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Elizabeth Edith Hauver Architecture Portfolio 2016 - 2018

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Projects Fenway Housing

exploring shape grammars

undergraduate work 2017

Boston Harbor Association designing for rising seas

undergraduate work 2016

Tactical Ecology

enhancing New York City’s biodiversity

master’s thesis 2018

Anchor Point

affordable housing for Beverly, MA

EMERGING FORMALITY

local competition

Petare Norte, Caracas, Venezuela ENTRY CODE : AA44 Through combining the observations and analysis of the emerging bottom-up nature of Petare Norte with a formalized topdown design process a new series of design strategies begin to emerge. These strategies revolve around solving some of the issues Petare and its citizens face such as disconnected neighborhoods, increased gang activity, lack of public open spaces, and dependence on an unstable government for aid with food and water. These strategies form to create a new urban typology that will improve the overall quality of life throughout Petare while respecting the existing conditions and its people.

Emerging Formality

increasing livelihood in informal settlements

Summary of Changes – Non-conforming Lot

international competition

Professional Work

Alex J. Knox Collaborative Design Architects

architectural designer

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Undergraduate Work Fall 2016- Spring 2017

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Fenway Housing

exploring shape grammars

The location of this project was 72 Kilmarnock Street, located among the brownstone apartment buildings of the Fenway area. The program was to be single bedroom and studio apartment housing for all ages, but mostly directed at students. Additional program was to include basement parking, bike storage, commercial retail space, and community areas for the residents. Community program ranged from gym space, lounge, to study areas. The concept for this design derived from a study of shape grammars.

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4th year, 2017 Professor: Ann Borst


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What are shape grammars? Shape Grammars are used as a form of design computation. They work by recognizing an existing shape, then manipulate it based on one of the infinite rules that could be applied. The rules created when “coding� are called transformations, which manipulate the existing or previous shape within the computation. Rules can be repeated and new ones can be introduced into the line of transformation at any point. A shape rule defines how an existing shape can be transformed.

How can computation be turned into architecture? When analyzing the site forces and conditions, an analytical eye for geometries was necessary. The site documentation began with abstracting the shapes, solids and voids, within the neighborhood. Through dissecting their language, shape grammar rules began to emerge that make up the existing site conditions. After gaining an understanding for how the existing site geometries work, these rules were used to design the proposed building.

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Fenway

By Lizzie  Hauver

Exploration of Site Geometries

Exploring Void and Solid Geometries

Breaking Down of the Existing Site Language

Uncovering Existing Site Grammar Rules

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Looking at the location of voids within the area and where they sat within the block layout helped to develope the shape grammar language needed for this design. It became apparent that all of the “void” spaces in the area are shared light wells, or shared green space. Therefore the voids were interpreted as shared spaces for community programs within the proposed design. They could represent the building shape or even individual unit layouts. Where the “void” spaces could house the public/shared program. At the unit level they can start to influence the placement of kitchen/living room program versus the placement of the more private program, of bedrooms and bathrooms.

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cause the other voids in the area are shared light wells, or shared green space. Therefore I interpreted the voids as shared spaces for community program.

Developing a Language

Rule One: exploring how community program can form off of void light wells. What becomes of the void light well?

Rule Two: exploring how the residential units can grow in between the void community space.

Rule Three: exploring the massing shape and how the voids will be placed within.

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First Floor Plan N.T.S.

The first floor, along Kilmarnock St., became designated to retail/commercial space because it receives the most public foot traffic. The side of the building along Queensbury Street, which is more private containing only residential, received community space for the residents of the building. The community program consisted of a large gathering space that residents can use for parties or large events. Bike storage and a private back entrance that connected to the lobby space is situated in the back corner of the building. The floor plans for the above floors are designed around the voids that cut through the entire building, centered along each quadrant of the building mass. Community space/shared program would connect or come off of these void light wells, providing visual connectivity, and in some instances, audio connectivity between the floor levels. Providing more opportunity to interact with neighbors within the apartment complex.

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Roof Plan N.T.S.

Fifth Floor Plan N.T.S.

Fourth Floor Plan N.T.S.

Third Floor Plan N.T.S.

Second Floor Plan N.T.S.

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The rendering above, taken on the 3rd floor, shows the light well that cuts through the entirety of the building, visually and audibly connecting the levels. On every floor, in the areas that surround the light wells, will contain some biophilic element, as a means to connect residents to natural elements; which are lacking from residential buildings in the area. All of the light wells are open to the sky above, meaning residents can watch as rain falls through their floors, filling the hallways with the sound of rain drops. Or come winter, watch the snow fall. In the sections to the right, you can see the voids that connect each level, and the community program that comes off of it.

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B A

C

SectionAA Section

Scale 1/8” = 1’=0” N.T.S.

Section SectionBB

N.T.S. Scale 1/8” = 1’-0”

Section SectionCC

N.T.S. Scale 1/8” = 1’-0”

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The rendering above, much like the previous one, is showing the 2nd floor condition. Here the light well contains a small garden that can be kept by the residents, or maintenance, and allows them an opportunity to experience a serene piece of nature in the comfort of their own apartment building. This is the bottom of the light wells in which weather can freely effect. The drawings to the right are showing the different unit layouts and how they form around the light wells. In the axon, the space on the first floor is left open for retail shops to occupy.

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Unit Layouts Layouts Room Scale 1/4” = 1’-0” N.T.S.

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Boston Harbor Association designing for rising seas

The Boston Harbor Association, the client, is a team of committed individuals who work to revitalize Boston’s harbor. They advocate for the cleaning of the harbor, and establishing the Boston harborwalk. They specialize in climate change preparedness, water transportation, and Boston’s working port. They also work to provide free and low-cost public programming for residents and visitors. The BHA created platforms for exploration and learning opportunities for youth and adults because they believe that public involvement is crucial for a healthy economy, healthy environment, and for healthy people.

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3rd year, 2016 Professor: Alberto Cabre


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Existing Conditions

16th Street

Spaulding Rehabilitation Center

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June 21st, Shadow Study

December 21st, Shadow Study

Goal: Design a new headquarters for the Boston Harbor Association. Location: 300 1st Ave., Charlestown, MA Problem: Sea levels expected to rise 6’ by the year 2100. 21


Proposed Design

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DN

DN

DN

Second Floor Plan N.T.S.

UP

DN

UP

DN DN

First Floor Plan N.T.S. 23


Solution By breaking down the existing sea wall, water will be guided into the site, thus redirecting the existing harbor walk (shown in diagram). The site topography will be raised, so that the building sits 6’ above the existing ground level. A natural filtration system, that utilizes marsh land vegetation, will be created to filter the harbor water as it moves inland, within my building, and finally back to the harbor as clean water. The clients goal is not only to clean and preserve the harbor but also to educate. The harbor walk is redirected to bring people through the site and walk them past the natural filtration steps, classrooms, and demonstration lab - an educational sequence. It also passes though the cafe to encourage people to enter the building and see how the interior methodology of design matches the exterior filtration concept through the materials, apertures, and the thickness of walls.

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Elevate The Site’s Topography Allow Water Into The Site

Existing Harbor Walk Proposed Harbor Walk (educational sequence)

Flow of Water

Natural Filtration Mechanical Filtration

Classrooms Public Cafe

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This rendering is taken on the second floor, once you step off of the elevator. It’s showing the open and collaborative space that I designed. To the left you can see the double height demonstration lab which is open on the second floor for others to see and listen to the lessons taking place below. To the right is the gallery and event space, where we were told that artwork may be displayed. This program was located here so that any artwork will be protected from direct sun rays due to the “filtration� concept wall filtering the sunlight. The space will receive plenty of ambient light through the glass wall on the other side (which faces away from the sun). Moving forward through the space are the offices.

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DN

Office Space

Gallery and Event Space

DN

Open to lab below

DN

Exterior Deck/ Second Level Cafe

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North Elevation N.T.S.

South Elevation N.T.S.

East Elevation N.T.S.

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West Elevation N.T.S.

