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Elia System and market overview 2010


Table of contents I. System and grid management and market data

01

I.1 Energy balance on the Elia grid in 2010

01

I.2 Consumption recovers in Elia control area in 2010

02

I.3 Power injected into the Elia control area and temperature

03

I.4 Energy injected into the Elia control area

05

I.5 Net offtake

06

I.6 Generation

06

I.7 Imports and exports

08

I.8 Belpex day-ahead market in 2010

14

I.9 Reliability

16

I.10 Balancing

17

II. Infrastructure

19

II.1 Length of Elia grid on 31 December 2010

19

II.2 Access points

19

II.3 Commissionings

20

II.4 Nominal capacity of interconnection lines

20

III. Rational use of energy

21

III.1 Energy savings

21

III.2 Green certificates

21


01 • ELIA System and market overview 2010

I. System and grid management and market data I.1 Energy balance on the Elia grid in 2010 Energy balance on the Elia grid in 20101 (in GWh) Exports

Imports France:

3,167.0

France:

5,409.0

Luxembourg:

1,845.8

Luxembourg:

1,121.5

Netherlands:

7,382.7

Netherlands:

5,313.3

Net Import 551.7 Net injection

Net consumption2

Power stations:

76,545.2

Direct customers:

29,176.7

Local generation on Elia-net:

9,068.9

Distribution:

56,110.8

From distribution networks:

697.0

Total:

85,287.4

Total:

86,311.2

Energy losses: 1,575.4

Energy balance on the Elia grid in 2009 (in GWh) Exports

Imports France:

1 831.9

France:

6,642.5

Luxembourg:

1 867.5

Luxembourg:

909.7

Netherlands:

5 786.8

Netherlands:

3,769.3

Net Export 1,835.3 Net injection

Net consumption2

Power stations:

76,192.2

Direct customers:

25,740.4

Local generation on Elia-net:

7,214.0

Distribution:

55,109.2

From distribution networks:

679.2

Total:

80,849.6

Total:

84,085.5

Energy losses: 1,400.6

1 Figures as of 1 June 2011 2 Consumption on the Elia grid, including consumption supplied by local generation

The energy balance provides an overview of imports and exports, injections into the Elia grid in Belgium, consumption and energy losses during transmission. Net injections cover net injections from distribution networks and by power stations, pumped-storage power stations and local generation units that inject energy into the grid at a voltage of at least 30 kV. Generation units connected to a voltage lower than 30 kV are only counted if a net injection into the Elia grid is measured. A customer with local generation takes electrical energy off the grid at the same point where local generation units inject it into the grid. Consumption only covers the consumption of local generation from the Elia grid, not from grids of voltages under 30 kV. Consumption is split into two categories: Elia’s direct grid users and distribution networks. The amount of energy is expressed in gigawatt-hours (GWh). By way of example, one gigawatt-hour is the amount of power needed to light 50 million 20 W energy-efficient lamps for one hour. The consumption on the Elia grid rose 5.5 %, from 80.8 TWh in 2009 to 85.3 TWh in 2010, effectively halting the downward trend caused by the recession that began to bite in the fourth quarter of 2008. The recovery begun in late 2009 continued throughout 2010. The values recorded in 2010 are higher, month by month, than the corresponding values for 2009. Up to and including October 2010, they were lower than the same months in 2008. On the whole, consumption in 2010 was up 13.3 % on 2009 for industrial customers connected directly to the Elia grid, and up 1.8 % for industrial, business and residential customers of the distribution system operators. However, there remains a 1.1 % drop in consumption compared to 2008.


02 • ELIA System and market overview 2010

I.2. Consumption recovers in Elia control area in 2010 Consumption levels in the Elia control area, based on the Elia consumption indicator3 reached their 2010 peak at 13,845 MW between 17:45 and 18:00 on 1 December. This peak was 1.1 % lower than the absolute record set on 17 December 2007 (14,040 MW), but is 2.3 % higher than the 2009 peak (13,531 MW on 8

January 2009). Consumption was at its lowest in 2010 between 06:15 and 06:30 on 25 July, when it bottomed out at 6,278 MW, 6.4 % higher than the 2009 minimum recorded on 26 July 2009 (5,901 MW).

