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ELIZABETH SPATOLA MASTER OF INTERIOR DESIGN SEGMENT1PORTFOLIO REVIEW MAY 2012 1


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Elizabeth Spatola

295 Windsor Street, Cambridge, MA 02139

781-249-0434

elizabeth.spatola@gmail.com

EDUCATION BOSTON ARCHITECTURAL COLLEGE, Boston, MA Master of Interior Design Candidate BOSTON COLLEGE, Chestnut Hill, MA September 2000 – May 2004 BA in Communication

January 2011 - Present

DESIGN SKILLS   

Drafting - Hand and AutoCAD 2D – Plans, sections and elevations Drawing – Freehand, sketching Computer – Microsoft Office Suite, AutoCAD, Adobe InDesign, Rhino, Revit (beginner skills)

EMPLOYMENT GATEWAY PROJECT – IMPROV BOSTON Cambridge, MA

Student Designer      

Analyzed the site, exterior and interior conditions, and layout of Improv Boston Suggested program and structural changes for a more effective use of the space with improved circulation Created floor plans by hand and with AutoCAD that reflect the suggested changes, and began the use of Revit and Adobe Illustrator as a design tool Supported the comedy theater’s brand identity by creating a design language that continues throughout the space Presented materials and design ideas to client that interpret his desire for an underground, punk, yet clean and inviting performance space Learned about theater seating, lighting and acoustics so as to create a functional, professional, quality space that reflects Improv Boston as New England’s premiere comedy club

J.E.M. Boston, MA

June 2011 – December 2011

Design Assistant    

Researched materials, finishes, furnishings, color and textile options as a Design Assistant at J.E.M. Interior Design Analyzed interior space and conditions to redesign floor plans for optimal space planning in residential interiors Customized millwork, cabinetry and furniture per designer and client needs Maintained resource library and contact with vendors

SAN DIEGO CHARGERS

San Diego, CA

Executive Assistant to the General Manager    

January 2012 – present

March 2005 – January 2011

Organized all meetings, travel and correspondence for the San Diego Chargers General Manager Oversaw the day to day management of the Football Operations and Scouting Departments Liaised with reporters, agents, players and the public on behalf of the General Manager and Scouting Department Fulfilled donation requests and was the point of contact for nonprofits, charitable organizations and fundraising events

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A little over a year ago I used to sit at a desk in a job where I enjoyed the people I worked with, the environment I worked in, but not the job itself. I wasn’t challenged, and wasn’t using the creativity, and skills I knew I had.  I wanted to and needed to make a change, but sometimes that realization isn’t an automatic call to action - especially when I wasn’t exactly sure what I wanted my next step to be.  I wanted to discover a career that I would find fulfilling, challenging, and interesting.  Fast forward a year and I am compiling all of my design work for both my practice portfolio and my Segment 1 portfolio review. The amount of work I have done in the last 14 months is something I am so proud of, and slightly amazed by. Not only have I learned a great deal in my studios and courses, but one of the main reasons I decided to attend Boston Architectural College was because I would have the opportunity to learn from practice in jobs, design competitions and Gateway projects. I began my practice experience this past summer and fall by working for a very small store and design firm in the South End. I had never worked in the design field before, and I appreciate that I was given the opportunity to learn from someone who had been doing it in one way or another for many years. I learned about textiles, paint colors, furniture design, installation, and how to deal with clients, vendors and contractors. I utilized my beginner AutoCAD skills to create floor plans and got better with every rearrangement of furniture within the space. Over the summer I also worked on the IIDA Fashion show which was one of the most fun, and the most challenging experiences I’ve had. I loved that the design process was so similar between school and studio projects, and designing clothing that was going to be seen on a runway. So many months of brainstorming, sketching, researching, designing, redesigning and then finally, construction, taught me to keep working through ideas and issues. I believe I have learned the most from my current participation in a Gateway Project, for which I am working on the redesign of Improv Boston. The improv comedy theater is 5 years into a 20 year lease and needs to recreate their space to be more functional and professional, and less rundown and patched together. Our group is made up of 5 students – 2 interior design, 3 architecture – and 2 advisors, both of whom are practicing architects. I have learned so much from working with students who are more experienced than I am, and with 2 architects who have been practicing for years. I have learned about measuring spaces, documenting and sketching existing conditions, building a model in Revit, creating schematic designs in AutoCAD and Adobe Illustrator, and presenting our ideas to the Executive Director of Improv Boston. I had done many of these tasks before in my studio classes, but now doing it for a real client that was depending on us brought that learning and practice from studio into reality. I enjoy the learning and collaboration that takes place in our meetings and work sessions and appreciate the constructive comments and discussions we have. Since I am one of two Interior Design students working on this project, I have taken the opportunity to step up and create material and furniture selections for the space. I enjoy the process and the research I have done so far, and I also like that everyone in the group now looks to me for any and all information regarding these choices. I have also learned that I really enjoy working on the branding of a company, through the design of their space, color and material choices and the overall layout. I have started to wonder if this may be a direction I take my career. In both the IIDA Fashion Show, and Improv Boston Gateway Project I have learned so much about collaboration, group work and the give and take of working with so many people on a project. It is an exhilarating process – always interesting, challenging and fulfilling. The last year has been one of dramatic changes, exciting learning experiences, exhausting school and work schedules, and the greatest sense of accomplishment, pride and fulfillment I have ever had. To make the huge decision to get my Master’s in something I had a passion for, but no experience in was daunting to say the least. I am happy to say that the endless days of work, school, projects and deadlines are exactly what I want to be doing, and the work I have done and continue to do will prove to myself and others that I am now using the creativity and skills I’ve had all along.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS RESUME P. 5 PERSONAL STATEMENT P. 7 STUDIO MASTER’S A BODY SENTIENT & BODY ENGAGED P. B-1/ID-1 BUILDING ANALYSIS - KOSHINO HOUSE P. B-1/ID-1 BOATHOUSE P. ID-2 RETAIL P. ID-2 OFFICE P. ID-2 RESTAURANT P.

