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COLOR THEORY – IND 5325 FALL 2016 l Elizabeth Lee


TABLE OF CONTENTS Color + ME… 4

Color + DESIGNERS… 6

Color + PSYCHOLOGY… 16 Color + BALANCE… 26

Color + HEALTHCARE… 27 Color + IMAGE… 28

38 Color + RETAIL… 39 Color + SCALE… 43 Color + HOSPITALITY… 44 Color+ VARIETY… 52 Color + WORKPLACE… 56 Color + CULTURE… 65 Color+ RHYTHM…


HELLO

I was born in Tampa, Florida; raised a little further south in Bradenton, Florida. My mother is culturally Thai and ethnically Chinese. My Father is what we like to call Heinz 57, he is a mixture of everything. Not exactly sure what he is, though he has Cherokee in him as well as European. I have quite a bit of family members, half live in Alabama, while the other half live in Thailand. But my immediate family still live in Bradenton. I used to be able to speak Thai‌when I was 2 years old. After that I only could speak English and through this past summer I’ve been improving my Spanish. I have only lived in Bradenton and became focused on design once I traveled up north. I have always been very good at sketching and where I live, the architecture is very unimpressive. When I began to travel it got me interested in the possibilities of what a structure could be and how the building’s design responds to its community and environment. I study design because it can breathe life into a city. The building is our physical representation of how life can be lived and how a community can function. Every site is a puzzle and as an architect it is our job to create the best solution for the site. So that when a person visits your building or installation, they remember the experience they had and hopefully it inspires their own creativity as well.

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COLOR + ME


TRAVEL

Like most people, I love to travel. For the change in scenery, culture, and climate.

Strangely enough my favorite colors are not what I tend to wear. I tend to purchase clothing darker in color or jewel tones such as black, burgundy, darker grey, forest green, etc. In my design I use neutral colors and I do tend to use the light grey and white. My art, when painting, does tend to be on the lighter side. But I don’t stick tend towards my favorite colors, there is something to appreciate in every color. In art, in design, in material objects. It always depends on the situation and how the color is helping display what you want.

HOBBIES

COLOR

Favorite Color is purple. Also like very light greys as well as lavender.

Hiking Reading… mainly History Books Painting Scenery Sketching….which I’m much better at than painting Going to the beach….because this is Miami Piano Martial Arts Making Holiday Cards Walking around Cities

Within the United States I have been to Alabama, Arizona, Georgia, the Carolinas, Colorado, Massachusetts, New Orleans, New Jersey, New York. My favorite by far was Sedona Arizona. Their building aesthetics were much different then I am used to seeing within Florida and the red rock hiking was phenomenal and offered the best views especially at sunset. Internationally, I have been to Thailand, China, and Japan. I have yet to travel to Europe, but its on the short list of my bucket list. Half of my family lives in Bangkok, Thailand and between the trips to travel around the country my favorite past time is to simply walk alone through the city streets.

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REM KOOLHAS - OMA McCormick Tribune Campus Center

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COLOR + DESIGNERS


REM KOOLHAS Remment Lucas Koolhas was born November 17th, 1944 in Rotterdam, Netherlands. He is Dutch architect, architectural theorist, controversial urbanist, and Professor in Practice of Architecture and Urban Design at the Graduate School of Design at Harvard University. Koolhas is regarded as the world’s most controversial architect. In 2008, Time put him in the top 100 of The World’s Most Influential People. His habit of ignoring established conventions has made his one of the most Influential architects of his generation. While his contemporaries, such as Gehry or Hadid, refine their singular aesthetic visions over time, Koolhas works as a conceptual artist – drawing from a endless stream of ideas. Koolhas founded OMA (The Office for Metropolitan Architecture) in 1975.

“The good is not a category that interests me” - Rem Koolhas

Pritzker Prize (2000) Praemium Imperiale (2003) Royal Gold Medal (2004) Leone d'oro alla carriera (2010) COLOR + DESIGNERS

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THE PROJECT McCormick Tribune Campus Center

Illinois Institute of Technology Chicago, Illinois, USA Design chosen in 1997 in an international architectural design competition Design Challenges: 1. Create a student center with campus functions previously scattered around campus such as a bookstore and post office. 2. Reduce the noise of the public transit overhead. To reduce the noise, Koolhas enclosed a 530-foot section of the tracks in a acoustically isolating stainless steel tube passing directly over the building.

To create the interior layout of the building, Koolhas studied the preexisting footpaths made over 70 years by the students walking to and from the residence halls and classroom building underneath the train tracks.


Horizontal Elements: 1. The roof and floor, finished in green epoxy, provide a clean backdrop to the splashes of color Koolhas uses to highlight certain areas. 2. The grid lines of the roof are highlighted with a lighter neutral color.

ACHROMATIC PALETTE The community center underneath hides and distinguishes the structure of the tube above with it’s Achromatic color palette.

