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Working Title Thinking, Doing, Rethinking.

By Elliot McKellar

Design Context


Introducing the creative approaches and working methods of leading professionals at the forefront of print and contemporary graphic design. A unique mix of visual examples, detailed descriptions, and case studies based on my own personal experiences and development at Leeds College of Art.


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Rosario Florio & Larissa Kasper

Switzerland

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Format & Function

Chapter One

Fomat & Function My time at LCA BAGD has taught me and given me the opportunity to explore what format and fuction means to me and my design practice and make me aware of bigger ideas, whilst

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Format & Function

Chapter One

Chapter One Format & Function

Featuring; Rosario Florio & Larissa Kasper, Coรถp, Matt Judge, Jung Und Wenig, studiofilippo-nostri, Raw Colour, Benjamin Critton, Hey Ho.

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Rosario Florio & Larissa Kasper

Switzerland

Format & Function

Chapter One

Echo of the Moon

www.larissakasper.ch

Rosario Florio & Larissa Kasper work on various self-initiated, personal projects as well as commissioned ones. Their main activity and interest is in printed matter, with a strong focus on typography. Most of the studio’s projects are in the musical and cultural fields. The duo shares a small workspace with a few friends called Bureau Collective.

Rosario Florio & Larissa Kasper

(Left) Invitation card announcing the birthday party of a friend. In collaboration with Larissa Kasper. (Right) Publication on the occasion of the exhibitions ‘Echo of the Moon’ by Luca Francesconi. The project is centered on moon magnetism involving other less immediate reflections about the idea of the moon and in particular the dichotomy of transparency and opacity. A black part is dedicated to the absorption of light and opacity referring to an absorption of thoughts and ideas of references which are later being reflected in the white part presenting his artwork. Published by Kaleidoscope Press. In collaboration with Larissa Kasper.

Format & Function

www.rosarioflorio.ch

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Rosario Florio & Larissa Kasper

Switzerland

Format & Function

Chapter One

Format & Function

www.larissakasper.ch

Interview

Rosario Florio & Larissa Kasper

1. In three words how would you describe your design practice? Thinking, doing, rethinking. 2. Who or what inspires you? (This doesn’t necessarily have to be design related). Who inspires me are people who stimulate and challenge me to think. That can be words from a book or also a naive approach of someone who works in a totally different field. But in particular it’s people who developed an own visual language in art as well as in graphic design by their enormous dedication and diligence. It’s people who also steadily continue to develop themselves and intend to reach something they not even know what it will be. People who find the right questions to a problem.

3. How did your ongoing collaboration with Larissa Kasper begin? We met about ten years ago and were first a couple, actually quite long before we started to work together. I did an apprenticeship as a typographer and later on Larissa did one as a graphic designer. That was the first time we made things together and tried to mix our skills. We then both started studying graphic design in different places. During that time we already worked on projects collaboratively which helped us to develop our working process. We had great luck having a similar view to graphic design and things in general and also to pursue the same goals. So it was and still is a steadily progression of our doing.

4. In your collaborative work with Larissa what is your design process when starting a new brief, do you work collaboratively right from the start or do you individually play different roles in the design process? We always work together right from the beginning of a new project. The starting rituals are a lot of discussions about the problem we have

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to solve, that hopefully let us find the right questions and especially the right solution. It’s always a back and forth between thoughts that join together and lead us to a result. We basically don’t have different roles during the whole creative and graphical process. It’s solely a reciprocity propose and extend that repeats as long as the result corresponds to our perception.

5. Is there a favourite project you have both worked on? And why? We don’t have a favorite project in general but most often it is our latest. Therefore we try to develop our senses with every new project.

6. If you had to recommend one book to another designer what would it be? It’s hard to choose just one, especially because I don’t think that one is enough for a designers needs to learn and evolve. If they have to be design related I would say: Designing Books: Practice and Theory by Jost Hochuli and Robin Kinross Graphic Design Manual: Principles and Practice by Armin Hofmann Wolfgang Weingart: My Way to Typography by Wolfgang Weingart Typographie: A Manual of Design by Emil Ruder But to achieve a good knowledge to combine things and thoughts there are a lot more and to just name a few of them: Waiting for Godot by Samuel Becket About Looking & Ways of seeing by John Berger Life with Picasso by Francoise Gilot Vincent van Gogh Lust for Life by Irving Stone Art and visual perception by Rudolf Arnheim Matisse on Art by Henri Matisse

www.rosarioflorio.ch

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Coöp

Australia

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Coöp is the studio of designer Paul Marcus Fuog. Since opening in 2004, Coöp has undertaken a variety of projects ranging from small art-based briefs to expansive design contracts. Positivity and experimentation are at the core of the studio’s practise.

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Victorian College of the Arts An identity system for the Victorian College of the Arts (VCA). The identity needed to frame the artistic culture of the faculty and allow the personalities of the four sub schools - arts, performing arts, music and film and television - to shine through.

Constraints are explored in optimistic and creative ways resulting in inventive new directions. Coöp’s work is always current and often personal informed by observation and a curiosity of contemporary culture. Collaboration with other designers is a constant source of renewal and inspiration. Pride and passion drive design innovation.

VCA was symbolised by a pyramid where four platforms, representing the four schools, converge to create a whole. Often chaotic, the identity reflects the ground up, energetic and creative ethos of the VCA. A collaboration with Axel Peemoeller.