3 The consumption indicator pertains to the largest proportion of consumption in the control area, but not to all consumption. With the development of decentralised generation (such as wind farms and cogeneration units), which inject the energy produced into the distribution grids, the difference between actual consumption in the control area and the consumption indicator based on measurements in the Elia control area is gradually growing. Consumption at distribution level is determined in part by weather conditions. The consumption indicator is based on injections of power into the Elia grid and gives a rough idea of electricity consumption in the Elia control area. It takes as its basis net generation from power stations and local generation units injecting at a minimum voltage of 30 kV as well as the balance of imports and exports The energy needed to pump water into power-station storage reservoirs is subtracted as it is used to temporarily store energy which is then re-injected into the grid. Generating facilities connected to the distribution network, such as wind turbines, small water turbines and small cogeneration units, are only taken into account if a net injection from the distribution network is recorded on the Elia grid. Where this is not the case, injections by these facilities into networks at a voltage lower than 30 kV is entirely consumed within the networks concerned. Hence, the value of the consumption indicator is lower than total electricity consumption. Along with the increase in the number of decentralised generation units in distribution networks, a clear upward trend can be seen in net injections from the distribution networks into the Elia grid. Net injections into the Elia grid from the distribution networks rose from 39 GWh in 2006 to 194 GWh in 2008, 679.2 GWh in 2009 and 697 GWh in 2010. This upward trend is expected to continue in the future. The main reasons for different maximum power levels are changes in temperature and the intensity of economic activity in Belgium. The chart and table below show the maximum electrical power for each month and the average maximum and minimum temperatures for that month (in °C).


03 • ELIA System and market overview 2010

I.3. Power injected into the Elia control area and temperature The table and chart show the maximum electrical power (in MW) injected into the Elia control area for every month of the period

2008-2010. Values are based on the consumption indicator (see definition above; see also www.elia.be).

Power injected into the Elia control area in 2008, 2009 and 2010 (synchronous peak) MW 14,500 14,000 13,500 13,000 12,500 12,000 11,500 11,000 2008 10,500

2009 2010

10,000 Jan

Feb

March

April

May

June

July

Aug

Sept

Oct

Nov

Dec

MW

Jan

Feb

March

April

May

June

July

Aug

Sept

Oct

Nov

Dec

2008

13,479

13,360

12,822

12,454

11,890

12,138

11,968

11,790

11,796

12,022

12,706

12,875

2009

13,531

12,752

11,820

11,021

10,923

11,035

11,354

11,221

11,314

11,969

12,365

13,046

2010

13,692

13,335

12,616

11,613

11,808

11,472

11,567

11,459

11,468

12,236

13,467

13,845

Monthly power injections into the Elia control area and average temperatures in 2010 The main reasons for different maximum power levels are changes in temperature and the intensity of economic activity in Belgium. The chart and table below show the maximum electrical power for

each month and the average maximum and minimum temperatures for that month (in °C). Values are based on the consumption indicator (see definition in footnote 3; see also www.elia.be).


04 • ELIA System and market overview 2010

MW 14,500 14,000 13,500 13,000 12,500 12,000 11,500 11,000

Synchronous peak

10,500

Avg. max. temp. Avg. min. temp.

10,000 Jan

Feb

Synchronous peak in MW

March

April

May

June

July

Aug

Sept

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

Feb

March

April

May

June

July

Aug

Sept

Oct

Nov

Dec

13,692

13,335

12,616

11,613

11,808

11,472

11,567

11,459

11,468

12,236

13,467

13,845

Avg. max. temp.

3.70

6.30

3.70

17.40

19.10

21.30

23.60

24.90

20.40

15.10

12.10

5.30

Avg. min. temp.

