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Ellen Ashbourne University of Sheffield BSc in Landscape Architecture with Ecology

2015 Portfolio


Landscape Architecture with Ecology Portfolio Throughout my childhood my family travelled, as a result I have experienced a variety landscapes. Living in six countries has enabled me to have a culturally sensitive view on life, as well as teaching me many life lessons such as adaptability to new places and people, language skills, and a number of vital communication and teamwork skills. Whilst in Bosnia and Herzegovina I observed that the majority of the city’s population lived in decaying 1960s tower blocks with reminders of war at every corner, a damaged environment that spoke of division, which the few modern, expensive shopping centres merely reinforced. There is great beauty too in Bosnia from the raw nature of the Krevice Falls to the reconstructed old city around the fast flowing Neretva. The contrasts were a powerful inspiration for my art and I produced work based on the architecture and the landscape. I wanted to tune my artistic skills to the built environment and to bring a soul back into the city. When living in Bratislava I could photograph a beautiful sunrise or the fumes from the oil refinery in the distance. I could admire the castle or count the cost of the excessive floodlighting. I could feel the life of a thriving city or notice the lack of green space and cramped living conditions. This reinforced my passion for the environment and a will to design to enhance people’s quality of life. Similar themes have reoccurred throughout my work and projects, especially through some of the most recent work undertaken in the States where the contrast of natural and unnatural can be seen. This continuous theme can still be witnessed in current projects, particularly in my final project. Having completed a BSc in Landscape Architecture with Ecology in 2014 I acquired many skills over the last three and a half years helping me to develop my aim of becoming a chartered landscape architect. In this portfolio I have chosen some of the work I have done over the last three and a half years both in my degree and more recently in my job, along with artwork that has been an ongoing passion in my life. Thank you for taking your time to look at my work.


Between the lines - planting Through the inspirational road trip taken in the USA including Las Vegas and the Grand Canyon inspiration was drawn from the contrast of the natural versus the human impact. Over time the theme developed from looking at using planting and vegetation in a structural and maybe even unnatural way to create a focus, to using planting and landform throughout the site to have a heavily human intervened side to the side and a heavily natural impacted site. Eventually this led to the theme of “lines of intervention” where both vegetation and topography play a part in the design. The section chosen for the planting detail is the point at which the two axes (that run along the River Sheaf and the River Don) of human with nature and nature with human amalgamate. As a result the planting is fairly wild and natural, with an unnatural boardwalk crossing the space. By the river Don the vegetation takes charge, nature is brought in and animals return to the area. The riparian planting and reedbeds joining the river are overlooked by a walkway that leads people right to the water side. Detailed contractor’s AutoCad plan. 1:100 N A2

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Overview map, red box location of detailed site. 1:500 at A2 Mix A: 50 - erythposora, 25 Dryopteris filix-mas, 38 Iris ’Jane Phillips’, 25 Luzula nivea, 25 Vinca minor  ‘Atropurpurea’, 60 Hyacinthoides non-scripta 4 Alnus incana 5 Polygonatum x hybridum

A1 3 Alnus glutinosa

Mix B: 71 Dryopteris erythposora, 1 Osmunda regalis, 8 Perisicaria amplericalis, 63 Leucojum vernum

Mix A

15 Carex elata ‘Aurea’, 7 Carex riparia, 11 Iris pseudacorus, 22 Lythrum salicaria

Polygonatum x hybridum

Hyacinthoides non-scripta

Vinca minor ‘Atropurpurea’,

Dryopteris erythposora

Dryopteris filix-mas

Iris ’Jane Phillips’

Luzula nivea

Mix C

Lythrum salicaria

Iris pseudacorus

Carex riparia

Carex elata  ‘Aurea’