Coöp

Studio success has been built on lasting partnerships with creative and commercial clients, government and educational institutions

Format & Function

co-oponline.net.au

Format & Function

co-oponline.net.au

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Hey Days

Oslo, Norway

Format & Function

Chapter One Hey­days is a dynamic and effec­tive design stu­dio founded in 2008. We are large enough to take on a lead design role, but small enough to fol­low projects from start til end. In our cen­tral Oslo stu­dio we pro­duce visual iden­ti­ties, dig­i­tal designs and excep­tional print work for a wide range of clients, both com­mer­cial, cul­tural and orga­ni­za­tions. Since founded we have been rewarded with both nor­we­gian and inter­na­ tional design awards. Hey­days was founded by Math­ias Had­dal Hovet, Lars Kjel­snes, Mar­tin Sanne Kris­tiansen, Thomas Lein and Stein Hen­rik Haugen.

Hey Days

Their own iden­tity reflects their design prin­ ci­ples. A devel­op­ment from the start in 2008, the iden­tity is based on a divid­ing line half way through every sur­face, empha­siz­ing a new period in time and a more con­fi­dent stu­dio. Paper stock, mate­ri­als and print meth­ods are care­fully selected to make every sur­face a crafted pro­duc­tion, with a feel­ing of qual­ity and time­less­ness. Beneath it, our logo­type remains the same, accom­pa­nied by the sin­gle ‘H’.

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Hey Days Identity

Hey Days Identity

www.heydays.no

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Matt Judge

London, UK

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Matt Judge

An interview with Matt Judge about his award-winning Design Assembly book

When the Design Assembly discussion forum closed, founder Matt Judge was determined it should’t sink without trace. The book he produced to mark its passing was one of the most eye-catching publications to appear last year and has rightly been recognised by various awards panels. We spoke to Matt about the process of commemorating a blog in print, his attitude to awards and the pressures of designing a book aimed at design afficianados… How did the idea for the book come about? Ask anyone who runs a blog and they’ll tell you it’s a pretty thankless task. We weren’t interested in turning it into a commercial venture, in part for fear of losing the integrity of its voice, so it was fuelled purely by the passion of its authors, and their desire to make a difference. Design Assembly had been pretty prolific for the first 18 months but as our authors moved up the professional ladder their priorities naturally changed, and writing thought-provoking content became more and more of a challenge that time didn’t permit. After all the energy and effort that had gone into making the platform I would have been devastated to just pull it down, but equally would have hated for it to just become forgotten because of the growing infrequency of its posts.  Then in late 2010 I lost my dad to cancer. It had a profound effect on me, forcing me to question what I wanted from my life and

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career. With Design Assembly we had been trying to make a difference to fellow creatives, by challenging their perception of design and showing them how important our role is to greater society. What better example of that than to donate all that time, energy and content to a far greater cause — fighting cancer. Why did you decide to structure it in the way you did? The number three became a recurrent theme throughout the project. Three years with of Design Assembly being the starting point, and the frightening statistic that one in three of us will be diagnosed with some form of cancer in our lifetime being the motivation. It made sense to split the content into three sections — an introduction to Design Assembly and the cause the project supported (book 1), the new content I had commissioned exclusively for the printed publication (book 2) and an archive of the website forming the bulk of the publication (book 3).  Because each section was unique in content, each was unique in design, size, binding, which was way more work than I imagined, and added huge complications to the production process, but gave DA3 a unique selling point, which I felt was crucial in a fairly congested design-publishing market. All profits from the sale of the book are being split between three charities with a combined global reach, rounding off the theme of three nicely. How much pressure was it to design a

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book about a design site – knowing it would be pored over by design buffs? I am my harshest critic, always have been, so could feel no greater pressure than that which I put myself under. How pleased were you with the end result? Delighted. Considering the time frame it was put together in, the limited budget to work within and the problems I encountered (paper sponsorship being withdrawn two weeks prior to print was amongst the worst) I’m surprised it happened at all! When you see someone go through something as destructive as cancer it helps give you some perspective, and what may have seemed like a brick wall a few years ago started looking more like speed bumps. “Producing something physical is a great way of placing a stake in the ground — we were here.” Matt Judge You won the Creative Circle award recently for best publication – how do designers feel about these kinds of awards? I’m a pretty big award sceptic. Unless it’s based on something tangible (increased revenue or subscription, for example) it’s just down to personal taste. The best work can be dismissed because the judging panel have a different aesthetic, so the entry fee becomes a gamble some people just won’t take (often the smaller agencies doing the most progressive, compelling work). But I knew a little of the Creative Circle from my time at This is Real Art, and knew it was highly regarded in advertising circles, which was interesting because I thought it may help give the book exposure to a different audience. Having Micheal C Place as head of the design judging panel also gave it real credibility. I hold Build’s work in such high regard, so to have a real ‘design buff’ you respect and admire single your work out for praise is incredibly humbling.

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Benjamin Critton

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Rosario Florio & Larissa Kasper

Benjamin Critton is an American designer, art director, typographer, publisher, writer, editor and curator. He lives in Brooklyn, New York, where he makes graphic design from a studio in a neighborhood called Greenpoint. Before moving to New York, he attended the Yale School of Art. Before that, he went to Hamilton College. Before that, he went to William H. Hall High School. Before that, he went to King Philip Middle School. Before that, he went to Morley Elementary School. Before that, he went to Knight Hall Nursery School.