-2.50

0.80

-2.50

7.60

9.50

12.10

14.50

13.80

11.50

7.50

7.40

0.20

April

May

June

July

Aug

Sept

Oct

Nov

Dec

Monthly average temperature

Jan

Feb

March

Avg. temp. 2010

0.10

2.50

6.70

10.30

11.20

17.40

20.50

17.00

14.20

10.60

6.10

-0.70

Avg. temp. 2009

0.70

3.60

6.70

12.50

14.40

16.50

18.70

19.40

15.80

11.30

9.70

6.90

Source: Belgian Royal Meteorological Institute

Rise in Gross Domestic Product per quarter in 2010 compared to same quarter in 2009 Growth GDP

1e quarter

2nd quarter

3rd quarter

4th quarter

1.7 %

2.7 %

2.0 %

2.1 %

Source: National Bank of Belgium-Belgostat


05 • ELIA System and market overview 2010

I.4 Energy injected into the Elia control area Monthly energy injections into the Elia control area in 2009 and 2010 The chart below shows the amount of electrical energy (in TWh) injected into the Elia control area and the average temperature in C° for every month in the period 2009-2010. The values of these

injections are based on the consumption indicator (see definition above; see also www.elia.be). Electricity consumption is largely determined by the temperature and the season.

TWh/month

9

25

8 20 7 6

15

5 10 4 3

5

2

Energy 2009 (TWh) 0

Energy 2010 (TWh)

1

Avg. temp. 2009

0

Avg. temp. 2010

-5 Jan

Feb

March

April

May

Jan

June

Feb

July

March

Aug

April

Sept

Oct

May

Nov

June

Dec

July

Aug

Sept

Oct

Nov

Dec

Energy 2010 (TWh)

8.19

7.31

7.61

6.93

6.92

6.73

6.56

6.53

6.80

7.27

7.50

8.20

Energy 2009 (TWh)

7.83

7.00

7.03

6.33

6.37

6.27

6.22

6.30

6.65

7.16

7.01

7.59

Avg. temp. 2010

0.10

2.50

6.70

10.30

11.20

17.40

20.50

17.00

14.20

10.60

6.10

-0.70

Avg. temp. 2009

0.70

3.60

6.70

12.50

14.40

16.50

18.70

19.40

15.80

11.30

9.70

2.90


06 • ELIA System and market overview 2010

I.5 Net offtake The net offtake of electrical energy is the sum of the net energy taken off the grid at all access points, including the net offtake (measured at the Belgian border) of Luxembourg system operator

Sotel. The net offtake per region is based on the location of the offtake points and hence is an approximation of the real net offtake per region.

Net offtake in the Elia control area per region GWh

2007

2008

2009

2010 45,472

Flanders

48,759

48,187

43,884

Brussels

5,839

5,896

5,863

5,907

Wallonia (Sotel included)

24,000

24,420

24,044

25,010

Total Belgium

78,598

78,503

73,791

76,390

Net offtake in the Elia control area per type of customer GWh

2007

2008

2009

2010

Direct customers

21,291

20,775

18,559

20,143

Distribution networks

57,307

57,728

55,232

56,247

Total

78,598

78,503

73,791

76,390

I.6 Generation Total power per type of generation facility4 2010

MW

Nuclear power plants

5,934

Conventional power plants

2,619

Multifuels

One fuel

CCGT and gas turbines Hydroelectric Other

763 1,856 4,387 82 1,705

Cogeneration

958

Incinerators

171

Diesel engines

83

Turbojets

180

Wind turbines

313

Pump stations

1,308

Total without pump stations

14,726

Total with pump stations

16,034

4 Facilities with a CIPU contract with Elia; values based on the maximum technical capacity.


07 • ELIA System and market overview 2010

Breakdown of installed generation capacity in 2010 10.6%

8.2% 37% 0.5% Nuclear CCGT and gas turbines 16.3%

Conventional Hydroelectric Pump stations Other 27.4%

Breakdown of generation per type of generation facility in 2010 9% 1.6% 9.4%

Nuclear 55.5%

CCGT and gas turbines Conventional

24.5%

Pump stations Other, including hydroelectric

Electricity generation per type of generation facility per month in 2010 GWh 8,000 7,000 6,000 5,000