16 24 28 40 46 54

-

23 27 39 45 53 61

PRACTICE GATEWAY - IMPROV BOSTON P. 64 - 73 IIDA FASHION SHOW P. 74 - 77 ADDITIONAL WORK FREEHAND DRAWING P. 80 - 81

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Studio Work January 2011 - May 2012

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THE BODY SENTIENT & THE BODY ENGAGED MASTER’S A SPRING 2011 1ST SEMESTER, AOP INSTRUCTOR: DEVON MILLER PROJECT LENGTH - 2 MONTHS The first part of this two part project was the Body Sentient. The goals of this project were to study, analyze and interpret the body, bodily motion and the ways the body works with and is surrounded by space. Each student had to choose a motion that would be the basis of how they studied and developed analytical thinking, drawing, model building and space planning. The motion I chose was serving a tennis ball. I thought the motion was interesting and hoped it would give me just enough movement and body motion to study and analyze. The feet mainly stayed still, the legs bent, there was line of sight, a target-like point where the tennis ball was aimed, and the whole execution of throwing the ball and striking it with the racquet. All of these elements ended up providing interesting information to understand size, scale, proportion and the body’s relationship to its environment. The intent of the transition from the Body Sentient to the Body Engaged was to continue to develop an understanding of the body and the space that it inhabits, Now we would be looking at the body with a focus on space, movement and spatial experiences. Site and program were looked at for the first time during this segment of the project. A continuation of the body sentient thesis was further developed and explored with a focus on the relationship between movement and space.

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Movement Analysis

I chose to analyze the motion of a tennis serve. Much of the power in the serve comes from bending the front leg, and the accuracy of the serve comes from release of the ball from the front (left) hand and the proper extension of the left arm. Power and accuracy are needed in the back (right) arm which holds the tennis racquet. The form of taking the racquet from starting position, sweeping it back and then up to make contact with the ball is a sequence that takes almost perfect form, to then ensure accuracy and power.

overlay analysis of the tennis serve motion where I was looking at muscle movement and power. Through these overlays I determined that strength, power and accuracy were the driving forces behind a successful tennis serve.

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Construction Drawings CONSTRUCTION DRAWINGS OF THE BODY DEVICES ALLOWED FOR FURTHER ANALYSIS OF EACH DEVICE TO DETERMINE IF THEY WERE WORKING BOTH INDIVIDUALLY AND AS A SINGLE COHESIVE UNIT TO AID IN A SUCCESSFUL TENNIS SERVE MOTION. BACK JOINT HEAD JOINT

The line off of the brim of the cap gave an extension point for release of the tennis ball from the left hand

The jingle bells in the middle of the back ensure that the tennis racquet extends and touches them before coming forward to make contact with the tennis ball

KNEE JOINT

Attaches to the front knee to provide a reference point on the outside of the leg for a full follow through of the tennis racquet Leg LEGJoint JOINT

FOOT JOINT

Attaches in between both knees to achieve proper tennis serve stance

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A rigid horizontal attachment to the front foot, with a verticle piece that determines how much the left leg should bend to achieve the most base power in the serve


THE TRANSITION FROM THE BODY SENTIENT STUDY TO THE BODY ENGAGED STARTED WITH THE ANALYSIS OF JOINTS WITHIN THE CHOSEN MOTION. THE JOINTS COULD LOOK AT HOW THE DEVICE JOINED TO THE BODY, THE JOINTS WITHIN THE DEVICE ITSELF, AND HOW THE BODY WAS JOINED WITHIN ITS SURROUNDINGS.

analysis of the tennis racquet and it’s motion in relationship to the body

the foot device joins to the foot and leg to ensure proper form when bending the knee. The accurate bending of the knee allows for power behind the serve and momentum for the entire serving motion.

This diagram is investigating the connection between the final destination point of the tennis ball, that point in the server’s line of sight, and how the accurate motion of the tennis serve is necessary in reaching that destination. The concepts of line of sight and the motion of the tennis racquet became the basis for my connection between the body motion and my site design for the next phase of the project.

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ANALYSIS OF THE MOTION STUDIES FROM THE BODY SENTIENT ARE CONTINUED AND TRANSLATED INTO STUDIES OF THRESHOLD. REAL WORLD THRESHOLDS WERE UTILIZED TO DEVELOP THE CONCEPTUAL DESIGN OF THE SITE PLAN. MY GOAL WAS TO USE THE TENNIS SERVE CONCEPTS OF LINE OF SIGHT AND MOTION OF THE TENNIS SERVE AS THE BASIS OF BOTH THE THRESHOLD AND SITE DESIGNS.

