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UPDATED AMISH

A car is chased by a “black blizzard” in the Texas Panhandle, March 1936. Arthur Rothstein.


TABLE OF CONTENTS 001 _ AGENDA 002 _ MANIFESTO 003 _ DISCOURSE 004 _ PROPAGANDA 005 _ DECLARATION


0601

A G E N D A


A dust storm approaches Stratford, Texas, April 18, 1935. George E. Marsh.

In the 1930s, the Great Plains of America faced a drought that had never been seen before or since. Drought and dust storms rampaged across six states, affecting 100 million acres and effectively damaging the United States’ ecology and agriculture throughout the decade. A series of untested and untried methods and actions brought about such destruction. Ignorance destroyed lives and homes, intensifying the economic impact of the Great Depression throughout the region. Ignorance of environmental conditions caused such a reaction of the landscape.

HANSJOERG GOERITZ | DIPLOMA STUDIO _ SPRING 2017


A series of acts all moved urban poor west to start new, rural lives. Farming by inexperienced farmers and encouragement by government aid created arid conditions, ultimately leading to dust storms of stripped topsoil. Through the New Deal, changes were made which affected many poor rural regions; however. It was not until the Dust Bowl began that the government attempted to prevent the destruction. Of course, it was too late for many. Most families were displaced and suffered more than they had as urban poor.

ELIZABETH CARTER | 001 _ AGENDA


HANSJOERG GOERITZ | DIPLOMA STUDIO _ SPRING 2017 Destitute Pea Pickers in California. Mother of Seven Children. Dorothea Lange.


Today, 72% of the United States’ land area belongs to rural districts; however, as of 2014, roughly 15% of the population inhabits these areas. These counties are dependent on farming, manufacturing, or resource extraction with a poverty rate of 18.1%. Chronic health conditions such as diabetes, heart disease, and cancer are more likely to be found in rural America. Suicide rates are almost double in rural America than in urban America, often attributed to social isolation and difficulty accessing healthcare.

ELIZABETH CARTER | 001 _ AGENDA


A car is chased by a “black blizzard� in the Texas Panhandle, March 1936. Arthur Rothstein.

In a time of political controversy, in a time when no one is sure what is to become of our country, in a time when we refuse to acknowledge our ecological impacts, we must unite together on a front of rebellion. We must leave behind a more beautiful, pastoral landscape, a more peaceful area, a territory we know will continue to exist for generations to come. Our predecessors left us a world of waste and ruin. Our world decays around us, day be day. Now that we have put a man on the moon, and sent probes into deep space, and landed crafts on Mars, what is there to do?

HANSJOERG GOERITZ | DIPLOMA STUDIO _ SPRING 2017


Continue destroying our world in the hopes we may find another planet to provide us refuge? Not I. Not those who understand. Not those who realize we must restore our inheritance to its former magnificence. In new communities, we will see how detrimental the effect of urban and suburban sprawl are to our landscape and environment. Though some changes are not immediately visible, they are still quantifiable, showing dismal and unfavorable results. Our new president wants us to believe that climate change does not exist. Something in this political system disturbs me – ignorance.

ELIZABETH CARTER | 001 _ AGENDA


06 02

M A N I F E S TO


HANSJOERG GOERITZ | DIPLOMA STUDIO _ SPRING 2017


We must rectify our ignorance and work together to improve our societies in a way that would better the country for generations to come. For this reason, I am interested in exploring a combination of Utopian ideals in the context of the rural landscape; however, we have approached habitation in an incorrect and unjustified manner. Instead of sprawling around the urban landscape, we must rethink our approach to the Jeffersonian grid. Instead of giving each man one mile to work in one day, we must build communities around the Jeffersonian grid. There are five pillars which communities revolve and build themselves around: arts, education, history/literature, civil, and judicial. Each is required to make a community work and have equal importance. The Amish have lived in a similar manner, without technology. I suggest we strive to build similarly structured communities which radiate and reevaluate the possibility of rural Utopia. By investing our most modern and advanced technologies in new, small townships, we can repair landscapes which have been ravaged by time and poor climate conditions; perhaps these changes will be allowed to, one day, interface into our urban societies. Instead of communities based on economic, capitalistic hubs, the people will once again become focused on our natural landscape and how these improvements in rural conditions can reconstruct not only our climates, but also our society. Naysayers must be addressed and must come to terms with the lack of renewable and worthwhile energy resources. Otherwise, we will ultimately over-farm our lands, become a society focused on pecuniary advances, and lead to the destruction of ourselves, our culture, and our country. ELIZABETH CARTER | 002 _ MANIFESTO


