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Content From Experience

Publication Design; Elliot McKellar info@elliotmckellar.co.uk +44 (0) 7794 520 951


Featured Work; Rosario Florio & Larissa Kasper / Coöp / Hey Days /Matt Judge / Benjamin Critton / Studio Laucke Siebein / Raw Colour / HeyHo / Studio Filippo Nostri / Keller Maurer Design / Project Projects / Research and Development / Qubik / Werkplaats Typografie / Ok-Rm / NR2154 / Iron Flag / Colville Walker / Mirko Borsche / Studio Newwork / John Morgan Studio / Mass Observation / Studio Subsist / Think Work Observe / Anni’s / Node (Berlin) / Ill Studio / Studio Reizundrisiko / VLF / Adriaan Mellegers / Everything Type Company / Joel Evey / Alex Witjas / Famous Visual Service / Colophon Foundry / An Endless Supply / Radim Pesko / Lineto Foundry.


Working Title

Introduction

This is a publication based on the inspiration and contextulising of my design work whilst I have been studying at Leeds College of Art.

Prologue

In my own work I aim to produce intelligent, simple and effective design solutions which explore the relationship between typography and layout. My work often results in editorial, identity and publication design for print but I am inspired by all aspects of design and other subjects outside of design. I hope this comes across in this showcase of work. This publication is as much of an insight in to my working influences as it is an archive for me to take inspiration from later on in my design practice, whilst there will always be new design to be inspired by I feel it will be nice to reference the inspiration that has influenced me whilst I have been studying my degree and my time spent as a student. The name Working Title is a reference to my workings at Leeds College of Art, this publication features the workings by design professionals which have influenced me. Thinking, Doing, Rethinking has been


Working Title

Introduction

embedded into my mind when I’m Working. As a young designer I have to constantly ask my self the relevance of what I’m doing and how my work is appropriate to the brief in hand. Working Title hopes to inspire you and your work, making you think about what you’re doing and why and then rethinking how you’re doing it and what that means. Working Title Introduces the creative approaches and working methods of leading professionals at the forefront of print and contemporary graphic design, showcasing a unique mix of visual examples, detailed descriptions, and case studies based on my own personal experiences and development at whilst studying my degree. Being creative is dependant on a state known as inspiration. Inspiration, however, is just as beautiful as it is elusive, like a decidedly unquantifiable variable in a world of deadlines and targeted objectives. Because fertile ideas are rarely found on demand, or when expected, the quest for inspiration is ongoing, often long predating the project immediately at hand.


Working Title

Introduction

The goal of this book is to present part of the ‘raw inspiration material’ which has influenced my design practice and my way of thinking. Working Title is broken down in to four chapters, these chapters mark different influences that have impacted me and my design style. I feel these chapters best represent my day to day inspiration in graphic design. For me this is the sort of work I want to be producing and this is where I see myself going as I grow as a designer.

Prologue

Chapter One looks at the format and function of my graphic influence with an emphasis on publication, typography and layout. Chapter Two is a showcase of work which has been design for a specific sector, client and audience from the commercial, Arts and Culture. Whilst demonstrating a key understanding of how design is tailored for an audience/sector.


Working Title

Introduction

Chapter three looks at design in a larger geographical scale from around the world not necessarily to identify trends in design dependent on their location because they all have something in common and that’s design. But taking a look at design by Location you get a real impact for how important design is in every country. The work featured and a lot of contemporary design would be nothing without the typography thus Chapter Four is dedicated to a selection of contemporary type foundries, pushing typography and producing not only excellent fonts but entire type families. Its becoming an increasing practice for studios and designers to be not only designers working across print but to have knowledge of digital, type design and much more.


Table of Contents


Table of Contents

Working Title

000

Chapter One Format & Function

001

Chapter Two Design For Sector

026

Rosario Florio & Larissa Kasper Coöp Hey Days Matt Judge Benjamin Critton Studio Laucke Siebein Raw Colour HeyHo Studio Filippo Nostri

004 / 007 008 / 009 010 / 011 012 / 015 016 / 017 018 / 019 020 / 021 022 / 023 024 / 025

Keller Maurer Design Project Projects Research & Development Qubik Werkplaats Typografie Ok-Rm NR2154 Iron Flag Colville Walker Mirko Borsche Studio Newwork

030/ 031 032 / 035 036 / 037 038 / 041 042 / 043 044 / 047 048 / 049 050 / 051 052 / 053 054 / 055 056 / 057

Chapter Three Design By Location

058

Chapter Four Typography

090

John Morgan Studio Mass Observation Studio Subsist Think Work Observe Anni’s Node (Berlin) Ill Studio Studio Reizundrisiko VLF Adriaan Mellegers Everything Type Company Joel Evey Alex Witjas Famous Visual Service

062 / 063 064 / 065 066 / 067 068 / 069 070 / 071 072 / 073 074 / 075 076 / 077 078 / 079 080 / 081 082 / 083 084 / 085 086 / 087 088 / 089

Colophon Foundry An Endless Supply Radim Pesko Lineto Foundry

094 / 097 098 / 099 100 / 103 104 / 107

Conclusion

108 / 109

Acknowledgements

110 / 111


Chapter One - Format & Function


Chapter One

Format & Function

Chapter One Format & Function

Rosario Florio/Larissa Kasper Coรถp Hey Days Matt Judge Benjamin Critton Studio Laucke Siebein Raw Colour HeyHo Studio Filippo Nostri

001


Chapter One - Format & Function

002


Chapter One

Format & Function

Being creative is dependant on a state known as inspiration. Inspiration, however, is just as beautiful as it is elusive, like a decidedly unquantifiable variable in a world of deadlines and targeted objectives. Because fertile ideas are rarely found on demand, or when expected, the quest for inspiration is ongoing, often long predating the project immediately at hand. The goal of this book is to present part of the ‘raw inspiration material’ which has influenced my design practice and my way of thinking.

003


004

Rosario Florio & Larissa Kasper

St. Gallen, Switzerland

Rosario Florio & Larissa Kasper work on various self-initiated, personal projects as well as commissioned ones. Their main activity and interest is in printed matter, with a strong focus on typography. Most of the studio’s projects are in the musical and cultural fields. The duo shares a small workspace with a few friends called Bureau Collective.

Rosario Florio & Larissa Kasper

(Left) Invitation card announcing the birthday party of a friend. In collaboration with Larissa Kasper. (Right) Publication on the occasion of the exhibitions ‘Echo of the Moon’ by Luca Francesconi. The project is centered on moon magnetism involving other less immediate reflections about the idea of the moon and in particular the dichotomy of transparency and opacity. A black part is dedicated to the absorption of light and opacity referring to an absorption of thoughts and ideas of references which are later being reflected in the white part presenting his artwork. Published by Kaleidoscope Press.