The public gardens provided an ideal setting to translate the tennis serve thesis of line of sight and destination point into a real world setting. In these images, a bridge is visible in the distance, but steps must be taken before this destination point is reached. This is much like the tennis serve motion where the player knows exactly where the serve must go, but the exact motion of serving the ball must occur for that to happen.

Orthogonal sections of a preliminary threshold model

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A conceptual drawing suggesting a destination point and the movement it takes to reach that point


PROGRAM MODELS EXPLORE THE PHYSICAL QUALITIES OF AN URBAN PARK, FARMER’S MARKET AND YOGA STUDIO. DESCRIPTIVE WORDS WERE USED TO FOCUS THE FEELING AND INTENTION OF EACH SPACE.

Urban Park

Market

ACTIVE, PLAYFUL, FUN, CALM, ENCLOSED

COLLABORATIVE, FRESH, ORGANIC

The urban park was designed as an enclosed, calm space in the site that was between a busy and quiet street. The goal was to give people a place to relax amidst the busy city around them

The market design was interpreted as an outdoor farmer’s market, where many people come together to provide the community with fresh, healthy foods. The concept of keeping the farmer’s market outdoors was that it was open, visible and a destination point.

line of sight from the site entrance to the end, destination point

Yoga Studio

INTROSPECTIVE, RELAXED, REFLECT, RENEW, PEACEFUL The word introsoective was the basis for the yoga studio design, which is underground and under the farmer’s market boardwalk. The space is enclosed, focusing the yoga practice inward.

perspective drawings give a visual connection to the concept of line of sight and destination point. The drawing on the left is the view someone standing at the entrance to the site would have, with a clear view of the pathway to the large tree at the opposite end of the site. The connection between the site design and the motion of the tennis racquet is experienced through a person having to engage in the farmer’s market and urban park before they reach the destination point, reflecting the smaller movements to achieve the end result.

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UPPER LEVEL

PROGRAM

urban park

Section ee

Section dd

farmer’s market

farmer’s market

e d Section aa

LOWER LEVEL e d c b Section bb

a Yoga Studio

urban park

c b a

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Section cc

PROGRAM


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Building Analysis Interior Design Studio 1 Fall 2011 Semester 2, AOP Instructor: Morris Tyler 4 week Project The Building analysis was the first project for ID Studio 1. The objective of the course was to learn how to critically examine a building and site, and understand how that analysis informs the spaces, and the design. Utilizing drawings, diagrams, model making and sketching, the goal was to understand underlying ideas and relationships that inform the design of the building. Given a list of buildings to choose from was the beginning of our analysis. Looking at the images of each building provided an opportunity to realize likes and dislikes about a building’s design. Through the drawing and model making, spatial qualities were revealed that lead to analysis through diagrams.

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THE PROCESS OF DOING ORTHOGONAL DRAWINGS OF KOSHINO HOUSE WAS AN EXERCISE IN UNDERSTANDING AND INTERPRETING THE SPACE. REALIZING PROPORTIONS, SOLID SURFACES AND GLASS, OPENINGS, DOUBLE HEIGHT SPACES AND THE RELATIONSHIP OF LARGER AND SMALLER SPACES AIDED IN THE INITIAL ANALYSIS OF INHABITANT EXPERIENCE IN THE SPACE.

A

B

A

B

Section AA

Section BB

C

C

D

D

Section DD THE PROCESS OF MEASURING, CUTTING AND BUILDING THAT GOES INTO MAKING A MODEL IS AN EFFECTIVE FIRST STEP OF ANALYSIS. IT WAS DURING THE MODEL BUILDING PROCESS THAT I TOOK NOTICE OF WHERE WALLS, WINDOWS, DOORS, HALLWAYS AND STAIRWAYS WERE. MORE IMPORTANTLY, I BEGAN TO QUESTION AND ANALYZE HOW ALL OF THESE BUILDING ELEMENTS CREATED SPACES AND WHAT THOSE SPACES FELT LIKE FOR THE PEOPLE IN THE HOUSE.

Section CC 25


DIAGRAMS

N W

1 pm

E S

N W

9 am

E S

Light is an important design element and intention of Tadao Ando’s architecture. Light diagrams helped to explore and understand how it was used in his design of Koshino House, and how light would affect the space for its inhabitants. gathering/isolated & view

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view

enclosure

public and private spaces


A PERSPECTIVE DRAWING OF THE LIVING ROOM ALLOWED FOR A BETTER UNDERSTANDING OF THE SCALE AND FEELING OF THE TWO STORY SPACE

THE PROCESS OF DRAWING AN AXON GAVE AN UNDERSTANDING TO THE PROPORTIONS OF ROOMS, THE LAYOUT OF THE HOUSE, CONNECTIONS AND CIRCULATION.

Concept models were utilized to further develop analysis of Koshino House. The left and center models were investigating the relationship between spaces that had light and views to the outside, and spaces that had light but no view. The model on the right was an analysis of the connection between the different buildings and rooms of the Koshino House.