06 03

D I S C O U R S E


AMISH COMMUNITY

NEW HOLLAND, PENNSYLVANIA

The Amish devote their lives to farming and integrating agriculture into their familial life. While farms remain small to be manageable by family units without electricity or modern technology, they are consistently productive, serving to meet the needs of the community rather than earn large profits. Communities like New Holland are expected to double in population within the next twelve years. These communities will serve as a template for technological utopias for the modern world.

HANSJOERG GOERITZ | DIPLOMA STUDIO _ SPRING 2017


UTOPIAN COMMUNITY NEW HARMONY, INDIANA

New Harmony was successful during its tenure under the Harmonie Society. It failed as a community when sold to an incompetent leader. New Harmony contributed heavily to American society. A few of their contributions include free education available to men and women and free libraries. New Harmony still exists today, 0.65 by 0.64 miles.

ELIZABETH CARTER | 003 _ DISCOURSE


NEW DEAL COMMUNITY CROSSVILLE, TENNESSEE

The Cumberland Homesteads were a planned New Deal Community in response to the Great Depression’s affect in Cumberland County, Tennessee. Thousands of unemployed miners, textile mill workers, and farmers applied for one of 250 positions within the community. Cultural importance is integrated into each building as each family was responsible for building their home and outbuildings with the latest technologies. While the project’s main goal failed, the community survives today. The idea of integrating cultural importance is integral to the proposed technological utopia.

HANSJOERG GOERITZ | DIPLOMA STUDIO _ SPRING 2017


FARMSTEAD COMMUNITY YORK, NEBRASKA

Organized as a cooperative farmstead, the community was founded as a way of promoting neighborliness and civic engagement. Six to ten families on relief were resettled to build their own homes, plant gardens, and begin cooperative businesses. This community is analogous to many other rural communities, exhibiting a proportionally older population than urban areas, less education, lower incomes (proportional to the cost of living), are majority Caucasian, and lack medical care.

ELIZABETH CARTER | 003 _ DISCOURSE


Map of Westworld. HBO.

FICTIONAL COMMUNITY WESTWORLD

This fictional complex contains a whole world complete with western scenery, towns, and robots with artificial intelligence capable of following story lines without tending. Westworld promises experience without real-world consequences. Bliss, escape, freedom, and thrills are guaranteed to all who would venture into the complex. While there are no real world statistics, the idea of building around a landscape and creating an idyllic society is intriguing. Here we see the blending of an outdated realm in accordance with technological advances that are merely dreamed of today, a model for the proposed technological utopia.

HANSJOERG GOERITZ | DIPLOMA STUDIO _ SPRING 2017


Octagon House Plan. Wikipedia.

FAILED COMMUNITY OCTAGON CITY, KANSAS

This failed vegetarian commune never existed due to lack of leadership and provisions for the establishing members. The ideal community was designed octagonally, taking influence from Orson Squire Fowler. Eight roads would radiate from an octagonal town square, between which, sixty-four families would build octagonal farmhouses with octagonal barns in four-square-mile areas. The idea of radiation will be applied within this proposed technological utopia.

ELIZABETH CARTER | 003 _ DISCOURSE


Latham Architectural Photography.

VISION HOUSE TUSCON, ARIZONA

An entire neighborhood, Armory Park del Sol, is capable of generating its own power. By utilizing traditional Mission style architecture in tandem with the latest energy efficient components and techniques, they were capable of developing a zero energy home. The Vision Home is connected to utility, drawing electricity when needed, but rolling the meter back when electricity is generated.