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Switzerland

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Boom A hand-painted poster announcing the arrival of guest critic and lecturer Irma Boom, rendered on painter’s dropcloth. An exhaustive redesign of L’AmuseBouche, the French Language journal at Yale University. A lecture given by Hunter Tura focused on the major architectural, technological and musical events of the year 1982. It was hung using extensions of its own graphic elements; in this case colored tape that blended seamlessly with printed linework. With Sara Hartman

E.P.i.M.H.i.P.F.

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Following a degree from the Hochschule der Künste Berlin and five year’s working in agencies, Dirk Laucke set up his own studio in Amsterdam. The multiple-award-winnig solutions he created there are beautifully clear and often surprising in the detail. Dirk Laucke and Johanna Siebein Dirk Laucke (1965) was born and brought up in Berlin, where he graduated in 1994 from the University of the Arts (UdK). Since 1995 he lives and works in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. In 2000 he founded Studio Laucke.

Studio Laucke Siebein

Johanna Siebein (1982) studied at the University of Fine Arts (HBKsaar) in Saarbrücken, Germany, and at the Academy of Art and Design (AKI ArtEZ) in Enschede, The Netherlands. She graduated in 2008 at HBKsaar. Since 2010 Johanna heads the Berlin office, Studio Laucke Siebein. Circa 1986 Exhibition catalogue for Hudson Valley Center for Contemporary Art, New York Visions Exhibition catalogue for Monica de Cardenas Gallery, Milan

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Rosario Florio & Larissa Kasper

Switzerland

Raw Colour

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The work of Raw Color reflects a sophisticated treatment of material and colour by mixing the fields of graphic design and photography. This is embodied through research and experiments, building their visual language. Daniera ter Haar & Christoph Brach work on self initiated and commissioned projects in their Eindhoven based studio.

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Hey Ho

France

Hey Ho

France

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Hey Ho is a graphic design studio founded in 2007 in Paris by Julien Hourcade & Thomas Petitjean. In 2010, Julien Hourcade leaves the studio to found Sundries . After three years at the School of Architecture and Landscape of Bordeaux, then studies of visual communication, Thomas Littlejohn moved to Paris in 2005. Specializing in print design, he designed mainly books, magazines, posters, signage and visual identities. Working mainly in the cultural field (house publishing, museums ...), his work is distinguished by a strong presence of typography, and a rejection of ornament almost systematic. POSTER FRENCH SELECTION 2010

Hey Ho (France)

ocument presenting the selection of French Posters 2010. Festival International Poster and Graphic Design of chaumont Booklet 48 pages 160 mm x 240 Cartels 160 x 240 mm Print 160 x 240 mm 480 mm x 640 -www.chaumont graphisme.com

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Studio Filippo Nostri

Solarolo, Italy

Format & Function

Chapter One

Format & Function

www.filipponostri.com

Introducing the crisp, clean, considered work of Studio Filippo Nostri, a small but perfectly formed graphic design studio based in Solarolo, Italy, specialising in paper and web based projects. With years of experience working for important museums, institutions, galleries and publishers, the studio has developed a deep knowledge of the entire design process and abides by set guidelines/principles for each project: relevance to the content, coherence in the structure and in the details, right typographic choices and optimization of materials. (LEFT) Cardboard box containing 60 postcards and a 32 pages booklet, 210 x 150 mm.

Studio Filippo Nostri

Design of the catalogue for the third year of ‘Lugo Land’ project. The box contains 60 postcards (5 per artist) and a 32 pages booklet for the texts. Punctum Press Right Book, 64 pages, 165 x 230 mm. Book for artist Riccardo Baruzzi, printed on the occasion of his solo exhibition ‘Quando disegno non canto’.

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Chapter Two

Design For Sector

Design for the Commercial, Culture and Fashion Sector. My time at LCA BAGD has taught me and given me the opportunity to explore what format and fuction means to me and my design practice and make me aware of bigger ideas, whilst

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Chapter Two

Design For Sector

My time at LCA BAGD has taught me and given me the opportunity to explore what format and fuction means to me and my design practice and make me aware of bigger ideas, whilst

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Keller Maurer Design

Switzerland

Commercial Sector

Chapter Two

(Left) Project Catalogue design Artist Alix Stadtb채umer A comprehensive summary of the sculptural works of Munich based artist Alix Stadtb채umer which also features essays and an interview. The 88-page book is bound in a flexible grey dye-penetrated cover. Screen-printed bright orange titles are running across front and back cover. Published by Vexer Verlag, Switzerland. (Right) Project Platform3 Futures catalogue

Keller Maurer Design

Client Platform3 Platform3 is an experimental art space in Munich. As a link between culture and economy it serves as a think tank and production site for young curators and art professionals. This catalogue was designed as a documentation and development assessment on occasion of the second anniversary of Platform3.

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Catalogue design Alix Stadtb채umer

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Project Projects Salt Identity System

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Rosario Florio & Larissa Kasper

Switzerland

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Project Projects is a design studio focusing on print, identity, exhibition, and interactive work with clients in art and architecture. The studio was founded in 2004 by Prem Krishnamurthy and Adam Michaels; Rob Giampietro joined as a principal in 2010. Project Project’s clients include the Berkeley Art Museum, Bard College Center for Curatorial Studies, Bernard Tschumi Architects, BOZAR Brussels, Canadian Centre for Architecture, Field Operations, Guggenheim Museum, Harvard GSD, Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates, Museo Tamayo, The Museum of Modern Art, National Museum of China, New York City Department of Parks & Recreation, Phaidon, Princeton Architectural Press, SALT (Istanbul), Steven Holl Architects, Tablet magazine, Vera List Center for Art & Politics, Whitney Museum of American Art, WORKac, and the Yale University Art Gallery. Project Projects was commissioned in summer 2010 to design a comprehensive identity and graphic system for SALT, a new cultural institution in Istanbul. Merging a contemporary art space, an architecture and design gallery, and a scholarly archive, SALT promotes research and experimental thinking. This mission prompted a meditation on the nature of institutional identity in a world of continuous cultural change.