Mix B

Osmunda regalis

Perisicaria amplericalis

Leucojum vernum

x ela Care a’ ‘Aure x Care ia ripar

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Planting Strategy The planting is separated into sections. The trees that cover the planting site are Alders. Having looked at the Sheffield biodiversity plan for the River Don Alders were selected as the choice of tree for the riverside due to the fact that they have been seen further up the River Don and have been known to encourage local wildlife. They are also excellent riverside trees that like moist conditions. The Woodland Understory (mix A) has a variety of plants with the base of ferns, Dryopteris erythposora and Dryopteris filix-mas being predominant throughout the year. The evergreen presence carpets the woodland all year round. The Iris ‘Jane Phillips’ brings a splash of blue-purple colour during the months of May and June. Followed by the small Luzula nivea which is most attractive from June to July with its slender look and clusters of white flowers, it provides a colourful groundcover. Vinca minor ‘Atropurpurea’ provides a beautiful green carpet cover that from April to September blooms small, beautifully deep purple shaded flowers. The Hyacinthoides non-scripta bulbs bring a blue colour during April and May that cover the floor of the woodland with beautiful bluebell flowers. Positioned strategically across the plan Polygonatum x hybridum bring a more height and a splash of white during the months of May and June. As we move away from the woodland towards the river the transition from woodland to wetland begins (mix B). Dryopteris erythposora continues to make an appearance and the much larger grandiose Osmunda regalis takes the stage. These evergreens will show off their foliage all year. The vibrant scarlet flowers that appear on the Perisicaria amplericalis are at their best from July to October, its heart-shaped deep green leaves are very elegant. The bulb Leucojum vernum illuminate the floor with little white snowflake flowers from March to April. The third mix (mix C), closest to the waterside, with parts in the water. Carex elata ‘Aurea’ reaches the edges of the water. It is the smaller of the two Carex’s and creates a gradient from the water’s edge from small to big. The Carex riparia reaching heights of 1.5 metres is the taller of the two grasses. In early Summer it springs long spikes with feathery brown flowers. The flowering season for Carex riparia is from March to May followed by Carex elata ‘Aurea’ in June and July. From April to August the Lythrum salicaria produces beautiful tall pink flowers. During July and August bursts of yellow appear as the Iris pseudacorus flowers a spectacular display. Users are able to walk amidst the plantings on the boardwalk. This avoids people trampling on them, but also gives the user a feel of unnatural among natural.

Detailed colour section elevation of plants. 1:50


Between the lines - Inspiration In today’s world it is so difficult to find somewhere that has had human intervention without having a negative impact. In my design I aim to show that you can combine human and nature together without there necessarily being a negative visual impact. From the vast open plains of Nevada desert to the built up hillside of San Francisco, the range of landscapes I travelled through on my breath-taking road trip were phenomenal. Stretches of beautiful untouched landscape separated the built up bustling cities. The contrast of the man made with the natural always lingered in my mind. The one time it was clear to me was when we drove from Vegas through Hoover Dam, and on to the Grand Canyon. Vegas is known for its flashing lights, grandiose fountains and extravagant hotels. As a result, it is easy to forget that it is situated in a desert where civilisation should not exist in this way. Vegas, which is entirely artificial in contrast with the naturally formed Grand Canyon, shows two complete extremes of control. Could there be a healthy balance? By stopping at the Hoover Dam between the two places it was clear to see that human impact on natural areas can be visually damaging and degrading. This begs the question: is there a way for human intervention to enhance the naturalistic experience of a place? Using nature and art as an inspiration I became aware of the theme of using vegetation in a structural and maybe even unnatural way. This combination of using natural features in an unnatural way created an element of intrigue to the human eye.

Double Negative Many case studies inspired my design. Among these was ‘Double Negative’. ‘Double Negative’ is a piece of artwork that was created from 1969 to 1970 in Mormon Mesa, Overton, Nevada. It is 50ft deep, 30ft wide and 1500ft long. Double Negative was among the first ‘earthworks’ art pieces created as part of the ‘land art’ or ‘earthart’ movement. Michael Heizer once described this artwork, saying “there is nothing there, yet it is still a sculpture”. He created space or the absence of form. Although not literally translated into my work, I have kept some of the logic and reasoning behind it throughout my design. Especially in the way it uses both human and natural elements.

9/11 Memorial In the centre of New York City a memorial park was created where the Twin Towers used to stand. The anticiB pation and expectation before walking into the landscape could not even begin to compare to the breath-taking beauty and emotion felt when entering it. This truly inspirational park helped with some of the design of the Castlemarket site. The dramatic drops of the fountains that are in remembrance of the Twin Towers are wonderful features. This landscape is a true example of how human and nature can interact in a positive way. The one tree that survived in the terrorist attacks of 9/11 has been used on the site. This is a prime example that nature always fights back but can also be in harmony with human beings. The historical element also links to the Castlemarket site. The 9/11 memorial does not rebuild what once was there but rather makes a monument to remember the history in the space. The Castlemarket site aims to do something similar. The design acknowledges the presence of the castle remains, and enhances them but does not rebuild the castle that was once there. 2