HANSJOERG GOERITZ | DIPLOMA STUDIO _ SPRING 2017


A 4.2-kilowatt PV array and integrated solar water and space heating system contribute to its lack of energy use. The home is built using solid masonry with insulation and efficient windows to keep out unwanted heat. Heat is also prevented via reflective roof coating and radiant barrier roof decking. The home cost about 20% more to build than other homes in the neighborhood, but is expected to pay for itself in energy costs.

ELIZABETH CARTER | 003 _ DISCOURSE


Courtyard. Frank Ooms.

NATIONAL LABORATORY GOLDEN, COLORADO

The U.S. Department of Energy and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory used a performance-based design-build contract to construct the most energy efficient office building in the world. It is a showcase for sustainable, high performance design that incorporates the best in energy efficiency, environmental performance, and advanced controls using a “whole building” integrated design process. The assembly serves as a model for cost-competitive, high energy performance commercial building for the nation’s design, construction, operation, and financing communities.

HANSJOERG GOERITZ | DIPLOMA STUDIO _ SPRING 2017


Lobby. Frank Ooms.

The facility acts as a living laboratory, providing real-time data that allows researchers to discover opportunities for improved performance. Net zero energy is achieved by building siting, orientation form, and massing driven by energy and environment, low energy consumption, daylighting, energy efficient lighting, natural ventilation, night purging, transpired solar collector, thermal basement labyrinth, radiant slabs, evaporative cooling, heat recovery from the data center, and renewable energy generated by PVs along the rooftop and in the parking lots.

ELIZABETH CARTER | 003 _ DISCOURSE


South Elevation. Kevin G. Reeves.

FEDERAL BUILDING

GRAND JUNCTION, COLORADO

The Wayne N. Aspinall Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse won the 2014 AIA COTE Top Ten and is a landmarked net-zero facility. The century old building is the first net-zero facility on the National Register. New energy interventions include a roof-canopymounted, 123-killowatt PV array, which generates enough electricity on site to power 15 average homes. The project demonstrates the importance of investment in low-tech measures to dramatically increase energy efficiency.

HANSJOERG GOERITZ | DIPLOMA STUDIO _ SPRING 2017


Upgrades include insulation addition to the building shell, installation of storm windows with solar control film to preserve exterior appearance, a 32-well geothermal exchange system, fluorescent and LED lighting upgrades, and post-occupancy monitoric capabilities, all of which contribute to the building’s netzero design. Original fenestration was preserved while daylighting was increased by addition of a skylight and perimeter ceiling zones free of building services.

ELIZABETH CARTER | 003 _ DISCOURSE


06 04

P R O PAG A N DA


HANSJOERG GOERITZ | DIPLOMA STUDIO _ SPRING 2017


ELIZABETH CARTER | 004 _ PROPAGANDA


Utopia is a scaled, net-zero, closed system city. Utopia is where people live a mostly agrarian lifestyle. Occupations are merely necessary, but held only by those who choose not to participate in agrarian tasks. Utopia is where life is lived only with necessity. Technology exists, but consumerism is eradicated and moderate in participation. Utopia is where everything is within walking distance. Public transportation is for traveling distances over two miles. (Ultimately, distance should not be exceeded by the community.) HANSJOERG GOERITZ | DIPLOMA STUDIO _ SPRING 2017


A series of moves to be distilled and recontextualized. “Updated Amish” – a counter-reaction to today’s lifestyles The technologies we use today are propelling the Great Plains into a second Dust Bowl. We must reevaluate these tehniques in terms of supporting the landscape and those who farm it. Why the hell, are these tiny, rural towns built at the scale of the car? Adaptable to different climate conditions Everything that is good takes time. ELIZABETH CARTER | 004 _ PROPAGANDA


co-operative community will be built in the following spaces Primary _ community space and education Secondary _ market, government, and financial Tertiary _ living spaces Quatenary _ agrarian pastures with orchards and landscape sculptures at the periphery. HANSJOERG GOERITZ | DIPLOMA STUDIO _ SPRING 2017