Nuclear

4,000

CCGT and gas turbines

3,000

Conventional

2,000

Hydroelectric

1,000

Pump stations Other

0 jan

feb

march

april

may

june

july

aug

sept

oct

nov

dec


08 • ELIA System and market overview 2010

I.7 Imports and exports Physical energy exchanges with neighbouring countries Import and export volumes – Belgium 2007-2010 The table provides an overview of the physical flows of electrical energy measured at Belgium’s borders each year. Physical flows do not necessarily correspond to contractual flows, as electri-

cal energy is divided up over the grid on the basis of resistance, always choosing the path of least resistance, and does not take account of the contents of commercial agreements.

GWh

2007

2008

2009

2010

France

Imports

8,331.6

7,386.3

1,831.9

3,167.0

Exports

2,322.4

2,038.6

6,642.5

5,409.0

Netherlands

Imports

5,265.8

8,118.6

5,786.8

7,382.7

Exports

5,083.7

3,004.6

3,769.3

5,313.3

Luxembourg

Imports

2,083.9

1,628.6

1,867.5

1,845.8

Exports

1,630.7

1,517.9

909.7

1,121.5

Total

Imports

15,681.3

17,133.5

9,486.2

12,395.5

Exports

9,036.8

6,561.1

11,321.5

11,843.8

Net imports

Net imports

Net exports

Net imports

6,644.5

10,572.3

1,835.3

551.7

Net electricity import balance in 2010 As regards the balance of imports and exports for the Belgian control area, 2010 saw net imports of 0.55 TWh, while 2009 had net exports of 1.83 TWh. Physical exchanges of electricity with neighbouring countries via the Elia grid totalled 24.2 TWh, a 16.3 % increase compared to the 2009 total of 20.8 TWh of

exchanges. In other words, some 14.5 % of consumption in the Elia control area in 2010 came from imports. These differences were the result of a sharp rise in imports from the Netherlands and France, while total exports rose only slightly compared to 2009.


09 • ELIA System and market overview 2010

Monthly import and export volumes in 2010 and 2009 The charts below show physical exchanges of electricity with neighbouring countries in GWh for 2010 and 2009. Negative volumes indicate imports while positive volumes indicate exports. Electricity chooses the path of least resistance, so that physical

exchanges of electricity do not necessarily correspond to international commercial exchanges. However, the grid operator must take account of the actual physical flows at Belgium’s borders.

Import and export volumes in 2010 Imports

Exports

January February March April May June July August September

Exchanges with Luxembourg

October November

Exchanges with the Netherlands

December

Exchanges with France

-2,000

-1,500

-1,000

-500

0

500

1,000

1,500

GWh

Import and export volumes in 2009 Imports

Exports

January February March April May June July August September

Exchanges with Luxembourg

October November

Exchanges with the Netherlands

December

Exchanges with France

-1,500

-1,000

-5,000

0

500

GWh

1000

1,500

2,000


10 • ELIA System and market overview 2010

Commercial energy exchanges with neighbouring countries Use of cross-border capacities Transmission capacity at borders is divided into three parts and allocated on an annual, monthly and daily basis to market parties. Market parties can use the annual and monthly capacity allocated to them by nominating it on a day-ahead basis. Allocated annual and monthly capacity which is not nominated is redistributed as additional daily capacity to the market parties. Since 2008, the principle of “netting” has also been applied to calculate the amount of available daily capacity. This involves “netting out” import and export nominations of annual and monthly capacities, thereby freeing up additional available daily capacity.

Since 2007, it has also been possible to acquire and use intraday border capacity on the day of delivery at the border between France and Belgium. This system was also introduced at the Dutch-Belgian border in May 2009. The amount of intraday capacity available is mainly determined by the level of unused daily capacity. The charts below illustrate the average nominations of annual, monthly, daily and intraday capacity each month at each border. Nominations are compared to the capacity physically available to the market (net transmission capacity, or NTC).

