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ISSN: 2043-992X

Spring/Summer 2011

DefenDer

Operation Lion Ark Closing down every circus in Bolivia and taking all of the animals to safety! New UK law on vivisection – Government decides Lab Animal Week 18-24 April Horrific suffering of UK circus elephant exposed


ANIMAL DEFENDER ISSN: 2043-992X published by Animal Defenders International incorporating The Campaigner, published by the National Anti-Vivisection Society

UK: Millbank Tower, Millbank, LoNDoN, SW1P 4QP, U.K. Tel: +44 (0)20 7630 3340 Fax: +44 (0)20 7828 2179 e-mail: info@ad-international.org web: www.ad-international.org

© Tim Phillips / Animal Defenders International

Editorial

2011 is already shaping up to be one of our most important years, certainly in my memory. Not only to we have proposals for new UK legislation on animal experiments for the first time in nearly 25 years, but we also have a government announcement imminent on the use of animals in travelling circuses. Let’s hope the Coalition Government sees sense and bans the use of animals in travelling circuses here.

USA: 6100 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 1150, LoS ANgeLeS, CA 90048, USA Tel: +1 323-935-2234 Fax: +1 323-935-9234 e-mail: usa@ad-international.org web: www.adiusa.org

In this issue, we cover our latest exposé of the utterly sickening cruelty and suffering of circus elephant Anne, who was torn from the wild and has endured the kind of life that only nightmares are made of, for over 50 years. Almost all of my life. It hardly bears thinking about. I hope we can save her.

South America: Apartado Postal 359888 BogoTÁ, Colombia. e-mail: info@ad-international.org web: www.ad-international.org

Then there are the lucky ones: the picture above is me with a little horse who I christened Tim – he was going to be dinner for the lions in one of the Bolivian circuses we raided – so I insisted we take Tim, too. We are now finding a permanent place for Tim and some other horses we found in Bolivia. The full story of how we closed down every single circus in Bolivia and rescued every animal in Operation Lion Ark has a special report starting on p11.

editors: Creamer/Phillips Design: Creamer/Phillips/Elson Cartoons: Paul Taylor Contributors: Jan Creamer; Tim Phillips; Phil Buckley; Helder Constantino; Alexandra Cardenas; Christina Dodkin; Jessamy Korotoga; Lisa Mitchinson.

Our biggest challenge this year, though, is the Home Office proposals for new legislation on animal experiments, following the adoption of the new European Directive. We have to fight to the end to make as much ground as we can to ensure that there are specific measures taken to replace the use of animals with advanced methods, and we need to educate parliament and public about the iniquity of animal experiments. See our ‘Cutting Edge, not Knife Edge’ article opposite. This is your call to arms – we need you out on the streets, delivering leaflets, lobbying your MP, writing to the Home Office minister, Lynne Featherstone. The animals have no voice – they only have you.

©2011 ADI. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced for commercial purposes by any means whatsoever without the written permission of ADI/NAVS. ANIMAL DEFENDERS INTERNATIONAL: Founded 1990. To educate, create awareness, and promote the interest of humanity in the cause of justice, and the suppression of all forms of cruelty to animals; wherever possible, to alleviate suffering, and to conserve and protect animals and their environment. NATIONAL ANTI-VIVISECTION SOCIETY: Founded 1875; the world’s premier anti-vivisection group. Millions of animals suffer and die in cruel, unscientific, and futile experiments. The NAVS advocates the total prohibition of all animal experiments, and, pending the achievement of this aim, we may support partial measures which would provide steps towards reform.

We need do something today for animals. Jan Creamer, Chief Executive.

LORD DOWDING FUND: Founded 1974; a department of the NAVS; sponsors non-animal scientific and medical research.

Where there’s a WILL there’s a WAY to help suffering animals If you knew animals were being abused, could you rest in peace? Sadly, throughout their lives, the last thing many animals experience is peace. Toto the chimpanzee, for example, was imprisoned in a circus for 25 years and forced to perform tricks and smoke cigarettes for people’s entertainment. He was one of the lucky ones because he was rescued by Animal Defenders International (ADI) and returned home to Africa where he now lives with his own kind. ADI is a major international force in animal protection. Please help us to help other animals like Toto to live in peace by making a bequest today to Animal Defenders International.

If you believe in reincarnation there are some animals you wouldn’t want to be. Imagine a life imprisoned in a cramped cage, subjected to constant experimentation; a lifetime of suffering followed by a painful death. That’s the cruel, futile fate suffered by millions of laboratory animals in the name of research. The National Anti-Vivisection Society is the world’s premier and leading group working to end the suffering of animals in laboratories. We lobby Parliament; produce scientific reports, educational materials and videos; conduct undercover investigations and expose law breaking. We fund nonanimal scientific research. Please help us to help laboratory animals by making a bequest to the National Anti-Vivisection Society.

Help finance an evolution. Will you leave a lasting legacy of compassion, and help scientific advancement? The Lord Dowding Fund finances scientific and medical research without the use of animals. We believe that cruel animal techniques have no place in 21st century science. We have supported major advances in many fields, including neuroscience, cancer research and safety testing – we developed a humane British Standard Test for the toxicity of dental fillings. Your legacy could help save the lives of animals and advance scientific research. Help finance an evolution in medical science and leave a lasting legacy with a bequest today to the Lord Dowding Fund.

For a free guide to making a Will and helping animals, call us today on 020 7630 3340

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www.ldf.org.uk NAVS & ADI


Cutting edge, not knife edge This is our new mobile billboard that will be touring the UK during Lab Animal Week.

New vivisection law for the UK – this year The Home office has told us that they plan to have draft legislation prepared by the autumn with a view to this being implemented by late 2012. This will be the biggest overhaul of animal experimentation regulations for nearly 25 years, as the Home office transposes european Directive (2010/63/eU). For over seven years we have been fighting this battle in europe – now it is here. The UK government will be amending the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 to comply with the new Directive and can choose whether to adopt the bare minimum, or use this as an opportunity to drive forward modern replacement techniques. A choice of cutting edge or knife edge. The Right to Decide Following meetings with the minister and Home Office officials, the NAVS can reveal that the Coalition Government is considering putting the Directive into UK law without a full public and parliamentary debate. The Home Office is looking at powers under the European Communities Act to bring in ‘secondary’ legislation. This means that the new law is written by the Home Office and submitted for a vote ADI & NAVS

without full public debate. We believe that it is vital that public and parliament get the opportunity to decide on this legislation. NAVS, ADI and LDF have put together a list of key areas where the new Directive provides the opportunity to replace animal experiments, but also, we have pointed out where there could be a danger of lowering of UK standards. The Key opportunities for Change An aim of the Directive is to make a “step towards achieving the final goal of full replacement of procedures on live animals for scientific and educational purposes” (Recital 10). We recommend ten steps the Coalition government should take: 1. end household product testing. 2. No downgrading of UK animal protection measures in the law – our rules that are stricter than the EU Directive must be maintained. 3. Commit to replacing experiments on monkeys in UK laboratories. Article 8 of the Directive establishes that “specimens of non-human primates shall not be used in procedures” with the exception of procedures “undertaken

Ten steps the Government must take 1. Ban household product testing 2. No downgrading of existing UK animal protection measures 3. Commit to replacing experiments on monkeys in UK laboratories 4. End the capture of monkeys from the wild, by laboratory dealers 5. Set limits on the pain laboratory animals are allowed to suffer 6. Increase transparency on animal experiments – before animals are used 7. Increase compulsory data sharing to prevent unnecessary experiments 8. Establish a UK co-ordinating body for the development and validation of replacements – non-animal methods 9. Ensure the effective implementation of non-animal methods – if there is an alternative it must be used 10. The UK should organise regular reviews to identify and agree replacement methods with binding targets for specific animal experiments and specific uses of animals with a view to the avoidance, prevention, diagnosis or treatment of debilitating or potentially life-threatening clinical conditions”. 2008 EU statistics show the UK has become the no.1 user of laboratory primates in Europe, while in other