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M-Arch Thesis Work Spring 2017 - Fall 2018

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Tactical Ecology

enhancing New York City’s biodiversity

This thesis aims to develop a language that can manifest and aggregate across all of Manhattan, and serve as a precedent study for other large cities. The driving force behind this work is to prove that integrating more aspects of nature into our cities is crucial and vital for the well being of residents and the economy. Through the lens of urban and landscape architecture, a series of tactical interventions can begin to alleviate infrastructural problems that nuance, and possibly even hurt, our cities.

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Graduate Year, 2018 Advisors: Lora Kim, Christopher Meyer, Linda Weld, and John Ellis


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Why is it important to bring wildlife back into our cities? After months of research the issues of pollution, climate change, specie decline, and increasing human population seemed to jump out of the books and beg to be heard. Humans by nature have a biophilic desire to connect to nature, but with an increasing population mega cities are becoming our future. I support the growth of cities, for it means less people move rural which only fragments the natural landscape (severing ecosystems and habitats which local flora and fauna rely on). But large cities also create large barriers in which local wildlife either adapts to, or dies off. If a city can be created that allows for the preexisting wildlife to live alongside the man build environment, the land will only benefit. It would make the city more resilient to flooding, less suspectable to the urban heat island effect, and have cleaner air and water with the help of vegetation. Our ecosystems are intricate webs, each thread supporting several others. When threads start getting severed an entire ecosystem becomes off balanced, allowing for specie decline and pollution.

How can a series of urban tactics provide a more diverse ecology for cities? East Harlem, one of the greater poverty stricken boroughs of NYC faces a glooming issue; rising sea levels. It also has the highest rate of asthma cases for children and adults per the city area. With poor air quality, health, and lack of connection to green spaces, an architectural landscape intervention is necessary to address these issues. The images on this page show my thought experiments collaged into what could be solutions. One of the main ideas which drove my thesis are wildlife corridors. Manhattan traps the ecology of central park like its private terrarium. If I could successfully provide corridors linking Central Park to other NYC parks and to the coast line, we could potentially see an increase in wildlife and specie count. These corridors will not only provide safe travel for wildlife, but will also give people more opportunity to experience the beauty of nature while in the comforts of a city.

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Mapping Truths

Comparing Past to Future: looking at the Sandy inundation area, 100, and 500 year flood lines

This thesis needed a starting point and in order to find that one, information was needed to be displayed geographically. Through ArcGIS mapping the map here and on the following pages were created. It was through these series of mapping that Lower East Harlem was most evidently in need of an intervention. This map here is showing, in green filling, the areas effected by Hurricane Sandy. Almost all of the coast line along the FDR Drive flooded, and in some areas (the lower income areas) residential buildings became flooded. The lighter blue line is showing the anticipated 100 year flood line if climate change continues at it’s current rate. The darker blue line shows the 500 year flood line, with much of lower Harlem swallowed by the East River. How can this be prevented? What interventions will alleviate flooding while lighten our carbon footprint?

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Comparing Watershed to COFS: visualizing East River pollution during storms

The bottom layer of this map, and all the others, is showing topographic change with the dark shades being of lower elevation. This is important when analyzing water shed. The areas overlaid in a blue shade is the water shed which drains out into the East River. Any and all pollution that gets picked up in the city will find its way to the East River during a heavy downfall or storm. New York City’s sewer system is a combined sewer system, meaning rain water drains directly into the sewer lines. And when it storms too heavily for the sewer lines to hold, the excess sledge over flows at each large white dot located on the map. Those locations are the COFS (combined overflow system) openings. The small orange dots represent the location of all street drains. In a city, with non pervious ground surfaces it’s necessary to have this many. But if openings in the asphalt, such as rain gardens, were introduced the issue of over flooding the sewer lines could be solved, reducing pollution.

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Comparing Low Income and Affordable Housing to Green Space: visualizing poor living conditions The diagram above shows a dog peeing on the sidewalk because the only green spaces available are fenced off and non-accessable to pet and owner. What’s the point of having green if it’s not being used? Not to mention there isn’t much green to start with in East Harlem. Not only that, but in these lower income areas, asthma seems to effect children and adults more than any place else in the city. Being able to see and interact with biophilic elements have been proven to make a person feel better. In the case of East Harlem there is a need for more green interventions, to not only increase the livelihood of the residents, but to also reduce air pollution. I’m sure the local dogs would love a green intervention too.

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Comparing Park Space to Vacant Lots: locating the path of least resistance

With a radical idea of wildlife corridors, there is going to be push-back from many directions. So my design approach incorporates vacant lots and underutilized space as a means to connect Central Park to the water front. The images on the right are some of photos I took of vacant buildings and empty plots around lower East Harlem. The diagram above is showing the urban heat island effect, emphasizing that man-made materials such as asphalt and concrete tend to absorb and retain heat whereas vegetation does not. So by implementing more green space in the vacant area, costs of cooling a building can be reduced in the summer months and risk of heat strokes for the sick and elderly might decline.

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With the issues identified, solutions of how to implement more green space in the city started to be developed. These diagrams are showing different scenarios in which solutions to connect Central Park to the East River are required. The ideal option out of each group satisfies the following criteria: deals with rising sea level effectively, allows for more vegetation and ecosystems, reduced urban heat island effect, and does not require the demolition of roads or buildings. The first group of four shows where ground meets FDR Drive which abuts the East River. The ideal solution would be a combination of rising FDR Drive above grade level and inviting water from the East River inland to allow dispersment of rising seas. The bottom two diagrams are showing vacant lots which can be turned into park space, and possibly connect to a larger canal system to alleviate flood water. The top four on the right show how to deal with roof to facade connections. The goal is to not only have a wildlife corridor on the ground, but intertwine it with the buildings. The bottom four show how the facade meets the street.


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B

Pa

rk

Av e

Central Park

Final Outcome Through a series of testing different combinations of the diagrams from the previous page, I settled on a canal system composed of varying sizes. This type of intervention not only connects severed green spaces within the city, but it addresses the issues of rising seas and pollution. The desired effect is to obtain an atmosphere similar to Amsterdam’s throughout Manhattan. By allowing flood waters to enter the city in a controlled direction, we don’t require heavy control infrastructure like the “Big U” project proposes. I believe that water will travel where it wants, and you can only keep it out for so long, that’s why I am proposing a canal system which will direct the water in desirable locations. The system I am proposing fluctuates to fit the width of the street it occupies. The Primary Street Intervention will aggregate on the wide Avenues to hold a deep canal. The Secondary Street Interventions will aggregate on narrower side streets with pervious shallow channels running through it. The last element to the intervention are the vacant lots and how they tie into the larger system as additional park space.

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E1

09

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3rd

Av e

C

A

Primary Street Intervention

B

Secondary Street Intervention

C

Vacant Lot Intervention

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Primary Street Intervention

Existing Street Configuration

Proposed Street Configuration

The Primary Street intervention will aggregate itself along the wider streets of NYC where traffic permits it. The diagrammatic sections above show a street layout analysis of East 106th Street. The existing condition included wasted space. It was comprised of 20 foot side walks on either side, 12 feet of parking lane on either side, 12 feet of road on either side, and the middle was an empty 12 foot section that people were illegally using as parking. I had better plans for the useless space and so I reconfigured the size of the sidewalks and parking lanes in order to fit a 30 foot wide canal without disrupting the flow of traffic. The canal system will contain pedestrian paths and moments for rest or interaction with the ecosystem of the canal. Gardens on stilts will be added throughout as a means to provide vegetation for insects and birds to travel along, and shade for pedestrians strolling through. 52


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Secondary Street Intervention

Existing Street Configuration

Proposed Street Configuration

The Secondary Street intervention will manifest on the narrower streets in Manhattan where a full canal cannot fit. The sectional diagrams above analyze a one way cross street with one driving lane and two parking lanes. My intervention incorporates rain gardens and a metal grate cover lane in the middle. The idea is to leave this middle lane exposed to sun and rain as a means to alleviate storm water runoff and create a condition where small plants can flourish. The gap of space between the surface of the steel grate road and the vegetated ground beneath will be around 2 feet. This shallow channel will drain directly into the canal system to created a large connected network which deals with flood water independently from the sewer system. 54


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Vacant Lot Intervention

Existing Street Configuration

Proposed Street Configuration

The Vacant Lot intervention will connect into either a primary or secondary street intervention. There are many spaces in the city vary in size where space is not being utilized for anything, so my thought process is to give it back to the species we drove out of the city. These empty spaces can be transformed into what ever is more needed in that specific neighborhood. For example it can be a temporary park with picnic tables and built in grilles, or some tennis courts. The hope is that these vacant plots will be turned into community program to supplement the canal system. In one of the areas I would have liked to design a learning center for wildlife if we were given more time to keep developing.