Use of transmission capacity at Belgium’s south border in 2010 Imports

Exports

January February March April May June July August September

Year

October

Month Day

November

Intraday

December

Not nominated -3,500

-3,000

-2,500

-2,000

-1,500

-1,000

GWh

-500

0

500

1,000

1,500


11 • ELIA System and market overview 2010

Use of transmission capacity at Belgium’s south border in 2009 Imports

Exports

January February March April May June July August September

Year

October

Month Day

November

Intraday

December

Not nominated -3,500

-3,000

-2,500

-2,000

-1,500

-1,000

-500

0

500

1,000

1,500

GWh

Use of transmission capacity at Belgium’s north border in 2010 Imports

Exports

January February March April May June July August September

Year

October

Month Day

November

Intraday

December

Not nominated -1,500

-1,000

-500

0

GWh

500

1,000

1,500


12 • ELIA System and market overview 2010

Use of transmission capacity at Belgium’s north border in 2009 Imports

Exports

January February March April May June July August September

Year

October

Month Day

November

Intraday

December

Not nominated -1,500

-1,000

-500

0

500

1,000

1,500

GWh

Congestion The graphs show in percentage and in both directions the average number of hours per month with congestion on a border, as

against the total number of hours during the month. Imports are on the left, exports on the right.

Congestion at the south border in 2010 Imports

Exports

January February March April May June July August September October November Percentage of hours with congestion

December -100 %

-80 %

-60 %

-40 %

-20 %

0%

20 %

40 %

60 %

80 %

100 %


13 • ELIA System and market overview 2010

Congestion at the south border in 2009 Imports

Exports

January February March April May June July August September October November Percentage of hours with congestion

December -100 %

-80 %

-60 %

-40 %

-20 %

0%

20 %

40 %

60 %

80 %

100 %

Congestion at the north border in 2010 Imports

Exports

January February March April May June July August September October November Percentage of hours with congestion

December -100 %

-80 %

-60 %

-40 %

-20 %

0%

20 %

40 %

60 %

80 %

100 %


14 • ELIA System and market overview 2010

Congestion at the north border in 2009 Imports

Exports

January February March April May June July August September October November Percentage of hours with congestion

December -100 %

-80 %

-60 %

-40 %

-20 %

0%

20 %

40 %

60 %

80 %

100 %

I.8 Belpex day-ahead market in 2010 Price change on the Belpex day-ahead market in 2010 €/Mwh 70

60

50

40

30

20

APX Belpex

10

EPEX Spot FR EPEX Spot DE

0 Jan

Feb

March

April

May

June

July

Aug

Sept

Oct

Nov

Source: APX, Belpex, EPEX Spot

Average price on the Belpex day ahead market in 2010: 46,30 €/MWh Average price on the EPEX Spot day ahead market (France) in 2010: 47,40 €/MWh Average price on the APX day ahead market (Netherlands) in 2010: 45,38 €/MWh Average price on the EPEX Spot day ahead market (Germany) in 2010: 44,49 €/MWh

Dec


15 • ELIA System and market overview 2010

Price convergence with energy exchanges in neighbouring countries The year 2010 saw the launch on 9 November of pentalateral coupling between the Belpex, APX, EPEX Spot France and EPEX Spot Germany (including Luxembourg) day-ahead markets, combined with the ITVC (Interim Tight Volume Coupling) with the Nordic market. The effect on price convergence due tof the pentalateral coupling therefore started to be recorded as of 10 November 2010. If we look at 2010 as a whole, we note that during the year, the prices on the day-ahead markets in Belgium, France and the Netherlands were the same for 59.1 % of the time (full convergence between electricity prices in those countries). This figure is slightly below the average of 63 % achieved in the first three years of trilateral market coupling and somewhat higher than the figure for 2009, when there was complete convergence 56.8 % of the time. Prices on the Belgian and French day-ahead markets were the

same 84.9 % of the time in 2010, while prices on the Belgian and Dutch day-ahead markets were the same 72.9 % of the time. In the months prior to the launch of price coupling with Germany, we saw only sporadic, brief and purely coincidental periods of price convergence with Germany. From 10 November until the end of the year, Belgian, Dutch, French and Germany day-ahead prices were the same 55.1 % of the time. During that period, Belgian and French day-ahead prices were the same 99.7 % of the time, while Belgian and Dutch prices were the same 69.3 % of the time. Market coupling ensured optimum use of the import and export capacities at the Belgian-Dutch and Belgian-French borders, resulting in an average daily import volume of 18,099 MWh and an average export volume of 16,244 MWh.