Format & Function

www.rosarioflorio.ch


Chapter One

Format & Function

Echo of the Moon

www.larissakasper.ch

005


006

Rosario Florio & Larissa Kasper

St. Gallen, Switzerland

Interview In three words how would you describe your design practice?

Rosario Florio & Larissa Kasper

Thinking, doing, rethinking. Who or what inspires you? (This doesn’t necessarily have to be design related). Who inspires me are people who stimulate and challenge me to think. That can be words from a book or also a naive approach of someone who works in a totally different field. But in particular it’s people who developed an own visual language in art as well as in graphic design by their enormous dedication and diligence. It’s people who also steadily continue to develop themselves and intend to reach something they not even know what it will be. People who find the right questions to a problem.

We always work together right from the beginning of a new project. The starting rituals are a lot of discussions about the problem we have to solve, that hopefully let us find the right questions and especially the right solution. It’s always a back and forth between thoughts that join together and lead us to a result. We basically don’t have different roles during the whole creative and graphical process. It’s solely a reciprocity propose and extend that repeats as long as the result corresponds to our perception. Is there a favourite project you have both worked on? And why? We don’t have a favorite project in general but most often it is our latest. Therefore we try to develop our senses with every new project.

How did your ongoing collaboration with Larissa Kasper begin?

If you had to recommend one book to another designer what would it be?

We met about ten years ago and were first a couple, actually quite long before we started to work together. I did an apprenticeship as a typographer and later on Larissa did one as a graphic designer. That was the first time we made things together and tried to mix our skills. We then both started studying graphic design in different places. During that time we already worked on projects collaboratively which helped us to develop our working process. We had great luck having a similar view to graphic design and things in general and also to pursue the same goals. So it was and still is a steadily progression of our doing.

It’s hard to choose just one, especially because I don’t think that one is enough for a designers needs to learn and evolve. If they have to be design related I would say:

In your collaborative work with Larissa what is your design process when starting a new brief, do you work collaboratively right from the start or do you individually play different roles in the design process? ..

Format & Function

- Practice and Theory by Jost Hochuli and Robin Kinross - Graphic Design Manual: Principles and Practice by Armin Hofmann - Wolfgang Weingart: My Way to Typography by Wolfgang Weingart - Typographie: A Manual of Design by Emil Ruder But to achieve a good knowledge to combine things and thoughts there are a lot more and to just name a few of them: - Waiting for Godot by Samuel Becket - Looking & Ways of seeing by John Berger - Life with Picasso by Francoise Gilot

www.rosarioflorio.ch


Chapter One

Format & Function

Selected Works

www.larissakasper.ch

007


008

Coöp

Australia

Coöp

Coöp is the studio of designer Paul Marcus Fuog. Since opening in 2004, Coöp has undertaken a variety of projects ranging from small art-based briefs to expansive design contracts. Positivity and experimentation are at the core of the studio’s practise. Constraints are explored in optimistic and creative ways resulting in inventive new directions. Coöp’s work is always current and often personal - informed by observation and a curiosity of contemporary culture. Collaboration with other designers is a constant source of renewal and inspiration. Pride and passion drive design innovation. Studio success has been built on lasting partnerships with creative and commercial clients, government and educational institutions

Format & Function

co-oponline.net.au


Chapter One

Format & Function

Victorian College of the Arts An identity system for the Victorian College of the Arts (VCA). The identity needed to frame the artistic culture of the faculty and allow the personalities of the four sub schools - arts, performing arts, music and film and television - to shine through. VCA was symbolised by a pyramid where four platforms, representing the four schools, converge to create a whole. Often chaotic, the identity reflects the ground up, energetic and creative ethos of the VCA. A collaboration with Axel Peemoeller.

Victoria College of Arts

co-oponline.net.au

009


Hey Days

Oslo, Norway

Format & Function

Hey Days Identity

Hey Days

010


Chapter One

Format & Function

Hey­days is a dynamic and effec­tive design stu­dio founded in 2008. We are large enough to take on a lead design role, but small enough to fol­low projects from start til end. In our cen­tral Oslo stu­dio we pro­duce visual iden­ti­ties, dig­i­tal designs and excep­tional print work for a wide range of clients, both com­mer­cial, cul­tural and orga­ni­za­ tions. Since founded we have been rewarded with both nor­we­gian and inter­na­tional design awards. Hey­days was founded by Math­ ias Had­dal Hovet, Lars Kjel­snes, Mar­tin Sanne Kris­tiansen, Thomas Lein and Stein Hen­rik Haugen.

Hey Days Identity

www.heydays.no

011


012

Matt Judge

London, UK

Matt Judge

An interview with Matt Judge about his award-winning Design Assembly book

When the Design Assembly discussion forum closed, founder Matt Judge was determined it should’t sink without trace. The book he produced to mark its passing was one of the most eye-catching publications to appear last year and has rightly been recognised by various awards panels. We spoke to Matt about the process of commemorating a blog in print, his attitude to awards and the pressures of designing a book aimed at design afficianados… How did the idea for the book come about? Ask anyone who runs a blog and they’ll tell you it’s a pretty thankless task. We weren’t interested in turning it into a commercial venture, in part for fear of losing the integrity of its voice, so it was fuelled purely by the passion of its authors, and their desire to make a difference. Design Assembly had been pretty prolific for the first 18 months but as our authors moved up the professional ladder their priorities naturally changed, and writing thought-provoking content became more and more of a challenge that time didn’t permit. After all the energy and effort that had gone into making the platform I would have been devastated to just pull it down, but equally would have hated for it to just become forgotten because of the growing infrequency of its posts.  Then in late 2010 I lost my dad to cancer. It had a profound effect on me, forcing me to question what I wanted from my life and

Matt Judge

career. With Design Assembly we had been trying to make a difference to fellow creatives, by challenging their perception of design and showing them how important our role is to greater society. What better example of that than to donate all that time, energy and content to a far greater cause — fighting cancer. Why did you decide to structure it in the way you did? The number three became a recurrent theme throughout the project. Three years with of Design Assembly being the starting point, and the frightening statistic that one in three of us will be diagnosed with some form of cancer in our lifetime being the motivation. It made sense to split the content into three sections — an introduction to Design Assembly and the cause the project supported (book 1), the new content I had commissioned exclusively for the printed publication (book 2) and an archive of the website forming the bulk of the publication (book 3).  Because each section was unique in content, each was unique in design, size, binding, which was way more work than I imagined, and added huge complications to the production process, but gave DA3 a unique selling point, which I felt was crucial in a fairly congested design-publishing market. All profits from the sale of the book are being split between three charities with a combined global reach, rounding off the theme of three nicely.

Assembly Book


Chapter One

Format & Function

Interview

www.designjudge.co.uk

013


Matt Judge

London, UK

Matt Judge

Assembly Book

Matt Judge

014


Chapter One

Format & Function

“Producing something physical is a great way of placing a stake in the ground — we were here.”