Community Space and Education _ park and gardens, auditorium and theater, gathering space, psychologist, maker space, oneon-one or small group learning facility, teaches basic education, teaches agrarian practices, teaches about technology Market, Government, and Financial _ general store [with online shopping, clothing and furniture stores ultimately become obsolete], net-zero municipal building including post office, justice offices and police, library with data banks, mayor and council rooms, bank, insurance Living Spaces _ neighborhood of net-zero housing and agrarian space a new deal to help the rural poor ELIZABETH CARTER | 004 _ PROPAGANDA


06 05

PROCLAMATION


HANSJOERG GOERITZ | DIPLOMA STUDIO _ SPRING 2017


SITE SELECTION

criteria for site selection is as follows - located between 35° + 45° latitude - located in climates considered mixed humid (4), cool humid (5), cool dry (5b), cold humid (6), or cold dry (6b) - must be grouped no less than four, no more than a hundred miles apart in at least two different climates The areas explored within this declaration are based around an idea, similar to Shaker communities. Communities are located in groups such that, should one community’s crops not succeed, another community may be capable to assist. Suggested here are ten communities. To the north, two communities within the cold humid (6) and cold dry (6b) climates each and one community within the cool humid (5) and cool dry (5b) climates each. To the south, one community within the cool humid (5) and cool dry (5b) climates each and two communities within the mixed humid (4) climate alone. The intention is that these groups act as precedent for future developments. ELIZABETH CARTER | 005 _ PROCLAMATION


HANSJOERG GOERITZ | DIPLOMA STUDIO _ SPRING 2017


population density map showing a need for rural growth ELIZABETH CARTER | 005 _ PROCLAMATION


HANSJOERG GOERITZ | DIPLOMA STUDIO _ SPRING 2017


shale

sedge-peat

claystone

uranium

sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata)

ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa)

rabbitbrush (Ericameria nauseosa)

rhizomatous grass

winterfat (Krascheninnikovia lanata)

NORTH SITE | 5 | UTOPIA A

BOWEN, NEBRASKA [42.875047, -103.928979]

Bowen is located at approximately 4849 feet above sea level. It receives an average rainfall of 17.12 inches and an average snowfall of 47 inches, precipitating the most overall in May. The annual high temperature is 57.8°F (lowest 35°; highest 85°) with an annual low temperature of 31.5°F (lowest 11°; highest 55°). The wind prevails to the west-north-west during the winter months at over 11 mph, while it prevails to the south-east as well as the west-north-west during the summer months.

ELIZABETH CARTER | 005 _ PROCLAMATION


HANSJOERG GOERITZ | DIPLOMA STUDIO _ SPRING 2017


loess

claystone

juniper (Juniperus communis)

winterfat (Krascheninnikovia lanata)

mountian-mahogany (Cercocarpus)

saltbrush (Atriplex)

spiny hopsage (Grayia spinosa)

ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa)

NORTH SITE | 5B | UTOPIA B

GOSHEN COUNTY, WYOMING [42.255345, -104.190940]

Goshen County is located at approximately 4239 feet above sea level. It receives an average rainfall of 14.73 inches and an average snowfall of 25 inches, precipitating the most overall in May. The annual high temperature is 62.4°F (lowest 39°; highest 88°) with an annual low temperature of 30.2°F (lowest 11°; highest 53°).The wind prevails to the west-north-west during the winter months at over 11 mph, while it prevails to the south as well as the west-north-west during the summer months.

ELIZABETH CARTER | 005 _ PROCLAMATION


HANSJOERG GOERITZ | DIPLOMA STUDIO _ SPRING 2017


limestone

claystone

black hills or white spruce (Picea glauca)

buffalo grass (Bouteloua dactyloides)

blue grama (Bouteloua gracilis)

needle and thread grass (Hesperostipa comata)

western wheatgrass (Pascopyrum smithii)

sandburg bluegrass (Poa secunda)

new zealand wire vine (Muehlenbeckia complexa)

NORTH SITE | 6 | UTOPIA C

EDGEMONT, SOUTH DAKOTA [43.056858, -103.799850]

Edgemont is located at approximately 3609 feet above sea level. It receives an average rainfall of 16.29 inches and an average snowfall of 33 inches, precipitating the most overall in June. The annual high temperature is 62.6°F (lowest 36°; highest 91°) with an annual low temperature of 32.8°F (lowest 8°; highest 59°). The wind prevails to the north-north-west during the winter months at over 11 mph, while it prevails to the north-north-west as well as the south-east during the summer months. Utopia D – Rapid City, South Dakota [43.941318, -103.146377] – is also located in climate 6, with almost identical geological and vegetative properties.