Between the lines - Overview +56 +57

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The design is based on a combination of human and nature. On one axis the design follows the idea of human with nature and the other axis follows nature with human. They follow respective rivers: the River Sheaf being the more controlled and canaled river, and the River Don being released and naturalised to allow nature to take charge. Over time the theme developed from looking at using planting and vegetation in a structural and maybe even unnatural way to create a focus, to using planting and landform throughout the site to have a heavily human intervened side to the side and a heavily natural impacted site. Eventually this led to the theme of “lines of intervention� where both vegetation and topography play a part in the design. The design will follow the two axes. The section chosen for the detailed design is the point at which the two axes (that run along the River Sheaf and the River Don) of human with nature and nature with human amalgamate. As a result the planting is fairly wild and natural, with an unnatural boardwalk crossing the space.

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The design has an obvious element of human intervention; nature is still apparent throughout the site. Both controlled by nature and by human aspects, the landscape combines the elements to create a space that is both intervened by nature and by humans. By the river Don the vegetation takes charge. Nature is brought in and animals return to the area. The riparian planting and reedbeds joining the river are overlooked by a walkway that leads people right to the water side.

N Detailed design

0 10 Scale in metres printed at A2

Buildings

Sunken paths

Grass

Raised mounds

Trees

Wetland mix

Woodland understorey

Paved areas

Grassland

Rivers

Castle remains

Perennial planting


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History: Castlegate market is currently a rundown part of Sheffield with a lack of interest. The market closed down and is due for demolition because gradually the centre of the city moved away from there. The site used to be where Sheffield castle was. The original timber structure was built around the year 1100, and rebuilt in stone in 1270. Some of the stone remains are still accessible under the Castlegate market that is currently on site. The council has plans to reveal these historic features. Connections: Castlegate used to be the centre of attention, it was the entrance to the city and the main attraction in Sheffield. Unfortunately, this has bit by bit disappeared, and it has become a derelict, unattractive way to enter the city. This park will enhance the area, bringing in vitality and life back into the space. The riverside park will reveal the River Don, and recreate the River Sheaf. It will bring people from all directions and adapt the area to suit the communities that would use it; passers-by, those visiting and the people who live and work in Kelham Island, the Cultural industrial quarter, the Central Business District or The Wicker. Regeneration: The area begs for a transformation, the economy is in need of a boost and there is a lot of potential in this site. The park will breathe life back into the space through the use of topography, vegetation and water. Taking into account the current circulation and how the circulation may change on the site a 1:500 masterplan for the new site has been developed. Lines of human intervention and naturalised areas have been combined to create areas for a multitude of users. The walls on site are a very important feature of the design and are generally 1.5m in height. They dominate the site. The main walkway for communters or any users of the site bring you litterally into the site as the user is emmersed in and can only just see over the walls. This creates different feelings for different users. A child may see this site as a daunting or fun place to be around, whereas adults may be able to see above the walls and as a result experiencing something different. From one dirrection the site looks as though it is just a field or woodland. From the other side it is apparent that it has both a dirrect way through the site for users, but also a playful and experiential qualities for those who may choose it to be a leisurely and recreational place. This park will be a main attraction leading people back into the thriving entrance of sheffield that once was there.

Castle remains

Wetland planting

Boardwalk

Rivers

Steps with water feature

Woodland understorey

Grasses

Sunken paths

Woodland, Alnus

Formalised trees

Steps by riverside and path

Mound

A2

C1

C2

B2

B1

A1

A2

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B1

C1

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Scale in metres printed at A1

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Chicago Lumpkin Foundation Design This project was one that I completed whilst on my semester of study abroad in the USA. It was for a client who wanted to make an urban park while encouraging people to be drawn in from the train station across the road. The aim of my design was to make a site that retained water well and was sustainable


AutoCad: Construction Details PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

This project was one to design the concourse in front of Western Bank Library, situated by the Arts Tower in Sheffield. These are the detailed sections for the plan on the opposite page.