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Project Projects

New York

Project Projects

New York

(Right) Anne Tyng: Inhabiting Geometry presents the sculptural works of the visionary architect, theorist, and pioneer of habitable space-frame architecture. After working closely with Louis Kahn and influencing many of his major works, Tyng went on to independently conduct a lifelong study of advanced geometry, mathematical forms, and their application to built forms in a range of scales. The 2011 exhibition, presented at the Institute of Contemporary Art Philadelphia and Graham Foundation in Chicago, featured room-size models of five platonic solids created in collaboration with architect Srdjan Weiss. Project Projects designed a catalogue with documentation from both installations, in addition to supplementary materials, including drawings, plans, models, and an illustrated timeline of Tyng’s significant life and work.

Project Projects

(Left) Project Projects worked closely with Architecture Workroom Brussels to produce a publication that expands upon the significant 2010 exhibition, Building for Brussels. Focusing on contemporary architecture, planning, and public policy in Europe, the 324-page book––with editions available in French, Dutch, and English–– addresses the complex urban issues facing Brussels and other European cities in a manner accessible to a broad audience. A ‘magazine-like’ design approach employs a flexible kit-of-parts to organize the dense materials, which include photographs and drawings of featured projects; contextual essays; and interviews with policy-makers, designers, scholars, and critics, alongside charts, maps, and statistical information. In addition to designing each of the three editions, Project Projects created all of the information graphics and cartography within the books.

Culture Sector

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Rosario Florio & Larissa Kasper

Switzerland

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Interview

Qubik

Tauba Auerbach

1. How important was the use of white space in the layout of the book. What were the design decisions made in the process and did that influence the way the images of Taubaʼs work were laid out in the book? White space is important in any design, at least as important as the actual content. Art books especially so because the book seeks to replicate somewhat the experience of seeing the art works in a gallery context. So from the beginning of working on ‘Folds’, the works – the paintings – were probably already going to have a generous amount of white space around them. When speaking to Tauba in the early stages she pointed out that her Folds paintings are always hung in rather unconventional ways: usually close to the floor or corner or edge of a wall. She sent me some installation photographs illustrating this concept and these ended up in the book in section 3. So I decided to use the same strategy in the book, to position the paintings near the edges of the page. 2. Did the white space hold any meaning, Was it used consciously to frame Taubaʼs work or is there another interpretation? White, negative space was used consciously with regard to each painting and its relation to other paintings. Although each spread consists of only 2 or 3 paintings I spent a lot of time choosing which paintings to group together and their relative sizes and position.

It can be used for that but ultimately it’s the ground for the content and it takes a lot of experience and confidence to use white space effectively. A lot of design is really about editing – which means removing unnecessary content. I’m always asking myself “is this necessary to communicate the message?”. 4. What do you see as the purpose of white space in your design work? is it for clarity, minimalism, the idea of less is more or is it a means to relate to a target audience? Less is more and clarity are definitely a purpose. I’m also attracted to minimalism in general – not only in design but in music, film and art. There is almost too much noise in the world, I mean visual noise, the Internet, TV etc. 5. What are your views on the use of white space used by other designers and has that influenced your own work? I am really drawn to ideas such as nothingness and also certain philosophies like Zen. I take influence a lot from music. One of my favourite CDs is ‘Series’ by American composer Richard Chartier – the sound is so quiet there’s almost nothing on the CD. Silence is important in music, for example the space between sounds can create tension. There isn’t enough use of silence in music, it’s often ignored.

3. Do you see white space as a tool used predominately for framing in graphic design to bring emphasis to a visual hierarchy?

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Joe Gilmore (Qubik)

Branding and identity for Chromatologies, a festival of digital art and music in Rotherham. Materials included a fold-out brochure/poster, exhibition signage, invitations and website.

Joe Gilmore (Qubik)

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Chums Client: Urban Outfitters Date: 2010 Category: Catalogue

Exhibition catalogue for Chums, a group show curated by Mary Manning at Space 15 Twenty in Los Angeles.

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Chromatologies Client: Snd Date: 2010 Category: Brochure

Leeds, UK

Culture Sector

www.qubik.com

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United Kingdom

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Interview

Ok-Rm

Footnote to a Project*

Oliver Knight and Rory McGrath founded London-based studio OK-RM in 2008. Combing conceptual focus with typographic rigour, the pair have, in a relatively short amount of time, amassed a body of predominantly culturalsector work that epitomises an emerging new wave of language-based contemporary design. And they’ve recently completed an absolute tome of a book – Footnote to a Project – which documents and celebrates contemporary art in the Middle East. We asked Rory to tell us a little more… You’ve just completed a project for ArtDubai. Could you tell us a little bit about it? Footnote to a Project is a collection of images, citations and references that support and inform the creation of the five artworks for the 2011 Abraaj Capital Art Prize. How did it come about? Long-term collaborator Sharmini Pereira was approached to become the curator of the prize for 2011, and she approached us to discuss the potential of creating a project that would enrich the communication of the commissioned artworks to a broader audience. The result of this collaboration was Footnotes to a Project.