Price convergence between the Belgian, Dutch, French and German day-ahead markets from 1 January to 31 December 2010

January February

34.81 %

31,45 %

29.17 %

March

23.36 %

25.89 %

48.21 %

36.74 %

6.73 %

54.51 %

April

19.31 %

76.94 %

May June

32.64 %

64.58 %

July

25.40 %

67.20 %

August

BE=NL=FR=DE 18.06 %

79.72 %

October

49.26 %

November

48.61 %

December

38.26 %

10 %

20 %

40 %

50 %

60 %

BE = FR BE = NL BE = DE

31.85 %

21.24 %

30 %

BE=FR=NL, DE <>

9.53 % 27.22 %

19.72 %

45.30 %

0%

6.45 %

47.04 %

50.00 %

September

18.41 %

11.96 %

68.55 %

70 %

80 %

Other 90 %

100 %

Volumes traded on Belpex The average daily volume traded on the Belpex day-ahead market in 2010 was 32,446 MWh, accounting for 13.7 % of Belgian consumption. This is somewhat higher than in 2009, when the average daily volume was 27,782 MWh or 12.4 % of consumption. In

2010, the Belpex day-ahead market set two records: 78,080 MWh was traded on 7 December 2010 (a record 27.1 % of Belgian consumption) and a record volume of 80,607 MWh was traded on 8 December.


16 â&#x20AC;˘ ELIA System and market overview 2010

I.9 Reliability Reliability indicators The Elia grid is very reliable. Reliability is measured using three statistical parameters: the average annual interruption time for each customer on the Elia grid (given in minutes per customer and per year), the average number of annual interruptions to an Elia grid

customerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s electricity supply (annual frequency) and the average duration (in minutes) per interruption on the Elia grid and per year. In percentage terms, the Elia grid achieves an average reliability rate of over 99.999 %.

Average annual interruption time Time (min./cust./year) 00:07:00 00:06:00 00:05:00 00:04:00 00:03:00 00:02:00

Number of minutes per customer per year Average per five years

00:01:00 00:00:00 1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Average annual frequency of interruptions per customer Frequency 0.150 0.125 0.100 0.075 0.050 Annual frequency Average per five years

0.025 0.000 1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010


17 â&#x20AC;˘ ELIA System and market overview 2010

Average interruption time per affected customer Time (hours:minutes) 1:00:00 0:55:00 0:50:00 0:45:00 0:40:00 0:35:00 0:30:00 0:25:00 0:20:00 0:15:00 0:10:00 0:05:00 0:00:00

Minutes per interuption Average per five years 1999

2000

Average Interruption Time5

2001

2002

Average Interruption Frequency6

2003

2004

Average Interruption Duration7

2005

2006

2007

Reliability Elia grid

2008

2009

2010

Number of days per year

2006

05:14

0.130

41:23

99.9990 %

365

2007

03:32

0.090

39:07

99.9993 %

365

2008

03:07

0.080

38:29

99.9994 %

366

2009

01:34

0.091

17:12

99.9997 %

365

2010

04:51

0.129

37:24

99.9991 %

365

5 Average Interruption Time is the average number of minutes of power cuts for all customers. 6 Average Interruption Frequency is the annual frequency of power interruptions per customer. A value of 0.09 indicates that on average a customer experiences a power cut every 11 years. 7 Average Interruption Duration is the average duration of a power cut experienced by a customer.

I.10 Balancing Reserve power is contracted to balance injection and offtake of electricity on the grid on an ongoing basis. This is done by increasing or reducing injections of energy or scaling down offtake among interruptible customers as required. Reserve power is broken down into primary, secondary and tertiary categories primarily on

the basis of response time and duration. Tertiary reserve power is supplied via generation as well as under contracts with interruptible customers, who are willing to shed offtake for a temporary period at Eliaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s request. The table and chart outline the amounts of electricity used by Elia to balance the grid each month.


