Page 1


Contents Introductions

07

The Beginning

09

70s and 80s

14

Today’s Benefits

14

U.S. Law

16

Not Your Usual Fans

19

Moped Army

20

Creatures of the Loin

22

The Late Birds

24

Hells Satans

28

The Orphans

30

Lifestyle

33

The Style, Tops

34

Accessories, Skinny Jeans

37

Tattoos

38

Booze and Butts

39

Shoes, Grooming

43

Vintage Restoration

47

A New Art Form

50

Parts in the U.S.

50

Art or Not?

51

Age and Rarity

51

Getting from A to B

57

Travels

59


Introductions

“Mopeds reached the height of their popularity in the 1970s during the oil crisis. Now they litter backyards and clutter garages with their rusted frames and rotted tires. A growing subculture is eager to breathe life back into these gems and turn them loose in the streets.” —Wired Magainze, 2010

Moped Gangs // Introductions


3 5


With gas prices soaring in the United States during the late 1970s, Americans relied on moped to get them safty and quickly to their destinations. The average moped could get 220 miles to the gallon. This eventually lead to a cult-like following.

The Beginning In the late 1880s people started mounting engines on bicycles, thus naming the invention, the Moped (Motor+Pedals). The pedals were used on all of them as both a starting device and as emergency fallback on human power. After the first war ended in Europe, there was a high demand for simple and economical means of transportation. Nobody could afford a car, or even a motorcycle. Bicycle makers, most of which were also motorcycle manufacturers, all started offering small engines for their bicycles. Motobecane, Peugeot, Ducati, Moto Guzzi and Velosolex were among the first. The moped scene changed drastically, when Johann Puch, a master bicycle maker in the late 1800’s, introduced the first MS-50 in 1952. It represented a dramatic departure from the bicycle-based design principles and was the first

moped that was designed to be driven by its engine most of the time. As Europe recovered economically, the moped kept flourishing and its popularity went on to become a craze; followed by clubs, races, meets, and trips. By the late 1960s mopeds branched off into multi-speed and cheaper single speed versions. The 2-speed manually shifted Puch MS-50 and the 4 and 5-speed versions appeared as well . Soon the auto-shift 2-speed models arrived, followed by the continuous variable transmissions, the same system that is commonly used today on virtually all modern scooters.

5


‘70s and ‘80s

The oil pump is a nonrepairable part and has to be replaced as a unit. It is a factory metered unit to obtain the correct lubrication ratio for the engine. It delivers 1.35 fl. oz at 1500 rpm.

Moped Gangs // Introductions

In 1974, The United States was mired in a fuel crisis, thanks to an oil embargo. People were forced to wait in line for hours just to get a tank of gas. At that time, cars were not very fuel efficient, so people began looking around for an alternate mode of transportation —something that would allow them to travel at a reasonable, inexpensive price. Fuel was the problem; the moped was the solution. Half bicycle, half motorcycle, the moped had been in use for years in Europe but it had not made it to the United States. This was partly because of safety restrictions imposed by the Department of Transportation. Serge Seguin of France had written his master thesis on the European moped. After receiving grants and mopeds from Motobecane, he started traveling through the United States promoting the mopeds advantages. He also lobbied Congress and was able to get more than thirty states to create a specific vehicle classification for the moped. Mopeds have very small engines and most do not exceed forty miles per hour. However, on one tank of gas, a moped can travel over 220 miles. hey were cheaper than cars and motorcycles, yet faster than bicycles. Prices ranged from $300 up

to $550. Lenient state laws were being passed, favoring mopeds enabling an astonishing three million moped on the road by 1980. By the late ‘70s, the field was crowded with hundreds of styles, models and brands; the only common trait was the under-50cc engine size. Worldwide sales were in the millions. Even in North-America, that only caught the tail end of the boom, mopeds sold in spectacular numbers. In 1975, in the US alone, some 125 different models were available; Canada had about 25. They were sold through car dealerships, bicycle shops, county fairs, hardware stores, garden supply places (together with lawnmowers). By 1977, more that 250,000 Americans owned a moped. Eventually, gas prices fell and automobile manufacturers produced more effient cars. This, in combination with the introduction of mandatory licensing and insurance, lead to a decease in popularity of the moped.