on the region in recent years with announcements that the Guggenheim and the Louvre are to open new spaces in Abu Dhabi, and with Art Dubai and Sharjah Biennial, art activity is growing in scale and stature with every year. This is a refreshing contrast to the heavily established and potentially saturated art scene here in the UK. Because of this we felt that Footnotes to a Project was able to make a real impact by contributing to a developing and critical contemporary vocabulary. Can you tell us a little more about your practice in general? This is something we have devoted much thought to recently, and the answer can be found here. In order to add to this within this more informal context: our practice is new and constantly re-arranging itself and its priorities. Each new opportunity is a chance to head in a direction that can challenge us and enrich our practice. So perhaps it would be interesting to discuss our practice in more un-defined terms – anamorphic, empirical and speculative. So how important is language in your work? Simply essential.

What’s the state of art in Dubai at the moment? And how do you think it differs from the scene in England? Dubai and the rest of the Middle East is still a relatively new territory for contemporary art and its context within the international scene is still being moulded. There’s been a lot of focus

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Footnote to a Project*

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www.ok-rm.co.uk


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Rosario Florio & Larissa Kasper

Switzerland

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Neo Neo Fashion Sector

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Rosario Florio & Larissa Kasper

Switzerland

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Saturday London Fashion Sector

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Rosario Florio & Larissa Kasper

Switzerland

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ironflag is a newly established multi-disciplinary design studio by mikkel møller andersen, kasper fjederholt and marco pedrollo. from both the digital and more tactile end of the creative spectrum, we aspire to utilize our different visual backgrounds to create singular works within the fields of art direction, graphic design, illustration, photography and video.

Iron Flag

hailing from the danish design school, central saint martins and 2gd/gold studio, we aim to integrate our specific knowledge, offering a unique approach to the design process, regardless of size.

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Collive Walker

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Rosario Florio & Larissa Kasper

Switzerland

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An impressive body of work here from this London-based design studio, who are an “independent design studio delivering art direction, branding, digital and editorial services to the fashion, luxury and media industries.� Colville-Walker are also the publishers and art directors behind the beautiful, sartorial b Magazine which channels the nonchalant style of the store into some beautifully put-together pages. With a golden touch when it comes to the curation of editorial photography, Colville-Walker are definitely the go-to people when it comes to making a brand look incredibly cool and stylish through elegant, simple design.

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Acne Art Department

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Rosario Florio & Larissa Kasper

Switzerland

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A few weeks ago GraphicHug received a hefty package from Sweden. Now, we had heard of whispers about Acne Paper, but we were blown away by what we saw. What has unfolded over the past few years is a masterful curation of high class content and photography. Acne Paper is product of the Acne Collective that comprises of many different entities involved in graphic design, fashion, film, etc‌the list goes on and on. In the early issues there was a strong hint of fashion roots, but as the publication has matured so has the content, (the latest issue has an interview with Noam Chomsky alongside photos by Nan Goldin.) Our favorite detail has been the endsheets making the publication a very subtle fusion of magazine and book. It is published twice a year and available in chic cities around the US and the rest. The web does very little justice to this magazine we strongly encourage you grab a copy!

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Rosario Florio & Larissa Kasper

Thomas Persson is the mild-mannered editorin-chief of Acne Paper, the magazine published by the Swedish label of the same name. But as its latest cover makes perfectly clear, this is no dressed-up catalog flogging skinnies and tees. Rather, sold mostly in museums, Acne Paper is a large-scale, thick-stock, finely crafted art biannual with a mission all its own. Unabbreviated, the title says it all: Ambition to Create Novel Expressions. Thomas was in town recently to launch the new winter issue and met up with our very own Lee Carter to start celebrating a little early... LC: Would I sound like a groupie if I told you I’m a fan of the new issue even before seeing it? TP: No. Yes. Each issue does get better. I think because we have these themes, which makes the magazine stand apart. What’s the theme of winter? Tradition. What’s your favorite thing about it? There’s one feature that’s my darling. It’s about two extraordinary tapestries from the late Middle Ages that went through a major renovation. They’re enormous. They’re from Belgium, now hanging in Genoa. It took this atelier five years to restore them, which they’ve been doing for hundreds of years. They tell the story of Alexander the Great, the Macedonian king—who was gaaaay. So the tapestries are gay porn? No, they’re quite sexy though. It’s interested to see how sophisticated things were. We think about the Middle Ages as something dark and gloomy, but in fact it was quite a colorful, glorious and glamorous time. You can see that in the tapestries. The women are beautiful with high foreheads and heavy eyelids. The men are very masculine and they all have their own individual expressions. There could be hundreds of men in one fragment yet every inch is so full of