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Competition Work Spring 2017- Summer 2018

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Anchor Point

affordable housing for Beverly, MA

The 2017 Annual Affordable Housing Development Competition paired six teams of talented graduate students interested in architecture, planning, finance, and policy with affordable-housing organizations to develop innovative and comprehensive development proposals addressing the needs of these organizations. My team’s sponsor for the competition was Harborlight Community Partners located in Beverly, MA. Harborlight is a non-profit, Massachusetts certified Community Development Corporation with the capacity and sustainability to provide affordable housing across Southern Essex County.

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4th Year, 2017 Team Members:

Matt Curtin Project Manager Master of Urban Planning Harvard GSD

Kevin Symcox

Master of Urban Planning Harvard GSD

Lizzie Hauver

Bachelor of Science in Architecture Wentworth Institute of Technology


Special Thanks to Harborlight Staff:

Kristin Carlson Sponsor

Harborlight Community Partners Senior Project Manager, Real Estate Development

Nicolas PĂŠrez

Bachelor of Science in Architecture Wentworth Institute of Technology

Andrew DeFranza Sponsor

Harborlight Community Partners Executive Director

Victoria DeVeau

Bachelor of Science in Architecture Wentworth Institute of Technology

Brandon Wilks

Bachelor of Arts Harvard College

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Executive Summary

Massachusetts struggles to provide quality, affordable housing for low income families. There are the usual culprits: high construction costs, inflated property values, overly restrictive local zoning codes, and so on. Additionally, developers must consider the needs of two generations of residents. Parents require access to quality employment; children need good schools in safe, kidfriendly neighborhoods. Traditional, cost efficient multifamily design may not be appropriate for families, where safe places for play and community interaction are critical. Unfortunately, there is a limited supply of cities where great schools, good jobs, and child-friendly infrastructure overlap. These cities tend to command the highest real estate prices and often restrict multifamily housing construction, greatly reducing the feasibility of affordable housing projects. Finally, fear of low income students in the classroom and the fiscal burden of new children for the school district can erect an unbreakable wall of political resistance. On the high-cost North Shore, the City of Beverly and local housing advocates have been laudably proactive addressing

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regional housing needs. Despite being over Massachusetts’ 10% affordability requirement (under Chapter 40B), city leaders are working closely with Harborlight, a nonprofit affordable housing developer, to bring family-oriented affordable housing to a five acre site adjacent to Beverly High School. The city has been an excellent partner, using the state’s Chapter 40R and 40S programs to provide critical zoning relief and offset costs to Beverly schools. This document is a study of how local, state, and federal resources can be leveraged to provide high quality, familyfriendly affordable housing on this site. Design, programming, and financial challenges will be addressed in detail. The project team’s proposal, Anchor Point, includes 61 units of family oriented housing targeting families earning 30%, 50%, and 60% of the HUD-defined area median income (AMI). It addresses a critical need through innovative design and specialized programming while being a responsible steward of the state’s limited resources. Anchor Point will be an asset for its residents, the City of Beverly, and the North Shore.

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Judging Criteria Project Financing 20%

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- A  nchor Point leverages state, federal, and local subsidies to create new affordable housing units serving low income families. - Traditional debt financing is combined with LIHTC equity to generate financially viable housing at low rents. Anchor Point seeks the maximum eight project-based Section 8 housing vouchers to extend housing to extremely low income and transitioning homeless families. - This project seeks at all times to be a responsible steward of the state’s financial resources. Construction costs are carefully managed in light of the enormous statewide need for very limited affordable housing subsidies.


- E  very stage of the design process was guided by the special needs of working families with children. - Children’s spaces are designed to foster imaginative play in a safe environment. Outdoor play areas have easy sight lines to apartments and are shielded from fast moving cars on Tozier and Sohier roads. - Communal spaces such as rooftops, the reading room, and common room are designed to fulfill the unique needs of families, including spaces for children and parents to access imaginative play and foster informal social networks. - The development leverages the natural topography of the site to create programmable spaces with breathtaking views.

Physical Design 20%

- A  nchor Point responds to a long recognized need for financially accessible housing for families of moderate means. - Children need access to good schools. Parents need good jobs. Beverly has both, with close proximity to regional educational and employment centers.

Community Responsiveness 20%

- A nchor Point was planned to minimize vehicle trips and encouraging active transportation. The site is located within easy walking distance to the commuter rail and is served by two bus lines providing access to Beverly’s commercial district. -  The project uses low-cost interventions to reduce its environmental footprint such as passive heating and cooling, green rooftops, and rainwater reclamation tanks. - Anchor Point is eligible for a LEED Silver Certification.

Environmental Sensitivity 20%

- A  nchor Point has the explicit backing of the mayor, several city councilmen, and senior city planners. - Anchor Point provides 61 units of low cost housing in a high opportunity area at a reasonable cost for state taxpayers.

Project Feasibility 10%

- A  nchor Point carefully blends design and programming to meet the needs of families with children. - Anchor Point is the first project in Beverly to use Chapter 40R and Chapter 40S resources to financially offset costs to the school district and enable spot zoning. - Anchor Point will partner with Beverly institutions such as the school district, library system, and local non-profits to deliver on-site services for working parents and school-age children. - Through operating revenue, Anchor Point will be staffed with an on-site resident advisor to help residents access support and services.

Innovation 10%

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Existing Conditions

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Proposed Design

The proposed building is oriented around an existing easement that bisects the site.

Objective Design Anchor Point is first and foremost a community for families. Like any other Beverly neighborhood, the parents at Anchor Point deserve a quality home and their children are entitled to a safe place to grow. The concept was driven by the idea of a simple metal wire. Malleable but strong, it can be bent, twisted, and shaped without losing its strength. It can bent to a complete circle, a single continuous strip of metal, enclosing and protecting everything within. This is the concept of the Mobius strip: a continuous surface that conveys the idea of one. One family, one body, one community. The key design challenge is a utility easement bifurcating the site. The easement became a walkway separating Anchor Point’s two structures, the bend of each leaves the mind to complete the circle while providing easy access from both sides. A site defining, programmable skybridge links the buildings to the north without inhibiting access to the easement by utility vehicles and equipment.

Our future design contains: 61 units of family housing 92 parking spaces 63,700 GSF of building space 1,300 NSF of community space

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2:00 PM

1:00 PM

W 4:10 PM

S

Solar Orientation

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This sun study depicts the summer and winter solstices, the shortest and longest days of the year, to show the two extremes in sun exposure and shading. Anchor Point is oriented specifically to ensure maximum desired sun coverage across the site, and architectural elements are employed in the areas where sun exposure is less favorable.


7:22 PM

N

4:08 AM

7:11 AM

June 21

E

December 21

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Our plan adds one additional point of entry to the new development.

A present entry point to the site is maintained.

The building’s orientation allows full access to an existing easement that bisects the site. Out site plan maintains the existing tree canopy at the intersection of Sohier and Tozier Roads.

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An existing housing complex is adjacent to the site.


Floor Plans The initial shape and layout of the units proved challenging since the long strips of the building did not allow for natural light to enter the living space. The best solution was a double loaded corridor with elongated units to allow maximum exterior wall surface for window placements. There is one large community room for the residents to gather and mingle as opposed to multiple locations as to encourage social interaction.