Vertical Elements: 1. Black painted steel columns holds the structure of the roof. 2. The exposed concrete square columns hold up the train track. 3. Black painted diagonal pilons hold up the tube.


Unifying Theme Orange is the building’s unifying color and can be seen repeated throughout. Within the building there is a constant reference to Mies Van der Rohe, who designed the masterplan for the campus. The Black that Mies would use to paint his steel represents “…the qualities of his buildingselegant, strong, and protecting, but also mysterious and forbidding. Orange is Koolhas’s opposite effect on the campus- “…happy, warm, generous, and invigorating, but also overbearing and superficial.

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NATURAL LIGHTING: ANALOGOUS COLORS Daylight is constantly changing. Therefore, the color of the light passing through Koolhas’s orange windows is constantly changing, yet the color palette remains the same and analogous. In addition to the changing window color. The reflection of the light off the wall, ceiling, and floor as well as their individual components creates a different hue of orange with each passing second of the day.

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NATURAL LIGHTING: SPLIT COMPLEMENTARY COLORS Remment Lucas Koolhas is a master at lighting and creating screen systems to react to different times of the day. In his interiors Koolhas combines his color palette using opposites again. The warm orange-tinted windows allow light in to guide movement. While his glass screening allows some of the orange light to pass through the voids of the grey images of Mies separating different programs of the building. The orange screening and the many hues of yellow and orange light that passes through it are all warm tones while the grey screening and blueish light that passes through the untinted windows are all cooler tones. The results in a Split Complementary Lighting Color Palette.

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COLOR + DESIGNERS


NATURAL LIGHTING: COMPLEMENTARY COLORS Dramatic lighting transitions in the building such as the one on the right are common. On the right is a predominantly orange Light reflected onto the walls from the orange windows while on the left is a predominantly blue light reflected from the windows with no tint. The change in program of the building, as well as Koolhas’s addition of the building on the campus designed by Mies van der Rohe, is highlighted by the dramatic switch between the complementary colors.


CONCLUSION: The McCormick Tribune Campus Center is a building of opposites. It is a campus center constructed not only under a railway, but absorbs the structure of the railway as well. It is a building designed by Rem Koolhas on a campus designed by Mies van der Rohe. Throughout the building Koolhas reflects this polarity through his use of color and lighting. By using complementary colors and analogous colors and transitioning between the two frequently, he relays this idea to his visitors and creates a constantly changing experience.

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BIBLIOGRAPHY: Websites: • http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/why-is-rem-koolhaas-the-worlds-mostcontroversial-architect-18254921/?no-ist=&page=1 • http://www.panelite.us/projects/interior-projects-gallery/iit-mccormick-tribune-campuscenter-interior/ • http://www.lynnbecker.com/repeat/OedipusRem/koolhaasIIT.htm • https://en.wikiarquitectura.com/index.php/McCormick_Tribune_Campus_Center • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fCEx8w9kCQ4 • http://imagecolorpicker.com/en Images: • http://archpaper.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/iit-mccormick-tribune-flickr.jpeg • https://www.flickr.com/photos/ericejohnson/6344153475 • http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8365/8501556644_ef4bd1b022_z.jpg • http://wirednewyork.com/ • http://www.newyorker.com/wp-content/uploads/2005/03/050314_r13928-1200.jpg • http://images.oma.eu/20150804004952-1505-mgtu/700.jpg • https://www.pinterest.com/pin/381961612118859362/ • https://encryptedtbn2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSfUcKzyzGAEkZaw2OdsIatJtaN4oRmZrwnmJTq9l2R OOK0SKfKdg • http://www.panelite.us/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/Panelite-ClearShade-Exterior-FacadeCurtain-Wall-Glazing-McCormick-IIT-Office-for-Metropolitan-Architecture-5.jpg

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What Dreams May Come

-Vincent Ward (1998)

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COLOR + PSYCHOLOGY


What Dreams May Come uses color in a beautiful and tantalizing manner. As the main character, Chris, travels through his obstacles in life and then through heaven, hell, and purgatory, the audience is able to feel every transitioning mood of each specific place. Vincent Ward, the director, changes the lighting and color palette to make the audience feel the scene’s happiness or hopelessness in order to have empathy for the dramatic changes the character must go through to reunite his family in the afterlife. Ward also uses three main colors (blue, red, and violet) symbolically throughout the film. The colors pop out against the palettes of his scenes to represent how the two main characters change. Ward is able to use color so masterfully, that the story could be told by color alone.

Awards: Academy Award for Best Visual Effects

Art Directors Guild Award for Excellence in Production Design Nominated for the Academy Award for Best Art Direction

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Chris and Annie’s ColorsBLUE and RED Blue and red represent Chris and Annie. The color red represents Annie. She changes constantly throughout the film and when she is herself, she is wearing red or something of hers is red. Once Annie’s children die, she never wears red again and transitions to black, from then on only items representing her are red. When Chris needs motivation to travel down the steep mountain, he imagines Annie throwing a red cloth for him to retrieve. Chris is Blue. Throughout the movie he wears the color. Once he dies, the color blue represents Annie's mourning of him. At his funeral, blue pots are in the background, at his grave site, she wears a blue head scarf and when she is about to kill herself there is a blue pillow next to her in their bed. In Chris’s memories of the two of them, he wears blue.