How much pressure was it to design a book about a design site – knowing it would be pored over by design buffs? I am my harshest critic, always have been, so could feel no greater pressure than that which I put myself under.  How pleased were you with the end result? Delighted. Considering the time frame it was put together in, the limited budget to work within and the problems I encountered (paper sponsorship being withdrawn two weeks prior to print was amongst the worst) I’m surprised it happened at all! When you see someone go through something as destructive as cancer it helps give you some perspective, and what may have seemed like a brick wall a few years ago started looking more like speed bumps.

gamble some people just won’t take (often the smaller agencies doing the most progressive, compelling work). But I knew a little of the Creative Circle from my time at This is Real Art, and knew it was highly regarded in advertising circles, which was interesting because I thought it may help give the book exposure to a different audience. Having Micheal C Place as head of the design judging panel also gave it real credibility. I hold Build’s work in such high regard, so to have a real ‘design buff’ you respect and admire single your work out for praise is incredibly humbling.

“Producing something physical is a great way of placing a stake in the ground — we were here.” Matt Judge, You won the Creative Circle award recently for best publication – how do designers feel about these kinds of awards? I’m a pretty big award sceptic. Unless it’s based on something tangible (increased revenue or subscription, for example) it’s just down to personal taste. The best work can be dismissed because the judging panel have a different aesthetic, so the entry fee becomes a

Interview

www.designjudge.co.uk

015


Benjamin Critton

New York, America

Benjamin Critton

www.falsearms.com

Benjamin Critton

016


Chapter One

Benjamin Critton is an American designer, art director, typographer, publisher, writer, editor and curator. He lives in Brooklyn, New York, where he makes graphic design from a studio in a neighborhood called Greenpoint. Before moving to New York, he attended the Yale School of Art. Before that, he went to Hamilton College. Before that, he went to William H. Hall High School. Before that, he went to King Philip Middle School. Before that, he went to Morley Elementary School. Before that, he went to Knight Hall Nursery School.

Selected Works

Format & Function

(Left) Boom - A hand-painted poster announcing the arrival of guest critic and lecturer Irma Boom, rendered on painter’s dropcloth. A lecture given by Hunter Tura focused on the major architectural, technological and musical events of the year 1982. It was hung using extensions of its own graphic elements; in this case colored tape that blended seamlessly with printed linework. With Sara Hartman (Below) An exhaustive redesign of L’AmuseBouche, the French Language journal at Yale University.

benjamincritton.com

017


studio-laucke Siebein

Amsterdam and Berlin

Category Section

Circa 1986

Studio Laucke Siebein

018


Chapter One

Format & Function

Following a degree from the Hochschule der Künste Berlin and five year’s working in agencies, Dirk Laucke set up his own studio in Amsterdam. The multiple-awardwinnig solutions he created there are beautifully clear and often surprising in the detail. Dirk Laucke and Johanna Siebein Dirk Laucke (1965) was born and brought up in Berlin, where he graduated in 1994 from the University of the Arts (UdK). Since 1995 he lives and works in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. In 2000 he founded Studio Laucke. Johanna Siebein (1982) studied at the University of Fine Arts (HBKsaar) in Saarbrücken, Germany, and at the Academy of Art and Design (AKI ArtEZ) in Enschede, The Netherlands. She graduated in 2008 at HBKsaar. Since 2010 Johanna heads the Berlin office, Studio Laucke Siebein. (Left) Circa 1986 - Exhibition catalogue for Hudson Valley Center for Contemporary Art, New York (Right) Visions - Exhibition catalogue for Monica de Cardenas Gallery, Milan

Visions

www.studio-laucke.com

019


Raw Colour

Eindhoven, Netherlands

Raw Colour

Agenda 2011

Raw Colour

020


Chapter One

Format & Function

The work of Raw Color reflects a sophisticated treatment of material and colour by mixing the fields of graphic design and photography. This is embodied through research and experiments, building their visual language. Daniera ter Haar & Christoph Brach work on self initiated and commissioned projects in their Eindhoven based studio.

Agenda 2011

www.rawcolor.nl

021


022

Hey Ho

Paris, France.

Hey Ho (France)

Hey Ho is a graphic design studio founded in 2007 in Paris by Julien Hourcade & Thomas Petitjean. In 2010, Julien Hourcade leaves the studio to found Sundries . After three years at the School of Architecture and Landscape of Bordeaux, then studies of visual communication, Thomas Littlejohn moved to Paris in 2005. Specializing in print design, he designed mainly books, magazines, posters, signage and visual identities. Working mainly in the cultural field (house publishing, museums ...), his work is distinguished by a strong presence of typography, and a rejection of ornament almost systematic.

Hey Ho

Poster French


Chapter One

Format and Function

The Institute of Social Hypocrisy Ection

www.heyho.fr

023


024

Studio Filippo Nostri

Solarolo, Italy

Introducing the crisp, clean, considered work of Studio Filippo Nostri, a small but perfectly formed graphic design studio based in Solarolo, Italy, specialising in paper and web based projects. With years of experience working for important museums, institutions, galleries and publishers, the studio has developed a deep knowledge of the entire design process and abides by set guidelines/principles for each project: relevance to the content, coherence in the structure and in the details, right typographic choices and optimization of materials. (LEFT) Cardboard box containing 60 postcards and a 32 pages booklet, 210 x 150 mm.

Studio Filippo Nostri

Design of the catalogue for the third year of ‘Lugo Land’ project. The box contains 60 postcards (5 per artist) and a 32 pages booklet for the texts. Punctum Press Right Book, 64 pages, 165 x 230 mm. Book for artist Riccardo Baruzzi, printed on the occasion of his solo exhibition ‘Quando disegno non canto’.

Studio Filippo Nostri

Riccardo Baruzzi


Chapter One

Format & Function

Riccardo Baruzzi

www.filipponostri.com

025


Chapter Two - Design for Sector

026


Chapter Two

Chapter Two Design for Sector.

Keller Maurer Design Project Projects Research & Development Qubik Werkplaats Typografie Ok-Rm NR2154 Iron Flag Colville Walker Mirko Borsche Studio Newwork

Design For Sector

027


Chapter Two - Design for Sector

028


Chapter Two

Design For Sector

Design for Sector Design is essential for any business, small store or indepedant individual. Graphic Design can introduce to an entire new world of people, working with clients in a variety of different fields which demand different and appropriate designs which are suited to their ideal. In this Chapter I have showcased a variety of works which have been produced for different sectors.

029


Keller Maurer Design

Munich, Germany

Keller Maurer Design is a graphic design consultancy based in Munich. Formed in 2002 by Martina Keller and Marcus Maurer after working several years abroad, we have over 16 years of experience in delivering design of the highest standards. Our approach to communication is one of simplicity and clarity, allowing us to create content-driven, original and relevant design strategies for our clients. While placing an emphasis on creativity we have a pragmatic outlook in finding intelligent design solutions that really work. We work across a wide range of disciplines and media with a tailored network of specialists and partners.