Today’s Benefits One of the best ways to get around town is by riding around on an electric moped. They’re great for getting to and from work, and if you live close enough, and they are excellent for driving


that is in the category that’s kind of ambiguous to most local authorities, so they don’t know just how to classify it. Another benefit of riding electric moped is the fact that runs on electricity and can be recharged at any time. On some electric mopeds (just like on some electric bicycles) the batteries come with a device called a charger, which helps you to charge up the batteries again and in some cases, these chargers can be removed. If you have two charters and an extra set of batteries, you can virtually drive for almost 80 miles, because the average distance and spam for electric batteries. So they carry an extra charger or an is 40 miles. extra set of batteries that are charged up already, you can go much further. If you want to have sustainable energy or energy from the sun, then you can hook up your rechargers to the solar panels either on your garage roof or home and recharge your batteries by way of a charging station. That

you are not using any electrical power from your community and thereby adding to the need for power stations. One other thing you should know about electric mopeds is that there are so many of them being produced now, along with electric bikes and electric scooters that is hard to keep track of all the new models coming out. If you’re deciding to buy electric moped, you need to decide what you will need it for. If you’re just driving around town and want to do errands or go to work in an electric moped may be perfect for you. However, if you like you recreational riding, you may want to get an electric bicycle, because you can go much further with that and get more exercise without over straining yourself. If you do decide to get an electric moped, bear in mind that there is plenty of storage space on one of those units and I can be very convenient if you need to carry things to and from a particular place.

is what is known as sustainable energy, because

“ They’re great for getting to and from work, and they are excellent for driving around and playing. ”

7


Batavus

HUSQVARNA Monark

eagle

derbi

carabella

Aprilia

sparta

peugeot YANKEE

s Peddler kromag moppet


VeloSoleX

PUCH Motobecane ZiD50 douglas

DUCATI

Yamaha

Cimatti

Moto Gu zzi garelli Zundapp

9


Moped Parts

1

22

2

3

4

21

20

Moped Gangs // Introductions

5

6

19

18

17

16

15

14

7

13

8

9

12

10

11


A break down of the 1977 PUCH Moped.

1

Tail Lamp

2

Rear Mudguard

3

Tire Pump

4

Tool Kit

5

Luggage Carrier

6

Fuel Tank

7

Fuel Tank Killer Cap

12

Front Wheel

8

Handlebars

13

Engine

9

Speedometer

14

Alternator

10

Headlamp

15

Engine Chain

11

Front Mudguard

16

Pedal Cranks

17

Pedcal Chain

18

Exhaust Silencer

19

Rear Wheel

20

Intake Air Cleaner

21

Exhaust Silencer

22

Rear Wheel 11


U.S. Laws

(Right) PUCH is a popular moped brand from Austria. (Bottom Right): Melissa Gooseman of California starts her moped. (Bottom Left) A PUCH moped headlight

Moped Gangs // Introductions

In many states, after reaching the age of 18 or 19, a moped driver is no longer required to wear a helmet. Helmet requirements also depend on the maximum speed that the moped can travel, along with the state’s minimum moped speed requirement, if one exists. Brake power is also considered in many states before helmets are required. Regardless of the helmet requirement, consider all the other unsafe drivers out there, and don a helmet just in case. A nationwide moped law in the United States dictates that mopeds cannot exceed a named output. The highest legal output of a moped engine is 130 cubic centimeters, allowed in the state of Kansas. The average cubic centimeter output limit for the United States is 50. Horsepower and brake power are directly correlated; the greater the horsepower of the moped’s engine, then the greater the brake’s stopping power will be. Too high of a stopping power means that the moped may stop too suddenly in emergencies and throw the operator off. The average brake power in the U.S. is 3.0 horsepower.