- Blue: Chris; Annie’s memory of Chris stability, trust, loyalty, faith, truth - Red: Annie; Chris’s love of Annie passion, love, a very emotionally intense color

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The Last Goodbye - VIOLET As Chris’s children are driven off to school it is he last time Chris sees them alive. For the viewers, it is the first time they see the color violet and the blue jacaranda that will continue to appear throughout the film. The Violet Jacaranda represents two ideas. It is Chris’s and Annie’s grief at the loss of their family. It also is the director’s representation of the fact that they are soul mates. The scene is overwhelmed with the color violet meaning that the scene is filled with grief. The car is a light blue, representing the sadness about to come, and is driving into a white horizon representing their innocence. In the corner of the scene is a pale red, representing the love the family has for each other. The green and brown of the trees not only adds depth but symbolizes Ian and Marie’s last moments on earth. The entire scene is bathed in a muted light emphasizing the somber moment.

- White: Innocence, purity, goodness - Violet: loss of family, grief, psychic ability and spiritual enlightenment

- Green: Life, renewal, nature, harmony, safety - Brown: Earth, healing, stability, foundations, home - Red: Chris and Annie’s love for their children


The Children’s Funeral- WHITE

- White: Innocence, purity, goodness ( Is Tinted Blue due to the blue lighting of the scene) - Dark Color Palette to represent Chris and Annie’s depression

- Red: Chris and Annie’s love for their children The scene uses neutral colors (excluding the presence of violet and red) and will be the scene with the most absence of color until Chris enters the lowest levels of hell. The noticeable dark scene, represents the darkest moment of Chris and Annie’s life. With their children dead, joy has left their world. Dark browns and black dominant the scene with even the red and violet and white tiling toned down in brilliance and saturation. The only bright color in the room are the coffins. The two kids, Ian and Marie, are encased in two white coffins. The white in this scene represents their innocence as they died too young.

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- Violet: loss of family, grief, psychic ability and spiritual enlightenment


Chris’ Heaven– MULTIPLE COLORS When Chris goes to Heaven he is bathed in a constantly warm light. As he moves around, the scene’s palette is constantly saturated with colors. Bright green, violets, and blues dominant the foliage and yellow horizons flood the scene with light. All the colors are vibrate. That is all except red. Red represents Annie. The dark red symbolizes Chris’s longing for her presence even in heaven. When Chris’s mentor, Albert enters the scene, he walks on a lake of orange and blue and is bathed in a warm, yellow light as well. This symbolizes the peace and happiness that they are both finding in heaven. Albert is wearing all white to represent him being from heaven.

- Yellow: joy, happiness, cheerfulness, warmth

- Green: Life, renewal, nature, harmony, safety

- Blue: Faith, truth, peace, heaven

- Red: Annie; Chris’s love of Annie passion, love, a very emotionally intense color - Orange: Joy, happiness, success, enthusiasm, fascination, creativity


- Pink: empathy, kindness, love, nurturing, - Red: Chris and Annie’s love for their children - Yellow: joy, happiness, cheerfulness, warmth - Orange: Joy, happiness, success, enthusiasm, fascination, creativity - Brown: Earth, healing, stability, foundations, home

Marie’s Heaven– YELLOW and ORANGE Marie’s Heaven is much different from her father’s. Where Chris’s Heaven had many colors, Marie’s is very trichromatic, Her heaven’s color palette uses shades of yellow, orange, and red for her residents while the stairway and mountain are composed of browns. The whole scene is filled with a warm yellow light. The Director chose the lack of color range to show that she has settled in and is content and happy after death. The mountains and stairways are light brown. In prior scenes on earth the browns had been very dark, but in her heaven, they are lighter with only darker browns for detailing. This symbolizes her remembrance of earth, but how she is now elevated from it in heaven. Her outfit has the only colors outside the scene’s color palette. She wears blue, red, and purple. Indicating to the viewer, before she reveals her true identity, that she is connected to Chris and Annie somehow.


Double-D Day- GREEN

- Green: Life, renewal, nature, harmony, safety

- Brown: Earth, healing, stability, foundations, home

Nowhere in the movie is there a monochromatic color palette except in Chris’s memory of his special anniversary with Annie. After the loss of their children, Annie plummeted into depression and was living in a psychiatric ward. Chris felt his presence was hurting her and eventually proposed leaving her for her own good. She asks him to stay “Divorce Decision” Day is the day they began their life again. The Color green floods the scene. It is the background, the frame, and the only other color Annie wears besides red and blue. Green represents life and Annie’s decision to choose life. Brown is added in the background and detailing to add depth. It also represents healing, stability, foundations, and home.