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Boathouse project Interior Design Studio I Fall 2011 AOP, second semester instructor: Morris Tyler Project Length - 8 weeks THE BOATHOUSE PROJECT WAS A CONTINUATION OF THE ANALYTIC SKILLS DEVELOPED DURING THE BUILDING PROJECT. THE BOATHOUSE ALLOWED FOR GREATER DEVELOPMENT OF SITE OBSERVATION, SKETCHING AND INTERPRETATION. AFTER EXTENSIVE FIELD WORK WAS DONE IN CAMBRIDGE AND ALONG THE CHARLES RIVER, THE PROJECT DEVELOPED INTO THE DESIGN OF A SITE AND BOATHOUSE SPACE, BASED ON INFORMATION GATHERED DURING SITE OBSERVATIONS. THIS ALLOWED FOR ANALYSIS OF SPATIAL EXPERIENCE AND RELATIONSHIPS, HUMAN SCALE AND OCCUPANCY, STRUCTURE, THRESHOLDS, PROGRAM, LIGHTING AND MATERIALS.

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watercolor map by Stamen


Site Observation & Analysis

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Site analysis

Walking from Central Square to the B.U. boathouse (zone 3) gave a moment of very distinct change turning from Mass Ave onto Vassar street, where The commotion of the city stopped almost immediately upon making that right handed turn. The quiet of vassar Street leads into even more secluded and desolate areas through the MIT playing fields and ultimately at the river and BU boathouse

The walk from Cambridgeport to the Central boathouse site (zone 2) revealed a similar experience as the Central Square to BU boathouse route. The streets of cambridgeport were quiter than central Square and Mass Ave, but still showed signs of life in people working in their yards, playgrounds and parks, cars, bikers and people out for an afternoon walk. The rotary between Memorial Drive and Brookline Street leads to an area that has the same feeling of seclusion and desolation that Vassar Street had. There are cars flying by on Memorial Drive, but there is still a feeling that there isn’t a soul around for miles. 30


Document based analysis

Bus Bike T- subway

The MIT playing fields and dorms along Memorial Drive create a barrier between cambridge and the Charles River

Public transportation is not provided to the Charles river site contributing to the isolation of the area

Other than the MIT playing fields, there are only small spots of green space to enjoy in the city, with the area by the waterfront providing much of that space

Zoning provided an investigation into the types of buildings that were near the river and who the users would most likely be

This diagram suggests of The business and activity that takes place in cambridge, the small amount of movement parallel to the Charles River, and that void in between the two that is the barrier of the MIT dorms on Memorial Drive. The dorms face in towards the MIT campus and create a stopping point for students. These dorms are one element that contribute to the isolation of the Charles River from the neighborhoods of Cambridge.

Main Streets like Memorial Drive and Mass Ave lead past the Boathouse site areas, but none lead directly to it.

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thesis

The Charles River stretch between the BU boathouse and the MIT boathouse is an area that is isolated from its surroundings in both Cambridge and Boston. Memorial Drive runs parallel to the Charles and acts as a circulation barrier between cambridge and movement along the river. The model above is an analysis of the isolation that exists, and how the site is simply a space for people to pass through to destinations that are elsewhere. The basswood strips at the top reference those people, mostly in cars on memorial drive. The trace paper strips reference the people that are using the riverside for recreation and exercise. They are also moving through the site - walking, running and biking to a destination that is elsewhere. While they are utilizing the site, it is not their destination. These people are still using the riverside as a means to get to the end. The woven basswood and tracing paper are what the new site and boathouse design will be. movement will make a 90 degree turn from its current direction so that people are heading from spots in Cambridge to enjoy canoeing and relaxing at their boathouse destination spot.

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My revised thesis combines the idea of destination and recreation with a further analysis of what the destination spot is. Originally I had envisioned the Boathouse as the destination, but in thinking about it a bit more, I realized that is only true for people that are utilizing the Boathouse as a gathering space. For the people that are going to take canoes out on the river, the boathouse becomes yet another space, like Memorial Drive and the riverside, that they pass through to get to their actual destination, which is the river. The line in the middle that stops suggests of the gatherers, while the two extended arms refer to the canoers that pass through the boathouse to the river.

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Site Design Zone 2

Zone 1

Zone 1 - the area between the Mass Ave bridge and the end of the retaining wall just past the MIT Boathouse. This zone is visually the most connected and the most easily accessible of the 3 zones. I considered going against my thesis reading of the Charles River area as isolated and building my boathouse in this most connected zone.

Zone 2 - The open area between the MIT boathouse and the BU Boathouse. This Zone is the most isolated of the 3 zones. Unlike Zone 1, it isn’t as visually connected and isn’t easily accessible. I decided to continue with my site reading of isolation and choose Zone 2 as the site for my boathouse.

Zone 2 150’ boathouse

Cambridge

Charles River

Boston

In choosing Zone 2 as the building site for my boathouse, I was creating a destination of even greater isolation than the river already is. by moving the Boathouse about 150 feet out into the Charles River, I was recreating the riverside as the space that is passed through, to get to the destination point which was the river for canoers, and the Boathouse for gatherers.

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The MIT dorms create a barrier between cambridge and the Charles River

Images of Zone 2 show the lack of people by the Charles River. These photos were taken on a beautiful saturday afternoon in the fall


threshold

View of the pathway over Memorial Drive. This bridge is intended to allow for easier movement between the

MIT

dorms

and the river

view from crossing walkways close to the boathouse entrance

View at the end of the bridge Memorial Drive, looking out

over

to the overlapping paths that go to the

For

Boathouse

the threshold sequence to the boathouse i wanted to create an

experience with varying levels of enclosure, compression, view and connection.

the bottom diagram addresses the enclosure that is felt

when walking in the entrance door, then the openness of the two story entry, continuing on with the compression of walking into the canoeing area, and then on to the very open two story space that leads out to the canoeing docks through the two story open wall.