ELIZABETH CARTER | 005 _ PROCLAMATION


HANSJOERG GOERITZ | DIPLOMA STUDIO _ SPRING 2017


loess

claystone

Guernsey limestone

winterfat (Krascheninnikovia lanata)

mountian-mahogany (Cercocarpus)

saltbrush (Atriplex)

spiny hopsage (Grayia spinosa)

ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa)

juniper (Juniperus communis)

NORTH SITE | 6B | UTOPIA E

NEWCASTLE, WYOMING [43.586841,-104.105966]

Newcastle is located at approximately 4314 feet above sea level. It receives an average rainfall of 16.45 inches and an average snowfall of 40 inches, precipitating the most overall in May. The annual high temperature is 60.6°F (lowest 35°; highest 89°) with an annual low temperature of 34.2°F (lowest 13; highest 59°). The wind prevails to the south-west during the winter months at over 11 mph, while it prevails to the west-south-west as well as the southwest during the summer months. Utopia F – Niobrara County, Wyoming [43.048187, -104.357482] – is also located in climate 6B, with almost identical geological and vegetative properties.

ELIZABETH CARTER | 005 _ PROCLAMATION


HANSJOERG GOERITZ | DIPLOMA STUDIO _ SPRING 2017


cottonwood limestone

Leadville limestone

sandstone

shale limestone

buffalo grass (Bouteloua dactyloides)

blue grama (Bouteloua gracilis)

Utopias G and H – Staton, Kansas [37.449569, -101.742472] and Voorhees, Kansas [37.046470, -101.465594] respectively – are located in climate 4, with almost identical geological and vegetative properties to Utopias I and J – Tribune, Kansas [38.277226, -101.861558] in climate 5 and Sheridan Lake, Colorado [38.284161, -102.303692] respectively.

western wheatgrass (Pascopyrum smithii)

SOUTH SITES | UTOPIAS G - J These sites are located at an average approximately 3469 feet above sea level (ranging from 3058 to 4072). They receive an average rainfall of 17.68 inches and an average snowfall of 17.6 inches, precipitating the most overall in June. The annual high temperature is 68°F (lowest 43°; highest 92°) with an annual low temperature of 38.5°F (lowest 14°; highest 65°). The wind prevails to the north and south equally during the winter months at over 11 mph, while it prevails to the south as well as the south-east during the summer months. These sites are located within 150 miles at most of each other, thus allowing for such condensing of information.

ELIZABETH CARTER | 005 _ PROCLAMATION


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program for primary space _ community space and education

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park and garden | 5 acres auditorium and theater | seating for 250 gathering space | religious seating for 100 psychologist office | office and waiting room maker space | space for ceramics, wood working, metal working, general crafts, textile manufacturing, and glass blowing - learning spaces | 10 feet by 10 feet offices for mathematics, biology, chemistry, physics, anatomy, astronomy, english literature, english composition, music history, art history, american history, world history, foreign languages, agrarian practices, technology - open air market | to trade and sell produce - visitor center | education program including informative documentation of this utopia -

program for secondary space _ market, government, and financial - general store | 18,000 square feet - net-zero municipal buildings | 75,600 square feet including: - agriculture offices - military office - mail storage, records, office, and mailboxes - social security offices - civil service office - city engineering and architecture office - court clerk offices - stenographer, judge, and witness office - court library - court room - probabtion officer and police officer offices - holding cells - swing room - United States Marshal offices - jury rooms (one grand and one petit) - United States Attorney offices - collector of internal revenue offices - narcotics, alcohol, and tax unit offices - mayor office - council offices and meeting rooms - bank vault - bank manager office - bank teller space - insurance office - general library with librarian office and return box - data banks and special archives HANSJOERG GOERITZ | DIPLOMA STUDIO _ SPRING 2017