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- Yellow: hope, confidence, optimism

Entrance to Hell- RED and BLACK

- Red: anger, war, determination, danger, passion, desire, love.

- Black: power, death, evil, mystery When Chris learns his wife is in hell, the director switches from yellow and blue light to red and the palette becomes dark. The scene is red to represent Chris’s anger and love. He is angry at the rules of the afterlife, that suicides are sent to purgatory, and he is self-assured that his love will bring her back. His hope is also represented by yellow. There are notes of yellow placed in the scene: in the sky and in the candlestick holders. Chris is certain that Annie can be saved. There is no blue in this scene, only red- Annie’s color - emphasizing Chris’s anger, love, and complete focus on saving Annie. In the corner of the scene is a fruit bowl. It seems out of place in this dark scene but it is purposefully placed there to reference Chris’s heaven. Chris wants to bring Annie out of her purgatory into his heaven. When Chris crosses the lake to hell the whole scene is void of color, except for the broad red sail of the boat. The colorless scene is hopelessness and the red sail is Chris’s determination in the face of overwhelming odds.

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Annie’s Purgatory- VIOLET Annie’s purgatory is void of color. When Chris approaches her projection of their home it is in an achromatic palette. The only color in the scene is the Violet Jacaranda which represents grief. Then the viewer realizes that the scene’s lighting is violet. Annie is consumed by her grief: at the loss of her children, at the loss of her husband, and at the loss of her own life. When Chris enters the house, it is still feels void of color though bathed in violet lighting, even Annie has no pigment. Chris for a while is the only alternate source of color in the scene. When he tries to coax Annie out of her denial, the light in the background appears red and blue against the violet tint dominating the scene. The colors represent Annie and Chris, how they used to be and what Chris is trying to get Annie to remember.

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Achromatic Palette: hopelessness, depression, emotionlessness

- Violet (Appears Blue): Chris

- Violet (Appears Red): Annie

- Violet: loss of family, grief, psychic ability and spiritual enlightenment


“Balance enforces the demand for oppositional groups…and it achieves its objectives as soon as oppositional forces are clearly identified” Balance refers to the relationship of different hues to one another when each is perceived to be equal in perceived visual weight. Perceptual balance involves the object itself (size, scale) and the visual weight of the color (appears heavy or light). The four key factors to good color balance Amount of color used Number of different colors used Visual weight of the colors Location of colors within the space. The four types of color balance Value Contrast (Light/Dark) Hue Balance (Complements) Intensity Contrast (Bright/Dull) Size of Color Area (Large/Small) The location of colors is as important to a balanced composition as the selection of color itself. Color acts as a carrier focusing attention on specific design features and elements. Color can connect the design elements and create harmony. Throw out trendy or established rules. No color is good or bad. How color is used within the space determines its success.

COLOR + BALANCE

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COLOR + BALANCE


COLOR + HEALTHCARE Goals of Healing Environments Strive to heal the patient Support the staff Engage the family 12 aspects of a healing environment that can speed up the healing process 1. Single patient rooms 2. Ergonomics 3. Furniture arrangement 4. Air Quality 5. Windows 6. Wayfinding 7. Building layouts and zoning 8. Access to nature 9. Light – natural daylight 10. Floor materials 11. Noise control 12. Positive distraction through the use of aesthetics Different spaces have different programs so the color palette should be chosen with the idea of how the space will be used and who will be in the space.

“Designing for unique human beings requires the design of unique built environments.”

COLOR + HEALTHCARE

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COLOR + IMAGE

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COLOR + RHYTHM The purpose of rhythm is to provide an opportunity to move the viewer through the space, creating moments for emphasizing or downplaying various design elements. There are five types of rhythm associated with color: repetition, alternation, progression, continuation, and radiation. Using Bio-Inspired color and design creates a personal connection, familiarity, and relevance.

Using high-saturated opposing color creates strong vibrancy and results in an over visual stimulation. Outlining with color is a way to add visual movement with minimal effort. A Color rhythm of more than three hues should be avoided due to visual clutter. The exception would be a gradual succession of light to dark values.

“The shapes and qualities of architectural spaces greatly influence human experience and behavior, and columns that shape it. Positive spaces are almost always preferred by people for lingering and social interaction. Negative space tends to promote movement rather than dwelling in space.

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PROJECT: Christian Dior DESIGNER: Meyer Davis Studio LOCATION: Miami Design District, 162 NE 39th St, Miami, FL 33137

COLOR + RETAIL R Design Analysis

COLOR + RETAIL

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The Dior women's collection store uses an color and an achromatic palette to highlight its main design features and to make its inventory stand out in the store. Founded in 1946 by Christian Dior, today the company designs and retails ready-to-wear, leather goods, fashion accessories, footwear, jewelry, timepieces, fragrance, make-up, and skincare products while also maintaining its tradition as a creator of recognized haute-couture.

