elliotthudsoncollege.ac.uk EHCleeds @EHCleeds

EHC Prospectus 2016/17  

Your guide to everything Elliott Hudson College has to offer students.

EHC Prospectus 2016/17  

Your guide to everything Elliott Hudson College has to offer students.

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