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Cutting edge, not knife edge countries such as France, Belgium and Netherlands primates use has dropped. Austria appears to have completely ended their use; in Germany numbers are stable. Yet in the UK primate use has jumped from 3115 to 3354. Our 2009 investigation in Huntingdon Life Sciences exposed the appalling suffering of monkeys used in contract research laboratories (see this issue). 4. end the wild capture of monkeys by laboratory dealers. Article 10 of the Directive aims at ending the use of F1 primates in experiments and breeding programmes. This would stop the capture of monkeys from the wild. However, hard lobbying from the laboratory animal dealers ensured a long phase-out of F1 primates - 12 years. This is where the UK government could take the lead in Europe – by setting an earlier, more responsible and reasonable deadline. More than 50% of all primates imported to the UK are born from parents caught in the wild (F1 primates). Every year hundreds of primates are imported from Asia, where wild monkeys are caught for breeding stock to supply British labs. Wholesale capture of wild monkeys has devastating effects on the environment, and wild populations. The Home Office refusal to recognise the

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Current UK legislation utterly failed to protect the monkeys whose suffering we exposed at HLS – the government must use the new Directive to implement rules that protect animals more effectively. suffering of monkeys caught from their native environment and kept in inhumane conditions in supply centres, such as Nafovanny in Vietnam, is irresponsible and reflects the protection given to suppliers’ interests (see this issue). 5. The new Directive establishes a limit on the severity of the pain that laboratory animals are permitted to suffer. Article 15 provides: “Member States shall ensure that a procedure is not performed if it involves severe pain, suffering or distress that is likely to be long-lasting and cannot be ameliorated.” The government should set limits on the severity of pain that animals are allowed to suffer, and the Home Office should create a list of prohibited experiments. 6. Increase transparency on animal experiments – provide more public accountability and independent scrutiny, before permission to use animals is granted. Put project licence applications online and allow organisations such as NAVS and LDF to suggest non-

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animal alternatives. Overhaul the local ethical review bodies, to bring in more expertise from non-animal research bodies. Recital 41 of the Directive provides that “to ensure that the public is informed, it is important that objective information concerning projects using live animals is made publicly available”. However, as many of our readers will recall, in the UK Section 24 of the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 (ASPA), bars the release of all information on animal research from laboratories, the penalty being prison. NAVS has campaigned against this secrecy clause since 1986, and vigorously during the passage of the Freedom of Information Act 2000. We pointed out that the FOI Act adequately provides for protection of confidential information (for example intellectual property and personal details), making S.24 of the ASPA both unnecessary and at odds with FOI principles. The exemption for S.24 under FOI rules should be removed, and in this review of the ASPA, S.24 should be repealed. 7. Compulsory data sharing to prevent unnecessary experiments. 8. establish a UK co-ordinating body for the development and validation of replacement (non-animal) methods.

NAVS & ADI


Lab Animal Week 9. ensure the effective implementation of non-animal methods – where there is an alternative available, it must be used. 10. The UK should organise regular reviews to identify and agree replacement methods with binding targets for specific animal experiments and specific uses of animals, as outlined in the Directive. This should involve all stakeholders, including animal protection and replacement experts. Such targets have proved effective on the cosmetics testing issue. You can help change the lives of the 3.7 million animals who suffer and die in UK labs every year. Tell your MP you want advanced technology, not animal tests.

World Lab Animal Week

18-24 April 2011 Help Help the the animals during during Lab Lab Animal Animal Week Week 2011! 2011! every year, millions of laboratory animals suffer and die in laboratories where they are burnt, blinded, scalded and poisoned in unreliable, unethical and unnecessary experiments. Yet there are advanced scientific techniques and technologies to replace the use of animals. We need our supporters to help us end animal experiments and bring in replacement methods. New laws on animal experiments are about to be discussed in the UK (see opposite). Help us to persuade the government to bring in the use of advanced nonanimal methods. It is time for action. If you do nothing else for lab animals this year, help us with this campaign in Lab Animal Week 2011.

Here’s What you can do ● Write to your local newspaper;

WHAT YOU CAN DO ●

Write to your MP – include the list above and ask them to put pressure on the government to act to replace the use of animals in tests. Take part in the government’s public consultation. In the coming week’s the Home Office will hold a consultation about the new Directive. Laboratory animals need you to be their voice. Keep in touch with NAVS to find out how to take part. give out 25 of our ‘Cutting Edge, not Knife Edge’ leaflets – to homes near you; distribute them to friends and family, ask them to help. give one hour a week to helping this campaign. Keep in touch with NAVS. You can visit our website – navs.org.uk for the latest news, sign up for our email alerts, or call us on 020 7630 3340.

ADI & NAVS

tell them about Lab Animal Week, and the ten things that the government needs to do. Write to your MP; tell them about the ten things the government needs to do; ask them to support widespread use of non-animal alternatives. Deliver Lab Animal Week leaflets to 25 houses in your neighbourhood. We also have a new Animal experiments: The Facts leaflet available for distribution. Contact us to put you in touch with a local group, so you can join in local activities. Distribute our leaflets to your local veterinary surgery, library or community centre. Visit: navs.org.uk for more information on what you can do, or call 020 7630 3340.

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Campaign News

Right: our NASA DVD; April evans the Nasa engineer who resigned over the tests, speaks at Congressional reception; Tim Phillips, ADI Campaigns Director arrives at Congress on the day of the vote.

Our global campaign to end space experiments has been given a massive boost with NASA halting its proposed experiments on squirrel monkeys. The announcement followed distribution to every member of Congress our new space experiments DVD and campaign activity in the US, Europe, Russia and Brazil. The Brookhaven National Laboratory, where the monkey experiments were to take place, announced that “NASA has informed Brookhaven that a proposal involving primate research at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory on the Brookhaven Lab site should be removed from consideration for experimental time at the facility.” Additionally, NASA stated that it is “going to undertake a comprehensive review of the agency's current research and technology development plans to see how they align with the president's plan for human spaceflight, as outlined in the U.S. National Space Policy and the 2010 NASA Authorization Act.” In September, we launched our new video ‘Space Experiments on Monkeys – One Giant Leap Backwards’ revealing the horrific nature of the monkey experiments which would have included: Burns, weakness, hair loss, failing organs and nausea. We underlined how the tests were scientifically flawed and included quotes condemning the experiments from the European Space

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© P. Taylor / ADI

Victory for NASA monkeys

Agency, Cosmonaut Valentin Lebedev, who set a world record for time in space, Jim Bates, NASA retired, formerly Co-Chairman of the JSC Space Radiation Environment Group, and ExESA astronaut and former MEP, Umberto Guidoni. There was also an extensive interview with aerospace engineer April Evans who resigned from NASA in protest over the tests. The video was distributed to every member of the US Congress. Those in the space programme often talk in lofty terms that this is about making advances for the whole of humankind. We wanted the world to make it clear that this cruelty is not in our name, and there are plenty of people in the space research community who agree with us.

Under the banner “Not in our name” supporters all over the world were urged to contact the US and Russian Embassies. From the outset the scientific validity of the experiments had been questioned but NASA seemingly pressed on regardless. The project grant proposal noted “We understand that in these initial studies, monkeys will be exposed to particle radiation that does not fully mimic the chronic low dose situation in a mixed radiation field.” 4 A Freedom of Information Act request revealed how NASA braced themselves for public opposition. Francis Cucinotta of NASA’s Johnson’s Space Centre, had informed Jack Bergman the researcher who was to carry out the experiments, via email that “one topic came up is to be prepared [sic] for any public relations issues that could arise with upper NASA management or the public. NASA has funded primate research in the past but not in the last few years.”