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COLOR + RETAIL


Contrast of Hue

The Dior store occupies a modern three-story building with a façade that appears to by crookedly stacked concrete blocks, created in collaboration with Barbarito Bancel. To attract the customer the display windows are bursting with color which change in hue adding more dimension to the display. This striking contrast to the white façade draws the eye to the mannequins at the center and also entices the potential customer to continue walking around the building to see the other displays as well.

Contrast of a Design Feature

The center seating contrasts to the room first in its geometry. Compared to the rigid lines of the design surrounding it. The organic flowers and the curved seating offer relief to the otherwise inflexible design. The flowers, which change based on the season, offer a bright pop of color to the section of the store whose only color is its inventory. Its contrast with the white, grey and black surrounding it gives the eye a visual relief of color while at the same time drawing the eye to the mannequins seated, dressed as the season’s “it girl”.

Contrast of Texture

The use of texture is used as a backdrop to Dior’s present inventory. Dior grey can come of as flat and dull but its subtlety also provides an opportunity to add more texture then one would with a colored surface as it will not become overwhelming. Texture is added to the displays, allowing the light to cast shadows over the metal, while on the walls, varying tones of grey are used. Both give a sense of depth.

Contrast of Value

The interior design was designed by renowned architect Peter Marino. Throughout the interior he uses the iconic Dior grey. In this room, it especially highlights how the use of lighter and darker tones can draw attention to the display cases and is able to create visual section in the wall, making the room feel larger and more dynamic. The flooring separating the two rooms is white with black border to act as a separation but still not visually distract from the room’s interior.

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The interior is dotted with commissioned artworks that change by season. But at the heart is the video art wall by Yoram Mevorach. The wall can be seen from the entrance and highlights the buildings main circulation: a staircase that connects the three story building. The colors used within the video montage are collected from past Dior seasons with clips from runway shows. This ensures that the colors that appear momentarily on the screen do not clash with Dior’s present inventory.

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COLOR + RETAIL


“Balance enforces the demand for oppositional groups…and it achieves its objectives as soon as oppositional forces are clearly identified” Children live in an adults world, where large spaces seem overwhelming. Color can be used to change our visual perception of a space’s actual size. Practical Application with Color and Perception of Scale 1. Light colors advance, and dark colors recede. Warm colors advance and cool colors recede. 2. Use a hue in two to three close values 3. A room with a dark ceiling and light floor will spear top heavy and our of balance. 4. Small spaces can be made to appear much larger if similar colors are used throughout. 5. Dark, strong, or warm colors like red or dark orange will make the wall seem to advance and make the room feel smaller. 6. Cool, dull, or light colors will appear to stretch space – to push the wall outward. 7. A long corridor will seem shorter if the end wall is painted or covered in a warm color. 8. A low ceiling will seem higher if it is painted a lighter value than the walls. 9. Large pieces of furniture will look smaller if upholstered in the same color as value as the walls. 10. A dark hue, whether warm or cool, can decrease the size of a space and a light hue will open up a space

COLOR + SCALE COLOR + SCALE

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PROJECT: 1 Hotel South Beach DESIGNER: Meyer Davis Studio LOCATION: 2341 Collins Ave, Miami Beach, FL 33139

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COLOR + VARIETY _ HOSPITALITY

Commercial Design Analysis


PROJECT + DESIGNERS The new brand, 1Hotel, sets out to redefine luxury with its opening of its flagship in Miami Beach. Ithe Brand is owned by Barry Sternlicht, the chairman and CEO of Starwood Capital Group and a member of the Interior Design Hall of Fame . Meyer Davis Studio, a New York City–based design boutique specializing in residential, hospitality, retail and workplace environments, was given the task of designing the interior of the new hotel , with sustainability in mind.

““The luxury of enough” – Will Meyer

The site is located in the quieter Mid-Beach, stretches a full city block with 600 feet of beachfront. The sixteen-story building from 1968 that occupied the site was transformed. The lower eight stories became the hotel while the upper eight became apartments. The Hotel’s brand is “The luxury of enough” as Meyer calls it. The Brand seeks to make its name synonymous with eco-consciousness. In keeping with Sternlicht’s overall vision of sustainability, the interior displays the hotel’s drive towards LEED certification. Reclaimed wood, recycled material used to make coat hangers, green walls, hemp mattresses, and chalkboards replacing paper are just a small percentage.

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LOBBY


Palette

As Davis said, the hotel’s palette is “Wood, sand, and ocean tones”. By looking to Miami’s nature as inspiration, the hotel becomes an oasis from the “art deco razzledazzle” of Miami Beach. As the visitors first impression of the hotel, the lobby epitomizes the relaxing spirit of the hotel.

““We paid homage to the natural landscape of South Florida”– Will Meyer

Color + Line

The horizontal lines created on the entrance walls and roof by the material’s joints lead towards the reception area. The vertical lines attempt to pull the scale downwards to prepare the guests for the drop in ceiling height when they walk from the double heighted space to the lowcompressive ceilings of the reception.