Keller Maurer Design

030

Keller Maurer Design

Catalogue design Alix Stadtb채umer


Chapter Two

Commercial

(Left) Project: Catalogue design Artist: Alix Stadtb채umer A comprehensive summary of the sculptural works of Munich based artist Alix Stadtb채umer which also features essays and an interview. The 88-page book is bound in a flexible grey dye-penetrated cover. Screen-printed bright orange titles are running across front and back cover. Published by Vexer Verlag, Switzerland. (Right) Project: Platform3 Futures catalogue Client: Platform3 Platform3 is an experimental art space in Munich. As a link between culture and economy it serves as a think tank and production site for young curators and art professionals. This catalogue was designed as a documentation and development assessment on occasion of the second anniversary of Platform3.

Platform 3

www.km-d.com

031


032

Project Projects

New York

Project Projects

P roject Projects is a design studio focusing on print, identity, exhibition, and interactive work with clients in art and architecture. The studio was founded in 2004 by Prem Krishnamurthy and Adam Michaels; Rob Giampietro joined as a principal in 2010. Project Project’s clients include the Berkeley Art Museum, Bard College Center for Curatorial Studies, Bernard Tschumi Architects, BOZAR Brussels, Canadian Centre for Architecture, Field Operations, Guggenheim Museum, Harvard GSD, Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates, Museo Tamayo, The Museum of Modern Art, National Museum of China, New York City Department of Parks & Recreation, Phaidon, Princeton Architectural Press, SALT (Istanbul), Steven Holl Architects, Tablet magazine, Vera List Center for Art & Politics, Whitney Museum of American Art, WORKac, and the Yale University Art Gallery.

Project Projects

Salt Identity System


Commercial

Showcase

www.projectprojects.com

Salt Identity System

Chapter Two

033


Project Projects

New York

Project Projects

034

Project Projects

www.projectprojects.com


Chapter Two

Commercial

(Right) Anne Tyng: Inhabiting Geometry presents the sculptural works of the visionary architect, theorist, and pioneer of habitable space-frame architecture. After working closely with Louis Kahn and influencing many of his major works, Tyng went on to independently conduct a lifelong study of advanced geometry, mathematical forms, and their application to built forms in a range of scales. The 2011 exhibition, presented at the Institute of Contemporary Art Philadelphia and Graham Foundation in Chicago, featured room-size models of five platonic solids created in collaboration with architect Srdjan Weiss. Project Projects designed a catalogue with documentation from both installations, in addition to supplementary materials, including drawings, plans, models, and an illustrated timeline of Tyng’s significant life and work. (Left) Project Projects worked closely with Architecture Workroom Brussels to produce a publication that expands upon the significant 2010 exhibition, Building for Brussels. Focusing on contemporary architecture, planning, and public policy in Europe, the 324-page book––with editions available in French, Dutch, and English–– addresses the complex urban issues facing Brussels and other European cities in a manner accessible to a broad audience. A ‘magazine-like’ design approach employs a flexible kit-of-parts to organize the dense materials, which include photographs and drawings of featured projects; contextual essays; and interviews with policy-makers, designers, scholars, and critics, alongside charts, maps, and statistical information. In addition to designing each of the three editions, Project Projects created all of the information graphics and cartography within the books.

Showcase

www.projectprojects.com

035


036

Research and Development

Switzerland

Art Director duo Daniel Olsson and Jonas Topooco in partnership since 2002. Works in close collaboration with Artists, Architects, Curators, Critics, Collectors, Directors, Museums and Cultural Institutions. Uglycute collected works. Published by Revolver on the occasion of the Uglycute exhibition at Marabouparken. Essays by Sara Kristoffersson, Helena Mattsson and Helena Selder.

Research and Development

Identity for the Uglycute retrospective at Marabouparken, Stockholm. February 2012

Research and Development

Selected Works


Chapter Two

Commercial

Selected Workds

www.researchanddevelopment.se

037


Qubik

Leeds, Uk

Qubik

Folds

Qubik

038


Arts and Culture

Chapter Two

Interview

How important was the use of white space in the layout of the book. What were the design decisions made in the process and did that influence the way the images of Taubaʼs work were laid out in the book? White space is important in any design, at least as important as the actual content. Art books especially so because the book seeks to replicate somewhat the experience of seeing the art works in a gallery context. So from the beginning of working on ‘Folds’, the works – the paintings – were probably already going to have a generous amount of white space around them. When speaking to Tauba in the early stages she pointed out that her Folds paintings are always hung in rather unconventional ways: usually close to the floor or corner or edge of a wall. She sent me some installation photographs illustrating this concept and these ended up in the book in section 3. So I decided to use the same strategy in the book, to position the paintings near the edges of the page. Did the white space hold any meaning, Was it used consciously to frame Taubaʼs work or is there another interpretation? White, negative space was used consciously with regard to each painting and its relation to other paintings. Although each spread consists of only 2 or 3 paintings I spent a lot of time choosing which paintings to group together and their relative sizes and position.

It can be used for that but ultimately it’s the ground for the content and it takes a lot of experience and confidence to use white space effectively. A lot of design is really about editing – which means removing unnecessary content. I’m always asking myself “is this necessary to communicate the message?”. What do you see as the purpose of white space in your design work? is it for clarity, minimalism, the idea of less is more or is it a means to relate to a target audience? Less is more and clarity are definitely a purpose. I’m also attracted to minimalism in general – not only in design but in music, film and art. There is almost too much noise in the world, I mean visual noise, the Internet, TV etc. What are your views on the use of white space used by other designers and has that influenced your own work? I am really drawn to ideas such as nothingness and also certain philosophies like Zen. I take influence a lot from music. One of my favourite CDs is ‘Series’ by American composer Richard Chartier – the sound is so quiet there’s almost nothing on the CD. Silence is important in music, for example the space between sounds can create tension. There isn’t enough use of silence in music, it’s often ignored.

Do you see white space as a tool used predominately for framing in graphic design to bring emphasis to a visual hierarchy?

Tauba Auerbach

www.qubik.com

039


Joe Gilmore (Qubik)

Leeds, UK

Chromatologies Client: Snd Date: 2010 Category: Brochure

Branding and identity for Chromatologies, a festival of digital art and music in Rotherham.

Arts and Culture

Chromotologies

Qubik

040


Chapter Two

Arts and Culture

Chums Client: Urban Outfitters Date: 2010 Category: Catalogue

Exhibition catalogue for Chums, a group show curated by Mary Manning at Space 15 Twenty in Los Angeles.