Campaign News In late 2010, coffee shop Costa Coffee aired a puerile TV advert featuring sixteen monkeys of different species. The monkeys were supplied by the same company ADI exposed several years ago when a keeper was filmed pinning down a screaming mandrill whilst he forced back in a prolapsed rectum – the keeper commenting that it was a result of the monkeys walking on their hind legs (the Costa ad featured a mandrill). The same company that misled the media about how a lion used in a Conservative Party advert was being kept. Prior to the launch of the advert – which had nothing to do with their product but was simply a crass one-line gag – we urged the company not to air it, but to no avail. We therefore produced leaflets and supporters protested and sent postcards of complaint to Costa. Costa’s Chief Executive, Andy Harrison, commented: “It seems to me that only a commitment never to use the advertisement again could fully satisfy those who have objected to this commercial. I cannot give this commitment but I can further confirm to you that we would always take steps to avoid animal suffering or exploitation in every aspect of our business.” There’s plenty of other coffee houses out there that aren’t making performing monkeys the butt of their jokes. Please boycott Costa. At one point, Bergman complained; “This primate issue is annoying but we are fully committed to the concept and work of the project. I don’t understand how folks expect space research to progress otherwise”. Bergman had also noted “The subjects we will use will live out their natural lives and be available to NASA for further study, should that be desired. Indeed, that is a notable strength of the project design.” Experimentation without end had been planned for these poor monkeys. On the same day a Johnson Space Centre employee reassured Bergman about the funding for his project; “know that you have HUGE NASA support…But being NASA, HQ wants to proceed as cautiously and politically correct [sic] as possible – comes with the territory of a federal agency…So know that we are doing everything we can to get the award out to you.” In September ADI attended a reception at the US Congress organised by Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine with April Evans calling for NASA funding to be redirected from the monkey tests. That night the NASA ADI & NAVS

Authorization Act of 2010, passed the House of Representatives, disappointingly without the original House language requiring “justification and rationale for human primates". Despite this setback, we pressed on, then NASA finally decided to halt the tests. This leaves Russia isolated in its use of monkeys in space experiments. Supporters will recall the horrific photographs we obtained from inside the laboratory in Abkhazia showing the monkeys restrained during the experiments and living in tiny, barren cages. Like the NASA tests, the Roscosmos experiments are also aimed at enabling a mission to Mars. In October we launched the campaign in Russia with VITA, a non-profit animal protection organisation based in Moscow, urging the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) not to perform the experiments. We continue to press the space agencies around the world to abandon all animal experiments.

guinness World Records has dropped elephant polo statistics from the record books, “in line with our policy not to accept or recognise any records based on the killing or harming of animals, this includes fox hunting and bull fighting”. The work of LDF was showcased at the British Science Festival held in Birmingham last year, and was a great success. This years event, themed "Exploring New Worlds" will be in Bradford. CITeS quotas published. The CITES 2011 national export quotas have been published. DRC, Togo and Tanzania have all established quotas for trade in live Appendix II primates. An international treaty will set the first-ever limit on the number of polar bears that native people in Northwest Alaska can harvest and also legalise polar bear hunting in Russia; the first time in decades. The Russia-U.S. commission agreed to let native subsistence hunters in each country kill 29 bears. Chimp meat has been discovered on the menu in restaurants in the UK after raids by trading standards. Backstreet restaurants and market stalls in the Midlands are believed to be selling chimpanzee meat. Canada’s fight against a european ban on seal products has moved to a new level. Canada’s Federal Fisheries Minister says the government will take action at the WTO over the European Union's ban on seal products.

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Campaign News European Commission urged to uphold cosmetics testing ban

Missouri has passed the Puppy Mill Cruelty Prevention Act, which establishes minimum standards in what is regarded as America’s puppy mill capital. ADI joined others campaigning for the law. Already there are attempts to overturn this minimal protection.

We continue to work to ensure that the cosmetics testing ban timetable remains in place. With clear resistance to the ban coming from certain sectors of the cosmetics industry, we recently met with the european Commission and Members of the european Parliament to discuss the issue. In 2003 the EU introduced a phase-out of cosmetics testing on animals and a ban on the sale of cosmetic products that contain ingredients tested on animals (regardless of where in the world the testing occurred). Although the ban on ingredients tested on animals has been in place since March 2009, the deadline for replacement of certain tests under the marketing ban was extended to March 2013 to allow the development and approval of alternatives. In our last issue we reviewed the European Commission’s draft technical report on alternatives to animal testing for cosmetics, which gave a pessimistic view of the replacement of the remaining animal tests by the 2013 deadline. It is clear that, instead of investing in alternatives, some cosmetic companies, that use animals for testing, have been dragging their feet and are lobbying in Brussels to be allowed to continue their horrific tests. The European Commission has recently stated that they have “not yet taken a decision as to whether or not to postpone the implementation date” . There is speculation that there could be a proposal to postpone the ban by at least 5 years, a terrifying prospect. In January, we had a series of meetings at the Commission and European Parliament to ensure that a strong stand was taken on the deadlines. In general, MEPs agreed to stand firm on the March 2013 deadline. However, the Commission confirmed that the official position remains that a decision has not yet been taken. The Commission also stressed that they will be hearing the concerns of the cosmetics industry regarding the deadline as well as our concerns. They say that an assessment of postponing the deadline or not “will need to take into account the potential economic, social and environmental of these options”. We are maintaining a dialogue on this and are ready to fight to uphold the 2013 deadline. Make sure your MEP knows that you want the cosmetics testing ban to be fully enforced.

Another SeaWorld whale, Kalina has died. The young female orca’s death in Orlando follows that of another young orca, Sumar, at SeaWorld’s San Diego facility. SeaWorld is apparently planning to allow trainers back in the water with orcas, and may spend millions of dollars installing pool floors that can be quickly raised in an emergency. They are also considering using remote controlled underwater vehicles, emergency air supplies for trainers and ways to pry open an orca's jaws. African vulture numbers have declined dramatically due to poisoning by farmers, who leave dead goats laced with pesticides to kill hyenas and lions. Animals “surplus to requirements”, were culled and left to rot in at Knowsley Safari Park according to a zoo photographer. elephant intelligence is on a par with that of great apes and dolphins according to a study in which they cooperated to solve a problem. British firms are selling wood products from countries where illegal logging is devastating the environment. A new report found that wood, sold in the UK, originates in parts of Indonesia, Malaysia and the Congo Basin where illegal felling is threatening animals, plants & humans.

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NAVS & ADI


Campaign News

The circus name that became synonymous with animal cruelty goes animal free

Animal smuggling worth £6 billion a year – exceeded only by the drugs and arms trades. The activities drive numerous species towards extinction. An alarming rise in manta and mobula ray hunting threatens the existence of the species. Fishing has become big business for those selling their gills for use in soups and traditional Chinese medicine.

In october something once unthinkable occurred. Chipperfield’s Circus appeared with no animals. once the biggest UK animal circus and the biggest european supplier of circus lions and tigers, it was the first time that the circus had appeared in the UK since being exposed by ADI in 1998. The Chipperfield name is leased out by Dicky Chipperfield, Mary’s cousin. Between 1996 and 1998, ADI field officers worked undercover inside three circus establishments run by different members of the Chipperfield family: Chipperfield’s Circus as it toured with animals owned by Dicky Chipperfield; Chipperfield Enterprises, the Oxfordshire lion and tiger breeding centre owned by Dicky Chipperfield; and Mary Chipperfield Promotions, the huge training and animal dealing operation run by Mary Chipperfield in Hampshire. Our investigation is credited with bringing the UK’s animal circus industry to its knees, featuring several other UK circuses, and within six months of its release half of the UK’s animal circuses had closed. The investigation led to successful convictions for cruelty of Mary Chipperfield and her husband Roger, jail for their elephant keeper Michael Gills, and subsequent closure of all three circus enterprises in the UK. The news that Chipperfield’s Circus was animal-free was greeted with delight by ADI and with fury by several circus people – including members of the Chipperfield family. It confirmed one thing, that animal circuses can move on and go animal-free, but also the utter resistance to this from sectors of the industry.

Political animals: We had information stands at the conferences of the Conservative, Liberal Democrat, and Labour Parties. Below Christina Dodkin of our Research Department at the Lib Dem conference. Inset: our, annual publication Political Animals.

Circus lions seriously mauled a trainer and almost escaped from the ring during a performance in Ukraine. One lion attacked the trainer and another joined in. Circus workers tried to beat back the animals and sprayed them with water. Monkeys have been made overweight to study human obesity and diabetes at the Oregon National Primate Research Center. Some will be kept in individual cages for years, to limit their exercise. Fish living in water contaminated by human sewage are exposed to antidepressants such as Prozac according to a Canadian study. Although the amounts were minute, the study warned that over time, the drugs could impact their behaviour and ecology. one of the biggest hauls of illegal ape parts in Central Africa has been seized by officials in Gabon. The seizure included the head and hands of a gorilla, 12 chimpanzee heads and 30 chimpanzee hands.

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Rescue News

Welcome Home Tilin!

Main picture: Tilin the baboon surveys his new home in England. Right: Tilin is loaded at Santa Cruz airport; Actor Brian Blessed is interviewed next to Tilin. Brian urges the UK Government to follow Bolivia’s example.