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The final boathouse model shows design elements that reflect the thesis of Isolation. Within the design the intention was to have moments of isolation and moments that counteracted that isolation. Walkways, two story spaces, views, and light were all used to reflect the thesis. The walkways that enter the building on the second floor are isolated and then transition into a space that has a feeling of integration and inclusion. This is achieved because the walkway allows a view to the canoeing space on the first floor. Visual connection and openness aim to create a feeling of inclusion and integration. The skylights are also another design element of the boathouse that intend for a contrast in the feeling of isolation and inclusion by using areas of light and shadow. Shadows created by roof plates provide areas of darkness and 36isolation, while light areas created by the skylights are intended to contrast that isolation.


Materials W1

Wood Decking running N>S

G1

M1

Wave Metal Sheets Horizontal

M2

Woven Mesh All Columns

W2

Wood Decking running E>W

Glass with Small Threads

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Interior Perspectives

View from the first floor, 2 story space looking towards the main entrance. The entrance is meant to be open and inviting, drawing people into the space. The intention of the two story spaces are to counteract the isolation that occurs in the site until entering the boathouse

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View from the walkway into the second floor. this long pathway seems to float above the water as it goes between land and the boathouse. Upon entering the boathouse the isolation of the walkway is lessened with the visual connection to the open plan of the space

View from the first floor, 2 story space looking up to the second floor. the first floor windows of the conoeing space allow for light with no view. The intent of this is that the boathouse is not the final destination for these users, and their view is saved for when they are out on the River. The gathering space on the second floor has Garage door style walls, which allow for these users to enjoy an unobstructed view of the river from their destination point.


Exterior Perspectives

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Retail Design ID Studio II Spring 2012 Instructor: Corky Binggeli 3 week project The goal of this project was to redesign the interior of a single story older building in Denver, Colorado. This space is for the Artisan’s Collaborative which is an artist owned and operated gallery. The artists would like a space that speaks to the quality and uniqueness of the merchandise and enhances its appearance without overwhelming it. The design for this space is focused on creating a store that highlights the artist’s pieces as one-of-akind, unique and exclusive. The store will have a very warm, comfortable feeling that will remind people of a beautifully eclectic home. There will be different displays and vignettes that provide customers with ideas of how pieces could possibly look in their own home. The furniture will be set up in a seating arrangement, with artisan made lighting, quilts and paintings around it. a dining table will be set with handmade table settings, glassware and pottery. All of these elements will suggest design ideas to customers that they may not have envisioned on their own.

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Key Displays - 400

sq ft

Clothing Paintings, Cards, Photographs Jewelry Pottery & Glassware Furniture Storage -100 sq ft Register - 80 sq ft Restroom - 50 sq ft Office - 80 sq ft Changing Display

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Floor Plans & Sections

AA C

B

A

A

C

B

CC

BB

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Perspective & Materials

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Reflected Ceiling Plan & Lighting Fixtures

Much of the lighting for the Artists’ Collaborative would be pieces made by local artisans and sold in the store.

2x4 Fluorescent light

Track Lighting

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Office Design Interior Design Studio II Spring 2012 Instructor: Corky Binggeli 5 week project The Goal of this project was to design a two story training and conference center for a publishing company. Their main offices are located elsewhere, and this space is used solely for training, client meetings and presentations. The client would like a space that reflects the company’s professional image, and their creative energy through an impressive interior space. The users of this meeting facility are a diverse group of multigenerational employees and clients, and the design should take this into consideration. A few Important design elements must be taken into consideration for the meeting facility. the space is used for presentations and training so the rooms should be designed accordingly. large groups will be using the space and moving from one area to another, so circulation is important, And very large and particular spaces need to successfully fit in the 3000 sq ft building shell, while maintaining the existing staircase, windows and entrance door. The design intention for this space was to create an office for a children’s book publishing company. I wanted to design a space that fused business, with fun, imagination, beautiful art, meaningful stories and creativity. The space is designed to foster communication, collaboration and teamwork by using light, bright, open spaces that flow from meeting areas, to gathering spaces. A sculpture of books is a focal point in the stairwell and both visually and physically connects the first and second floors.

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book image by cara barer


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Bubble Diagrams

initial design and space planning ideas: • reception, waiting and break area should be connected. Ability to expand break area into reception and waiting space for larger gatherings is desired • allow for break type spaces on each floor • restrooms not required on each floor but makes for user friendly space and accessibility

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Schematic Design

a

c

b

d

e

research about modern office spaces revealed two major points that focused the design of this meeting facility. The first was that work environments need “Diverse, vital spaces that foster creativity and serendipity”. The second was that “workplace openness creates a feeling of one firm rather than individuals working on separate projects”. communication and collaboration are key. visual access > interaction >discussion and the exchange of ideas 49


Floor plans & Sections c

c

b

b section cc

a

a

c

section bb

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scheme c was the basis for the final design and office layout. The focus on both visual and physical connectivity was highlighted in this design through:

c

section aa

• the staircase sculpture that brings together open spaces on both the first and second floors • the glass wall in the 2nd floor presentation room that allows for visual connectio between meeting space, circulation (stairwell) and gathering (open office) • the open circulation from reception to waiting and break space, which wraps around the 1st floor training room to the restrooms and elevator