Urban Outfitters

www.qubik.com

041


Werkplaats Typografie

042

Werkplaats Typografie

The Werkplaats Typografie (WT) is part of ArtEZ Institute of the Arts. WT is a two-year masters programme centred on practical assignments and selfinitiated projects. It also serves as a meeting place for graphic designers with regard to research and dialogue. The WT is supervised by Karel Martens and Armand Mevis. Further guidance is given on a regular basis by Paul Elliman and Maxine Kopsa. Anniek Brattinga is in charge of general co-ordination and management, Roland FrĂźh is responsible for program co-ordination and Liesbeth Doornbosch is office manager. Visiting lecturers are regularly invited to provide individual

tutoring and/or for presentations. Reviews of work, critiques and project participation are informal in character. Participants work in a professionally equipped studio accessible 24 hours a day. The WT is open to a maximum number of twelve graphic designers who would like to deepen their knowledge and skills. Celebrating the twentieth anniversary of the Berlage Institute--the Netherlands’ international training ground for architecture--this publication investigates how architectural models, insights and principles create a global architectural culture. With contributions by both prominent and up-andcoming architects, theorists, critics, historians and lecturers, The Berlage Institute examines

Werkplaats Typografie

Netherlands

the various fields that factor in the emergence of an architecture culture: education, practice, discourse and media. By means of critical reflection on the projects, theories, buildings and writings that have dominated the culture over the last three decades, the authors in this book preview the trends that will be decisive for architecture discourse in the coming years. Key texts address architecture policy in the Netherlands since the 1980s, the internationalization of Dutch architecture since the 1990s, the development and dissemination of Dutch expertise and the need for appropriate architectural visions for a globalized world.

The Berlage Survey


Chapter Two

Commercial and Education

The Berlage Survey

www.werkplaatstypografie.org

043


Ok-Rm

London, UK

Ok-Rm

Footnote to a Project*

Ok-Rm

044


Chapter Two

Culture

Interview

Footnote to a Project*

Footnote to a Project*

Oliver Knight and Rory McGrath founded London-based studio OK-RM in 2008. Combing conceptual focus with typographic rigour, the pair have, in a relatively short amount of time, amassed a body of predominantly culturalsector work that epitomises an emerging new wave of language-based contemporary design. And they’ve recently completed an absolute tome of a book – Footnote to a Project – which documents and celebrates contemporary art in the Middle East. We asked Rory to tell us a little more…

scene is still being moulded. There’s been a lot of focus on the region in recent years with announcements that the Guggenheim and the Louvre are to open new spaces in Abu Dhabi, and with Art Dubai and Sharjah Biennial, art activity is growing in scale and stature with every year. This is a refreshing contrast to the heavily established and potentially saturated art scene here in the UK. Because of this we felt that Footnotes to a Project was able to make a real impact by contributing to a developing and critical contemporary vocabulary.

You’ve just completed a project for Can you tell us a little more about ArtDubai. Could you tell us a little bit about it? your practice in general? Footnote to a Project is a collection of images, citations and references that support and inform the creation of the five artworks for the 2011 Abraaj Capital Art Prize. How did it come about? Long-term collaborator Sharmini Pereira was approached to become the curator of the prize for 2011, and she approached us to discuss the potential of creating a project that would enrich the communication of the commissioned artworks to a broader audience. The result of this collaboration was Footnotes to a Project.

This is something we have devoted much thought to recently, and the answer can be found here. In order to add to this within this more informal context: our practice is new and constantly re-arranging itself and its priorities. Each new opportunity is a chance to head in a direction that can challenge us and enrich our practice. So perhaps it would be interesting to discuss our practice in more un-defined terms – anamorphic, empirical and speculative. How important is language in your design work at Ok-Rm? Simply essential.

What’s the state of art in Dubai at the moment? And how do you think it differs from the scene in England? Dubai and the rest of the Middle East is still a relatively new territory for contemporary art and its context within the international

Interview

www.ok-rm.co.uk

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Ok-Rm

046


047


NR2154

New York

NR2154

Fashion Sector

NR2154

048


Chapter Two

Fashion

Love Magazine

www.nr2154.com

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050

Iron Flag

Copenhagen, Denmark

ironflag is a newly established multi-disciplinary design studio by mikkel møller andersen, kasper fjederholt and marco pedrollo. from both the digital and more tactile end of the creative spectrum, we aspire to utilize our different visual backgrounds to create singular works within the fields of art direction, graphic design, illustration, photography and video.

Iron Flag

hailing from the danish design school, central saint martins and 2gd/gold studio, we aim to integrate our specific knowledge, offering a unique approach to the design process, regardless of size.

Iron Flag

Dansk


Chapter Two

Fashion

Dansk

www.ironflag.net

051


Collive Walker

London, UK

Collive Walker

Selected Workds

Colville Walker

052


Chapter Two

Fashion

An impressive body of work here from this London-based design studio, who are an “independent design studio delivering art direction, branding, digital and editorial services to the fashion, luxury and media industries.� Colville-Walker are also the publishers and art directors behind the beautiful, sartorial b Magazine which channels the nonchalant style of the store into some beautifully put-together pages. With a golden touch when it comes to the curation of editorial photography, Colville-Walker are definitely the go-to people when it comes to making a brand look incredibly cool and stylish through elegant, simple design.

B-Store

www.colville-walker.com

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054

Mirko Borsche

Switzerland

Mirko Borsche

Bureau Mirko Borsche is a munich based graphic design studio founded by Mirko Borsche in 2007. The studio has been producing numerous projects such as magazines, catalogues, books, posters, typefaces, identities, industrial design, fashion design, exhibition design, movies and websites. Our clients hail from the fields of culture and business.

Mirko Borsche

Saskia Diez


Chapter Two

Fashion

Saskia Diez

Website

055


Studio Newwork

New York, America

Studio Newwork

Selected Works

Studio Newwork

056


Chapter Two

Fashion

Selected Works

www.studionewwork.com

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Chapter Three - Design By Location

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Chapter Three

Chapter Three Design By Location

John Morgan Studio Mass Observation Studio Subsist Think Work Observe Anni’s Node (Berlin) Ill Studio Studio Reizundrisiko VLF Adriaan Mellegers Everything Type Company Joel Evey Alex Witjas Famous Visual Service

Locations

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Chapter Three - Design By Location

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Chapter Three

Locations

Design by Location Design is forever progressing looking at locations allows us to not only look at the vast quality of design from around the world but also showcase unique design and strategy within these selected works This chapter showcases some selected works of working professionals in the UK, Europe and America all of which are heavily driven by typography and layout.

061


John Morgan Studio

London, UK

John Morgan Studio

Selected Works

John Morgan Studio

062


Chapter Three

Locations

Category Section

www.morganstudio.co.uk

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Mass Observation

London, UK.