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program for primary space _ community space and education

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park and garden | educational center of culture auditorium and theater | techological hub gathering space | communal psychologist office | responsive to community needs maker space | open, naturally lit spaces to create and develop

- learning spaces | enjoyable, non-institutional spaces to enhance the desire to learn and better one’s self

- open air market | communal economy and support - visitor center | pinnacle of key concepts program for secondary space _ market, government, and financial - general store | meeting material necessities - net-zero municipal buildings | creating community-wide discourse of the purpose of the governing body and the codes put forth, which determine the utopia

ELIZABETH CARTER | 005 _ PROCLAMATION


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program for tertiary space _ living spaces

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one home based on a family of two - living room | 250 square feet (increases size by 100% for every additional four family members) - kitchen with dining space, and pantry | 250 square feet (increases size by 25% per every additional two family members) - laundry and mechanical room | 30 square feet - bedroom | 150 square feet (increases number by every additional family member as needed) - bathrooms | one half bathroom of 25 square feet (one half bathroom for every four bedrooms) and one full bathroom of 50 square feet (one master bathroom for every two bedrooms) - outdoor room | 100 square feet - garage | 200 square feet for one car (increases size by 100% for every four family members) - garden shed | 50 square feet of storage connected to garage program for quatenary space _ agrarian spaces - homestead field | 40 acres per agrarian home - orchard | 1 acre per agrarian home - landscape sculptures | located at periphery of agrarian space on side of prevailing wind - produce storage | located between each field to store and process produced crops HANSJOERG GOERITZ | DIPLOMA STUDIO _ SPRING 2017


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program for tertiary space _ living spaces

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one home based on a family of two - living room | communal space for sharing and caring - kitchen with dining space, and pantry | nourishing space - laundry and mechanical room | necessitative - bedroom | relaxing space for interior reflection - bathrooms | necessitative - outdoor room | relaxing space for exterior reflection - garage | necessitative to store vehicles - garden shed | necessitative to store agrarian equipment program for quatenary space _ agrarian spaces - homestead field | provisionary land - orchard | provisionary land - landscape sculptures | artistic breaks within the landscape to create discourse of culture and lifestyles - produce storage | necessitative ELIZABETH CARTER | 005 _ PROCLAMATION


HANSJOERG GOERITZ | DIPLOMA STUDIO _ SPRING 2017


P E N U LT I M AT E

ELIZABETH CARTER | 005 _ PROCLAMATION


HANSJOERG GOERITZ | DIPLOMA STUDIO _ SPRING 2017


ELIZABETH CARTER | 005 _ PROCLAMATION


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ELIZABETH CARTER | 005 _ PROCLAMATION


HANSJOERG GOERITZ | DIPLOMA STUDIO _ SPRING 2017


ELIZABETH CARTER | 005 _ PROCLAMATION


HANSJOERG GOERITZ | DIPLOMA STUDIO _ SPRING 2017


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AXONOMETRIC SITE VIEW ELIZABETH CARTER | 005 _ PROCLAMATION


HANSJOERG GOERITZ | DIPLOMA STUDIO _ SPRING 2017


SITE ELIZABETH APPROACH FROM WITHIN CARTER | 005 _ PROCLAMATION


This project is based on the idea of readapting the Jeffersonian grid that is so prevalent in the western states. By creating a site, one mile in diameter, the idea to create communities which support exclusively themselves becomes possible with the work of collaborative farming. This project details the conditions of site materials and climate of ten sites, while only one example is represented here. Based on the idea of utopia, the community uses ideal shapes and iterations from those shapes. Plots are 250 feet by 250 feet, creating manageable plots to grow what is needed. Fruit and shade trees are dispersed around a circular, enclosing boulevard to create a pleasant canopy HANSJOERG GOERITZ | DIPLOMA STUDIO _ SPRING 2017