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detail. Um, hundreds of men? What kind of scene is this? A battle scene. One tapestry is about Alexander’s youth and the other is how he conquers the world. Then we have a wonderful cover shoot by Daniel Jackson with Guinevere van Seenus, beautiful pictures inspired by old master paintings. She’s perfect for that. She can do Renaissance, alien, anything. We also have an interview with Nan Goldin, which is quite brutal in its honesty. It’s sort of painful to read because she talks about love, but without being cynical. She’s realistic about love and sex and relationships. We also have an interview with the great Noam Chomsky about language, which is really fascinating. And we have a really funny story about wine. It’s with Raoul Ruiz, a filmmaker from Chile but based in France. He talked about a certain wine having so much acid that if you spilled it on a tablecloth it would burn a hole right through it. I must try this wine. Yes, you should. It was fun to do something about wine that wasn’t snobby. I like how Acne Paper has complete freedom of scope and tone. It’s able to touch on so many times and places, and really go beneath the surface. It’s a little universe. That’s very nice of you to say. And you’re absolutely right. That’s what we wanted from the beginning. I like to say it’s dinner conversation, as opposed to cocktail conversation. Today, with the web, you can get information in a flash. So in a way, magazines have lost their purpose. I wanted to offer something different. We’re more inspired by books than magazines. How do you come up with your stories? It all starts with a kind of feeling, which always

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seems to come when we’re already working on an issue. We get an appetite for something else, so each issue is a sort reaction to the previous. What’s your dream story? An interview with Irving Penn, because he’s so reluctant. I love what he writes in his books, there’s no bullshit. He’s about finding the essence, like in his photographs. He’s a great inspiration. What’s the mission of Acne Paper? To be timeless, to mix the historical with the contemporary. A theme that was relevant 500 years ago can be relevant today. And it needs to have an aesthetic about it. I couldn’t do a magazine about passion because what’s the color palette of passion? For the color palette of tradition, I immediately think of wooden floors, rustic, old, textured. Then we just research for a while. We’ll look at books, go on the Internet, talk to people and boil down the theme. And sometimes we do something just because we want to.

rial for Acne. In the beginning, bookstores in Sweden would say, Oh, Acne is doing a magalog. But it’s not about Acne. It’s called Acne and it’s part of the Acne collective, but one has to remember that it’s published by all the Acne companies. People got that eventually. We’re getting better distribution all the time, primarily through cultural institutions. We’ve been contacted by the Centre Pompidou and the Tate Modern. We’re always sold out. So in a way, it seems like Acne Paper has reached a kind of perfect form. Is there anything you still really want to try? Of course, like anything, it can always be better. But if I wanted to try something radically different it would be to start a new magazine. Should we have another champagne? Yeah, I’m easy.

Are there stories you definitely don’t want? There’s so much focus on celebrities and consumerism these days, which is fine. But I thought maybe we could not do that, not because we don’t like it, but so many other people are doing it. And clearly you’re not funded by advertising. No. Someone said to me once that we have to advertising. He said without advertising it’s not a real magazine. But what is real? He was saying the prestige of a magazine comes from its advertising, which makes no sense. For me a real magazine has real content. If you look at most magazines, they’re controlled by their advertisers, but we have freedom. At the same time it’s not just promotional mate-

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Chapter Three

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Intro Chapter 3

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Chapter 3 Title Page Locations

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Location Volt is an independent fashion magazine published twice a year in London. It differs from the average magazine by being very large, unbound, and consisting almost exclusively of big size photographs. We were asked to collaborate with the editors as issue 5 was being prepared. The editors were happy with the simple design Volt had for the previous issues, but were looking for a stronger typographic voice. The initial idea was to commission us to design a typeface but soon we agreed to take care of the whole design.

Julia

Volt typeface was created to make the most out of the publication’s dimensions. A condensed type would allow us to easily use it with both small and big sizes. Also thinking about big sizes, we started with a thin version that would not weigh too much on a page. After deciding the overall look of thinner versions, we prepared bolder cuts to bring more rhythm to the titles. We were happy with the dry and imposing look of it, in contrast to the polished beauty of the pictures. One particular variation, Stroke, seemed to have the right feeling and was used throughout the magazine, becoming an important part of its identity. Another important feature of the design is the imposition of the layouts. We benefited from the unbound spine to create spreads that work differently from the usual page flipping. Some of the pages become posters when taken out of the magazine. For more information on Volt typeface, click here.

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John Morgan Studio

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Mass Observation

London, UK.

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Ken Kritton UK

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Z.a.k group UK

Z.A.K. is a design studio focusing on publication, identity, exhibition design and art direction for art, architecture and institutional clients. The studio’s approach is defined by its active collaborations in ever-changing constellations. The studio is engaged in complex projects that integrate graphic design, publishing, research, strategy and architecture. The studio was founded in London in 2005. In addition to undertaking commissioned work the studio initiates and produces editorial and curatorial projects. The studio has been awarded the Inform Award for Conceptual Design in 2011 and was twice awarded the prize for the Most Beautiful Swiss Books in 2010. The studio’s work has been included in the exhibitions Graphic Design Worlds (Triennale Design Museum, Milan, 2011), Wide White Space (CCA Wattis, San Francisco, 2011), The Malady of Writing (MACBA, Barcelona, 2009), Graphic Design for and Against Cities (Corner College, Zürich, 2009), Dubai Düsseldorf (Kunstverein für die Rheinlande und Westfalen, Düsseldorf, 2009) and the 22nd International Biennale of Graphic Design (Brno, 2009). Zak Kyes Biography Zak Kyes is a Swiss-American graphic designer. Kyes formed the design studio Z.A.K. in 2005 and joined the Architectural Association, London as Art Director in September 2006. In 2008 he co-founded Bedford Press, an imprint of AA Publications.

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Node Berlin

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Hey Days European

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Ill Studio European

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B채nziger Hug, a Swiss based design and web studio was established in 2011 by Samuel B채nziger and Olivier Hug. We are working in all areas of print and interactive design. We design books, exhibitions, publications, identities, and websites for cultural institutions, businesses and individuals. Further we develop websites for other design agencies, code web apps and create programs for your complex ideas. Klotzholz Identity for furniture design studio klotzholz. There are nine different business cards each one has its own picture on the back.