Color + Shape

Recycled wood are the sculptural pieces throughout the lobby. They are left in their natural color or painted white to reconcile the organic forms with the architectural linear forms of the space. Color alteration with the sculptures is used to define separate seating areas.

Color + Line

Color + Shape

Color + Texture

Color + Pattern

Color + Texture

The lobby is bursting with texture and the most intriguing use of texture is in its organic forms. At the reception desk near the bar, the white walls are clean and modern but its texture contrasts the white by being treated to resemble a cave. The lighting allows the grey shadows to add depth to the wall . The table, is a live-edge oak top resting on a gnarled teak-root base. The warm browns contrast against the cool white background making it stand out while the yellow light piercing in like sunlight ties them together.

Color + Pattern

The repetitive lines of live moss creates a very Miami motif on the entrance wall. Highlighting both the Hotel’s sustainability effort as well a its Miami luxury. The 20’-by-30’ mural, which is the largest collection of plants in the lobby serves as the focal point of the space.

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CENTER POOL


Palette

The color palette for not only the Center Pool, but all four pools, reference the natural landscape of Miami and therefore have a very neutral color palette. The Focal point of the pool patio is the pool itself. Therefore its bright blue is the main pop of color to contrast against the pure white and soft beige tones. The blue is referenced again in the blue pillows that accompany the furniture.

“There’s a relaxed peacefulness. Barry referenced toes in the sand.” – Gray Davis

Color + Line

The four pools within the 1 Hotel all have very linear designs. The horizontal lines created by the wooden planks draw movement towards the white and blue pool. By subtle changes in color tint, texture, or hue, a grid is created around the pool marking different spaces.

Color + Shape

To add to the ocean front vibe of the pool natural greenery is placed throughout the patio. Its organic form, which contrasts to the rigid linear design, is further highlighted by its bright green color.

Color + Line

Color + Shape

Color + Texture

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The main texture of the poolside is on the ground to not only visually transport guests to the boardwalks of South Beach but to also make them feel as though they are there. The roofing texture resembles that of a cabana, the wooden flooring is like that of a boardwalk, and the sand makes them feel as though they are sitting on the beach. All this is done in warm browns and light beiges and visually is separate from the plain white surfaces surrounding the pool.

Color + Pattern

The main pattern of the Center Pool Is the repetitive shadows created on the interior of the bar by the above roof. The pattern is alive, changing constantly throughout the day, and makes the cabana dynamic.

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ROOFTOP BAR + LOUNGE


Palette

The palette is light. Like the rest of the hotel below, the palette of the Rooftop Bar and Lounge is white, plain, and fresh with lots of wood.

Color + Line

Our concept from the start was to celebrate the day. Miami’s about the night. We actually like the night, but we like the day too…”– Barry Sternlicht

Strip lights are used to direct movement in the hotel as especially on the rooftop as guests fill up the space during the night. The sequence of yellow lines offers a progression to the rooftop pool. Lines of light also border the bar top, accentuating its length and encouraging movement through the space.

Color + Shape

Black is not used (noticeably) anywhere else in the rooftop design and mark the bar as the focal point. The square black columns represent stability and modernity in contrast to the light and airy feel of the rest of the space. The black columns become part of the space with the addition of yellow lights which match the hue of the surrounding lights.

Color + Line

Color + Shape

Color + Texture

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The side paneling on the roof of the shelter acts to further define the bar as the focal point of the space. The interior texture around it, such as the flooring, columns, and furniture are smooth and sleek, and lead up to the large rectangular structure at the heart of the rooftop lounge. The color is kept light brown so that it will keep with the color palette and not overshadow the columns.

Color + Pattern

The design of the hotel is kept very natural, therefore excess patterns that are inorganic are kept to a minimal. On the rooftop, the pattern lies behind the bar. The bottles of wine in their displays are used to accent the space. There bright colors, mixtures of complementary reds and greens, pop out against the dark wood borders.

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COLOR + VARIETY Rendering Analysis

Dominant

Secondary 2

Secondary 1

GREEN COAST This color palette is universal. The color combination is cool and calming and reflects the natural environment. In addition, being surrounded with this color palette can improve one’s health. Blue is beneficial to the mind and body. It slows human metabolism and produces a calming effect. Grey is calming and peaceful, though it can be cold and boring. However, Green is the color of life and brings rejuvenation to offset the coldness of the grey.

Accent 1

Accent 2

Dominant

M.10

GREY TINTS - Visually is a cool, neutral, and balanced color. It is associated with being sophisticated, conservative, and timeless. BLUE TONES - Is associated with depth and stability and symbolizes trust, loyalty, wisdom, intelligence, and heaven. GREEN HUES – Symbolizes growth, freshness, environment, and energy.

COLOR + VARIETY _ RENDERING


ANALOGOUS COLOR SCHEME The Colors used in this palette are located adjacent to one another on the color wheel. This is why the palette has such a soothing effect. In working with the 60/30/10 guideline, the greys are the dominant color. The Blue Tones are two secondary colors and the Green tints are the two accent colors.