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Suggested construction detail, drawn from manufacturers specification

Key Type 1 Sub-grade

Item

Supplier

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Handrail made of kiln cast glass, made to specifications

Chelsea Artisans

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Mortar joint, 10 mm

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Diamond sawn 95.00 crosland hill hard yorkstone

Johnson's Wellfield Quarries LTD

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Corduroy paving 400mm x 400mm

Johnson's Wellfield Quarries LTD

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Channel drain

Marshalls water management

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Perforated pipe

Hepworth drainage

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Engineer blue brick 215mm x 102.5mm x 65mm

Huws Gray brick company

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Bitumastic paint

R. J. Stokes & Co Ltd, Sheffield

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LED lighting shines up through glass easy to fix due to hatch

Maurice Brill Lighting Design

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Rubber filament

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Reinforced concrete

A B

C D

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Sand bedding course thickness Sand bedding course thickness

Stairs I J

1:20

Glass handrails 1:10

1:50

Retaining Structure

Section A

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Full Sections

G B F

1:20

1:50

SECTIONS AND DETAILS

Section B

Reg. number All scales at A2

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

1:10

Client

110175692 Andy Clayden & Thom White Page 2 of 2

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Letter


AutoCad: Construction Plan

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

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Section B

3000

0

4050

3850

3000 1050 Section A

1:100 Specifications: Diamond sawn crassland hill Yorkstone

Seating

Key

The engineering blue bricks are already used on Western Bank Library, so will complement the area.

The kiln cast glass replicates the glass of the impressive Western bank, and at night provides the lighting illuminates the blue tinted glass from underneath.

The Yorkstone paving allows a durable, non slippery and attractive space.

slip resistant value of 95.00TRL pendulum Pointed with 1:4 cement/sand mortar Joints 10mm thick Type 1 subgrade

Vegetated areas

Crasland hill hard Yorkstone

Direction of steps in ascent

Corduroy paving

Sand bedding, course thickness 50mm semi-dry mortar bed Engineer blue brick 215mm x 102.5mm x 65mm Cast glass blocks. Textured on one face, with bright polished edges.

Drains

Direction flow of water

Glass handrails (see page 2 for specifications)

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

2550

Document

Contruction plan

Area

Western Bank Library Courtyard

Scale

1:100 at A2

MASTERPLAN Reg. number Client

110175692 Andy Clayden & Thom White Page 1 of 2


Vectorworks The following four pages are most recent examples of work showing a proficiency in vectorworks and attention to detail in projects. These were all completed for clients.


Vectorworks


Vectorworks


Vectorworks SITE BOUNDARY

SITE BOUNDARY

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ce fen

16.4

ce fen

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18.6 16.4

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0 .40 16.2 16

16.4

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3 no. football pitches 2 no. Þeld hockey 1 no. rugby 1 no. cricket pitch 1 no. 400m running track

Section A'-A'' 1:500 @ A1

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CIRCULATION SPORTS PITCHES

d roa

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SOFT SOCIAL AREA

PAVED ACTIVITES AND SOCIAL AREA

Space for socialising and playing

Paved space with tree planting for external teaching, dining and socialising

0 PROPOSED SCHOOL BUILDING

16.4

17.400FFL

A''

aste dm hea house old

0 15.6

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15.9

r's

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Buffer zone

ENTRANCE TO SCHOOL

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Grass, tree and shrub and paved space as entrance to school

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29.600

.88 0 0 2020.820.6 0.40 2 18

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PROPOSED SPORTS HALL 18.600FFL

Full Length Proposed Site Setions A'-A'', B'-B'', C'-C''

SITE BOUNDARY

SITE BOUNDARY

B''

18

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PROPOSED SCHOOL BUILDING 17.400FFL

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Planting bed

Planting bed

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SOCIAL SPACE Paved area with tree planting and seating for outdoor socialising. Can also be used as additional space for arts activities and exhibitions.

SOCIAL PAVED SPACE

SOFT SOCIAL AREA

Social area with raised beds and small walls to sit on

Grass social area leading into pitches

Section B'-B'' 1:500 @ A1

SITE BOUNDARY

C'

Housing

A''

Fence .34 21 .80

17

EDGE OF SITE

Fence

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17

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ALL WEATHER PITCH

CURRENT HARDCOURT

3G sport Þeld for school and community access

Netball and Basketball courts currently on site

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17

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PATHWAY

SOFT PLAYING FIELDS

B''

This area will have soft playing Þelds

C'' SITE BOUNDARY

Section C'-C'' 1:500 @ A1 Continued below

B' C''

C'

Fence

SOFT PLAYING FIELDS This area will have soft playing Þelds

Section C'-C'' 1:500 @ A1 Continued

Current site outline in blue dotted line

A'

Short Length Proposed Site Sections D'-D'', E'-E''

Section D'-D'' 1:200 @ A1

Section E'-E'' 1:200 @ A1

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Location map NTSS

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29.6

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urt ray Co John G

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Rev A -11/12/14 - Sports Hall location revised on sections to new location