Tilin was handed to ADI with the lions we moved to California in summer 2010, by the first circus to close following Bolivia’s ban. The magnificent baboon arrived in the UK in September with ADI’s Alexandra Cardenas, Ricardo Farjado, and vet Simon Adams. Everyone who meets him is amazed by this wise and calm primate who took the journey in his stride. Our team in the UK had spent weeks preparing for Tilin’s arrival, and his new quarantine house was filled with branches, a comfy straw bed on a raised platform, and a tyre swing. Late at night he reached his new ADI home at Lakeview, striding out of his travel crate to climb and explore. He is in quarantine, due to UK regulations. It is still an exciting new world for him and we are searching for a rescued Hamadryas baboon companion to join him. Another animal’s life transformed with your support – how about adopting Tilin? Call 020 7630 3340 for details.

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Operation

lion ark Moving day at Santa Cruz Airport and the sheer scale of operation Lion Ark is apparent as crates containing 25 lions are lined up ready to be loaded. Below: ADI’s Jan Creamer and Tim Phillips with one of the lion cubs during the rescue; Campeon and one of his sisters reach their new home.

First we exposed the suffering; then we campaigned and secured a ban; and when the first circus closed we took all the animals to a wonderful new life. It turned out that was just the start..... In November and December we raided every circus in Bolivia and rescued EVERY aNImal. an entire animal circus industry was closed down in a stroke with the most comprehensive enforcement operation the world has seen. In February, we moved the lions to the US in the biggest airlift of its kind ever. This is the story of Operation lion ark.....

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© Animal Defenders International

© Animal Defenders International

No. 2. The ADI team remove India from the circus in the cage she’s lived in all her life. Despite the deplorable conditions the circus regards her as a pet – they cry as she is removed.

© Animal Defenders International

© Animal Defenders International

Circus No. 1. Chitara and Dalila arrive at the ADI compound in the circus cage. The circus ran for it, leaving the two lionesses behind. The operation starts smoothly.

No. 5. eight lions – Bam Bam, Morena, Campeon, Maria, Marta, Rosa, Rosario, and Rosita – in a stinking cage. The circus owner has threatened to kill them and produces a knife with which he stabs the tyres of the wagon we are moving them in. There is a confrontation but we rescue the lions and a horse called Tim.

SEaRCH & SEIZURE The record-breaking operation Lion Ark that began in Bolivia last November, ended on February 16 when 25 lucky lions touched down at Denver airport. operation Lion Ark is the world’s biggest rescue and airlift of lions. It began with dramatic seizures across Bolivia as ADI worked with the Bolivian authorities to enforce their new law banning animal circuses. The ADI team seized 25 lions, some were extremely malnourished, skin and bone, dehydrated, living in overcrowded cages. One family of eight were all in a cage the size of a double bed. They were fighting to survive, taking food out of each others’

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No. 6. Kenya had been put in this terrible cage as a cub. The circus owner didn’t realise she’d get so big, so she stayed there. our surveillance reveals the owner has hidden monkeys. We search the circus. They’re informed that ADI will constantly monitor them – the monkeys are handed over two days later.

In the weeks leading up to the operation aDI Field Officers kept the circuses under mouths. The stories are heartbreaking. Six monkeys, a coati mundi, a deer and horse were rescued and relocated in Bolivia or returned to the wild. This is the first national circus ban in South America and the world’s first ban on all animal acts. This is a world record for a lion rescue and ultimately a historic victory for animal welfare. It is a landmark in how strong animal protection legislation can be swiftly and effectively enforced. Bolivia has set a shining example to the world and we hope that Operation Lion Ark will have far reaching consequences, and encourage other governments to stand up and act, like Bolivia, to do the right thing for

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animals currently languishing in circuses throughout the world. This gargantuan task to end circus suffering in Bolivia started six years ago, when ADI field officers first exposed the cruelty in South American circuses. The shocking footage swept the continent, and in Bolivia the public were horrified by the conditions the animals were forced to endure. The exposé led to an educational and political lobbying campaign that gained early victories with animal circus bans secured in key cities and then after many attempts, the new law was secured on June 17, 2009. The circuses were given a year to dispose of their animal acts. NAVS & ADI


© Animal Defenders International

© Animal Defenders International

No. 3. The circus tries to make a run for it and the local police impound the lions. Above ADI prepare to load Pancho and Temuco.

© Animal Defenders International

© Animal Defenders International

No. 4. Seizing Colo Colo, Muñuca and Lulu – the lions that hate people and want to attack them (who can blame them). The circus hand them over willingly, probably because they are so aggressive!

No 7. A search of another circus secures the rescue of two spider monkeys, two capuchin monkeys and a coati mundi. They were returned to the wild in a safe natural area run by the Santa Cruz governor’s office.

No. 8. After playing cat and mouse we catch up with the last circus. The owner threatens the ADI team and builds barricades. It doesn’t stop us. Hercules, Panchula, Fida, Kiara and the cubs Bob, Nancy and Percy are all rescued. The last animals to perform in Bolivia. Above the cats on the ADI transporters head for freedom.

constant surveillance. We then moved in at speed with the authorities to rescue the animals. The battle of the circuses One circus volunteered their animals, and ADI moved this first family of four handsome lions, Camba, Daktari, Bambek and Simba to the Performing Animal Welfare Sanctuary in California, and a Hamadryas baboon, Tilin, to Lakeview Monkey Sanctuary in England, in 2010. Our South America campaigns team in London and Bolivia began drafting regulations to enforce the new law, 4040. As this progressed it was clear that the remaining circuses planned to defy the law. This would be harder. ADI teams spread out across Bolivia locating circuses and conducting a census of all animals. When a lioness ADI & NAVS

had cubs, the number of lions rose to 24 and it became apparent that this would be a huge operation. In November 2010, ADI circus search and seizure operations in Bolivia began. Ensuring an element of surprise we moved rapidly and, with the support of the Bolivian authorities, notably the DGB, Santa Cruz Governor’s office and police, staged raids on circus after circus. Our teams covered hundreds of miles each day; we provided the transport, cages, animal handlers, veterinary supervision, and all other animal care requirements. The circuses were very angry. There was much screaming, shouting,

threats, and one circus owner came out with a knife – slashing the tyres of the transporter. Others tried to make a run for it. One circus kept moving, and then gave up, leaving their animals behind as they left town. One attempted to conceal monkeys, but we were alert and searched and found the animals. We received threats but stood firm. In the first week we closed 7 circuses. Only one remained, which kept on the move in an attempt to find ways around the ban. The circus continued to take the cubs into the ring and to parks for photos. Later named Bob, Nancy and Percy, they were the last animals to perform in Bolivia.

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© Animal Defenders International

Jan Creamer lures Kimba into his ADI travel crate.

© Animal Defenders International

© Animal Defenders International

Lion Number 25: Kimba looks from his cage in Tariqa zoo. The ADI team had to to knock down a wall and cut through the bars.

Hercules in the ADI compound the day after his rescue. His face a map of the hard life he has lived in the circus, but proud and unbowed.

RESCUE & REHaBIlITaTION We caught up with them in a remote town in the rugged mountain area where Ché Guevara once had his hideout. They attempted to barricade the beastwagons and threatened to assault the ADI directors leading the operation. But in the end there was little resistance: we took the animals. A more daunting prospect was the treacherous 18-hour drive through the mountains back to Santa Cruz! In less than three weeks we had removed all of the animals from every circus in Bolivia. The animal circus industry was shut down in a stroke. The ADI reception centre Mayor Percy of Santa Cruz donated land to temporarily house the lions. So, during the rescues we established our reception center, constructing

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In Santa Cruz, we built temporary holding units for the lions as they arrived. They had hay and toys for the first time and, although small, they had more space than ever before in their lives.

as the lions arrived at the aDI compound in Santa Cruz,

security fencing, holding cages, installing running water, electricity, and veterinary facilities. It was here that the lions were nursed back to health, put on weight, built up their strength and had veterinary treatment. One of the family of eight who were crammed into that small cage was poor little Campeon, a young male. His front legs crippled with bone disease, he was too weak to get into the wagon that would take him from the circus. Our vet feared Campeon might not survive, and during the journey to freedom he collapsed; it was terrifying; we worked desperately to revive him – then finally, after what felt like an eternity, he got to his feet. Since then, Campeon has grown stronger every day; the joy on his face when he got his first toys, footballs l

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and logs, was something to behold. It will be a long road, but we are all crossing our fingers that this brave little lion will get stronger and stronger. These lions lived in bare cages, with nothing to do, nothing to interest them. When we gave them hay for the first time their sheer joy at having something to touch, sniff and roll about in was truly amazing – they cuddled the logs and tyres we gave them to play with, and within hours they became different animals. These animals had endured a horrific life, so our veterinary team led by Dr Mel Richardson, with Jimena Delgado in attendance daily, were regularly dealing with crisis. Lion number 25, Kimba, arrived in early February. Once owned by a circus, he had been dumped in a small NAVS & ADI


© Animal Defenders International

© Animal Defenders International

Worming day for the cubs with Bob being held by Tim Phillips.