Mass Observation

A Quick Perspective of the Future

Mass Observation

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Chapter Three

Locations

Selected Works

www.massobservation.org

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066

Studio Subsist

London, UK

Studio-Subsist is a London-based design practice producing work across corporate identity, editorial, web design, print, branding, digital design etc. Always striving to produce rational, meticulously crafted and compelling solutions that are tailored to the needs of each individual client.

Studio Subsist

Studio-Subsist frequently collaborates with illustrators, publishers, creative directors, photographers, web designers and filmmakers which further expands the ability to undertake a great variety of challenging projects.

Studio Subsist

Selected Works


Chapter Three

Locations

Selected Works

studio-subsist.com

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Think Work Observe

Italy

Think Work Observe is a graphic design practice born in 2011, based in Italy and run by Piero Di Biase and Alberto Moreu. We follow different projects in graphic design, typography and photography. We design printed matter, visual identities and websites, with a background of past experiences in developing identities for design furniture companies. We also acquired skills in designing our own typefaces, as well as customizing already existing fonts, using them to make a more focused project. We work on creating objects and shaping contents, and in the end creating and managing a flux of skilled professionals.

Think Work Observe

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Two

Selected Works


Locations

Chapter Three

P. → Piero A. → Alberto Where did you both meet and when did you decide to start your own design studio? P. We met 5 years ago, we were working in the same agency, after a couple of years we did a project for a friend, and we noticed that we shared a personal taste in graphic design, so after that project we decided to go ahead with our collaboration and TWO started. A.When we realize that the sum of our skills was more than the value of us as single designers. Could you tell us a bit about studio space? P. Basically we don’t have a studio space yet, at the moment we prefer to work in our own flats, and share ideas, suggestions and drafts through Skype or email, but we also have some meetings during the week. A. We have both experience of working in the studio, but by now we don’t think we need it immediately. Have you ever thought about expanding you studio to more than two designers? P. Can you imagine the problems we would have with our logotype and identity? Ah ah! Anyway, being serious this is a good question! Sometimes we have collaborations with other people, but basically we believe that two is a good number

Interview

of people to take decisions and follow the art direction of the projects. Involving more people in this could be difficult at the moment. A. I couldn’t say it better. What is your design process when starting a new project, do you each take one assignment from the outset or do you work collaborative right from the start until the very end? P. At the very beginning we share opinions and things that inspire us for choosing a way that could satisfy our vision of the project and the client’s one. We work very close for taking the first decisions. We work separately just when everything is quite clear, to make presentations or final layouts for the printers. A.Yes, the process begin from being in TWO, and this is the true meaning of the motto.

A. The best thing is probably that you don’t have to say ‘yes’ if you would like to say ‘no’. And most of all, you can shape it and feel you are achieving something. P. For me is finding time to follow experimental and personal projects, without someone that says to you: “is this a project of the studio?”. A kind of freedom. Do you have any advice to designers thinking about starting their own studio? A. My favourite is Bruce Mau “Manifesto for incomplete growth”, and exactly this sentence: “Play can only happen when people feel they have control over their lives. We can’t be free agents if we’re not free”. P. I use a quote too. “Create your own visual style… let it be unique for yourself and yet identifiable for others”. Orson Welles

What are some of the obstacles you have faced during your time at Think Work Observe? A. The TWO project is quite young, so probably the biggest obstacle now is to make it as we imagine it, doing the kind of works we would like to do, without too much compromises. P. I can’t see obstacles at the moment, just challenges! What is the best thing about running your own design studio?

www.t-wo.it

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Anni’s

Copenhagen, Denmark

Anni’s

Deformities of Speed

Anni’s

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Chapter Three

Locations

Anni’s Fredericiagade 78, 2tv 1310 Copenhagen Denmark Deformities of Speed Sophienholm Invitation, poster and exhibition catalogue 96 p., 17x24cm Published by Lyngby Art Society 2009

Category Section

www.annis.dk

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Node

Berlin, Germany

Node (Berlin)

Selected Works

Node

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Chapter Three

Locations

Selected Works

www.nodeberlin.com

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Ill Studio

Paris, France

Ill Studio

Selected Works

Ill Studio

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Chapter Three

Locations Founded in 2007, Ill-Studio is a multidisciplinary platform based in Paris. Headed by LĂŠonard Vernhet and Thomas Subreville, it also brings together Nicolas Malinowsky, Thierry Audurand, Pierre Dixsaut and Sebastien Michelini. The studio evolves in various creative areas such as artdirection, graphic design, photography, typography and motion design, for both personal or commissioned works.

Selected Works

www.ill-studio.com

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Studio Reizundrisko

Switzerland

Studio Reizundrisko

Koltzholz

Studio Reizundrisiko

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Chapter Three

Locations B채nziger Hug, a Swiss based design and web studio was established in 2011 by Samuel B채nziger and Olivier Hug. We are working in all areas of print and interactive design. We design books, exhibitions, publications, identities, and websites for cultural institutions, businesses and individuals. Further we develop websites for other design agencies, code web apps and create programs for your complex ideas. Klotzholz Identity for furniture design studio klotzholz. There are nine different business cards each one has its own picture on the back. Klotzholz Newspaper Promotional newspaper showing several products of furniture designed by klotzholz. Its a 24 pages newspaper printed in black and white.

Koltzholz

www.xn--bnziger-hug-l8a.com

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078

VLF

France

VLF (France)

VLF is Thomas Cristiani & Antoine Roux they make books, posters, photography, web design and more. (Above) l140 is a concept hotel, a “hotel with one room”, available for 500 nights. In the heart of Montmartre in Paris, and with the collaboration of many artists, the project uses a restraining archirecture to create a functionally habitation. The night comes with boxset containing three books, a t-shirt, and a sleeping mask. l140.fr (Right) Art direction, illustration and design for L’imparfaite, an erotic magazine made by young writers and artists.

European

| 140


Chapter Three

Locations

L’imparfaite

vlf-design.com

079


Adriaan Mellegers

Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Adriaan Mellegers

Frame Magazine

Adriaan Mellegers

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Chapter Three

Locations Adriaan Mellegers is an Amsterdam-based graphic designer focusing on institutional, artistic and commercial commissions within the fields of art, architecture and design. With a strong editorial approach and a consistently innovative use of typography, materials and color, Adriaan’s design sensibility engages the creative and content driven objectives of all involved. Central to Adriaan’s approach is a positive and enjoyable working experience where open dialogue with collaborators is key. From 2010 to 2011 Adriaan was the senior designer at Frame publishers where in 2011 together with Cathelijn Kruunenberg and MariÍlle van Genderen he was responsible for the art-direction and re-design of Frame magazine (NL), an international trade magazine for interior and product design.