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Smart Growth

Anchor Point implements five key “Smart Growth� principles to improve the environment, curb urban sprawl, and maximize diversity and community engagement. 1. F  irst, Anchor Point is walkable. By providing close proximity to Beverly High School, the North Shore Education Consortium, Beverly Hospital, the commuter rail, and local community bus routes, residents of the community may run errands and travel to school or work with ease. 2. S  econd, we are implementing compact design through infill development. By building on an underutilized infill lot, we are helping to curb urban sprawl, preserving open space, and improving the efficiency of existing public investments like schools, roads, bridges, water lines, sewer lines, roads, and emergency services.

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3. T  hird, Anchor Points contributes by adding affordable housing to an area that lacks such housing, giving Beverly residents more choices about where to live. 4. F  ourth, Anchor Point provides a strong sense of place via design elements like a unique two-story glass walkway, a gathering area above the entrance, and an abundance of indoor and outdoor gathering areas. 5. F  ifth, Anchor Point is designed to encourage the flow of air, light, and green space between the two structures. Existing trees are retained where possible.

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Typical one-bedroom unit.

Typical two-bedroom unit.

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Typical three-bedroom unit.


Unit Plans The elongated unit layout was designed with rooms located on the end walls and living space in the center to create a sense of community within individual units. Because the living space consists of the kitchen, dining, and living room, it was important to differentiate the spaces. The living room has wooden planks that define the area on the floor, wall, and ceiling. This creates a sense of being in a separate, calming area while still in the open. The unit perspective gives a sense of how the unit feels to residents. It also clearly differentiates between the living room, kitchen, and dining areas. The apartments are open, warm and inviting spaces with a sense of community at both the project and unit scales.

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Green Features

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Anchor Point’s design maximizes usable open space, improves storm water drainage, encourages heating and cooling efficiency, and optimizes energy efficiency. A green roof featuring a community garden and communal space aids with passive temperature control, reduces stormwater runoff, reduces noise, and extends the roof’s usable lifespan. Anchor Point will also feature a water reclamation tank in the southern part of the building. The tank will use the natural slope of the site by collecting runoff


water for re-use, conserving water and lowering expenses. Anchor Point will also feature environmentally sustainable lighting design techniques, which involve orienting the shape of the building to maximize the amount of light hitting the building at all times. The design also involves the placement of light shelves in strategic locations to allow indirect sunlight to enter the building during the summer and direct sunlight to enter during the winter. Finally, the design preserves the site’s existing tree canopy. 77


Smart Location & Linkage

15/28

Prereq

Smart Location

Required

Prereq

Imperiled Species and Ecological Communities

Required

Prereq

Wetland and Water Body Conservation

Required

Prereq

Agricultural Land Conservation

Required

Prereq

Floodplain Avoidance

Required

Credit

Preferred Locations

10

5/10

Credit

Brownfield Remediation

2

0/2

Credit

Access to Quality Transit

7

3/7

Credit

Bicycle Facilities

2

0/2

Credit

Housing and Jobs Proximity

3

3/3

Credit

Steep Slope Protection

1

1/1

Credit

Site Design for Habitat or Wetland and Water Body Conservation 1

1/1

Credit

Restoration of Habitat or Wetlands and Water Bodies

1

1/1

Credit

Long-Term Conservation Management of Habitat or Wetlands and Water Bodies

1

Neighborhood Pattern & Design

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28

41

1/1

21/41

Prereq

Walkable Streets

Required

Prereq

Compact Development

Required

Prereq

Connected and Open Community

Required

Credit

Walkable Streets

9

2/9

Credit

Compact Development

6

1/6

Credit

Mixed-Use Neighborhoods

4

1/4

Credit

Housing Types and Affordability

7

7/7

Credit

Reduced Parking Footprint

1

1/1

Credit

Connected and Open Community

2

1/2

Credit

Transit Facilities

1

1/1

Credit

Transportation Demand Management

2

0/2

Credit

Access to Civic & Public Space

1

1/1

Credit

Access to Recreation Facilities

1

1/1

Credit

Visitability and Universal Design

1

1/1

Credit

Community Outreach and Involvement

2

1/2

Credit

Local Food Production

1

1/1

Credit

Tree-Lined and Shaded Streetscapes

2

1/2

Credit

Neighborhood Schools

1

1/1


14

Green Infrastructure & Buildings

31

14/31

Y

Prereq

Certified Green Building

Required

Y

Prereq

Minimum Building Energy Performance

Required

Y

Prereq

Indoor Water Use Reduction

Required

Y

Prereq

Construction Activity Pollution Prevention

Required

3

Credit

Certified Green Buildings

5

3/5

2

Credit

Optimize Building Energy Performance

2

2/2

1

Credit

Indoor Water Use Reduction

1

1/1

1

Credit

Outdoor Water Use Reduction

2

1/2

0

Credit

Building Reuse

1

0/1

0

Credit

Historic Resource Preservation and Adaptive Reuse

2

0/2

1

Credit

Minimized Site Disturbance

1

1/1

2

Credit

Rainwater Management

4

2/4

1

Credit

Heat Island Reduction

1

1/1

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Renewable Energy Production

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Infrastructure Energy Efficiency

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Wastewater Management

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Recycled and Reused Infrastructure

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Solid Waste Management

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Light Pollution Reduction

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Innovation & Design Process

6

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Innovation

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LEEDÂŽ Accredited Professional

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Regional Priority Credits

4

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PROJECT TOTALS

SILVER

110

55

Certified: 40-49 points, Silver: 50-59 points, Gold: 60-79 points, Platinum: 80+ points

79


Development Timeline Community Engagement Community Engagement Efforts

Preliminary Analysis

Read 2017 Massachusetts QAP Analyze Projects Awarded Credit Allocations in 2016 Engage Staff at MA DHCD regarding potential project

Obtaining Site Control

Market Analysis Select Type of Project Analysis of Potential Sites Site Selection Determine Project Feasibility via Project Proforma Generate Construction Budget Engage Debt Financing Sources Place Land Under Option

Predevelopment Phase

Apply for Low Income Housing Tax Credits (Federal and State) Receive LIHTC Allocation Syndicators Source LIHTC to Equity Market Receive Tax Credit Commitment Pricing Letter from Syndicator Apply for Permanent Financing Receive Permanent Financing Commitment Apply for Construction Financing Receive Construction Commitment Apply for Bridge Financing Receive Bridge Financing Commitment Apply for Mass Affordable Housing Trust Fund Loan (2018) Receive Mass Affordable Housing Trust Fund Loan (2018) Apply for Beverly Affordable Housing Trust Fund Subsidy (2018) Receive Beverly Affordable Housing Trust Fund Subsidy (2018) Apply for Beverly Community Preservation Fund Subsidy (2018) Receive Beverly Community Preservation Fund Subsidy (2018) Apply for HOME Subsidy (2018) Receive HOME Subsidy (2018) Generate Site Plan & Submit to ZBA Receive Zoning Approval Purchase and Sale Agreement Due Dilligence Identify and Select Contractor Initial Closing (Construction Loan) Execute Land Purchase

Construction & Leasing Phase

Receive Initial LIHTC Equity Contribution Site Preparation Infrastructure Installation Receive Second LIHTC Equity Contribution Site Work Construct Buildings Receive Third LIHTC Equity Contribution Hardscaping / Landscaping / Paving Finish Construction Leaseu-Up Placed In Service (Section 42) Receive Final LIHTC Equity Contribution

Stabilized Operations Phase

80

Close Permanent Financing Begin Year 1 of Credit Period Submit Cost Certification for Forms 8609 Obtain IRS Forms 8609 Achieve Final Equity Contribution

Q4 16

Q1 17

Q2 17

Q3 17

Q4 17


Q1 18

Q2 18

Q3 18

Q4 18

Q1 19

Q2 19

Q3 19

Q4 19

Q1 20

Q2 20

Q3 20

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Emerging Formality

Petare Norte, Caracas, Venezuela

Through combining the observations and analysis of the emerging bottom-up nature of Petare Norte with a formalized top-down design process, a new series of design strategies begin to emerge. These strategies revolve around solving some of the issues Petare and its citizens face such as disconnected neighborhoods, increased gang activity, lack of public open spaces, and dependence on an unstable government for aid with food and water. These strategies form to create a new urban typology that will improve the overall quality of life throughout Petare while respecting the existing conditions.