CROPPED SITE PLAN | HYPOSTYLE HALL

which also contributes to the township’s stock. There is one key building on site, comprised of many different components. The building begins with an entrance into a hypostyle hall. The hall allows for commuters to park to engage in the community, creates an open air market for farmers and artists to sell their goods, and a place for equipment storage and maintenance to act as infrastructure of the farming community. The space is pierced by several vertical elements. The first five give access to the five pillars of the community: arts, education, history/ literature, judicial, and civil services. The second floor creates one, openly flowing space to house visitor centers for each of the five ELIZABETH CARTER | 005 _ PROCLAMATION


main building, as well as space for an enclosed market for hostile climate conditions, and space for hydroponic farming modules. Several vertical shafts pierce outside of the five key buildings, providing access to the roof park, which has been idealized. The park would include a green lawn, access to the green walls, a stone terrace, and a structured and idealized park, creating an organized garden park for visitors and inhabitants to enjoy in favorable conditions. The five buildings, built to create programmatic supporting spaces create spaces to foster the growth and learning of every community member. The arts building provides the necessary grocery and mall space to provide a place for produce to be sold when the market is not open, as well as other necessities for human living such as clothing and toiletries. The space is built to accommodate maker spaces, accessible by any inhabitants as well as fellows, selected every year to inhabit and teach the community about arts and cultures of other regions which may help the community succeed in becoming an attraction for others to visit. The tower would allow for local shop spaces and offices to support the artists-in-residence as well as other town members and would create living spaces for those who do not live in the community long term, including migrant summer workers. The building is capped with an exhibition space, allowing guest artists, speakers, and artists-in-residence to show their work throughout the seasons. The educational building begins with a lobby to direct guests and new students as necessary. A cafĂŠ has been added to the program to create a space for group or private study in a simulating atmosphere. Several floors have been allocated for administrative offices as well as personal offices for teachers and guest lecturers.

HANSJOERG GOERITZ | DIPLOMA STUDIO _ SPRING 2017


CROPPED SITE PLAN | VISITOR CENTER

CROPPED SITE PLAN | PARK

CROPPED SITE PLAN | PAVILION LEVEL

ELIZABETH CARTER | 005 _ PROCLAMATION


ENTRY VIEW Classrooms for mathematics, biology, chemistry, physics, anatomy, astronomy, English literature, English composition, music history, art history, American history, world history, foreign languages, agrarian practices all inhabit one floor each, with technology being giving two floors. The classroom levels are broken up by a cafeteria and a gymnasium to allow for easy access between the multiple floors. Teachers and guest lecturers are contracted on a yearly basis based on their performance in truly teaching rather than basing their skills on standardized testing and are given living accommodations for the yearly term of their contract, expected to foster the importance of learning and teaching necessary to sustain the community. The tower is concluded with a gathering pavilion to HANSJOERG GOERITZ | DIPLOMA STUDIO _ SPRING 2017


ELIZABETH CARTER | 005 _ PROCLAMATION


VIEW OF MAIN EXHIBITION SPACE be used for religious functions, school programs, and graduation. An auditorium and theater have been created in the basement to allow for larger functions requiring more or secondary space. The library tower is a series of stacks and computer labs capitalized by a glass reading pavilion. An archival floor is located in the building basement to allow for storage of documents that may be sensitive to light or need to be protected from everyday use. The judicial tower is structured similarly, beginning with attorney offices, then continued as judicial offices and courtrooms and finished with a town hall pavilion. The civil services building works as civil offices, local business offices and local shops. The building HANSJOERG GOERITZ | DIPLOMA STUDIO _ SPRING 2017


VIEW FROM A DISTANCE contains living spaces for civil servants and is capped with a green house pavilion. Town storage is located in the basement for access to town signage, decoration, and other items which may need to be stored. The building basement contains two levels of fallout shelters to house community members in case of nuclear fallout and to ease fears which may run rampant in this part of the country concerning fear of attack.

ELIZABETH CARTER | 005 _ PROCLAMATION


HANSJOERG GOERITZ | DIPLOMA STUDIO _ SPRING 2017


VIEW FROM GARDEN TO TOWERS ELIZABETH CARTER | 005 _ PROCLAMATION

Thesis Final  
Thesis Final  
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