18 â&#x20AC;˘ ELIA System and market overview 2010

Activated volumes for balancing in 2010 Decrease injections

Increase injections

January February March April May Secondary reserve +

June

Secondary reserve -

July

Generation +

August

Generation -

September

Tertiary reserve

October

Contractual interruptions

November

Inter TSO Import

December

Inter TSO Export

-60,000

-40,000

-20,000

0

20,000

40,000

60,000

80,000

100,000

MWh

Month 2010

Secundary reserve +

Secundary reserve -

Generation + (free offers) 8

Generation - (free offers) 8

Tertiary reserve

Contractual interruptions

Inter TSO Import

Inter TSO Export

Jan

37,118 MWh

-22,182 MWh

12,894 MWh

-2,295 MWh

1,915 MWh

652 MWh

975 MWh

0 MWh

Feb

28,279 MWh

-24,655 MWh

9,066 MWh

-1,416 MWh

1,366 MWh

149 MWh

0 MWh

0 MWh

March

23 ,742 MWh

-37,875 MWh

8,272 MWh

-11,245 MWh

551 MWh

0 MWh

0 MWh

2,400 MWh

April

22,873 MWh

-33,558 MWh

3,347 MWh

-10,177 MWh

0 MWh

308 MWh

0 MWh

200 MWh

May

24,715 MWh

-29,364 MWh

6,508 MWh

-3,942 MWh

446 MWh

0 MWh

0 MWh

150 MWh

June

32,240 MWh

-20,640 MWh

6,670 MWh

-557 MWh

1,938 MWh

0 MWh

1,750 MWh

0 MWh

July

40,271 MWh

-18,678 MWh

16,942 MWh

-638 MWh

5,845 MWh

372 MWh

0 MWh

0 MWh

Aug

31,003 MWh

-25,621 MWh

5,443 MWh

-2,191 MWh

812 MWh

0 MWh

750 MWh

0 MWh 1,150 MWh

Sept

21,855 MWh

-32,613 MWh

4,570 MWh

-4,507 MWh

163 MWh

0 MWh

0 MWh

Oct

27,399 MWh

-31,960 MWh

7,727 MWh

-6,060 MWh

3,366 MWh

0 MWh

0 MWh

1,175 MWh

Nov

42,085 MWh

-15,601 MWh

14,974 MWh

-238 MWh

4,923 MWh

1,235 MWh

350 MWh

1,200 MWh

Dec

46,492 MWh

-14,748 MWh

30,175 MWh

-429 MWh

5,688 MWh

2,155 MWh

975 MWh

3,050 MWh

Load-shedding in the context of the load-shedding plan and activated volumes for congestion management are not included in the activated volumes for balancing. 8 Free offers under the CIPU contract.

Contracted reserve power in 2010 Primary reserve R1

92 MW

Secondary reserve R2

137 MW

Tertiary reserve R3

400 MW

Interruptible customers 9

9 Average volume available

261 MW


19 â&#x20AC;˘ ELIA System and market overview 2010

II. Infrastructure II.1 Length of Elia grid on 31 December 2010 (in kilometres) Connections Voltage (kV)

Underground10 (km) Overhead11 (km)

Total (km)

380

-

891

220

-

297

891 297

150

427

2,008

2,435

70

280

2,382

2,662

36

1,927

8

1,935

30

141

22

163

Total

2,775

5,608

8,383

10 Underground connections: electrical length 11 Overhead lines: route length

II.2 Access points Overview of access points

Access points on Elia grid by region

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Federal

Regional

380 kV - 150 kV

70 kV - 30 kV

Direct customers: offtake points

46

139

Direct customers: injection points

9

10

Direct customers: offtake and injection points

37

55

Total direct customers

92

204

Total distribution system operators

0

510

Total

92

714

Flanders

411

410

413

414

416

Brussels

55

55

55

56

56

Wallonia (including Sotel)