82

Summer, 2018 Team Member:

Nicolas Perez

Master of Architecture Wentworth Institute of Technology


Advisors:

Robert Cowherd, PhD, Professor Wentworth Institute of Technology Department of Architecture

Ignacio Cardona, Doctoral Student Harvard Graduate School of Design Department of Architecture

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Public Space The hyper density of informal settlements often leads its residents with little to no usable public space. A quick study reveals that in Petare only thirty percent of the land is public space. That thirty percent is comprised of roads and pathways which sometimes become very active and dangerous. This lack of public space is detrimental to overall quality of life of the residents.

Food and Water Although the citizens of Petare do have access to food and water, it is often a result of government aid. A study focusing on the average wages reveal that a typical monthly salary often does not yield enough revenue to buy all the groceries needed for a healthy diet. This fact alongside the reliance of government aid to an unstable government leave its citizens in position of uncertainty and doubt.

Violence As a result of the hyper density, high disconnection, lack of resources and instability, violence in Petare has seen a rise in recent years. The disconnected neighborhood become breeding grounds for gangs that thrive on territorial control. These gangs operate by taking advantage of citizens who are desperately in need of a source of income and safety for their families.

Disconnection The emerging construction method of Petare and informal settlements alike often leads to a high number of dead ends and disconnection between neighborhoods. This is a result of homes being constructed before streets, typically streets and footpaths are the result of the where homes are constructed. This style of construction leads to chaotic urban sprawl that can be seen in the maps of Petare.

Total Food Cost: 2,008,921 Bolivars

Chicken(500g.): 354,751

Cheese(16oz.): 409,131 Bread(2 people): 68,909 Potatoes(1kg.): 123,779

Apples(1kg.): 464,286 Tomatoes(1kg.): 177,011

Total Space:

Milk(1 liter.): 153,123

Total Open Space: 30% Amount of people: 100,000 People Homicide per year in Petare: 122 Homicide per year in US: 5

84

Eggs(12): 257,931 Average Monthly Salary: 797,510 Bolivars


85


Petare Norte, Caracas, Venezuela

86


Dead Ends

Density: void and solid

Water Shed Direction

87


Public Space The lack of public spaces can be addressed by creating new public spaces above the existing dwelling spaces. Through a careful structural analysis of the existing conditions columns can be brought up that tie into and reinforce the existing structure. These columns can then lead to hold platforms which can house multiple program spaces which provide the citizens with a space to gather and play. In this intervention two multi-use courts have been added as well as garden spaces and areas to gather and discuss future community events.

Food and Water The dependence on government aid for food and water can be resolved through the use of water collectors and community garden spaces. The garden spaces can occur on the new platforms as part of the community gathering spaces, allowing residents to grow some of their food. The water collection system functions thanks to the proximity of buildings and their elevation. One rooftop collects and directs water to its direct neighbor downhill and so on. This system creates a sense of trust and cooperation throughout the neighborhood.

Violence This new urban typology can help alleviate crime in the region by providing increased circulation while maintaining a high level of transparency throughout the pathway. This can be achieved due to the location of entry points as well as having open public spaces where residents can gather. These two factors create a strong circulation of people that will intuitively monitor the area against dangerous behavior. This mixed with the seamless integration of existing dwelling spaces creates conditions similar to what Jane Jacobs refers to as “eyes on the street.�

Disconnection Disconnection of neighborhoods is a common problem facing Petare. Through the integration of new urban typologies, neighborhoods that were previously disconnected can now be joined. New bonds can be formed as neighborhoods come together in new open public spaces. Transportation through Petare suddenly becomes easier and safer as well as the overall quality of life will increase.

New Platform

Existing structural column

Existing Grade Level

New Support Column

Bedrock

88

Support Column Reinforcement


89


5 years later

Day in the life Petare, Caracas Wednesday May 25, 2023

Communal Multi-purpose gathering space

Fabiana - Female, age 19 Helps her family by working at their local store. Loves dance, and dreams to be a famous dancer.

90

Carlos - Male, age 28 Ex-gang member, who manages the local store. Hopes to open more stores throughout Petare to supply goods to those in need.

Wakes up

Wakes up

He ad

He

to s cho ol

Working He ad st ow or k

ol ho sc

Juanita - Female, age 55 Teacher at Alegria Educacional. Grandmother of five grandchildren, and loves gardening.

to ds ki

Jordan - Male, age 11 Student at Alegria Educacional. Loves Science and basketball and dreams to become a scientist.

Wakes up

s ke Ta

Maria-Gabriela - Female, age 37 Single mother of two. Works as a receptionist in Caracas and dreams of opening a restaurant.

Connector building entry space

Teaching

k or ow st d a

At school

Trades with Carlos for some goods for the store.

work s to Head

Wakes up

rk wo

Wakes up

to ads He

6:00am

7:00am

Working

Working

8:00am

9:00am

10:00am

11:00am

12:0


00am

Main Communal garden

Basketball court - Recreational zone

Goes home and gets ready for bed

Heads home, drops off her kids at the basketball to play for a bit. Goes home to pick up her kids from daycare (Juanita)

Plays basketball for a little bit

Goes home with some students to babysit and tutor. Goes with Juanita to her home after school.

Tends to her garden after everyone is picked up.

Gets Picked up

Heads to her dance class.

Chats with Juanita at the garden

Goes home and gets ready for bed

Goes home and gets ready for bed

Hangs out with her friends

Goes home and gets ready for bed

Goes home after a long day at work.

1:00pm

2:00pm

3:00pm

4:00pm

5:00pm

6:00pm

7:00pm

8:00pm

9:00pm

10:00pm

11:00pm

91


92


Professional Work Spring 2015- Summer 2017

93


Large House Study - Zoning Laws Needham, MA Issues Being Addressed - New residential construction is often built close to the maximum setback allowance. - Abutters are impacted by these large scale houses when views are altered, trees are removed, shadows are cast, and drainage is modified. - Neighborhood fabric changes with new scales; often loss of trees and changes in topography occur. - New construction replaces the more moderately sized housing stock, which alters our community’s diversity. - Many residents perceive that replacement homes are “just too big.”

Study Committee Goals - Respond to resident concerns about the issues of tear-downs and replacement housing. - Explore the specific effects of zoning and solutions for regulating this issue. - Investigate other communities’ responses. - Make recommendations for zoning changes to reduce the negative impacts of replacement housing on neighborhood character. - Analyze house size in relation to lot size, in order to complement the Town’s other zoning dimensional controls. - Make zoning changes fair and easy to understand.

Housing Inventory – Types of total

mily

occupied. e g for or

y17% are g for both ontage.

Needham’s Housing Inventory Types of Properties Distribution of Units per Structure

Needham’s HousingofInventory - Lot Distribution Properties by Lot Area Coverage Coverage

1.9% 10.5%

8.2%

79.4%

Singlefamily 2 to 4 Units 5 to 9 Units 10 + Units

- About 11,000 total units. - 76% single-family detached. - 82.5% owner-occupied. - About 25% are nonconforming for either lot size or Planning Board frontage. Meeting, January 10, 2017 - Approximately 17% are nonconforming for both lot size and frontage.

94

Needham’s Housing Inventory – Coverage

442 233 Less than 15.0% 15.0-19.9%

1,717 4,803

20.0-22.9%

More than 23.0%

(Footprint o % of lot area 2/3 of prope lot coverage percentages than 15%. Median lot c 13% compa for studied r units. Only 80 pro lot coverage than 25%.