Perspectives

The 2nd floor shared office space with a view of the stairwell and book sculpture

Sketches of the book sculpture in the stairwell

The waiting area with a view to the break area

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Materials & Furnishings

Conference room tables and chairs

Chair color with style seen at left

Bench seating for lobby

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Modular training tables

Stools for open office and gathering areas


Reflected Ceiling Plan

Key: 2x2 Fluorescent Light

Projector

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Restaurant Design Interior Design Studio II Spring 2012 Instructor: Corky Binggeli 7 week project The restaurant design project was based on an existing restaurant in Newburyport, MA. The restaurant is located about four blocks from the picturesque waterfront, on the corner of two busy streets, across from a beautiful town park. The owners of the restaurant envision turning their 3000 sq ft, old-fashion steakhouse with its dark wood paneling and dim lighting into a restaurant that reflects its historic New England seaport location. They want to create a restaurant that features good food with fresh, local ingredients. Newburyport’s location and history as a center of shipping and trading offered a perfect conceptual starting point for the restaurant’s design. My concept is based off of the molasses that was brought to Newburyport from the West Indies and used by the small distileries around town to produce rum. I used images of molasses, rum bottles, wooden barrels and the label from a rum produced in Newburyport as the starting point for my design. I also want to pull in elements of the ships, as they were a most important part of the molasses and rum trade. The image that provided the best design inspiration for the restaurant was the one seen at right of the rich, dark brown molasses being poured out of a light, porcelain pitcher. I not only used the colors from this image in my design, but I also wanted to bring in the textures - the contrast of the light and reflective quality of the molasses, it’s rich, fluid, smooth look and the shiny, clean lines of the porcelain pitcher. I felt the perfect contrast to these qualities would be the rough, worn look of a ship’s canvas sails, ropes, riggings and decks.

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Bubble Diagrams & Program

KEY Dining - 1000-1200 sq ft Bar- 300-400 sq ft- backbar & seating for 12 Vestibule - 80-100 sq ft - ada accessible and provide weather protection

Restrooms - 75-100 sq ft Women - 1 ada, 1 additional toilet, 2 lavs Men - 1 ada, 1 urinal, 2 lavs Host -20-30 sq ft - reservation book & menus Waiting Area - 60-80 sq ft - seating for 6 Coat Storage - 60-80 sq ft - 75-100 coats Liquor Storage -100 sq ft - lockable storage Chair Storage -15-20 sq ft - highchairs & extra chairs

Service Stations - 40-50

sq ft

-

computers,

extra table settings and water

Initial Design and Space Planning: • Designs that have easy access from the hostess to the bar provide two waiting options for diners. • The bathrooms work the best back in the space by the kitchen and door to the trash and recycling. There they are still quite easily accessible, but are out of direct view for most diners. • The waiting area seems to work best if it is close to the host, but set off to the side and not in the direct

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Schematic Design Further analysis of my bubble diagrams allowed for changes to be made to both program and space planning, and a clearer investigation of adjacencies and circulation.

• This schematic plan will keep the existing entrance from the parking lot into the restaurant. • The bar becomes a focal point in this design because it is centered in the larger of the two areas. having dining in the bar area provides for two different dining experiences - the bar area for a lively dining experience, and the other dining room for a quieter, laid back meal. • The connection between the entrance, host and waiting area, and the bar provides diners an easily accessible spot to gather and enjoy a drink while waiting for a table.

• This plan changes the entrance from the side by the parking lot, to the opposite side of the building. The new entrance will be across from the park, on a moderately busy street. With this change the entrance to the restaurant can be designed and a diner’s experience in entering the building will be more controlled and interesting. • Again, this design provides two dining experiences, but the bar is now along two walls of the space giving it a smaller, more enclosed feel that still allows for ample bar seating and space, but focuses more on the dining space and experience. • This is the design I chose to develop, because I liked the opportunity to redesign the threshold and entry experience of the diner.

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Floor Plan & Materials

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PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Reflected Ceiling Plan

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

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Sections

Sections done by hand and using autocad

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Perspectives Attempting to work on improving my computer skills, I built a very basic model of the restaurant in Revit. This gave me a 3-d view of the space, and aided in space planning and perspectives. I still like the way hand rendering looks and chose to show perspectives that way.

Banquet in bar dining area

bar and bar dining area

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Practice Work

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40 Prospect Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 Interior Architecture, Design and Space Planning 5000 Sq Ft Gateway Project, Spring 2012 5 Student, 2 Advisor team The goal of this Gateway Project is to redesign the 5000 sq ft Improv Boston space from convoluted and pieced together, to a space that is functional, professional and reflects the success they have seen over the past few years. They are 5 years into a 25 year lease and would like to make changes that will allow them to be profitable and successful in their convenient Central Square location. The design proposal our group provides will allow the Executive Director and the Board of Directors to begin a capital campaign to raise the funds needed to create the new and improved Improv Boston. My responsibilites for this project have included: • Study and analyze the existing building and create effective bubble and schematic diagrams that explore options for the redesign of the space • Take into account requests made by the client regarding his vision for the space. Present options that address his direct requests, and also some that provide alternative options. • Research theater design needs such as seating, lighting, and acoustics • Choose interior materials, fixtures, and furnishings • Design a space that creates greater brand awareness for Improv Boston