Studio Reizundrisiko

Klotzholz Newspaper Promotional newspaper showing several products of furniture designed by klotzholz. Its a 24 pages newspaper printed in black and white.

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VLF

France

VLF

European

| 140

L’imparfaite

vlf-design.com

VLF (France)

VLF is Thomas Cristiani & Antoine Roux they make books, posters, photography, web design and more. (Above) l140 is a concept hotel, a “hotel with one room”, available for 500 nights. In the heart of Montmartre in Paris, and with the collaboration of many artists, the project uses a restraining archirecture to create a functionally habitation. The night comes with boxset containing three books, a t-shirt, and a sleeping mask. l140.fr (Right) Art direction, illustration and design for L’imparfaite, an erotic magazine made by young writers and artists. Order on limparfaite.com With Arnaud Lajeunie

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Adriaan Mellegers is an Amsterdam-based graphic designer focusing on institutional, artistic and commercial commissions within the fields of art, architecture and design. With a strong editorial approach and a consistently innovative use of typography, materials and color, Adriaan’s design sensibility engages the creative and content driven objectives of all involved. Central to Adriaan’s approach is a positive and enjoyable working experience where open dialogue with collaborators is key. From 2010 to 2011 Adriaan was the senior designer at Frame publishers where in 2011 together with Cathelijn Kruunenberg and MariÍlle van Genderen he was responsible for the art-direction and re-design of Frame magazine (NL), an international trade magazine for interior and product design.

Adrian Millingers

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Everything–Type–Company (ETC) is a Brooklyn-based design studio founded by Kyle Blue and Geoff Halber. We specialize in the design of identity, publishing, and interactive projects for clients working in culture and commerce. Our design solutions capture the spirit of a project through the configuration of well-conceived ideas, a visual language, and a high-level of craftsmanship. With an ability to design and give art direction, to write copy and code, the work of our flexible and collaborative creative team focuses on the special needs of our clients. In pursuit of modern form Thesis Readings

Everything Type Company

Thesis Readings is a collection of essays that were important sources of research for the thesis statements presented by Yale Graphic Design Students. Likened to a college course reader, each essay was photocopied directly from the original text and followed by the corresponding presentation and images of that student. The color blue helped distinguish what was primary source material from what was secondary. (thanks to Linda van Deursen)

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Joel Evey

Urban Outfitters have been making some very high quality catalogues for a while now, and it turns out that’s mainly down to Joel Evey being their print art director. A man with his finger in an unreal amount of internet and zine-related pies, Joel has the enviable ability to nonchalantly throw bits of type on to a page and still make it look very, very cool.

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Alex Witjas

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Alex Witjas Graduated from Pratt Institute with a BFA in Graphic Design. She worked as a Graphic Designer for Urban Outfitters from 2010-2012 BRANDING AND PACKAGING SYSTEM FOR URBAN OUTFITTER’S HOUSEWARES BRAND MAGICAL THINKING, 2011. DESIGNED FOR URBAN OUTFITTERS 2011 GIFT CATALOG WITH PHOTOGRAPHY AND STYLING BY JULIA SADLER AND COLIN LEAMAN

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Chapter Two

Design For Sector

Typography Contemporary Type Design & Foundrys

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Chapter Two

Design For Sector

My time at LCA BAGD has taught me and given me the opportunity to explore what format and fuction means to me and my design practice and make me aware of bigger ideas, whilst

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Colophon Foundry

You run Colophon alongside your design studio, The Entente, where did the idea come from to start an independant Font Foundry? As The Entente our work is mainly type based, concentrating on the creation of bespoke typefaces for books, identities and exhibition catalogues. Colophon, as a platform, allows us to build-upon our commissioned type work and develop it into a commercial product.

Colophon is an independent type foundry set up by Brighton based design studio, The Entente (Anthony Sheret & Edd Harrington). As well as distributing and acting as a platform for fonts designed by The Entente, it selects fonts designed by other designers to distribute and create products for. Working in a similar way to that of a publishers, some typefaces that are released by Colophon will be in a limited edition. These fonts will be unique in its edition, ranging from 50-500.

also available including a small essay explaining the concept and ideas that led to the creation of the typeface for £8 plus postage. For more details visit the website.

Tell us more about your latest release, Aperçu, designed by yourselves. Aperçu began in December 2009 through an idea to create an amalgamation of classic realist typefaces; Franklin Gothic (1903), Johnston (1916), Gill Sans (1926) and Neuzeit (1928). The first usage of the typeface was in February 2010 and then continued development through to its eventual commercial release in August 2010. The specimen catalogue is the final stage in this project and gives an overview of the Aperçu family.

all produced in a limited edition. Brighton based designers Anthony Sheret and Edd Harrington have recently launched their specimen catalogue to accompany the release of Aperçu, the latest font to come out of their font foundry, Colophon. Working under the name of The Entente they set up Colophon in April 2009 and currently have nine fonts available, we went to find out more…

Where do you want to see Colophon go? To continue developing our curated catalogue of typefaces and products, both with releases from ourselves, other designers and type designers. We are planning to release a new website in December, along with more releases. It’s inevitable we’re going to ask you what your favourite font is, so, what’s your favourite font? We were a bit split on this one! Ant— AG Schoolbook, Edd — Unica Haas.