- (Footprint of house as a % of lot area.) - 2/3 of properties had lot coverage percentages of less than 15%. - Median lot coverage of 13% compared to 23% for studies replacement units. - Only5 80 properties had lot coverage of more then 25%.Meeting, January 10, 2017 Planning Board


Tear-down Activity - Smaller homes with median size of 1,536 square feet and have a median value of $600,00 are being torn down. - Replacement homes had a median size of 4,830 square feet and prices well above $1 million. - Two-family rental units that are reconstructed typically are converted to high-end condominiums and do not remain rental properties. -Tear-down properties had a median FAR of 15% compared to 44% for the replacement homes.

Proposed Changes to Zoning - Encourage more building elements and architectural diversity. - Modify setbacks. - Increase Lot Area Coverage in tandem with applying a Floor Area Ratio (FAR) calculation. - Change building height measurement method.

Allow Elements in Setbacks - Increase and encourage architectural variety by allowing various elements to be built within the front and side yard setbacks. For example: roof overhangs of up to 24 inches. - Bay windows of up to 8 feet long - maximum overall at 25% of that side of the house. - Covered porches can project into setback to maximum of 50 square feet.

Housing Inventory – Housing

mily home ased by 241%

000 250 500 000 ,449 based stimates. ew 2Charles River 1 to $6,742. households lf their g costs.

Needham’s Housing Inventory – Floor HousingArea Inventory Needham’s Housing Inventory Ratio (FAR)

Needham’s Housing Costs

Floor Area Ratio (FAR)

-

(Floor area divided by FAR Distribution the lot area.)  Median FAR of about 20%.  30% of properties had an FAR above 25%.  Only 5.6% had an home pricesabove increased 40%. by - FAR is determined by floor area divided by the lot FAR

Assessed Values of Single-family Homes and Condominiums, 2014 2500 2000 1500 1000 500 0

Single-family Homes Condos

- Median single-family 241% since 1990. 1990 = $245,000 2000 = $436,250 2010 = $632,500 2016 = $835,000 - Median rent of $1,449 based on 2015 census 6 estimates. - Market rent for new two bedroom apartments at Charles River 10, Landing Planning Board Meeting, January 2017 is $3,941 - $6,742 - Above 12% of households pay more than half their income on housing costs.

1800 1600 1400 1200 1000 800 600 400 200 0

1691 1541

1293

854

549

514

342

Number of Properties

207

117 86

area. - Median FAR of about 20%. - 30% of properties had an FAR above 25%. - Only 5.6% had an FAR above 40%.

Planning Board Meeting, January 10, 2017

95


Proposed Regulations: Conforming Lot 10,000 sf

Changes to Setbacks Front: - Increase from 20’ to 25’ measured to the nearest portion of the building or structure,

96

with an allowance of 6” of siding or trim. - Limit two-car garages within 35’ to 1 1/2 stories. Rear: - Remain at 20’ setback. Side: - Measure to nearest portion of building or structure with an allowance of 6” of siding or trim. - Conforming lot increase from 12.5’ - 14’ to 14’ - 16’. -32’ of structure allowed at 14’ setback line, the rest must be offset 2’ to 16’. - Non-Conforming Lot (for frontage only) increase from 10’ to 12’. - Maximum 32’ of structure allowed along a side yard, the rest offset an additional 2’.


ALLOWED LAC 28% 2,800 sf FAR 38% 3,800 + 600 sf gar ACTUAL FL1 2,150 sf + 600 sf garage LAC 2,750 sf FL2 1,645 sf Total: 3,795 sf FAR 37.9% <38%

97


egulations: Non-conforming Lot Proposed Regulations: Non-Conforming Lot 7,071 sf

sf 6 sf + 600 sf gar

52 sf gar LAC 1932

8%

ALLOWED Note:10, 2017 Planning Board Meeting, January LAC 28% 1,980 sf FAR 38% 2,686 + 600 sf gar

ACTUAL FL1 1,380 sf + 552 sf garage LAC 1,932 sf FL2 1,306 sf Total: 2,686 sf FAR 37.9% <38%

98

Front setback is either 25 ft or the average of the existing house setbacks of 150 ft on each side of the lot, whichever is greater. The maximum setback regardless of the average will be at 35 ft.


Proposed Regulations: Non-conforming Lot

ALLOWED LAC 28% FAR 38% ALLOWED LAC 28% FAR 38%

1980 sf 2686 sf + 600 sf gar

ACTUAL FL1 1380 sf + 552 sf gar LAC 1932 FL2 a 1306 sf Total 2686 sf 38%

1980 sf 2686 sf + 600 sf gar

ACTUAL FL1 1380 sf + 552 sf gar LAC 1932 FL2 a 1306 sf Total 2686 sf 38%

Proposed Regulations: Non-conforming Lot 28

Planning Board Meeting, January 10, 2017

ALLOWED LAC 28% FAR 38%

1980 sf 2686 sf + 600 sf gar

ACTUAL FL1 1380 sf + 552 sf gar LAC 1932 FL2 a 1306 sf Total 2686 sf 38%

99


Regulations: Corner Lot Proposed Regulations: Conforming Corner Lot 10,880 sf

ALLOWED LAC 28% 3,040 sf FAR 38% 4,126 + 600 sf gar

Note: Front setback is either 25 ft or the average of the existing house setbacks of 150 ft on each side of the lot, whichever is greater. The maximum setback regardless of the average will be at 35 ft.

Planning Board Meeting, January 10, 2017 ACTUAL FL1 FL2 Total:

100

2,350 sf + 600 sf garage LAC 27% 1,776 sf 4,126 sf FAR 38%


ed Regulations: Corner Lot Proposed Regulations: Corner Lot

roposed Regulations: Corner Lot Planning Board Meeting, January 10, 32 2017

Planning Board Meeting, January 10, 2017

101


Summary of Changes: Conforming Lot

Typical Existing Conforming Lot

Maximum Replacement House Under Current Regulations

Maximum Replacement House Under Proposed Regulations

10,000 sf lot LAC 25% 2,500 sf 4,400 sf + 600 sf gar

10,000 sf lot LAC 28% FAR 38% 3,795 sf + 600 sf gar

Additions to Existing Single and Two-Family Dwellings - Houses seeking to do an addition will be subject to the proposed regulations for new construction. Houses non-conforming relative to the front and side yard setback will be allowed exceptions to the proposed front and side yard setback requirements provided they are demolishing less than 50%, excluding a single story garage. The setback requirements for the addition will be based on the setbacks at the time of the houses construction with some limitations.

Planning Board Meeting, January 10, 2017

Front Yard: The front yard setback will be 20’ or the furthest extent of the existing structure, whichever is greater. Side Yard: The side yard setback for structures built prior to July 1, 1999 will be 10’ or the furthest extent of the existing structure, whichever is greater. The side yard setback for structures built between July 1, 1999 and May 1, 2017 will be 12.5’ of the furthest extent of the existing structure, whichever is greater. Structures where there is more than 50% demolition of the existing structure may be eligible for the above noted exemptions by applying for a Special Permit from the Zoning Board of Appeals

102


Summary of Changes: Non-Conforming Lot

Typical Existing Non-Conforming Lot

Maximum Replacement House

Maximum Replacement House

7,170 sf lot LAC 25% 1,768 sf 2,935 sf + 600 sf gar

7,170 sf lot LAC 28% FAR 40% 2,827 sf + 600 sf gar

Summary of Changes - Encourage more building elements and architectural diversity - Modify setbacks - Increase Lot Area Coverage in tandem with applying a Floor Area Ratio calculation - Change building height measurement method

Planning Board Meeting, January 10, 2017

103


Existing Conditions COLLABORATIVE DESIGN ARCHITECT

Existing Floor Plans

CEILING HEIGHT: 81.75"

BEDROOM

10'-7" X 8'-6" AREA: 84.78 SF

DINNING

10'-11" X 12'-2" AREA: 138.44 SF

CEILING HEIGHT: 82"

BASEMENT

11' X 20'-10" AREA: 281.82 SF

DEN

7'-7" X 11'-3" AREA 85.62 SF

CRAWL SPACE

CEILING HEIGHT: 81.25"

FIREPLACE

FURNACE

MECH ROOM

BEDROOM

11'-6" X 31'-3" AREA: 352.19 SF

18'-8" X 12'-7" AREA: 235.25 SF

CEILING HEIGHT: 82.5 UNDER JOIST 8" JOIST

KITCHEN

14'-2" X 9'-6" AREA: 147.98 SF CEILING DROP

FUEL OIL TANK

PROJECT:

DECK

P

MUD ROOM

TITLE:

6'-4" X 5'-4" AREA: 34.87 SF

STORAGE

BATHROOM

17'-10" X 7'-1" AREA: 127.43 SF

6'-5" X 7' AREA: 44.66 SF

T

ARCHITECT:

A

BLUKHEAD CONSULTANT:

C

Basement Floor Plan N.T.S.