As a safety precaution, many states instituted laws stating that mopeds may not be operated past certain speeds. This law is often broken, as the law is not enforced unless the moped is traveling faster than the speed limit posted for automobiles. To place further regulation on top speeds for mopeds many states prohibit mopeds to be used in areas with speed limits exceeding 35 miles per hour. In addition to this it is unlawful for a moped to be used on an interstate highway or freeway. While some states require that the moped operator hold a motorcycle license, other states give moped licenses to anyone with a bill of sale for a moped. Age requirements area also a part of many states’ laws governing the operation of a moped or motorized scooter. Regardless of the state specific laws that must be obeyed when operating a moped, it is always a safe choice to consider the other drivers using the road when operating a moped. Observe other drivers, and move over to the extreme edge of the road, or completely out of it to allow faster moving vehicles to pass. Wear a helmet even if there is not a law governing helmet use, and pay attention to the road.


13


Not Your Usual Fans

“We are pretty accepting of anyone with a moped, but to get invited on rides, you have to get into a gang. To belong to a gang you must first know someone associatied with a gang. Each gang operates as an independent state and has different initiation rights to joining.” —Craig Wong, Moped Army, 2011

Moped Gangs // Not Your Usual Fans


15


Moped Army The Moped Army is an organization of moped enthusiasts, centered around the organization’s website which serves as a catalyst for the spread of moped culture and the organization of mopedrelated events throughout the US and Canada. Founded in 1997 as the Decepticons in Kalamazoo, Michigan by Daniel Kastner, Simon King, and Brennan Sang, and as of January 2011 the organization has grown to include twenty-three official branches across the US. The branches each have a unique name, often inspired by the city in which they are based, and are self-governing; implementing their own criteria regarding membership and activities. With the motto of “Swarm and Destroy”, the Moped Army has been the subject of a graphic novel by Paul Sizer and a documentary called Swarm and Destroy.

Ashlyn Gervais and Graham French take a causual ride with friends around the Mission in San Francisco, CA Moped Gangs // Not Your Usual Fans


17 32


The Creatures The Creatures of the Loin, or COTL, are a San Francisco based moped gang, and a branch of the Moped Army. The were inducted into the Moped Army in 2005. They currently boast 55 members, 6 honorary, and at least a dozen former members. COTL is the largest moped gang in Moped Army. The COTL have jump started the formerly dormant California moped scene, inspiring gangs to form in LA, Oregon and Sacramento. The rapid growth of the COTL brought on growing pains between members along personal and ideological lines, resulting in a messy split during the spring of 2006. One of the founders and most current members continued under the name Creatures of the Loin, while some others, dubbed the Treats, left to pursue different goals. The COTL rides are dominated by Puch ownership, with around 75% of the mopeds in San Francisco being Puchs, and a growing contingent of Motobecanes alongside a smattering of other bikes.

Moped Gangs // Not Your Usual Fans


(Left) Inside the Creatures hang out, Moped 1977 in SF. (Middle): Ace with his gang sporting the COTL logo on his shirt. (Below): The few female members of the Creatures of the Loin head to meets the rest of the gang at a weekend rally.

19


The Late Birds The Late Bids dominate the Los Angeles, CA moped scene. They gather at The Choke, a Silver Lake shop, for their weekly ride. They lean against their motorized steeds —Tomos, Puchs, Motobecanes and Peugeots —on the sidewalk, brooding, smoking and shooting the breeze. They are artists, novelists, bike messengers, stylists, a mortician and the intermittently employed; twenty and thirtysomethings for whom riding and restoring vintage 1970s mopeds has become a lifestyle. Some call them “dirt wizards,” but their casual-yet-carefully wrought aesthetic —raw skinny denim, Vans and mucho plaid —betrays undeniable hipster leanings. With their quaint pedal-starters and twostroke engines, they normally max out at a puny 30 mph and are banned on freeways (although Moped Gangs // Not Your Usual Fans

it is legal to drive them in bicycle lanes). But the aficionados hanging around outside Choke have figured out how to trick out their engines so they can cruise at up to 70 mph. “That’s the thing with L.A. moped riders —we’re all about speed,” says Choke’s owner, Jeff Johnsen, unofficial mayor of L.A.’s moped scene, and one of the fastest competitive moped racers in California. He opened Choke about three years ago in a former upholstery store at the intersection of Normal and Virgil avenues. It is the only shop in L.A. dedicated exclusively to mopeds and is the clubhouse for the city’s ever-growing moped subculture. When Johnsen opened it in January 2007, his plan was to work on vintage motorcycles too, “but the moped thing started getting so big, I didn’t need to,” he says.