Colophon also offers a selection of specimen books and a range of miscellaneous products. These are

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The complete Aperçu font family, including ten weights is available for £285. The specimen book is

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Raisonne Raisonné is a contemporary sans-serif typeface, designed by Benjamin Critton over the course of several months during the summer of 2010. Its single weight—demibold—was drawn for use at all scales. Benjamin Critton (b. 1983) is an American designer, typographer, art director, publisher, writer, editor and curator. He lives in New Haven, Connecticut, where he studies graphic design at the Yale School of Art. Before that, he attended Hamilton College. Before that, he went to William H. Hall High School. Before that, he went to King Philip Middle School. Before that, he went to Morley Elementary School. Before that, he went to Knight Hall Nursery School. Raisonné was initially conceived as a typeface that would comprise the written portions of of a comprehensive catalogue raisonné, the creation and publishing of which is required of each MFA candidate in the Department of Graphic Design at the Yale School of Art. The typeface is parodic-serious, intended to be a bit dumb, blunt, candid, affable—honest in the same way Modernism liked its materials. It pays homage here and there to noteworthy precedents, among them Rudolf Koch’s Kabel, Sol Hess’ Twentieth Century, Joseph Churchward’s Crossbred, and Herb Lubalin’s Avant Garde. Raisonné is published with a full set of upper & lowercase letterforms, as well as a full latin character set and several stylistic alternates; it is distributed in OpenType format.

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Radim Pesko

Switzerland Radim Peško is a graphic designer based in Amsterdam. After studies at Academy of Arts in Prague and London he completed his postgraduate program at Werkplaats Typografie in Arnhem in 2004. Works in the field of type design and occasional curatorial projects. Work includes identity for Secession Vienna (A), various work for Moravian Gallery, Brno (CZ), Eastside Projects, Birmingham (UK), and collaborations with artist Katerina Seda among others. In 2010 he has established his own digital foundry. He teaches at Rietveld Academie in Amsterdam and is visiting lector at Ecal in Lausanne, Switzerland.

repeated outlines of the individual characters referred to motifs in Mexican folk art, transformed and used for the Boijmans typeface they are a metaphor for the museums new wrap-around building and the curatorial structures expressed by this architecture. Designed by Peško in ten weights, each font consists of three versions: single, double and triple lines. When combined, layered or coloured the typeface generates endless variations.

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Boymans

Radim Pesko - Boymans

Radim Pesko

Boymans was originally designed in 2003 as part of the identity developed by Mevis & Van Deursen for Museum Boijmans van Beuningen in Rotterdam. Its primary inspiration was the typeface designed by Lance Wyman for the Olympic Games in Mexico City in 1968. Boymans responded to the identity’s need for a flexible as well as playful design. Designed in ten weights, each font has three versions: single line, double line, and triple line. By combining, layering, or coloring these versions, Boymans can generate an endless number of variations. Five Prints (2009) by Radim Peško, are printed as editions of 13 in phosphorescent ink. Word sequences are set in the typeface Boymans designed in 2003 as part of the identity developed by Mevis & Van Deursen for the Boijmans van Beuningen Museum in Rotterdam, the Netherlands. The typeface is loosely based on Lance Wyman’s multi-layered identity design for the 1968 Mexico City Olympics. In Wymans font, the

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Radim Pesko

Fugue

Fugue, in its recent form, was first used in ‘Wonder Years’, a book published in late 2008 to mark the tenth anniversary of the Werkplaats Typografie in Arnhem. Fugue (originally designed and used solely in twelve point) was conceived as an appreciation of and going-back-to-the-futureand-back-again with Paul Renner. Fugue is now available in Regular, Regular Italic (both in two stylistic sets and with alternates of double-storey ‘a’ and ‘t’ letters), Monospace and Headline.

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Aa Bb Cc Dd Ee Ff Gg Hh Ii Jj Kk Ll Mm Nn Oo Pp Qq Rr Ss Tt Uu Vv Ww Xx Yy Zz . , : ; ? ! Category Section

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Lineto Foundry

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Lineto Foundry

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Curwen Sans An Endless Supply is a design studio and independent publishing activity organised by Harry Blackett and Robin Kirkham. Working in many roles — as designers, editors, printers, researchers, writers — a primary objective of the studio is to support the production of new art and writing.

An Endless Supply

Curwen Sans was first drawn by Harold Curwen at the Curwen Press in 1911. Curwen died in 1949 and the Press went out of business in the 1980s, and his sans serif—pre-emptive of Johnston, Gill Sans, Kabel—has never been digitised. An Endless Supply have re-drawn the font from prints sourced at Cambridge University, and the specimen includes a critical history of the typeface as well as new writing about the processes of revival. The jacket design is a re-print of wallpaper printed by Curwen Press in 1927. Produced as part of The Department of Overlooked Histories at Wysing Arts Centre. Curwen Sans type specimen 2011 100 pages, black and white, perfect bound First run of 15 copies with 3-colour screen-printed jacket ISBN 978-0-9570614-1-5

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Conclusion

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My Work Where I’m Going Why these designers have influenced me. etc etc

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Ending

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Working Title. Thinking, Doing, Rethinking Introducing the creative approaches and working methods of leading professionals at the forefront of print and contemporary graphic design. A unique mix of visual examples, detailed descriptions, and case studies based on my own personal experiences and development at Leeds College of Art.

working title  

thinking, doing, rethinking

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