1

First Floor Plan EXISTING FIRST FLOOR PLAN 1 N.T.S.

EXISTING BASEMENT PLAN 1/4"=1'-0"

1/4"=1'-0"

COPYRIGHT

DATE: SCALE: DRAWN:

DRAWING

Needham, MA Residence Remodel & Addition My previous firm was hired to help a family reach their goals of having a home that worked for them. The scope of work for the basement and first floor included: expanding the basement, remodeling the existing dining room into an office, expanding the living room, redesigning the kitchen, adding a powder room, and finally to redesign the front entry and rear yard patio. The scope of work for the second floor included: expanding the master bedroom and bath, remodel the shared bath, and to add a laundry room. I was in charge of measuring the existing home, drawing the existing floor plans, and elevations. From there my boss, Alex Knox, and I would go back and fourth coming up with different layout options to present to the client. The following page shows the final design outcome agreed on between my past firm and the client.

104


COLLABORATIVE DESIGN ARCHITECT

BEDROOM

BEDROOM

10'-11" X 11'-4" AREA: 124.30 SF

11'-9" X 11' AREA: 129.75 SF

East Elevation N.T.S.

1

EXISTING EAST ELEVATION 1/4"=1'-0"

BEDROOM

BEDROOM

9'-7" X 19'-10" AREA: 165.42 SF

10'-11" X 11'-6" AREA: 125.54 SF

PROJECT:

SHARED BATH 6'-5" X 7'-5" AREA: 48.13 SF

MASTER BATH 5' X 7'-6" AREA: 36.83 SF

TITLE:

ARCHITECT:

CONSULTANT:

1

EXISTING SECOND FLOOR PLAN 1/4"=1'-0"

Second Floor Plan N.T.S.

COPYRIGHT

COLLABORATIVE DESIGN ARCHITECT DATE:

North Elevation SCALE:

N.T.S.

DRAWN:

1 DRAWING

EXISTING NORTH ELEVATION 1/4"=1'-0"

OOF PLAN

West Elevation N.T.S.

EXISTING WEST ELEVATION

1

1/4"=1'-0"

Existing Site Plan N.T.S.

PROJECT:

South Elevation

FOR GENERAL REFERENCE ONLY NOTE: ALEX KNOX, AIA IS NOT THE ORIGINAL AUTHOR OF THIS SITE PLAN

N.T.S. TITLE:

1

EXISTING SOUTH ELEVATION 1/4"=1'-0"

105


Final Design Proposed Floor Plans COLLABORATIVE DESIGN ARCHITECT

New

New

Existing

Existing

CEILING HEIGHT: 81.75"

UP

UP

CEILING HEIGHT: 82"

CEILING HEIGHT: 81.25"

HOME OFFICE 11'-0" X 13'-0"

DINNING ROOM 20'-0" X 12' - 6"

DN

FURNACE

CEILING HEIGHT: 82.5 UNDER JOIST 8" JOIST

Existing

POWDER ROOM

New

6'-3" X 4'-6"

MUD ROOM 8'-0" X 10'-6"

FRIDGE

Existing

Existing

FUEL OIL TANK

FREEZER

CEILING DROP

KITCHEN

New

New

NEW THREE QUARTER BATH

14'-6" X 15'-0"

New

Existing

Existing

DN PROJECT:

MICROWAVE

New

New

TITLE:

UP

LIVING ROOM

DW

12'-0" X 16'-0"

Existing

CEILING HEIGHT: 81.25"

0"

'-

10

UP

DN

ARCHITECT:

BREAKFAST ROOM 15'-0" X 10'-6"

DN

CONSULTANT:

Basement Floor Plan 1

COPYRIGHT

BASEMENT PLAN

BBQ GRILL

N.T.S.

1/4"=1'-0"

DATE: SCALE: DRAWN:

DRAWING

First Floor Plan

1

FIRST FLOOR PLAN 1/4"=1'-0"

N.T.S. COLLABORATIVE DESIGN ARCHITECT

CEILING HEIGHT: 81.75"

NEW

EXISTING TO REMAIN

Electrical Plans GYPSUM BOARD UNDER STUDS

EXISTING TO REMAIN

S C

S

U

NEW

3W

CEILING DROP FUEL OIL TANK (TO BE REMOVED)

S

TRAY CEILING, TYP.

TGI

S

FURNACE

CEILING HEIGHT: 82.5 UNDER JOIST 8" JOIST

NEW

NEW

EXISTING TO REMAIN

EXISTING TO REMAIN

SSS

S

3W3W

SS

CEILING HEIGHT: 81.25"

JB

CEILING HEIGHT: 82"

3W

JB

S SS

SS

3W

SS

GFI

SS S PROJECT:

SS

EXT EXT

SSS

S SS

SS

S

TITLE:

ARCHITECT:

CONSULTANT:

S

EXT

First Floor Plan

N.T.S.

EXT

Basement Floor Plan

EXT

S

N.T.S. COPYRIGHT

1

BASEMENT ELECTRICAL PLAN

1

1/4"=1'-0"

DATE: SCALE: DRAWN:

DRAWING

106

FIRST FLOOR ELECTRICAL PLAN 1/4"=1'-0"


COLLABORATIVE DESIGN ARCHITECT

TW 2446 RO: 2'-6 1/8" X 4'-8 7/8"

*REPURPOSED EXISTING BAY WINDOW

*EXISTING TO BE REUSED

*EXISTING TO BE REUSED

REPLACE GABLE ROOF WITH FLAT HIP ROOF

REUSE WOOD COLUMNS AND TRIM

*EXISTING TO BE REUSED

TW 2446 RO: 2'-6 1/8" X 4'-8 7/8"

*EXISTING TO BE REUSED

STONE WALLS

*EXISTING TO BE REUSED

NOTE: * REPLACEMENT WINDOW (NEW)

*EXISTING TO BE REUSED NEW FRONT ENTRANCE

BLUE STONE TREADS AND RISERS

East Elevation

BEDROOM

10'-11" X 11'-4" AREA: 124.65 SF

N.T.S.

1 MASTER BEDROOM

EAST ELEVATION 1/4"=1'-0"

12'-6" X 16'-2" AREA: 252.43 SF

BEDROOM

Existing

10'-11" X 9' AREA: 98.70 SF

New

A/C

Existing

PROJECT:

TITLE:

*30.5" X 55.075"

*30.5" X 55.075"

TW 2446 RO: 2'-6 1/8" X 4'-8 1/8"

New

BEDROOM

W

LAUNDRY

5'-8" X 10'-5" AREA: 47.71 SF

D

13'-6" X 8'-8" AREA: 145.23 SF ARCHITECT:

SHARED BATH 8' X 7'-2" AREA: 57.57 SF

CONSULTANT:

TW 2010 RO: 2'-2 1/8" X 3'-0 7/8" *30.5" X 55.075"

TW 210410 TW 210410 TW 210410 RO: 3'-0 1/8" X 5'-0 7/8" RO: 3'-0 1/8" X 5'-0 7/8" RO: 3'-0 1/8" X 5'-0 7/8"

*34.25" X 18" COPYRIGHT

*34.25" X 18"

NOTE: * REPLACEMENT WINDOW (NEW)

DATE: SCALE:

North Elevation

DRAWN:

1

SECOND FLOOR PLAN

N.T.S.