(Left): Jeff Johnsen repairing his Puch Moped before a rally. (Middle): Members of The Late Birds (Top Right): Miles Rossi showing off the hipster style. (Bottom Right): The Late Birds at the Flock Yeah! Rally , 2009. 32 21


Cream City

Crankers

WIBOURBON BANDITS

Peddy Cash

KY

IL Action

City

Rockers Mosquito Fleet

Moped Gangs // Not Your Usual Fans

TX


Creatures

LoinSF Late BirdsLA of the

The

Orphans kHz NYC

Hells

SatanVA 23


San Francisco’s Creatures of the Loin hosted their annual Moped Rally in 2009. Named, the Ceremony, hundreds of Moped enthusiasts gather from all over the United States and Canada for a chance to ride together.


25


(Left): Mark Restivo shows off this athleticism at a weekend Rally in Richmond, Virginia. (Top Right): Travis Greenwood shares his experiences of Moped culture with a friend. (Bottom Right): As a gang, Hells Satans shows their strength and intimidateion to other moped riders.

Hells Satans Hell’s Satans are a moped gang from Richmond, VA. Started by Patrick Lowery, Mark Restivo, and Travis Pulley in 2003. The name Hell’s Satans is taken from the motorcycle gang from The Simpsons. Hells Satans are known to be the baddest moped gang in Moped Army. In the documentary film, Satan Since 203, which was entered in the Sundance Film Festival, its members cruise around the city by day, dealing with the turfs of rival gangs, and party hard by night. Soon, though, the gang becomes embroiled in a war that escalates from moped vandalism to a hit-and-run with a car, and finally culminates in the detonation of a homemade bomb. Although Hells Satans seem to be the most rowdy of the Moped Gangs, they still follow the Hipster fashion, but make up their own rules. They are tatted up, ironic t-shirt wearing hipsters with motorbikes. These young hooligans take themselves very seriously — settling their differences with vandalism, attempted murder and, eventually, much more destructive tactics.


27 32


The Orphans In 2009, the Orphanage was opened in Greenpoint, Brooklyn. It’s a full-service moped shop that carries parts and accessories, as well as engine and exhaust kits to power up a moped. Most of the shop’s business comes from fixing broken mopeds, since the bikes that roll through its doors often haven’t run in 30 years. As much as it is a business, the unassuming Orphanage has also become a clubhouse for members. Regular riders stop by to tinker with their bikes. Members of out-of-town gangs use it as a hub to meet up with old friends with their bikes. Members of out-of-town gangs use it as a hub to meet up with old friends. “Moped culture is a bunch of big dorks. It’s skinny nerds like me who play with computers all day.” says founded Ryan Due. Enthusiasts like the Orphans are committed to bringing the bikes back in a big way. Novice mopeders often come to the Orphanage for parts and repairs. But the Orphans advocate for learning to service the bikes yourself, almost as a badge of their burgeoning local moped culture.

Moped Gangs // Not Your Usual Fans


(Top): Ryan Due with fMoped Gang members repair his classic 1977 Puch Moped. (Bottom Left): Hipster style their Moped to match their unique fashion perspective. (Bottom Right): A member of The Orphans shows of his tattoos, style and riding abilities.

32 29


Lifestyle

“Hipsters are the friends who wear t-shirts, silk-screened with quotes from movies you have never heard of and the only ones in America who still think Pabst Blue Ribbon is a good beer. Everything about them is exactingly constructed to give off the vibe that they just don’t care.” —Time Magazine, 2009