COLOR + VARIETY

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COLOR + VARIETY


COLOR + RESULTS This was a fun way to apply our past weeks lessons and is a great example of how an image can inspire a design. While designing the room, I kept the image of the rocks, moss and ocean in mind and distributed the colors to reflect the image they came from. The light grey tints were used to paint the planes of the room with blue tones placed throughout as well. The light greens were used as accents, like the moss covering the stones in the image.

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PROJECT: One Workplace DESIGNER: Design Blitz LOCATION: 2500 De La Cruz Boulevard, Santa Clara, CA 95050, United States

COLOR + WORKPLACE Workplace Design Analysis

COLOR + VARIETY _ WORKPLACE

M.12


One Workplace is a family owned, family run company. It is the largest furniture dealer in Northern California and the single source of Steelcase furniture in the San Francisco Bay Area.

ONE WORKPLACE

Blitz is an architecture and interior design firm and specialize in commercial, retail, and hospitality design. Their focus is balancing buildings, branding, and experiences. Coincidentally for this project, they also offer furniture service. Rather than the traditional client/dealer relationship, One Workplace aims to create a partnership with the client and when they needed to change their office from 35,000 square feet to 45,000 square feet and still increase staff, they hired Design Blitz for the ambitious project. The new showroom defines their new business standard with a new architectural standard. The layered showroom’s “bleeding edge” serves a purpose for both clients and employees. By dualing as an office space, the room displays how furniture will react to architecture and One Workplace’s expertise in office furniture. In the interiors. the color palettes follow the 60/30/10 guideline: the dominant colors are white/grey, the subdominant are tones of brown, and the accent colors alternate between red, yellow, lime, blue, and purple depending on room. In addition depending on how the colors are balanced within the room, black is sometimes used as an accent color as well. The last office One Workplace occupied, they stayed for 10 years, the new Headquarters is planned to last for at least that long. Therefore, the main color palette is kept neutral while bright color and patterns are limited to elements that are easily replaced or interchanged as trends change.

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FIRST IMPRESSIONS


LOBBY

As the first showroom the customers will see, the lobby represents the tone of the design to come.

Color + LINE – Structural and mechanical elements are achromatic. They add depth to the room and define difference in areas.

COLOR + LINE

COLOR + PATTERN

COLOR + SHAPE

COLOR + TEXTURE

Color + SHAPE – Small furniture pieces stand out further because they are painted purple. Color + PATTERN – Because the pattern on the steel screen is grey. It ties into the achromatic palette of the walls. Color + TEXTURE - The green wall brings life into the near neutral palette and connects with the color of the furniture.

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LAYERED SHOWROOM


Design Blitz planned for longevity and flexibility by providing a raised floor system in the open office for easy furniture reconfiguration and limiting color and pattern to elements that are easily interchanged as trends change.

COLOR + LINE

COLOR + PATTERN

COLOR + SHAPE

COLOR + TEXTURE

Color + LINE – On the bottom level, the furniture guides guests through, the white lines of the furniture subtly displaying the direction. Color + SHAPE – The raised platform is painted in solid black, highlighting its importance in the space. Color + PATTERN – The white pattern on the carpet matched with the white walls and the black platform, tying the space together. Color + TEXTURE - The platforms floor and roof of the platform is covered in wooden planking adding warmth to an otherwise cold palette.

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DISTINCTION THROUGH COLOR


Color + LINE – The details and the structure of the building are kept in an achromatic color palette.

OFFICE

In the open office, each section has its own designated color. In this upper office area, the color assigned is red.

Color + SHAPE – The rug, the lamp, the cups, and pillows are all in a bright red. Which makes them stand out in the achromatic room.

COLOR + LINE

COLOR + PATTERN

COLOR + SHAPE

COLOR + TEXTURE

Color + PATTERN – To break up the flat planes of the room, a white couch with a cut-out pattern was added. It is enough detail to add interest for the eye, but not too much to fight with the red and become overwhelming. Color + TEXTURE - Like in the main office, the wooden table as warmth and earthyness to the colder palette.

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FINAL THOUGHTS

The collaboration between One Workplace and Design Blitz created a workplace that displays a new standard for furniture design companies. Not only is the client able to wander and get new ideas for their space, they are also able to interact with the One Workplace employees who are able to work at any space within the office building. So this seamless workplace to showroom idea creates a very dynamic and more personal business relationship with the client. The color palette is well thought out and timeless. The architectural elements are kept achromatic so that the furniture could stand out. By using different textures, patterns, and linear elements in the achromatic palette, Design Blitz could ensure that the room will be timeless and dynamic while still able to mix with new colors as trends change. Another smart move they made was using only a pure hue. If there was a variation in tint or shade, then the furniture color wouldn’t have as much an impact. The variation in tint or shade would also fight with both variation of shade in the achromatic palette as well as the other solid hues in the space. The single hues have a strong impact on their own.