WOLFRETON SECONDARY SCHOOL AND SIXTH FORM Numbers 7 and 8 John Gray Court

8 21.3

5 21.1

2 20.7

Location map for small sections NTSS

8 19.0

18.4

484 1:200/500@A1 JD

42.477m

27,712 m

Numbers 14 and 15 John Gray Court

SITE SECTIONS

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Sprinkler tank enclosure

Sports Hall

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12/12/2014

WOL - DHL - XX - Z0 - DR - L - 00007 - D6-A


Landscape Resilience Project Part of my semester abroad. This poster was designed to look at an element of landscape resilience. All of the photographs were taken by me on a road trip. They show the human impact on nature on the left-hand side and the natural course of nature on the right. I learnt many skills in this module as we studied how natural disasters can impact landscapes and how we should design to prevent, help or recover in natural disasters and natural changes.

HUMAN

NATURE

Golden gate bridge

San Francisco

San Francisco harbour

Coastal route between San Francisco and Los Angeles

Venice pier Los Angeles

Los Angeles river

Layers in rock of Grand Canyon National Park

Las Vegas

Hoover dam power

Painted Desert

Sunset Crater National Park

Hoover dam Wupatki National Park

Bryce Canyon National Park Sunset point

Outskits of Las Vegas desert Bryce Canyon National Park Inspiration point Cli cut on between Las Vegas and Grand Canyon

Near Wupatki National Park

Journey between Flagsta and Bryce Canyon

Grand Teton National Park

Grand Teton National Park Snake River


Rivelin Project Working in the wild wood Name: Ellen Ashbourne

Registration number: 110175692 Module: LSC108

This site was one in Sheffield around the Rivelin aim was create y aimValley. for the siteThe was to create an to inviting space,an with arM eas to venture. I wanted to use the beauty, originality and inviting space with different areas in which history of the fast flowing rivers’ features to benefit the area. I wanted to createUsing a feelingthe of transition as if history stepping into a difto venture. beauty, and ferent place. I would like to create a link between the two sides of thefast river at more points. originally of the flowing river and its features to benefit the area. The effect ages, One main ambition was to create areas that suit different users and personalities. I wanted to improve the access creatcreated is one of transition. Linking the two ing a space for all. sides of the river would also be an element I used the themes of retreat and wilderness to do this. of this design.

Wilderness Evaluation

This space has the aim of encouraging a multifunctional use to allow difWilderness ferent users to roam the area. It also rom merging a fieldaccess and woodland, will improve the current to enF to having some ropes to swing from, taken the word wilderness in the hance theI have space. wider context, both looking at it as ‘actThe central themes of this project are ing wild’ in the landscape, and the landscape ‘being wild’. retreat and wilderness. I have created spaces that allow both. AlRetreat though primarily ‘retreat’ of my Through thea use of section landform, plan, the re-introduced mill pond brings vegetation and the river wildlife and playfulness into the site, procreating wilderness. cess an adaptation of the site My site analysis allowed me to see the creates an area to suit the areas that needed adaptation and those that were already pretty Through much wilderness. users of the site. the use of the theme of retreat spaces have been created for playfulness, hiding and tranquillity.

Iideas.merging The feel of leaving the bustling, world and entering into a beautiful areato From a field and busy woodland to having ropes that radiates tranquillity has been created. It has given people the opportunity to take swing from, the word wilderness has been taken in the a stroll and have some personal space in the midst of busy life. I think I have made the space inviting through the use of vegetation, adding woodland and opening up wider context. Looking at it from the perspective of acting spaces that are near pedestrian crossings. wild, and the landscape being wild. I have attempted to not to introduce many new materials, but instead have replicated, re-introduced, or left local and natural of wilder-to Spaces have been created toresources. allowI have forcreated bothspaces of these ness and retreat and I think I have been successful in merging them. I feel as though occur. the area with theside theme ‘retreat’thethe re-introI have In emphasised the educational through of re-introducing mill pond, and the sluice, and putting the rangers’ hut nearby. I have created adventure through the duced mill ponds brings back wildlife, history and playfulsite: from the old fallen tree, to the not so natural swings added around the meander in the river. ness to the site creating wilderness. Overall, I have to my briefitand I believe that to I have improved site for the Through sitestuck analysis was clear see the this adaptation better. If I were to improve this project I think I would consider the materials and exneeded in them. the Isite which areasto show did the not needinmuch periment with would and also build some models landscape more detail and precision. change to achieve ‘wilderness’.