Moped Gangs // Lifestyle


31


The Style The Moped trend is once again coming back in mode The term “hipster” is cross-applied from the 1930s Beatniks. The modern hipster is a composite of individuals with a certain bohemian life situation and lifestyle. He or she rejects “mainstream” culture and embraces and contributes to independent culture, and prides him/herself on this. Hipsters are a subculture of men and women typically in their 20’s and 30’s that value independent thinking, counter-culture, progressive politics, an appreciation of art and indie-rock, creativity, intelligence, and irony. The modern hipster image has been proliferated through the internet, publications such as Vice Magazine, and sightings in the music, fashion, and art world. The image of the hipster is constantly changing, but several aspects have stayed constant over time. Many of these people would identify themselves as Indie as well. The beauty of Hipster fashion is that it is androgynous.; anyone can wear anyones clothes. Clashing colors and patterns inspire this fashion along with trends from the 1980s and the 1990s. Being ironic is a major part of the hipster culture There are common trends in hipster uniform, which many of the moped gang members follow:

Tops: Look for tight hoodie sweatshirts and striped fitted sweaters to perfect the look. Flannel shirts and thick thermals are reminiscent of Kurt Cobain’s ‘90s grunge, and thrift stores provide these items in various sizes and colors. Men’s sizes may provide an interesting and oversized edge to your outfit, especially in combination with skinny jeans. Graphic tees with bright colors and bold parrents are also popular. Ironic tees, cowboy shirts, paisley, vintage florals all work for tops. Many hipsters sport tops with appliques, images of animals or forests, other images, characters from children’s TV, and ironic sayings or even book covers. Layer is also an important trend.

Moped Gangs // Lifestyle


Accessories: The more jewelrey., the better; wear as much as possible. Popular types are plastic; kids’ jewelry; buttons and tarnished pieces from the junk store. Hemp bracelets, doorknocker earrings, long necklaces,vintage pins and necklaces are also popular with woman. Headbands that go around the forehead are also extremely popular, especially if they have feathers or are Native American themed. They are unisex and really in, no matter what hairstyle you have. You will also find Hipsters in oversized, neon colored sunglasses or aviator style sunglasses Black, fake plastic, thick rimmed glasses are also prominent. Scarves are great year round because you can et them in cotton, linen, silk and wool. Bandanas can also be made into a cool scarf--singular or with two tied together. You can also wear a scarf in many different ways.Vintage headphone and messages bags are popular as well. Woman also carry tiny little tiny leather pocket books with thing long straps.

Skinny Jeans As far as jeans go, there are the only way to go. Leggings as pants, are often worn in bright colors, preferably gold or silver metallic. Bleached, torn, acid-wash, paint-splattered or otherwise ’90s-referencing jeans “Denim-legging” is always appropriate. High-waisted “Mom” jeans — preferably pleated, for that extra dose of irony Homemade cutoffs: A summer staple, especially for the discerning gentleman who likes to walk around shirtles Dark-wash, straight-leg jeans that fit you properly. Colorful and pattern nylons nylons are a staple. Your legs shouldn’t ever be boring, even when they’re partially covered by a skirt. Instead, wear the brightest tights available. Its considered a bonus they clash with your outfit.

A member of the moped gang The Late Birds, shows off an intricate diamgram of the inner workings of a moped. 33


Tattoos: Hipsters and tattoos go together like soccer moms and minivans. Focusing on art and music, creative and all forms of independent thought or expression, hipsters have unique taste and placement of their tattoos. For example, inside of the lips, underneath the arm or right in the middle of the chest are all commo tattoo places. But hipster body art so often entails irony or obscurity that we find it kind of refreshing to see folks literally wear their heroes on their sleeve.

Moped Gangs // Lifestyle


(Top): John Devane in Oregon with his moped. (Bottom): Pabst Blue Ribbon, is a favorite beer amoung the culture.

Booze and Butts: Pabst Blue Ribbon beer is a Hipster essential. Costing roughly two dollars a beer, PBR and 40s helps to ensure a good night for these party loving culture. But young, cosmopolitan, nostalgia-loving kids also have a lot to do with the vintage cocktail revival. What began as a vogue for speakeasy-themed watering holes and parties has, in the past several years, grown into a full-blown cocktail Renaissance. Hipster brought back ingrediance likbitters, orgeat syrup, or frothy egg white. In hipster fashion, it is important to go against main stream society which is why many take up smoking cigarettes. Many hipster choose to roll there own cigareetes or to even smoke them in a wooden pipe. American Spirits are a very popular brand amount this group because they are all natural and cheaper than most brands. Marlboro Menthol, Menthol Lights and Lights are also popular. Cloves, which smell different than normal cigarettes, are also prevalent.