© Animal Defenders International

© Animal Defenders International

Kimba heads to Santa Cruz in style, with the ADI team in a C130 Hercules that had seen service in the Vietnam war!

Percy plays with a branch in the ADI compound. Born into misery, his life had just changed forever, he will live free.

Chitara and Dalila - like many of the animals we were saving they only had each other. Now they are in a pride with Pancho, Temuco and India.

new homes were built for them, they were given veterinary care and their strength was built up. zoo due for closure, some eleven years earlier and had been alone since. He was in Tarija – a 48 hour drive each way. So we booked space on an old C130 Hercules and flew down for him. We had to smash down a wall and hack through his cage bars to get to him, but we quickly lured him into his travel crate. On arrival at the reception centre, this grand, old, peaceful lion heard the roars of other lions for the first time in all those years and roared back. Support from back home Back in the US and UK a special appeal to raise funds for the rescue and lifetime care for the animals was launched. Jorja Fox (CSI’s Sarah Sidle), and celebrity TV presenter Bob Barker, whose substantial support ADI & NAVS

made the project possible, backed the appeal along with Twiggy, Brian Blessed, Joanna Lumley, Julia McKenzie, and Benjamin Zephaniah, along with Meg Mathews, Wendy Turner Webster and Prunella Scales. The Lion Ark The most efficient way to move the lions would be all at once and we secured a home for all of them at the Wild Animal Sanctuary in Colorado. With ADI funding, construction began immediately on a huge biosphere to house the lions as they acclimatised. Back in Bolivia, travel crates were built, including a special mother and cubs crate. Torrential rain made the roads impassable and the ADI team had to work soaked to the skin, pulling down

the rain covers to protect the lions. It began to look like the whole rescue could be washed out. But the sun came out on loading day and spirits rose. Loading 25 lions was a challenge. An hour per lion was not an unreasonable estimate – but that would mean a lion in a crate for 24 hours before even leaving. We had to do better. We split into two teams. All well drilled, professional and great affection for the lions, the teams worked in near silence, coaxing the lions in with food. Loading took just six hours. At midnight we headed to the airport. We had a TAB Airlines DC10 rented at a discount price and crew all had ADI logos on their uniforms for the day. Thanks to the ON Group who helped and were at our side at every step on

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© Animal Defenders International

Saved: The baby monkeys that the circus tried to hide.

© Animal Defenders International

© Animal Defenders International

This is freedom. Within 24 hours of his seizure, the coati mundi who had been snatched from the wild by the circus was free again. Here he is draped over the branch of a tree.

Jan nurses a foal that is desperately ill and has collapsed, the baby was saved. We are still working to rescue a group of horses in Bolivia.

THE lION aRK TaKES OFF this final stage. Our meticulous plan to have all the lions in colour-coded crates denoting family groups made sure everyone remained calm. Touchdown There had been continuous media in Bolivia and at Denver International Airport there was more, with Jorja Fox and Bob Barker there too. The video of the doors opening and Jan punching the air before the lions were unloaded raced round the world. The huge extended pride that arrived in Denver are the adorable cubs Percy, Bob and Nancy and their mother Kiara; the beautiful girls India, Chitara, Dalila, Kenya, Muñeca, Lulu, Panchula, Fida, Marta, Maria, Morena; and the naughty youngsters, Rosita, Rosario, and Rosa; and the magnificent males, Temuco, Pancho,

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Lion after lion is unloaded at Denver International Airport.

In the weeks leading up to the operation aDI Field Officers kept the c

ColoColo, Kimba, BamBam, Hercules, and young Campeon. All the families are now in the specially-designed 10-acre biosphere with natural sunlight, grass and trees whilst they acclimatise. When they arrived, they ran and frolicked, they had grass beneath their feet for the first time in their lives, and they loved the pine trees. A thrilling reward for the months of preparation. As summer arrives and the outdoor enclosures are finished, they will have free access to a further 70 acres. At the sanctuaries in Colorado, California and the UK, construction has been paid for by ADI, and all three are receiving payment from us for the lifetime care of the animals. These lucky lions have been on the journey of their lives, taking them from l

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cages on the back of trucks, being forced to perform demeaning tricks, to an expansive natural enclosure at a state of the art facility near Denver. Now, we need your help. Operation Lion Ark was logistically complex and expensive. Now we need your help to keep our promise of a bright new future to the lions. The suffering and years of neglect these animals have endured has taken its toll. Many require extensive dental work – broken, infected, painful teeth, even abscesses. It is hard to imagine the pain they have lived with for years. And, we need to feed and provide veterinary care for up to 23 years. We are urgently calling for donations to provide the specialised dental surgery required for many of the lions, NAVS & ADI


© Animal Defenders International

© Animal Defenders International

Actress Jorja Fox and TV presenter Bob Barker greet Bam Bam at Denver Airport with a drink of water. Two substantial donations from Bob Barker enable these ambitious seizure operations in Bolivia.

© Animal Defenders International

© Animal Defenders International

The Lion Ark arrives in Denver and the lions start to be unloaded.

With the females on contraceptives to prevent pregnancies, Bam Bam rejoins his family in his new home and looks content.

Campeon the little lion, who was sick and almost died, runs and plays on grass for the first time in his life. What a future now awaits!

circuses under constant surveillance, we then moved in at speed with the authorities to rescue the animals. for any other surgeries or treatments. This is such an important rescue mission because it shows South America and countries all over the world that if they pass strong laws to end cruelty, then ADI will be there to help ensure they are enforced. Too often have there been laws full of promise, heralded as victories, but simply never enforced because of lack of resources. Not this time. There are no animal circuses in Bolivia. Life is now worth living for these lions. Here are a few of their stories: Dear India, dainty, sweet-natured, timid, at first afraid to enter her temporary enclosure in Santa Cruz, because she had not seen a lion since being taken from her mother. Now, she is part of a pride of five.

ADI & NAVS

Campeon, the little lion with his twisted legs who almost didn’t make it, now so full of fun running and playing with his boistrous family. Quiet and gentle Kenya, her circus cage was the size of a cupboard with solid walls, put in there as a cub, never to come out. Exquisite ColoColo the angry lion, who reacts so aggressively when he sees a shovel or stick, but who can blame him? Now his teeth have been fixed and he can spend his days with his family, Muñeca and Lulu. Nobody is going to come near him with a stick ever again. Sweet Kiara and her three cubs, safe at last. Her cubs will never be taken from her again.

These lucky animals symbolise the work of ADI. All of the costs of rescuing these animals, including the investigation, the legislation campaign, rescue itself, the sanctuary enclosure and habitat materials, food and veterinary care, have been covered by ADI. We urgently need supporters to adopt some or all of our rescued animals – see page 26 or call 020 7630 3340 for details. This was a rescue for life!

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Rescue News

Help our rescued animals. Adopt now! See page 26.

Betty, Baloo and Boo go free Quarantine is over for our rescued laboratory monkeys and as they step out into the great outdoors of their new enclosure it’s a new life and new names. The laboratory called them: Bacil, Bacilusk and Baloo. We put the “vivisection humour” behind them and they are now Betty, Boo and Baloo. Their wonderful new enclosure at Lakeview has trees, swings, lots of enrichment, and plenty of space to play. Photo: Baloo.

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NAVS & ADI


Stop Circus Suffering our shocking mobile billboard exposés the abuse at Bobby Roberts Super Circus and calls on the government to finally act.