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COLOR + WORKPLACE


COLOR + CULTURE Commercial Design Analysis

My culture and country is Thailand. My mother is Thai. To keep my brother and I a part of the culture we would travel to the Thai Temple on Sundays and learn Thai dancing and how to speak Thai. During the summers, our family travel to Thailand to stay with family. When I was a child, I could see the cultural difference from the United States and Thailand just through color alone. In major cities, the streets are often flooded in bright yellow collared shirts and monks clad in orange (white for the women) can be seen walking in groups. As opposed to the typical USA yellow taxi cab, the cabs and tuk tuks on the busy Bangkok streets were green, blue, yellow, orange, and pink. What was interesting to me was that it was always the same tone, so I can still recognize a Thailand color.

I have chosen Russia to learn about their color and how they use color. After reading Anna Karenina and The Possessed, Russian culture has interested me. I’ve never been there, but it is one of the countries I would love to visit. I chose to analyze the colors of Russia because of it’s proximity to Thailand. I’ve always found it peculiar how Russia’s culture and architecture is unique from Asia and Europe, but has elements of both. I would to understand what color’s are symbolic of Russia and what meaning they find in color.

COLOR + CULTURE

M.13


THAILAND ราชอาณาจักรไทย

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COLOR + CULTURE


YELLOW - the color of King Bhumibol Adulyadej, the ninth monarch of Thailand.

BLUE - the color of Queen Sirikit as she was born on a Friday.

ORANGE - In Theravada Buddhism, orange represents peace, meditation, and glory of life itself.

RED – Color of the opposition group the “Red Shirts”

BLACK - associated with death and grieving. Traditionally it is taboo to wear black except during funeral rites and periods of mourning.

THAILAND ราชอาณาจักรไทย Thais are a very superstitious people, and subsequently there are many superstitious beliefs and customs that are observed in Thailand, especially the meanings of color. There is a color Day Lucky Unlucky assigned to each day Color Color of the week in addition Sun Red Blue there is also an unlucky color each day as well. Mon Yellow Red The tradition is no Tues Pink Yellow & White longer popular among Wed Green Pink young Thais, but many Traditional Thais still Thurs Orange Purple follow it. The Colors are Fri Light Blue Black & Dark believed to influence Blue the daily lives of Sat Purple Green people. King Bhumibol’s color is yellow because his birthday was on a Monday. Out of respect and love for their king, Thais wear his color on Mondays and special events, and some occupations, such as teaching require employees to wear yellow for long time periods. Until recently it was common to see people wearing yellow and blue on the streets until the rise of the Red shirts, an opposition group towards the current government, the yellow supporting the current government. After the recent death of the King, the country has entered a year long period of mourning. Advised to wear only black, grey or white, to be seen not wearing the colors is seen as a criticism of the monarchy (which is a dangerous thing to be accused of in a country with strict lese majeste laws). Black clothing has been in short supply, photos of the King have run out of stock, and the younger generation have even blacked out their social media profile pictures.

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RUSSIA Россия

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COLOR + CULTURE


RUSSIA RED – associated with the Bolsheviks and Communism, also means beautiful in Russian and is used often in weddings

BLUE – associated with romance and excitement of exploring. Traditionally a symbol of noble birth

WHITE- became synonymous in the USSR with “counterrevolutionary” and “hostile”.

VIOLET – The word “violet” in slang is used to describe utter indifference.

ORANGE - associated with members of the liberal, pro-western, opposition.

Россия Russian color symbolism traditionally, was quite simple. In their traditional garb the colors white, red, and black symbolized different period of life. White could mean a high social status, a transformation of a social role, or motherhood. Red symbolized blood and fire and thus the energy flow of a human being. It meant fertility, fitness, health, beauty and represented a mature young man and a young woman ready to become a mother. The word red has the most positive connotations of the Russian language and very closely means beauty. Black represented a distance between a person and a world. It symbolized seniors after 70 years old, spinsters, and monks. Color took a political meaning later on to represent different political ideology. In the early 20th century, the color red came to represent the Bolshevik Revolution and communism. In the 1918-1920 Civil war, the Red and White armies fought against each other and the color white became synonymous with “counterrevolutionary” and “hostile”. Following the Orange Revolution, orange began to denote members of the liberal, pro-western, opposition. The colors yellow and green have universally accepted associations. Yellow is used to describe sensationalist press (Yellow Journalism) and the color green is used to denote association with environmental protection. References • https://iluvthailand.wordpress.com/2008/06/28/thai-superstitionsabout-color/ • http://www.noupe.com/inspiration/photography/bangkok-colors69696.html • https://rbth.com/blogs/2013/11/14/red_white_blue_color_symbolis m_in_russian_language_31727.html • http://www.empower-yourself-with-color-psychology.com/culturalcolor.html

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Lee Final Book IND 5325 Color Theory for the Built Environment  
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