Frame Magazine

www.adriaanmellegers.com

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Everything Type Company

New York, America

Everything Type Company

Expressionism

Everything Type Company

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Chapter Three

Locations

083

Everything–Type–Company (ETC) is a Brooklyn-based design studio founded by Kyle Blue and Geoff Halber. We specialize in the design of identity, publishing, and interactive projects for clients working in culture and commerce. Our design solutions capture the spirit of a project through the configuration of well-conceived ideas, a visual language, and a high-level of craftsmanship. With an ability to design and give art direction, to write copy and code, the work of our flexible and collaborative creative team focuses on the special needs of our clients.

In pursuit of modern form

www.everything-type-company.com


Joel Evey

America

Joel Evey

Hand Made

Joel Evey

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Chapter Three

Locations

Urban Outfitters have been making some very high quality catalogues for a while now, and it turns out that’s mainly down to Joel Evey being their print art director. A man with his finger in an unreal amount of internet and zine-related pies, Joel has the enviable ability to nonchalantly throw bits of type on to a page and still make it look very, very cool.

Selected Works

www.iam.joelevey.com

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Alex Witjas

America

Alex Witjas

Majical Thinking

Alex Witjas

086


Chapter Three

Locations Alex Witjas Graduated from Pratt Institute with a BFA in Graphic Design. She worked as a Graphic Designer for Urban Outfitters from 2010-2012 branding and packaging system for urban outfitter’s housewares brand magical thinking, 2011. Designed for urban outfitters 2011 gift catalog with photography and styling by julia sadler and colin leaman

Selected Posters

www.alexwitjas.com

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Famous Visual Service

Melbourne, Australia

Famous Visual Service

Business Cards

Famous Visual Service

088


Chapter Three

Locations

Business Cards

www.famousvs.com

089


Chapter Four - Typography

090


Chapter Four

Chapter Four Typography

Colophon Foundry An Endless Supply Radim Pesko Lineto Foundry

Typography

091


Chapter Four - Typography

092


Chapter Four

Typography

A lot of the design showcased in this publication would be nothing without the typography used. The final chapter is deadicated to contemporary type design by some of the leading type foundrys around at the moment. Typorgaphy is essential in communicating a message effectivly, if that message cannot be communicated properly through the type which is used then its going to break a piece of design .

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Colophon Founndry

Brighton, UK

Colophon Foundry

Apercu

Colophon Foundry

094


Chapter Four

Typography

Colophon is an independent type foundry set up by Brighton based design studio, The Entente (Anthony Sheret & Edd Harrington).

You run Colophon alongside your design studio, The Entente, where did the idea come from to start an independant Font Foundry?

As well as distributing and acting as a platform for fonts designed by The Entente, it selects fonts designed by other designers to distribute and create products for.

As The Entente our work is mainly type based, concentrating on the creation of bespoke typefaces for books, identities and exhibition catalogues. Colophon, as a platform, allows us to build-upon our commissioned type work and develop it into a commercial product.

Working in a similar way to that of a publishers, some typefaces that are released by Colophon will be in a limited edition. These fonts will be unique in its edition, ranging from 50-500. Colophon also offers a selection of specimen books and a range of miscellaneous products. These are all produced in a limited edition. Brighton based designers Anthony Sheret and Edd Harrington have recently launched their specimen catalogue to accompany the release of Aperçu, the latest font to come out of their font foundry, Colophon. Working under the name of The Entente they set up Colophon in April 2009 and currently have nine fonts available, we went to find out more…

Tell us more about your latest release, Aperçu, designed by yourselves. Aperçu began in December 2009 through an idea to create an amalgamation of classic realist typefaces; Franklin Gothic (1903), Johnston (1916), Gill Sans (1926) and Neuzeit (1928). The first usage of the typeface was in February 2010 and then continued development through to its eventual commercial release in August 2010. The specimen catalogue is the final stage in this project and gives an overview of the Aperçu family. Where do you want Colophon to go? To continue developing our curated catalogue of typefaces and products, both with releases from ourselves, other designers and type designers. We are planning to release a new website in December, along with more releases. It’s inevitable we’re going to ask you what your favourite font is, so, what’s your favourite font? We were a bit split on this one! Ant— AG Schoolbook, Edd — Unica Haas.

Interview

www.colophon-foundry.org

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Colophon Founndry

Brighton, UK

Colophon Foundry

Raisonne

Colophon Foundry

096


Typography

Chapter Four

Raisonne

Raisonné is a contemporary sans-serif typeface, designed by Benjamin Critton over the course of several months during the summer of 2010. Its single weight—demibold— was drawn for use at all scales. Benjamin Critton (b. 1983) is an American designer, typographer, art director, publisher, writer, editor and curator. He lives in New Haven, Connecticut, where he studies graphic design at the Yale School of Art. Before that, he attended Hamilton College. Before that, he went to William H. Hall High School. Before that, he went to King Philip Middle School. Before that, he went to Morley Elementary School. Before that, he went to Knight Hall Nursery School. Raisonné was initially conceived as a typeface that would comprise the written portions of of a comprehensive catalogue raisonné,

Raisonne

the creation and publishing of which is required of each MFA candidate in the Department of Graphic Design at the Yale School of Art. The typeface is parodic-serious, intended to be a bit dumb, blunt, candid, affable— honest in the same way Modernism liked its materials. It pays homage here and there to noteworthy precedents, among them Rudolf Koch’s Kabel, Sol Hess’ Twentieth Century, Joseph Churchward’s Crossbred, and Herb Lubalin’s Avant Garde. Raisonné is published with a full set of upper & lowercase letterforms, as well as a full latin character set and several stylistic alternates; it is distributed in OpenType format.

www.colophon-foundry.org

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098

An Endless Supply

Birmingham, UK An Endless Supply is a design studio and independent publishing activity organised by Harry Blackett and Robin Kirkham. Working in many roles — as designers, editors, printers, researchers, writers — a primary objective of the studio is to support the production of new art and writing.

An Endless Supply

Curwen Sans was first drawn by Harold Curwen at the Curwen Press in 1911. Curwen died in 1949 and the Press went out of business in the 1980s, and his sans serif—pre-emptive of Johnston, Gill Sans, Kabel—has never been digitised. An Endless Supply have re-drawn the font from prints sourced at Cambridge University, and the specimen includes a critical history of the typeface as well as new writing about the processes of revival. The jacket design is a re-print of wallpaper printed by Curwen Press in 1927. Produced as part of The Department of Overlooked Histories at Wysing Arts Centre. Curwen Sans type specimen 2011 100 pages, black and white, perfect bound First run of 15 copies with 3-colour screenprinted jacket ISBN 978-0-9570614-1-5

An Endless Supply

Curwen Sans


Typography

Chapter Four

Curwen Sans

Curwen Sans

www.anendlessupply.co.uk

099


Radim Pesko

Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Radim Peško is a graphic designer based in Amsterdam. After studies at Academy of Arts in Prague and London he completed his postgraduate program at Werkplaats Typografie in Arnhem in 2004. Works in the field of type design and occasional curatorial projects. Work includes identity for Secession Vienna (A), various work for Moravian Gallery, Brno (CZ), Eastside Projects, Birmingham (UK), and collaborations with artist Katerina Seda among others. In 2010 he has established his own digital foundry. He teaches at Rietveld Academie in Amsterdam and is visiting lector at Ecal in Lausanne, Switzerland.