316

318

328

329

334

Total Belgium

782

783

796

799

806

Access points on Elia grid by type of customer

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Direct customers

281

281

290

290

296

DSOs

501

502

506

509

510

Total Belgium

782

783

796

799

806


20 • ELIA System and market overview 2010

II.3 Commissionings Commissionings in 2010 Line

Cable/overhead

Voltage

Circuit

Aubange - Moulaine L

220.00 2,00

Blauwe Toren - Brugge

150.00

K

1,00

Length

Type

13.3 km 707 AMS (1.7 km in Belgium) 7.5 km

2,000 AluPRC

MVA 2x 442 MVA 300 MVA

II.4 Nominal capacity of interconnection lines The nominal capacity of an international high-voltage line is determined by its voltage and type of cable. However, the extent to which this capacity can actually be used depends on the energy flows within the grids as well as on the safety margins the transmission system operators have to apply to ensure security of

Line

Voltage

Type

MVA

North border Van Eyck – Maasbracht

380 kV

2x593 AMS-AC

1,350

Meerhout – Maasbracht

380 kV

2x620 AMS

1,420

Zandvliet – Borsele

380 kV

3x460 AMS

1,650

Zandvliet – Geertruidenberg

380 kV

3x460 AMS

1,650

South border Achêne – Lonny

380 kV

2x 570 AMS

1,350

Avelgem – Avelin

380 kV

2x 705 AMSzz

1,550

Avelgem – Mastaing

380 kV

2x 593 AMS-AC

1,350

Monceau – Chooz

220 kV

707 Alac

405

Aubange – Moulaine

220 kV

2 x 570 AMS

800

supply, factoring in unavailability as a result of works and potential incidents. Therefore, the available border capacity is never equal to the sum of the nominal capacities of the individual interconnection lines.


21 • ELIA System and market overview 2010

III. Rational use of energy III.1Energy savings Promoting rational use of energy by our customers As part of its public-service obligations in Flanders, Elia implements an action plan each year to promote rational use of energy (RUE) amongst its industrial customers. In this connection, Elia provides its customers with the resources required to make recurrent savings of 2.5 % on their primary energy consumption for each MWh supplied, in the case of facilities connected at between 36 kV and 70 kV.

The objective set for 2010 was savings of 45.2 GWh of electric power, while savings of 27 GWh have been made. A total of 30 projects were launched and our customers undertook to invest in some 52 energy-saving projects. Thanks to the initiatives Elia has taken amongst its industrial customers, cumulative energy savings since 2003 stood at 453 GWh at the end of December 2010, i.e. some 147,250 tonnes of CO2.

III.2 Green certificates The Belgian federal and regional governments have developed support mechanisms in order to boost investments in electricity generation from renewable energy sources. One of these consists of the green certificates system, issued to generators of renewables by the regulator as an acknowledgement of the “green” origin of power. These certificates can be purchased by the market players (suppliers) or sold to Elia. Suppliers must each year present a certain number of green certificates to the

regulator. The required number is based on their power sales. Transmission system operator Elia has a legal obligation to purchase the certificates offered at a minimum price. Elia returns these certificates to the market via Belpex. The balance between the price at which Elia purchases the certificates and the price at which they are sold on Belpex is covered by a levy on the transmission tariffs.

Price and volumes of green certificates Number

€/Certificate

GC Flanders region

2,250

2,090

2,050 1,850 1,650 1,450 1,250 1,050

118.74

850

672

650 450 250 50

117.52 110.76

313

258 17-02-06

981

117.47

25-10-06

02-02-07

663

112 109.13 421

125.00

970

120.00 115,00

112

110.00 105.00

363 97

20-10-10 29-02-08 12-03-09 10-12-09 28-09-07 24-10-08 Sales date

100.00 95.00

Price

90.00 Number


02 • ELIA Systeem- en marktoverzicht 2010

www.elia.be

Elia Boulevard de l’Empereur 20 B-1000 Brussels Tel: +32 2 546 70 11 Fax: +32 2 546 70 10

Editor Jacques Vandermeiren


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