DRAWING

1/4"=1'-0"

NORTH ELEVATION

1

Second Floor Plan

1/4"=1'-0"

N.T.S.

COLLABORATIVE DESIGN ARCHITECT

A 21 RO: 2'-0 7/8" X 2'-4 7/8"

*27.625" X 40.5"

TW 2046 RO: 2'-2 1/8" X 4'-8 7/8"

S

S

AX 31 RO: 3'-0 1/2" X 2'-8"

S

TW 3046 RO: 3'-2 1/8" X 4'-8 7/8"

SP-68CL BROSCO PG 293 RO: 3'-0" X 6'-8"

GFI

TW 210410 RO: 3'-0 1/8" X 5'-0 7/8"

TW 210410 TW 210410 RO: 3'-0 1/8" X 5'-0 7/8" RO: 3'-0 1/8" X 5'-0 7/8"

TW 210410 RO: 3'-0 1/8" X 5'-0 7/8"

BEDROOM

TW 21046 RO: 3'-0 1/8" X 4'-8 7/8"

TW 21046 RO: 3'-0 1/8" X 4'-8 7/8"

SS

10'-11" X 11'-4" AREA: 124.65 SF

4W

EXT

GFI GFI

T

AR 31 RO: 2'-4 1/2" X 1'-5 1/2"

S

12'-6" X 16'-2" AREA: 252.43 SF

SC

S

S

SSS

MASTER BEDROOM

NOTE: * REPLACEMENT WINDOW (NEW)

SS S

BEDROOM

4W

S

West Elevation

S

A/C

S

BEDROOM

SS

S

WEST ELEVATION

1

N.T.S.

1/4"=1'-0"

S

10'-11" X 9' AREA: 98.70 SF

PROJECT:

13'-6" X 8'-8" AREA: 145.23 SF

GFI W

TITLE:

SHARED BATH D

GFI

S

LAUNDRY

5'-8" X 10'-5" AREA: 47.71 SF

8' X 7'-2" AREA: 57.57 SF

ARCHITECT:

CONSULTANT:

Second Floor Plan N.T.S.

1

SECOND FLOOR ELECTRICAL PLAN 1/4"=1'-0"

TW 2046 RO: 2'-2 1/8" X 4'-8 7/8"

TW 2046 RO: 2'-2 1/8" X 4'-8 7/8"

TW 2446 RO: 2'-6 1/8" X 4'-8 7/8"

TW 2446 RO: 2'-6 1/8" X 4'-8 7/8"

COPYRIGHT

DATE:

FWG5068R RO: 5'-0" X 6'-8"

SCALE: DRAWN:

TW 210410 RO: 3'-0 1/8" X 5'-0 7/8" DRAWING

TW 21046 RO: 3'-0 1/8" X 4'-8 7/8"

TW 21046 RO: 3'-0 1/8" X 4'-8 7/8"

AR 31 RO: 2'-4 1/2" X 1'-5 1/2"

TW 1846

TW 21046 RO: 3'-2" X 4'-10 3/4"

TW 1846

AR 31 RO: 2'-4 1/2" X 1'-5 1/2"

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South Elevation N.T.S.

1

SOUTH ELEVATION 1/4"=1'-0"


Pricing per square foot: $180.00 Estimated Total Cost: $3,071,440 Site Area: 25,875 sf

Concept A

Number Note: of Parking Spaces: 24

-Pricing includes $100,000 for elev -Pricing per sf is based off of finish -Pricing does0.57% not include site work Floor Area Ratio:

Provide nce Str eet

Total Habitable Area: 14,808 sf

Pricing per square foot: $180.00 Estimate Total Cost: $3,071,440 Note: -Pricing includes $100,000 for elevators -Pricing per sf is based off of finished space -Pricing does not include site work

Conceptual Massing Assignment Atlantic Heating and Air Conditioning reached out to my previous firm with a desire to rebuild there existing fabrication and distribution shop. The company is owned by three brothers, one of whom wants the new building, was explaining how they are busting at the seams in there existing conditions. He asked for several conceptual designs with pricing as a way to convince his two other brothers that a new building is essential for the growth of their company. I was in charge of coming up with the designs which satisfied their requirements: parking lot large enough to accommodate the turning radius of 18 wheelers, enough parking for all of their employees, executive offices, storage, distribution, and fabrication space.

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1

3D View 2

ATLANTIC HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING

1

139 PROVIDENCE ST., HYDE PARK

ALEX KNOX, AIA 617-306-3474

Concept A

3D View 1

ATLANTIC HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING

139 PROVIDENCE ST., HYDE PARK

ALEX KNOX, AIA 617-306-3474

Concept A

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Concept B

Site Area: 25,875 sf Number of Parking Spaces: 20 Total Habitable Area: 16,567 sf

Provide nce Str eet

Floor Area Ratio: 0.64%

Pricing per square foot: $175.00 Estimate Total Cost: $3,296,725 Note: -Pricing includes $100,000 for elevators -Pricing per sf is based off of finished space -Pricing does not include site work

1

3D View 1

ATLANTIC HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING 110

139 PROVIDENCE ST., HYDE PARK

ALEX KNOX, AIA 617-306-3474

Concept B


1

3D View 2

ATLANTIC HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING

1

139 PROVIDENCE ST., HYDE PARK

ALEX KNOX, AIA 617-306-3474

Concept B

3D View 3

ATLANTIC HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING

139 PROVIDENCE ST., HYDE PARK

ALEX KNOX, AIA 617-306-3474

Concept B

111


Concept C

Site Area: 25,875 sf # of Parking Spaces on Grade: 17 In Parking Garage: 16 Total: 33 Total Habitable Area: 16,567 sf Floor Area Ratio: 0.64%

Pricing per square foot: $200.00 Estimate Total Cost: $4,540,600 Note: -Pricing includes $100,000 for elevators -Pricing per sf is based off of finished space -Pricing does not include site work

1

3D View 1

ATLANTIC HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING

112

139 PROVIDENCE ST., HYDE PARK

ALEX KNOX, AIA 617-306-3474

Concept C


1

3D View 2

ATLANTIC HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING

1

139 PROVIDENCE ST., HYDE PARK

ALEX KNOX, AIA 617-306-3474

Concept C

3D View 3

ATLANTIC HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING

139 PROVIDENCE ST., HYDE PARK

ALEX KNOX, AIA 617-306-3474

Concept C

113


Pricing per square foot: $165 Estimated Total Cost: $2,660,

Concept C.2

Site Area: 25,875 sf

Note: -Pricing includes $100,000 fo Total Habitable sf -PricingArea: per13,819 sf is based off of -Pricing does not include site # of Parking Spaces on Grade: 19

Floor Area Ratio: 0.53%

Pricing per square foot: $165.00 Estimate Total Cost: $2,660,635 Note: -Pricing includes $100,000 for elevators -Pricing per sf is based off of finished space -Pricing does not include site work

1

3D View 1

ATLANTIC HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING

114

139 PROVIDENCE ST., HYDE PARK

ALEX KNOX, AIA 617-306-3474

Concept C.2


1

3D View 2

ATLANTIC HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING

1

139 PROVIDENCE ST., HYDE PARK

ALEX KNOX, AIA 617-306-3474

Concept C.2

3D View 3

ATLANTIC HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING

139 PROVIDENCE ST., HYDE PARK

ALEX KNOX, AIA 617-306-3474

Concept C.2

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Thank You! Elizabeth Hauver

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118


Elizabeth Hauver

Boston, MA 02120 | hauvere@wit.edu

Masters of Architecture Wentworth Institute of Technology, Boston, MA

Graduated Spring 2018

Bachelor of Science in Architecture Wentworth Institute of Technology, Boston, MA

Graduated Spring 2017

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