35


Skinny Jeans

acid wash

80s HeadThe

BANDS

rimmed glasses

Graphic Tees

Pabst Blue Ribbon


Vintage Vest

NEON

Converse

Sneakers

Handlebar mustache Suspenders

Fedoras

Button-snap western shirt

Ray Bans sunglasses

gaudy belts

33 37


Partying is large part of being in a moped gang, especially during moped rallys. Here, LA Gang, The Late Birds celebrate their Flock Yah! rally.


Moped Gangs // Lifestyle


The full beard and handlebar mushtache are popular grooming styles of the hipster style.

Shoes: Thats only if you can’t go barefoot. Shoe’s such as TOMS, Keds, and Vans are all popular because of all the different styles and color/patterns. They pair them with bright colored laces or doodle anything from designs to lyrics on them. Other suitable, footwear includes: cowboy boots, Converse, and a range of flats. Converse are no longer universal. They look great and you can wear them pretty much anywhere, but so is everyone else – Doc Martens or any other kind of vintage shoes are better. If it’s trainers you’re after, see Classic Reeboks or Vans. For girls, heels aren’t completely popular but feel free to wear them. Cute sandals, Keds, boots, and granny boots are not only more practical but also show how “little” effort you’ve put in even if it has taken you ages to find the “perfect” pair.

Grooming: Hipsters are known for the greasy, unkept look. While hipsters do shower regularly and clean their teeth, they’re just less interested in forking out money for hairstyling, spa sessions, and large make-up kits because these are signs of conforming to cultural ideals of beauty. The “bed look”, long unkempt hair, and hair that resists any attempts to stay flat without chemicals are acceptable looks. Blurring gender lines with haircuts and hairstyles are an important part of the hipster culture. Men, however, do take pride in their facial hair. These mustahes and long beards are grown initially as a joke and to impress one’s friends with the level of commitment necessary to maintain it. these mustaches often remain with the wearer far longer than they are funny and become a part of the person’s “look”.

41


The Late Birds cooling off in California after a long ride.


Vintage Restoration

“Bikes feature tons of customizations including a larger cylinder, carbon fiber exhaust pipe and a fresh paint job. Although mopeds use far less gasoline, their twostroke engines generate more pollution engines used by cars and motorcycles.” —PUCH Manual, 1977

Moped Gangs // Vintage Restoration


45


A New Art Form The Moped Gang movement take repairs seriously. It has become an art form in iteself. Finding, collecting, and learning how to install parts are just a small piece of why they love this culture. Regardless of how well your particular moped was put together or how well you have managed to take care of it over the years, you are eventually going to need some help maintaining it and keeping it in top working order. Fortunately, there are plenty of options that make moped repair a relatively easy endeavor.

Parts in the U.S. Finding moped parts can be important if you want to repair your moped, if you want to build your own moped, or if you want to replace any parts to increase your moped’s performance. You can find moped for various models that have been made over the years online, and you can find a lot of parts at auto part stores and any dealer that sells parts and accessories. Whether you want to replace a part to increase your performance or because the part is damaged, or you want to build your own moped, you should make sure that the parts you buy are high-quality. If you get durable high quality parts, your moped can last longer and the parts will be worth the price you paid. When you are shopping for parts, you should do a lot of research on what is available and what the best products are. It is a good idea for you to look up past customer reviews and professional reviews for different parts so you can know what parts are built to last the longest and perform the best. There is a large variety of parts available online, and if you do enough research and know that the vendor is reliable, you’ll be in good shape.

Moped Gangs // Vintage Restoration


Moped repairs and restoration have because an art form in the hipster culture.

Art or Not? Although Hipsters are fully into their own self express and art forms, they refrain from disrupting the classic look of mopeds. There are no stickers, paintings or abstract art forms decoring the mopeds or their helmets. However, you will see gang logos decorating the fromt headlight of mopeds as to be easily identified to the subculture. And of course you will see brightly colored moped chugging down the street. “They are classics for a reason; plus I’m pretty cheap� says Graham French.

