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Sarah Prescott Joe Snader, “The Oriental Captivity Narrative and Early English Fiction”, Eighteenth-Century Fiction, 9 (1997), pp. 267–298. [7] Kathryn R. King with the assistance of Jeslyn Medoff, “Jane Barker and Her Life (1652–1732): The Documentary Record”, Eighteenth-Century Life, 21 (1997), pp. 16–38. [8] Jane Spencer, Aphra Behn’s Afterlife (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000); “The Rover and the Eighteenth Century”, in Aphra Behn Studies, ed. Janet Todd (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996), pp. 84–106; “Adapting Aphra Behn: Hannah Cowley’s A School for Greybeards and The Lucky Chance”, Women’s Writing, 2 (1995), pp. 221–234. I would like to thank Jane Spencer for allowing me to read chapters of Aphra Behn’s Afterlife in manuscript. For a discussion of Jane Barker’s intertextual debts to Behn’s fiction, see Jacqueline Pearson, “The History of the History of the Nun”, in Rereading Aphra Behn: History, Theory, Criticism, ed. Heidi Hutner (Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1993), pp. 234–252. [9] Paula Backscheider, “The Shadow of an Author”, Eighteenth-Century Fiction, 11 (1998), pp. 79–102 (p. 85). [10] Eliza Haywood, Love in Excess; or, The Fatal Enquiry, edited with an introduction by David Oakleaf (Ontario: Broadview Press, 1994). All references to Love in Excess are to this edition. [11] Penelope Aubin, The Life and Adventures of the Lady Lucy, introduced by Josephine Greider (New York: Garland Publishing, 1973). All references are to this edition. The volume also includes Haywood’s The Rash Resolve; or, The Untimely Discovery (1724). In her introduction, Greider remarks that although the two novelists seen to be “unlikely” companions, the fictional techniques of the texts reprinted are “remarkably similar” (p. 5). [12] In A Collection of Entertaining Novels and Histories, 3 vols (London, 1739), III, p. 165. All references are to this edition. [13] My sense of Aubin and Haywood using “possess” in a sexual sense is upheld by the OED’s examples of the word being used in this way in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries The examples offered by the OED include Rochester, Poems (1680) – “Mad to possess himself he threw, On the defenceless lovely Maid!” – and Smollett’s translation of Le Sage’s Gil Blas (1749): “The four bandetti expressed an equal desire of possessing the lady who had fallen into their hands, and talked of casting lots for her”, The Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd edn (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1989). [14] The Strange Adventures of the Count de Vinevil and his Family (London, 1721). All references are to this edition. [15] April London, “Placing the Female: The Metonymic Garden in Amatory and Pious Narrative, 1700–1740”, in Fetter’d or Free? British Women Novelists, 1670–1815, ed. Mary Anne Schofield & Cecilia Macheski (Ohio: Ohio University Press, 1968), pp. 101–123 (p. 112). [16] The Noble Slaves; or, The Lives and Adventures of Two Lords and Two Ladies (London, 1722). All references are to this edition.

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Critque  

Crital analysis of Love In excess

Critque  

Crital analysis of Love In excess

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