We expose more sickening UK violence Surely the government must ban circus misery now? ADI has released shocking footage from behind the scenes at the winter quarters of Bobby Roberts Super Circus. Once again, the circus industry has been shown to be rife with sickening suffering of animals. Over a period of three and a half weeks in January and February 2011, our field officers recorded activity inside the barn where animals were kept during the winter off-season. Incidents included Anne, an arthritic 57year-old elephant, being hit with a metal pitchfork and kicked around the face and body 48 times during the period; workers are also hitting and kicking miniature ponies and horses and spitting in the face of a camel. The disturbing footage also shows Annie constantly chained for the entire period

of filming. Often by her front and arthritic back leg with only enough room to take one step forward or backwards. Her chains were only changed to different legs twice. ADI believes this will clearly cause her pain and discomfort. In May 2008, Bobby Roberts published a message on his website: “Anne our beloved elephant is now 55 years old…. Having worked faithfully for me for over 45 years we will now give her every possible care, attention and love for the remainder of her life.” “For Anne to be anywhere other than on the circus, where she is with the humans, her family, who she knows and trusts, together with the circus animals who have become her constant companions, would cause her unnecessary stress and indeed could

easily make her lose her life, which would be heartbreaking.” In press reports he has claimed “We take good care of her she is a family pet,” and responding to criticism from animal protection groups including ADI said: “How can they know better than us what is best for her?” “She is like part of the family. Annie will not be taken away from Bobby Roberts’ circus. We care too much about her.” Roberts is captured on camera kicking Annie on the trunk. The exposé comes just as the government is preparing to make an announcement on the use of animals in circuses, after years of deliberations, consultations, working parties, consideration of evidence and in 2006, a clear undertaking to parliament to ban wild animals.

She is chained, unable to escape and beaten and kicked repeatedly.

ADI & NAVS

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How many times must we expose scenes like these?

Bobby Roberts Super Circus 2011.

great British Circus 2009.

The government’s own public consultation published in March 2010 found that an overwhelming 94.5% of the public want to see a ban on wild animals in circuses and over 170 MPs have now signed Early Day Motion 403 calling for a ban on wild animal acts. A recent parliamentary poll conducted by ADI found that 63% of MPs would like to see a ban on the use of wild animals in circuses and only 14% disagreed. ADI has been concerned for Anne’s welfare for many years and have followed her tragic plight, even sending a vet to help when she appeared to be very ill. She has now been with the circus for over 50 years, having been caught in the wild as a baby and brought to the UK. This new evidence follows ADI’s exposé of similar suffering of elephants at the Great British Circus in 2009. It is time for the minister, Lord Henley, to take decisive action. URgeNT ACTIoN There has never been a more important time to write and ask your MP to call for a ban on wild animals in circuses Write to your MP, The House of Commons, London, SW1A 0AA.

63%

Lord Henley, minister for Defra, is expected to make an announcement imminently, on a ban on the use of wild animals in circuses. We’ve been putting on the pressure for a ban on animals in circuses at party conferences, in parliament, through our early Day Motion (eDM), and presenting the evidence from our 2009 investigation of cruelty at the great British Circus to MPs at the House of Commons. On learning that Defra was considering the option of self-regulation, we secured the circus industry’s proposals and presented a legal and political critique to minister Lord Henley which showed how self-regulation is unenforceable, expensive to implement and won’t protect the animals. We presented Lord Henley with a Christmas advent calendar with quotes

Write to the Minister responsible, ask him to back a ban. Lord Henley, House of Lords, SW1A 0WP.

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of MPs want ban on wild animals in UK circuses. Where is it?

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from politicians, celebrities and ADI senior staff, all requesting that the government do the right thing in the New Year, by announcing a ban on the use of wild animals in circuses. In January this year we conducted a poll in the Commons, asking MPs for their views on a ban on wild animals in circuses. 63% supported a ban with only 14% disagreeing. This reflects the support we have received for EDM 403, which has 170 to date, making it the third most signed EDM in the animal welfare category. We continued with the pressure with a photo call in February, when MPs were invited to meet our inflatable elephant. We received an encouraging response from Labour, Lib-Dem and Conservative MPs and the event was well attended, with the inclusion of Neil Parish; Jim Fitzpatrick, former minister for Defra; and Labour whip Kerry McCarthy. We continue to lobby Defra and its animal welfare unit in the lead up to the announcement. NAVS & ADI


Stop Circus Suffering Greece

our ‘elephant Tour’ has been visiting markets and public spaces all over the UK with our inflatable elephant. Members of the public have completed postcards asking their MP to sign up. You can find an updated list of venues for these events on our website at www.ad-international.org

In January our Greek partners, GAWF (the Greek Animal Welfare Fund) met with Milena Apostolaki - the junior minister at the Ministry of Agriculture and Foods, to discuss a circus animal ban. We provided support by supplying GAWF with background information on national bans on the use of animals in circuses worldwide. As well as discussing the circus ban, GAWF sought increased fines for animal abuse based on laws 1197/1981 & 3170/2003. The highlight of the meeting was Mrs. Apostolaki’s decision to bring forward to the Greek parliament, within the next month, a law that will ban animal circuses in Greece. This is a happy end to a long battle that started in 2006 when ADI and GAWF launched the campaign to stop animal circuses.

USA

© C. Dodkin / Animal Defenders International

Last october, ADI launched the ‘Break the Chain’ campaign in the US, which will drive forward the demand for legislation on animal circuses. ADI is partnering with local animal adovcates in this grass-roots network; organizing publicity events and public education drives across the US. Following ADI’s investigation of the use of animals in US circuses, and publication of our 2008 report, ‘Animals in Traveling Circuses: the science on suffering’, the Stop Circus Suffering campaign in the US continued to gather support. Now, the Break the Chain campaign network is positioned to take the lead in the drive for legislation. This campaign is reaching out to local communities and governments to educate them about circus cruelty. Recent Break the Chain activities include leafleting and demos at circus shows; lobbying for city bans on animal circuses; providing detailed reports and evidence, and regional publicity events.

Peru: Cruelty is not Culture Shortly after the launch of our ‘Unnatural Acts’ video in the Peruvian Congress, the circuses fought back with their own lobbying campaign. They claimed that our our investigation lacked validity and that animals do not suffer in Peruvian circuses, even claiming that their domestic animals enjoy performing. We quickly responded with a new video focusing on domestic animals and the confinement, deprivation and abuse that they suffer. We produced a detailed response to their claims and distributed new congressional briefings on the issue of public safety, as well as an economic briefing showing the lack of financial impact of a ban on animal circuses. To herald the passage of the bill to ban animals in circuses, several Peruvian celebrities gave support to our campaign by taking part in our video ‘Cruelty is not Culture’. The celebrities included musicians such as Julio Andrade, Miki Gonzalez, William Luna and Tóxico, and each delivered a message to the Congress. The Grammy Award winning band, Aterciopelados also recorded a video supporting the campaign. Before the end of the congressional session we led a series of public awareness events touring the main plazas of Lima. This included our 3 metre high inflatable lion and an exhibition of photographs to show the Peruvian public the reality of the circus. A candlelit vigil was also held in Lima in support of the bill. It is expected that the bill will have its final vote in the Plenary of the Congress this year.

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© Animal Defenders International

Colombia: Pereira sets animal protection standard Following ADI’s exposé of circus animal abuse in Colombia, the city council of Pereira approved an agreement to declare the city a national hub on animal protection and wildlife conservation. We supported Councillor Juan Pablo Gallo by presenting the findings of our investigation on the use of animals in circuses in Colombia as well as providing legal, evidential and scientific arguments in support of the motion. During the presentation we screened our video ‘Unnatural Acts’, which shocked councillors and members of the public. The agreement strictly regulates wild animals in public shows in the city and will effectively phase out the use of wild animals in circuses in the heart of Colombia’s coffee region. It will set a standard for other cities to follow. We also organised several public awareness and education events and co-organised the ‘March for the Animals 2010’ in Bogotá, where thousands of our leaflets were distributed, and posters displayed. During December we also carried out a Christmas Vigil for Circus Animals in the Plaza de Bolivar with an ADI information stand. In January, we started the year attending meetings at the city council of Medellin and Caldas and holding information stalls. We continue to lobby Congress to include the ban on the use of animals in circuses in the revision of the animal welfare law.

Bolivia: There are no animal circuses in Bolivia (p11)!

Brazil: Progress for ban gathers momentum In November 2010 we got an emergency vote on Bill 7291 – 2006 aimed at banning all animals in circuses in Brazil. Signed by 12 out of 16 Party Leaders in the Chamber, representing more than 400 deputies out of 513, this request has changed the legislative procedure for this bill from a “priority” to an “emergency” and will effectively speed up the ban. Once the bill is adopted in the Chamber of Deputies it goes to the Senate, where it will be reviewed by the relevant Commissions. We are calling on the President of the Chamber to include the bill in the agenda of the Plenary as soon as possible.