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Existing Space: • disjointed layout doesn’t allow for effective circulation and utilization of performance spaces, causing a significant loss of profit • Pockets of poorly used or unused space seem to dominate the building. Patchwork changes have been made over the past few years as they are needed creating a space that is choppy and unfunctional • classrooms are the main source of income and are important to the new layout • Getting rid of the small studio to allow for a bar/ lobby area where patrons can comfortably gather before shows is possible. More defined waiting spaces and better circulation will allow for an additional show per night in the main stage • Bar sales are highly profitable for improv boston, but due to the crowded lobby and inaccessibility of the bar, profits from beverage sales aren’t what they could be • Design of the current space is not reflective of a professional theater group, but rather of a make shift space that is lacking in design, organization and successful Improv Boston branding

Second City, Chicago is “Too business-like”

Upright Citizens Brigade, NYC is “too gritty”

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Site documentation Lobby, Box Office & Bar

View of the bar in the lobby. the curved shape of the bar makes it difficult for the bartender to move. There also isn’t adequate space for refridgerators or storage

The box office (seen here on the right) is awkwardly situated in the lobby space and is not easily accessible. Circulation and flow to the box office, and in the entire space is an important aspect of the new design.

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Studio

Main Stage

The stage is made of plywood, and has been patched and painted in very visible areas.

The fixed seating is a secondhand donation from a high school auditorium. The seats are too low, have springs that stick out, and are too big for the space. Unfixed ikea chairs are put in between the stage and fixed seating when needed.

The restrooms are small and take up space that might be better used for circulation

• The studio is 520 sq ft, has a very small stage and tech booth, seats 40 people, and is extremely cramped • The acoustics in the studio are ineffective because the walls don’t go all the way to the ceiling. All sound from the Main Stage and lobby can be heard during performances • Due to shows in the Studio and ineffective circulation in the lobby and hallways, the number of shows in the Main Stage are one less than they should be having per night • Getting rid of the studio space is a possibility. This would allow for increased Main Stage seating capacity, one more show per night, and efficient circulation

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all photos on this page by David Hansen, Barch


Classrooms and Green Room

The orange classroom is on Bishop Allen Road and needs better privacy when classes are taking place. This classroom is also used as access to the blue classroom and is disturbed when people walk through. Due to floor heights and lack of ADA accessibility, the orange classroom is inaccessible to the rest of Improv Boston unless movement takes place outside on Bishop Allen and Prospect Street sidewalks.

The blue classroom is the larger of the two classrooms and could possibly be divided into two spaces. The executive director would like to rent out the classroom spaces for corporate meetings and gatherings, so redesign should take this into consideration

The green room is used as both the prep area/Backstage space for performers, and as a classroom. The space needs more storage, furniture, flooring and a large HVAC unit not seen in these pictures needs to be upgraded and moved or hidden.

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all photos on this page by David Hansen, Barch


Bubble diagrams allowed for extensive consideration of program adjacencies and circulation. Each group memeber worked on their own designs, and then we each presented our most successful diagrams to the group. We discussed what worked and didn’t work in the designs and then chose a diagram for each person to develop into a schematic presentation.

E

Design “E” • circulation is improved by moving bathrooms out of the central hallway and putting the bar there. This also provides a more contained space for people to wait before the shows. • The circulation concept is effective in allowing steps through the space without backtracking (purchase tickets, wait in the bar for the show, watch show, leave). This way showgoers don’t have to come back through the crowded lobby and bar to leave the building.

F

Design “F” • Keeping the classrooms together provides an area dedicated to classes, separate from performance spaces. Creating 3 classrooms also utilizes the space more effectively for the size of the classes held there. • bathrooms still break up the space a bit, but good to have them centrally located by the bar/holding area, performance spaces and classrooms • Circulation needs improvement so that Main Stage traffic and Studio traffic don’t interfere with each other.

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0

1 2

4

8

16

32 feet

0

Schematic Design E 40 Prospect Street, Cambridge, MA 02139

1 2

4

8

16

32 feet

Schematic Design F

March 8, 2012

40 Prospect Street, Cambridge, MA 02139

Schematic Design E is a continuation of the concepts from bubble diagram E. Improvements to the design include: • The Main Stage orientation allows for the originally suggested office space to be a backstage area • the lobby is changed to another small classroom and the bar area will act as a waiting area pre show • Circulation is improved so the Main Stage audience doesn’t backtrack through the bar/waiting area. Studio audience members do.

March 8, 2012

Schematic design F is a continuation of the concepts from bubble diagram F. Improvements to the design include: • The bar is visible from the street and creates a flow from the box office to the bar and acts as a focal point. • The bathrooms were moved to create a more open path of circulation and gathering area at the bar • Classrooms were switched with the Studio space to allow for post show egress without backtracking through the Bar

Schematic designs A-F were presented to the Executive Director of Improv Boston to determine which design or design elements he saw as the most successful for their needs. Scheme D was determined to be the best option, mainly due to the elemination of the small studio and increased seating in the main stage (from 90 to 126). This will allow for one additional show per evening. Due to circulation issues and show staggering, existing nightly show attendance was a maximum of 390 people (sold out, turning people away). Eliminating the small studio will increase seating capacity per night by anywhere from 50-100+ seats/ticket sales (depending on seating code restrictions and egress requirements)

0 1 2

4

8

16

32 feet

Schematic Design D 40 Prospect Street, Cambridge, MA 02139

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March 8, 2012

designed by Erin Kim, MArch

The group took Scheme D and continued with iterations to work through concerns raised by the Executive Director during the presentation.