Through site analysis the Retreat site was adapted rather hrough the use of landform, vegethan clear completely Tadapted tation andit theand river process I have a landscape to better suit change it. This them makes the users of the space. Through the theme of retreat I have created it more accessible for those spaces of hiding, playfulness, and people whotranquillity. are already faThrough my site the analysisspace I was ableand to miliar with adapt rather than clear the space, keeping to the original charthus, making it more accessible to those who are already familiar with acter. the landscape, and keeping the original character.

A journey through the landscape

believe that my design has been quite successful in combining the themes with my

Bridges

Areas of my 1:500 masterplan (pictures not to scale) detailed Rangers hut Stepping stones Mill pond

1:500 masterplan (picture not to scale) Rocks

Paths


Planting - Contractor’s Contractor’s PlanPlan This project was a planting design for a plot of land on the Gold Route. The ideas behind the design were the golden spiral and the Registration number: 110175692 golden ratio. A combination of photographs of a model, conceptuCourse code: LSC 204 Page 1 of 2 al plans and drawings were included to show the thought process behind it all. Here is the contractor’s plan I derived for the design. This module taught me a lot in terms of planting design, planting organisation and how to draw up contractor’s plans.

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3, 2, 3, 2, 2 No. Buxus sempervirens

Betula nigra 17 No. Panicum virgatum

28 No. Miscanthus sinensis ‘Yaku Jima’

3, 3 No. Pennisetum setaceum ‘Rubrum’

7 No. Pennisetum alopecuroides ‘Hameln’

5 No. Miscanthus sinensis ‘Morning

Scarlet Affair 15, 22 No. Iberis amara 2, 3 No. Ajuga reptans

All plant quantities on the masterplan run from the left hand side of the plan to the right.

Scale

1:100

(m)

(m)

Moorland Mix 4, 4, 2, 3 No. Lavandula angustifolia 13, 11, 9, 7 No.Calluna vulgaris ‘Alexandra’

2, 3, 6, 2, 2 No. Cortaderia selloana

Prunus Serrula

5, 5 No. Pennisetum setaceum ‘Rubrum’

Moorland Mix 1 No. Lavandula angustifolia 1 No. Calluna vulgaris ‘Alexandra’ 6 No. Miscanthus sinensis ‘Yaku Jima’ 8 No. Pennisetum alopecuroides ‘Hameln’ 28 No. Pennisetum alopecuroides ‘Hameln’

34 No. Eragrostis curvula ‘Totnes Burgundy’ 6 No. Cortaderia selloana


Schmid Elementary School - Chicago This was a project for a client where we worked with staff, community and students to create a landscape for a school. We got the opportunity to lead community engagement meetings and take into account what people said and wanted in the site. It was necessary to help with the current water drainage system, due to the bad storm-water issues in and around the site where flooding of basements occurred frequently. I thoroughly enjoyed this project, mainly because I had the opportunity to work with real clients and it would be a project that eventually might be realised.


Sharrow - Strategic Planning This is just one of 10 sheets that looked at the wide scheme of Sharrow, a neighbourhood in Sheffield with a lot of poverty. This map work was looking at the different land-uses across the district in order to help with the design strategy and planning scheme that was later proposed. With self-driven initiative I interviewed locals, discovered the area and found out what was needed. My final planning strategy brought in vegetable patches, fruit trees and community engagement.


Artwork and Photography Here is a selection of my artwork and photographs over the years. My love for art and helping people was my main motivation behind doing a Landscape Architecture degree. Having a strong passion for the environment, geography, biology and art also aided this decision. I have enjoyed my degree through the hard times and the good and continue to be fascinated by the wonders of the world and the new things I learn daily.

Through the number of moves and the multicultural nature of my family I have gained a love for photography. Capturing even a glimpse of the majestic beauty of the places I have seen and travelled always seemed instinctive to me. In November 2014 I took a road-trip across some Western states of the US and saw some of the most stunning scenes I have ever witnessed, so many of the photographs here are from that journey.


Artwork Over the years my art and photography seem to have developed from more human intervened land to natural landscapes and plants. I have always had an interest in landscapes and the beauty of the nature surrounding me. I still have a passion for painting and hand drawing, but I have developed skills in Photoshop and computer graphics to enhance the elements I draw in landscape architecture.


Ellen Ashbourne

07411424999

ellen.ashbourne@yahoo.com

University of Sheffield BSc in Landscape Architecture with Ecology

2015 Portfolio


Landscape Architecture Portfolio - Ellen Ashbourne