Radim Pesko

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Boymans was originally designed in 2003 as part of the identity developed by Mevis & Van Deursen for Museum Boijmans van Beuningen in Rotterdam. Its primary inspiration was the typeface designed by Lance Wyman for the Olympic Games in Mexico City in 1968. Boymans responded to the identity’s need for a flexible as well as playful design. Designed in ten weights, each font has three versions: single line, double line, and triple line. By combining, layering, or coloring these versions, Boymans can generate an endless number of variations.

Radim Pesko

Five Prints (2009) by Radim Peško, are printed as editions of 13 in phosphorescent ink. Word sequences are set in the typeface Boymans designed in 2003 as part of the identity developed by Mevis & Van Deursen for the Boijmans van Beuningen Museum in Rotterdam, the Netherlands. The typeface is loosely based on Lance Wyman’s multi-layered identity design for the 1968 Mexico City Olympics. In Wymans font, the repeated outlines of the individual characters referred to motifs in Mexican folk art, transformed and used for the Boijmans typeface they are a metaphor for the museums new wrap-around building and the curatorial structures expressed by this architecture. Designed by Peško in ten weights, each font consists of three versions: single, double and triple lines. When combined, layered or coloured the typeface generates endless variations.

Fugue


Chapter Four

Typography

Radim Pesko - Boymans

Fugue

www.radimpesko.com

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102

Radim Pesko

Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Radim Pesko

Fugue


Typography

Chapter Four

Fugue

Fugue

www.radimpesko.com

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Lineto Foundry

104

Lineto Foundry

Lineto - the name is borrowed from the PostScript™ page description language - was founded by Cornel Windlin and Stephan Müller in 1993. Five years later, they jointly set up Lineto.com to distribute their own typefaces on the web, and invited a number of fellow designers with shared sensibilities to publish their fonts alongside. Since then, Lineto has grown into a reputable library of original typefaces. As of 2007, Jürg Lehni has officially joined forces as a third associate. Initiated as a collaborative type design project by Zurich-based designers Urs Lehni & Lex Trüb, LL Brown has been drawn and developed by Aurèle Sack over the course of the last four years. Evidently, Sack’s new font family owes a lot to the seminal type designs of Edward Johnston and Arno Drescher, who with their «Johnston» (ca. 1915) and «Super Grotesk» (ca. 1930) each created immensely influential and supremely successful geometric typefaces as much as one hundred years ago. Yet Aurèle Sack was not aiming at a revival font. Using the historic predecessors for formal

Lineto Foundry

Küssnacht , Switzerland

cues, he kept developing it more freely, adding a similarly purist and near-surgical flavour as with his earlier typefaces, most notably the Futura variant he drew as Omega’s corporate typeface for Norm a few years back. Since 2008, soughtafter test versions of LL Brown have been put to excellent use by a number of eminent designers around the globe, among them Oliver Knight & Rory McGrath, Mark Owens/Oslo Editions, Jonas Voegeli, Jon Hares (in the only authorised @fontface use to date) and, most recently, Norm & Andro Wekua as well as the wonderfully poetic Medium magazine. LL Brown also has been prominently featured in various design publications, among them the highly recommended Type Archive issue of Seoul-based GRAPHIC magazine. After much delay, we are proud and happy to finally offer LL Brown as a family package in 4 weights: Thin, Light, Regular and Bold, each weight with matching italic cuts. But that’s not all: Sack also created alternative cuts for the Regular and Bold weights, serving as a stylistic variant especially interesting for use at

smaller sizes. Furthermore, each cut also comes in a reclining version, offering variety and room for playful use. An elegantly serious typeface that works exceedingly well for large and small use, in headlines and for text. The fonts come in Opentype and Truetype format, in both Standard and Pro versions; Pro offers additional language support for Central European and Turkish languages. Pdf documents with the character map and a list of covered languages are available on request. Four «Reclining» cuts and six «Alternate» cuts are provided free of charge with their respective weights. Aurèle Sack is no newcomer to Lineto; under the guidance of Norm, he was responsible for the LL Purple typeface. Specializing in type design and editorial projects in the cultural field, Aurèle Sack was awarded the Swiss Federal Design Prize in 2006 and 2010. Currently teaching at ecal, he is working on a new typeface family whose colourful name we can only guess at this point.

About


Chapter Four

Typography

LL Brown

www.lineto.com

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Lineto Foundry

K端ssnacht , Switzerland

Lineto Foundry

Replica Font

Lineto Foundry

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Chapter Four

Typography

Replica Font

www.lineto.com

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Real Soloutions for real problems

108

Working Title

Outro

Working Title celebrates the power of design and its problem-solving abilities. Design is a catalyst of change and renewal and a way of addressing the societal questions of our time. Design is constantly inspiring me and introducing me to new ways of thinking. I hope Working Title has achieved what it set-out to do and to inspire you. Too often design is associated only with aesthetics, trends and luxury, but design can mean so much more. At its best, design can change, improve, renew, inspire, involve, shock, move, disrupt, help or solve. Working Title demonstrates the value of design thinking as a response to the challenges of today’s world. With a showcase of international designers from a mix of disciplines, Working Title acts as a platform for designers to consider the social potential of their profession. This Publication is a cross-over between sub design disciplines – from Type Design to publication layout, from design for fashion to design for the commercial sector. design – as solutions for today’s challenges generally


Working Title

Outro

demand a multi-disciplinary approach. It’s this multi-disciplinary approach which is pushing design. The making of this publication has been difficult, In that there is so much about design that I love, I see this publication as more of showcase of work which inspires me and different areas which I stride to push myself in and develop in, not only in terms of my design skills but my knowledge as well. There’s so much more that I would have liked to have put in and having done this publication I hope to produce further copies to produce an archive of my inspiration as I have been developing as a graphic designer, from being a design student to working as part of the professional industry to keep a catalogue of my progression.

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Acknowledgements

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Working Title

Acknowledgements

Thanks to all the designers and studios featured in this publication for making great graphic design and constantly inspiring me. Special Thankyou to Rosario Florio, Larissa Kasper and Joe Gilmore (Qubik) for supplying my self directed interview content. Some content and interviews have been sourced from online resources and are used to help inform and contextualised some of the projects. All imagery showcased has been taken from the showcased designer/studios website or has been sent to me directly from the designers/studios.

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Publication curated, edited and designed by Elliot McKellar


Publication Design; Elliot McKellar info@elliotmckellar.co.uk +44 (0) 7794 520 951


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