The

Seating

bar becomes a focal point and a destination for

people to move from the box office toward the theater space.

The

and counter space near the bar, main stage

and restrooms creates an area where people can wait for the show, enjoy a drink, and not create

curvilinear shape mimicks the

shape of the box office, and suggests movement

the traffic jam that exists in the current space

from the bar, to the seating area off to the side

Double The

ramp leading from the box office to the bar

allows for easy

ADA posters, and

accessibility,

of show

a prominent brick wall

display

(stripped of its existing coral color and left exposed). the brick would contrast the metal and dark greys that are used on the box office and office that is opposite it.

doors become centrally located on the

facade creating a more prominent threshold and an opportunity for signage and posted information about shows and classes

The

box office is now located directly in front

of the entrance and can be easily accessed.

The

curvilinear shape provides directionality

into the bar space and waiting area after show tickets are purchased.

The

office is now

located behind the box office and can function as the control center of

Improv Boston

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Materials

Lobby and Bar

Brick, metal mesh and industrial lighting are all materials and fixtures desired for the new improv space

a metal accent wall will contrast the rough, earthy look of the brick and wide-plank wood floors

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Box Office and Ramp

The brick wall in the lobby is currently painted coral. The design intent is that sandblasting it will bring the material back to its natural state

Swing arm lamps will light the ramp from the box office to the bar

Bar and waiting area

a barn door will be used as the entrance to the office

Under the existing blue and orange linoleum tiles are wide wood planks that could be refinished while maintaining a rouch look

Hallway to Main Stage


Main Stage

Thursday - Sunday shows at Improv Boston are usually sold out, while ticket sales on Tuesday and Wednesday tend to be anywhere from 50-75% sold out. I suggested that we design a divider screen in the Main Stage space that would block the back section of seats. This would force people towards the front on nights the shows aren’t sold out, giving the feel of a full house. Because the tech booth is at the back of the main stage space, this divider screen needs to be a material that the sound and light technicians can see through.

The flexible mesh is ideal for this space because it can collapse into a small area when not in use. This mesh may be too tightly woven for the technicians to see through

These rigid mesh panels have a more industrial look that we are looking for, but will not be able to easily collapse when not in use.

Acoustic panels can be arranged in the truss around duct work, stage lighting and sound systems.

We would like to utilize modular seating for the main stage so the space can be a flexible, multi-use space. These chairs maintain the industrial design, are comfortable, and are easily stacked on dollys

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IIDA FASHION SHOW October 2011

The theme of the 2011 IIDA Fashion Show was ICONOGRAPHY. Preliminary small group meetings were used for brainstorming ideas of how we thought the BAC should interpret and represent this one word. We went through endless meetings pesenting ideas on people, places, things and ideas that we thought were iconic. The architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright, the color red, and an american soldier, were a few beginning ideas. After working through many ideas and designs, our final design concept was based on the Making of a Hero.

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The heroic soldier is representative of all that is courageous, selfless, determined and unified. Together we feel the LOSS brought by tragedies of war. Together we are STRONG to support one another. Together we SACRIFICE to give and serve one another. Together we are BRAVE. Together we are HEROES.

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are my Preliminary sketches for each of the 4 outfit designs using the Design & Construction Below words Selfless, Courageous, Determined and Loss as the basis for the collection that would depict the “Making of a Hero”.

Sacrifice

The idea of sacrifice is depicted through a missing piece of the outfit to suggest a hero that would sacrifce and give anything of themself for others

Bravery

A brave person was thought to be courageous, strong and confident. This is shown through a puffed, strong chest, and made of armor-like material. This outfit most resembles that of a soldier or warrior.

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Strength

The thought in depicting Strength was that it was shown in a person’s strong legs that they stand on and a strong back that helps carry others.

Loss

The idea of loss is shown through something that drapes and is soft, like a mourning shroud.


Final Designs Sacrifice

Strength

Loss

Bravery

The final designs were created using materials from our sponsor and office interior design company, Teknion. The materials used were durable, upholstery materials, and metals used for partitions and cubicle walls. construction of the outfits was a team effort and challenge for a few reasons. Many of us had never sewn before, let alone create pieces that were going to represent the BAC and be judged for design, construction, and creativity. Another challenge was using materials meant for upholstering office furniture, for clothing. Our team had designed the outfits so that each one that represented a word would walk down the runway, and then all give a piece of their outfit to the outfit depicting bravery as he walked down the runway. The idea behind this was that a hero was made up of Sacrifice, Loss, Strength and Bravery.

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Additional Work

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FREEHAND DRAWING

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EXPLORATION OF STILL LIFE, PERSPECTIVE AND FIGURE DRAWING USING GRAPHITE AND CHARCOALWITH THE GOAL OF LEARNING TO SEE PEOPLE, PLACES AND THINGS AS THEY ARE AND THEN TRANSLATE THAT INTO THE DETAILS, GENERAL SHAPES, VALUES AND CONTEXTUAL RELATIONSHIPS ON PAPER


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Segment 1 Portfolio  

This is a compilation of my work from the first 3 semesters at BAC.

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