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BULGARIA


The stadium is one of the many preserved buildings from the time of the Roman empire in Plovdiv. Other buildings of the ancient city of Trimontium are the best preserved Ancient Theatre on the Balkans; fragments of the Forum / Agora, an Odeon / Bouleuterion, fragments of two aqueducts, fortification walls, thermae, a large and a small basilica, a synagogue, residential buildings with some Stadium of Trimontium in Plovdiv, Bulgaria, is among the largest structures from the time of the Ancient Rome in the Balkan peninsula. The facility, approximately 240 m 790 ft m long and 50 m wide, could seat up to 30 000 spectators. Today, the northern curved part of the Stadium (sfendona) is partially restored and is one of the most recognizable landmarks of Plovdiv. The


Plovdiv sits on seven hills, but the seventh, Markovo Tepe, was destroyed in the early twentieth century and its stone used to pave many of the city’s streets. Of today’s six syenite (stone similar to granite) hills the highest and most remote from the city centre is Dzhendem Tepe or Youth Hill. There is a large park here, with a mini railway for children.Second in height is Bunardzhika or Liberators Hill on the top of which are situated the monuments of Russian Liberators and of the Soviet Soldier, known locally as

Plovdiv was the most splendid town in the Thracian Valley. It was situated along the banks of the Maritza (or as it was called then, the Hebros) river and was an important trade center. Stories tell of the good life that the people of Plovdiv were leading – they were growing wheat and vegetables, harvesting juicy grapes, drinking wine and worshipping the Thracian gods. Plovdiv men were famous for their bravery and


Plovdiv was given var-

Plovdiv was given various names throughout its long history. Some names are suggestive. The Odrysian capital Odryssa (Greek: , Latin: ODRYFA) is suggested to have been modern

Plovdiv was given various names throughout its long history. Some names are suggestive. The Odrysian capital Odryssa (Greek: , Latin: ODRYFA) is suggested to have been modern Plovdiv by numismatic research[7][8] or Odrin.[9] Theopompus[10] mentioned in the 4th century BC a town by the name Poneropolis (Greek: Π “town of villains”) in pejorative relation to the nquest by king Philip II of Macedon, who is said to have settled 2000 men, false-accusers and witnesses, sycophants, lawyers, and other pos-


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