Age and Rarity: Although a majority of the mopeds around today in the 21st century are from the 1970s, it is still very easy to find new mopers. With so many of them being produced now,t along with electric bikes and electric scooters that is hard to keep track of all the new models coming out. Some of the more rare bikes include a1962 Mobylette AV 47. European bikes and parts are extrememly hard to come by. Finding a working, well running one of these mopeds is rare. 47


HEADLAMPA Crank ACE pump

Shaft

Pulley

Exhaustpipe

Choke Lever

Fuel Filling Vent

Alternation

Exhaust

Moped Gangs // Vintage Restoration

Headers


Intake Air

cleaner Pedal

chain

Fuel Tank Killer Generator C a p Suspension Viscous

PAS pump

Fan Pulley 49 41


Simple Moped Gear

1

8

Moped Gangs // Vintage Restoration

9

4

3

2

10

11

5

12

6

13

7

14


1

Generator

2

Water Pump Pulley

3

Belt Idler Pulley

4

Drive Belt Tensioner

5

Power Steering Pump

6

Drive Bult

7

A/C Compressor

8

Crankshaft Pulley

9

Tension Pulley

10

Ider Pulley

11

ACE Pump

13

PAS Pump

14

Viscous Fan Pulley

14

Alternator

Moped gear from a Velosolex V8, 1981 51


Restoration of vintage Mopeds has become an obsession in moped culture. The parts are easy to find, easy to install and are relatively cheap.

Moped Gangs // Vintage Restoration


53


Getting from A to B

“In the 1970s, people were forced to wait in line for hours just to get a tank of gas. People began looking around for an alternate mode of transportation —something that would allow them to travel long and short distances at a reasonable price.” —Dice Magazine, 2011

Moped Gangs // Getting from A to B


55


In 2006 Graham French and Zach Levenberg led a crew 13,000 miles from San Francisco, California to Ushuaia, Argentina on Puch Maxi mopeds. They later released a documentary and a0 book of their journey both called “Moped to South America”, consisting of the pictures and video they shot along the way.

Travels At various times of the year, moped gangs from all over the United States and Cananda, come together to ride as one over sized gang. “It is extremely loud and crazy, exactly the underlining goal of all moped gangs” says Ace Levenberg, brother of founder Zach. It also gives memebers a chance to see what other people with the same interests are doing in their cities. Many members keep intouch online and post about their recent routes and experiences.. It also providences the gangs with a sense of unity and freedom. Although in many states it is illegal to ride mopeds on highways and freeways, most moped gang members bend the rules to do what they love. The angs have traveled to all parts of the United States including Virginia, Oregon, New York City, various parts of California, Texas, and Illinois. Many gang members have traveled to Mexico and Canada as well.

The longest Moped ride was from Ontario, Canada to Alaska by James Bay in 1978. This inspired San Francisco native Graham French and Zach Levenberg to make a documentary of their travels to South America via moped in 2006. Their five month, 13,000 mile trip to the southern most tip of South America, Ushuais, at speeds of around 30 miles per hour are a testament that travel is not solely about the destination.

57


Riders of The Orphange gather at a gas station to fuel up on the way to a rally held in 2009.


59


Will Nosal of Virginia’s Hell’s Satan’s straps in his crews bikes and head for San Francisco, CA for The Ceremony Rally.

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South

AMERICA Highway

One

The

Brooklyn

Bridge

Gate Bridge

Golden

3 CAPE Scenic drive

Moped Gangs // Getting from A to B


Luckenbach Southern Hills

Straits

of

Mackinac

Cumberland Gap Yosemite

National Kangamangus Park HWY

Lake Mead

Kalamazoo 63 49


The ladies of The Creatures of the Loin patiently wait for their crew in San Francisco 65


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The Late Birds relax after a long ride to from Los Angeles to San Francisco , CA


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MoPed Gangs  

An in-depth look at the San Francisco subculture of Moped Gangs.

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