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© ARAN

© Animal Defenders International

Above: A sea of ADI circus posters ad banners at the Bogotá “March for the Animals 2010”, and below it the Christmas Vigil for Circus Animals.

Ireland Our Irish partners, ARAN (Animal Rights Action Network) have started the year with lively and peaceful demonstrations in Waterford and Galway (pictured right) as part of Stop Circus Suffering in Ireland. The Great European Circus has many animals in their acts, including kangaroos, dogs, camels, horses and zebras. ARAN’s demonstration informed the public and visitors to the circus of how animals continue to be exploited in cruel and demeaning ways. ARAN have also been visiting schools to educate the next generation of animal defenders about circus suffering. They were met with a warm reception from Wesley College, Dublin when they visited in February and screened ADI’s Stop Circus Suffering Ireland video.

NAVS & ADI


Save The Primates

© Animal Defenders International

In 2009, our undercover investigation of Huntingdon Life Sciences in Cambridgeshire exposed how British legislation continues to fail to protect animals. We showed the terrible suffering of animals in unnecessary, unreliable and unethical experiments. This year, with the transposition of the European Directive on animals in scientific procedures into UK law, it is timely to revisit the exposé, the horrors it uncovered and how the law failed these animals.

Huntingdon Life Sciences For 18 months our investigator worked inside the most notorious animal lab in the world. The evidence we collected represents the most comprehensive view into this secret world of commercial animal experimentation ever secured. During the investigation hundreds of monkeys poured into the lab from Nafovanny in Vietnam. We secured footage of the deplorable conditions at Nafovanny (see p25), showing that even at this very first stage, the Home Office promises of welfare standards were meaningless. But it got worse... A detailed report of our findings was supplied to the Home Office showing multiple breaches of the code of practice concerning how the animals were kept and clear unnecessary suffering during procedures. After requests for a report of the Home Office investigation, we were told that a senior inspector had visited HLS and written a report. We have not been allowed to see the report, only to hear excerpts during meetings.

Dossier of misery Even the basic level of animal housing our findings were shocking. Some cages had sharp edges which led to animals severing fingers. Others were so insecure that a drug company insisted they were fastened with chain in order to contain the animals. Sharp edges on the chains also led to animals suffering cuts, and in one case a female cut her cheek ADI & NAVS

pouch sufficiently badly to need special feeding. One poor male monkey ate his own excrement (corprophagy), and extremely stressed. Our report described his aggression towards other animals, and noted that he was consequently kept alone. When taken from his cage to have test substances forced down his throat via a tube, he would vomit faeces, which he had previously eaten, and he would then have a nose bleed. After one session he lay down and took a few minutes to recover. As if this wasn’t sufficient cause for concern, it transpired that none of this was recorded by the lab and that he was still being used 2 weeks later, while his nose bleeds and faeces vomiting continued. We challenged the Home Office about the lack of records regarding previous incidents of concern involving this animal, his obvious distress and the questionable scientific integrity of research using such traumatised animals. The Home Office replied that the computer system on which the notes on the animals’ well-being were stored “had no lexicon for coprophagy”. They added that staff were aware that he was a dominant animal but that there was “enrichment present”. It is staggering that if the laboratory does not record something, then the Home Office regards it never having happened.

Monkeys looked on as other monkeys were strapped down and experimented on Our report also described animals in cages being able to watch as other animals were experimented on. Our video showed a poor monkey strapped into a restraint chair being dosed in front of caged monkeys. The Home Office response was that that this was acceptable and that the “arrangement is not unique”. We were even told that animals may take comfort from having others present. It is hard to imagine how the additional terror of seeing what will happen to them will help these already terrified monkeys. Thanks to our exposé the recitals of the new Directive were amended in the European Parliament to say animals should not be experimented on in front of others. So distressed, the monkeys suffered rectal prolapse We reported to the Home Office horrific incidences where several animals being used to test an incontinence drug suffered rectal prolapses. On one occasion a laboratory technician attempted to re-insert the prolapse using a bottle spout, this failed and a veterinary surgeon was called. Rectal

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Save The Primates

“Acceptable © Animal Defenders International

A frightened monkey is strapped into a restraint chair and pinned by two technicians at HLS. Behind them the other monkeys can see what is happening. The Home Office think that it is possible that this is “comforting”.

prolapse has been described as a gross sign of distress. We were told, during our visit a meeting at the Home Office, that the number of rectal prolapses doubled from 2007 to 2008, from approximately 0.3% to 0.7%. We were also told that only 0.1% of prolapses required surgical intervention. Even if this were so, for an animal to be sufficiently stressed to suffer rectal prolapse is a horrific indictment of the practices being conducted and the trauma the animal will feel. No action was taken by the Home Office.

Horrific side effects and death in experiments licensed by the Home Office as “mild” On one inhalation study three monkeys died, or had to be killed, due to partially collapsed and blocked lungs. Three other primates collapsed, but were revived. When necropsied, it was seen that the animals had suffered blackened lungs. The first animal died 3 weeks before a meeting was held to discuss the severity banding of the licence, yet this protocol had a “mild” severity limit. During another study, several animals were frequently seen to salivate and vomit. One almost chewed its own finger off, gnawing into the bone. The injury was dressed by a vet, but the animal continued to chew. Due to this, the dose for one group of animals was lowered. Others pulled at their chest skin, put their fists into

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their mouths, pushed large amounts of sawdust into their mouths, chewed metal and dragged their teeth along the bars.

No significant avoidable suffering Further questions, via e-mail, led to the Chief Inspector of the Animals Scientific Procedures Inspectorate (ASPI) informing us that she “invited a senior inspector to review your report and to provide me with an independent view of the situation. He spent three days at HLS, one with the local inspector and the other two unaccompanied. He inspected the relevant primate holding areas and observed staff carrying out their normal duties, including carrying out regulated procedures and animal handling. He met with the relevant individuals including the holder of the Certificate of Designation, the NACWO and NVS, the relevant project and personal licence holders, and a number of technical staff. He carefully reviewed each of the allegations made in your report and concluded that no significant avoidable animal suffering had been caused, neither in husbandry and care practices, nor in scientific activities. As a consequence, no formal action has been taken against any of the duty holders at HLS.”

When the new european Directive is transposed into UK law this tragedy must be addressed. See page 3. You can also order our HLS leaflets and give people the facts. Call 020 7630 3340.

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The UK continues to import monkeys from the notorious Vietnamese monkey dealer Nafovanny. Our investigation revealed monkeys being kept alone in rusting, collapsing cages. What has followed has shown that UK claims that it sets welfare standards in dealers overseas are grossly misleading. Some of what has followed has been high farce. It might beamusing if it wasn’t so deadly serious.

In our last issue we reported that the Home Office (HO) had informed us that they had inspected the Nafovanny site, but we would not be allowed to see their report and that no action would be taken against Nafovanny. The HO had questioned whether our video footage had been taken at Nafovanny or at some “other” primate supplier elsewhere – a curious assertion. We knew our footage was from the correct location because of the huge Nafovanny sign on the gates! But where had the Home Office team been led? Increasingly it seems it was “up the garden path”! In October we met with Home Office officials, including the Chief Inspector (CI). During the meeting, we were told that the CI, accompanied by two other inspectors, had spent a day visiting Nafovanny and had not been denied access to any part of the facility. Apparently the team had been assured that our footage was not taken at Nafovanny. The CI informed us that there were satellite buildings which were nothing to do with Nafovanny. These were “hidden from view by a high perimeter walll” and so were not inspected during the visit. Bear in mind that our report had noted the locations of these cages on the Nafovanny site/

NAVS & ADI


Save The Primates

e welfare standards”

Between the first discussions with the Home Office the location of the “other dealer” had moved from elsewhere to being actually attached to Nafovanny! The Nafovanny site is surrounded by one large continuous perimeter wall. We showed the HO a map indicating the location of our footage on. We were informed by the CI that she would have to check with her inspectors that this was the exact location under dispute. It seems they were not denied any access to the Nafovanny site, except where Nafovanny told them that those buildings (despite being full of monkeys) ‘are nothing to do with us.’ We were also told that the HO had spoken to the “end user” – that’s Huntingdon Life Sciences – of the primates, who then contacted Nafovanny for information regarding these buildings. Apparently the “end user” was assured by Nafovanny that the buildings in the photographs were not theirs. The HO state “We have since been assured that these buildings are not in any way associated with Nafovanny” and that therefore “We currently have no evidence that suggests that animals destined for the UK are being bred and housed in areas other than those we have visited”. We requested clarification and five weeks later we received these replies: ADI & NAVS

Q1: Do the HO believe that the living conditions shown in our investigation are acceptable? HO: “Nafovanny animals destined for the UK are held in pairs in a dedicated pre-export quarantine unit. They are housed in cages significantly larger than those shown in your report for health screening procedures prior to export and at all other times they are housed in groups in larger pens. We understand that animals that are hospitalised may be singly housed for limited periods under veterinary direction in cages similar to those shown in your report.” It is shameful that the UK will import animals that are kept in conditions that comply with UK guidelines, but the condition of others in the same establishment is not deemed relevant. The assertion that the cages in our footage may be hospital cages is astounding. They were small, rusty, toppled at angles and barely gave the animals space to stand. There appeared to be no bedding and this would seem a large number of animals to be in hospital at the same time. Since they don’t actually answer the question, we must therefore conclude that the Home Office find these living conditions acceptable.

Q2: Since the release of our video, what steps had the HO taken to investigate Nafovanny and what were the results? HO: “During the Animals Scientific Procedures Inspectorate (ASPI) visit to Nafovanny last year[2009], the Inspectorate team scrutinised each of the hospital and nursery buildings in an effort to positively identify the building featured in your ADI/NAVS video and report. They eliminated all the buildings on both the Nafovanny sites and concluded that your material showed a set of buildings at some other location not visited by us.” It beggars belief that three inspectors visited a site, which allegedly had a compound of primates belonging to “another supplier” actually adjoining their site and that this was not noticed, questioned or a cause for some alarm. Q3: What was Nafovanny’s response and will there be any consequences for them? HO: “The ASPI review and re-appraisal of Nafovanny in May 2009 concluded that the descriptions and photographs/video of primate holding cages in your report did not accord with any of the holding units within the Nafovanny sites which had been visited and from which supplies of primates destined for the UK would be drawn. As I said at our meeting, we have also been assured that these buildings are not in any way associated with Nafovanny. Advice was therefore given in August 2009 that the breeding centre should continue to be regarded as acceptable.” The fact is that the Home Office is powerless to set animal welfare standards in Vietnam. They only get into the sites by invitation and they are clearly shown what the dealers want them to see. If they see sub-standard facilities they are told “those monkeys are for someone else”. So when the public and MPs are told: “we will only allow the use of animals from overseas centres we believe produce purposebred animals to acceptable welfare standards” it is misleading. The pretence must stop and the transposition of the new Directive (p3) must ensure that any new rules actually have teeth.

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RESEARCH WITH

Following the historic and successful Operation Lion Ark rescue and relocation, ADI has an incredible number of animals in our care. When we rescue animals in distress we make a firm commitment to fund their care for life. This means that we are effectively paying the running costs of a significant sized sanctuary. ADI is currently supporting 36 animals, of which we have: 31 lions (25 in Colorado; 4 in California; 2 in South Africa) 1 chimpanzee (Zambia) 1 Hamadryas baboon (UK) 3 Macaque monkeys (UK) We have recently funded the construction of the facilities for the lions in Colorado and California and the new homes for Tilin the baboon and the laboratory monkeys in the UK. In addition we have paid the very significant costs of transporting these animals. All of our animals have been placed in specialist sanctuaries where they receive the highest quality of care. We remain active in their lives by supporting them financially, and keeping up to date with health and general wellbeing. Through continued liaison and visits with the sanctuaries, we remain fully committed and involved. At times, we even provide ‘man’ power by using our weekends to help build enclosures for sanctuaries closer to home.

How you can help Our Animal Adoption scheme is vital for the long term care of the animals we have saved from such terrible suffering and for ensuring we can save more animals in the future. You can make either a one-off annual payment or set up a monthly direct debit. You can adopt an animal for as little as £48 per year or you can adopt groups of animals for more (less than 14p per day).

What you receive when you adopt A beautiful certificate with a drawing of your animal(s) Toto News our adoption newsletter - three times a year A Rescue DVD – about your rescued animal And, of course you continue to receive this magazine! To adopt our animals, please complete the form enclosed, or contact us on 020 7630 3340 or info@ad-international.org for more information. Thank you.

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© Lord Dowding Fund

Animal Adoptions more important than ever

2011 marks the 25th anniversary of our long term collaboration with Professor David Dewhurst replacing animals in education, and exciting new grants. Professor David Dewhurst was been funded by our Lord Dowding Fund since 1986. His work, on computer based alternatives for teaching physiology and pharmacology, has changed the way these subjects are taught and saved hundreds of thousands of animals. The strengths of latest developments include the ability for teachers to update the programmes and shape them to their own needs. Additionally, the learning objectives are available in many different languages, so they are able to reach more students and have a far-reaching effect. We are thrilled to have been connected with such forward-thinking progressive work. Professor Geoffrey Pilkington, University of Portsmouth, has received an additional 3 years of LDF funding in order to further develop his all human blood-brain-barrier model. Professor Pilkington’s extension work is entitled “Mechanisms of metastasis to the brain; investigative application of multiple in vitro systems”, and we look forward to reporting on his progress in the next edition of this magazine.

NAVS & ADI


Research Without Animals

Main picture: Breast cells in culture. Inset: Dr Debbie Holliday working on our latest project to develop a new humane breast cancer research model.

Our newest grant holder is Dr Debbie Holliday. She and her team have been awarded an LDF grant to validate and test therapeutics in a novel, all human, model of breast cancer. Breast cancer is a complex and heterogeneous disease. A comprehensive approach that takes into account the complexity of the disease is necessary to improve the efficacy of target-based therapy in breast cancer. None of this can be easily or accurately replicated in animal models. Typically, two types of animal model are commonly used to study breast cancer; transgenic mice and xenograft models. These animal models do not allow an understanding of tumour biology, nor do they take into account the multiple human cell types involved in breast cancer development and progression. To define cancer progression researchers utilising animal models use a number of end points in their assays including tumour cell proliferation, apoptosis (cell death) and release of matrix degrading enzymes.

Human model for cancer research Dr Debbie Holliday, and her team in Leeds, have developed a novel 3D model of breast cancer. It is the first model to contain the three major epithelial (lining) and stromal (connective ADI & NAVS

associated stromal fibroblasts to disrupt tumour structure formation. Additionally, they found that this process can be inhibited by the presence of drugs. The 3D model will be derived from ERÎą+ breast cancer, which represents twothirds of all breast cancers. The samples for this research have been obtained from consenting patients. The main aim of this project to is validate two novel in vitro models of breast cancer (the 3D model and the slice) against published endpoints of cancer progression using published data on animal experiments. This will demonstrate that the models provide the same level of data as animal experiments but from a human based source. Producing a superior and more relevant human model.

In addition, it will be necessary to validate that the 3D culture model maintains a phenotype which is representative of the original tumour, in order to show that it has not altered in any way. This will be done by growing isolated cells from primary tumours in their 3D culture model and then comparing tissue slices of these cultures to samples from the same case. In this way, the study will be producing a valid method for testing the response of tumours to therapies. The research will also assess the effect of three commonly used breast cancer therapies, in the unique model systems by including them in the culture medium for 7 days. Slices of the cultured tissue can then be fixed and analysed and the endpoints, commonly used in animal models of cancer progression, will be measured in the human models. The unique strength of this research and these models is that they contain not only human tumour cells but also incorporate a human only stromal component, something which is not achievable in animal models. With this well defined, highly reproducible model it is possible to genetically modify individual cell populations to look at the effect either in isolation or in combination with other factors. This in vitro system also provides a tool to investigate potential new therapeutic agents. Dr Valerie Speirs, who works alongside Dr Holliday, has recently expanded this tissue slice research to encompass pancreatic cancer to explore its potential for adenoviral delivery as a novel therapeutic approach.

Š P. Taylor / ADI

HOUT ANIMALS

and supporting) components of the breast; luminal epithelial, myoepithelial and fibroblasts. When validated against human tumours the morphological appearance bore a remarkable resemblance to human breast tumours. The team at the Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, based in St James's University Hospital, have shown, using this model, the ability of human tumour

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© R. Hill / Animal Defenders International

© Animal Defenders International

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Magazine Spring 2011