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MUSIC, COMMUNITY, AND CULTURE IN PORTLAND

ISSUE 56 | JANUARY 2016

ELEVEN PDX MAGAZINE - VOLUME 5, ISSUE 8

COMPLIMENTARY


Classy for a Cause
 


January 16th
 Alberta Abbey
 8pm
 Support the arts
 Formal attire required


contents

ELEVEN PDX MAGAZINE VOLUME 5

THE USUAL 3 Letter from the Editor 3 Staff Credits

ISSUE NO. 8

FEATURES Local Feature 13 Rare Monk

Cover Feature 17 NEW MUSIC

Hinds

4 Aural Fix Eartheater Oh Wonder Car Seat Headrest Lower Dens

COMMUNITY Neighborhood of the Month 24 Hollywood

7 Short List 7 Album Reviews Strange Faces Daughter Savages Tortoise

Literary Arts 25 Independent Publishing Resource Center

Visual Arts 27 Portland artist Steele Walston

LIVE MUSIC 9 Know Your Venue Alberta Street Pub

11 Musicalendar An encompassing overview of concerts in PDX for the upcoming month. But that’s not all–the Musicalendar is complete with a venue map to help get you around town.

more online at elevenpdx.com


HELLO PORTLAND! It's a whole new year. So many good things happened in 2015, as well as a number of scary things, but here at ELEVEN we like to keep it positive, so here's 11 wishes for the next 11 months! 1. AB/InBev doesn't buy any Portland breweries. 2. Elon Musk announces a Mexico City to BC Hyperloop with a PDX hub. 3. The Timbers repeat as MLS Champions! #RCTID 4. No ugly new complexes named for the dive bar they replaced. 5. How about a local M. Ward show? 6. PBR/MusicFest gets an even bigger/weirder twist. 7. Re-evaluated rent control so everyone can keep this city awesome. 8. City funded/sponsored creative spaces. 9. Moda Center renamed to Rose Garden, commemorated with a free Radiohead & Daft Punk show. 10. New MLB expansion team, the Portland Mustangs. 11. ELEVENfest 2016? Here's hoping at least a few come true! Happy New Year! Âť

- Ryan Dornfeld, Editor in Chief

3 | ELEVEN PORTLAND | www.elevenpdx.com

EXECUTIVE STAFF EDITOR IN CHIEF Ryan Dornfeld ryan@elevenpdx.com CREATIVE DIRECTOR Dustin Mills dustin@elevenpdx.com

ONLINE Mark Dilson, Donovan Farley, Kim Lawson, Michael Reiersgaard GET INVOLVED getinvolved@elevenpdx.com www.elevenpdx.com twitter.com/elevenpdx facebook.com/elevenmagpdx

SECTION EDITORS LOCAL FEATURE: Brandy Crowe LITERARY ARTS: Scott McHale VISUAL ARTS: Mercy McNab

MAILING ADRESS 126 NE Alberta Suite 211 Portland, OR. 97211

GRAPHIC DESIGN Dustin Mills Alex Combs

GENERAL INQUIRIES info@elevenpdx.com

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Brandy Crowe, Sarah Eaton, Eric Evans, Donovan Farley, Veronica Greene, Sophia June, JP Kemmick, Kelly Kovl, Travis Leipzig, Samantha Lopez, Ethan Martin, Scott McHale, Lucia Ondruskova, Gina Pieracci, Tyler Sanford, Stephanie Scelza, Victoria Schmidt, Matthew Sweeney, Erin Treat, Charles Trowbridge

ADVERTISING sales@elevenpdx.com

PHOTOGRAPHERS Alexa Lepisto, Mercy McNab, Aa Mills, Todd Walberg, Caitlin M. Webb COVER PHOTO Aaron Serrano

LOGISTICS Billy Dye ELEVEN WEST MEDIA GROUP, LLC Ryan Dornfeld Dustin Mills SPECIAL THANKS Our local business partners who make this project possible. Our friends, families, associates, lovers, creators and haters. And of course, our city!


AURAL FIX

new music aural fix Photo by Sigrid Lauren

up and coming music from the national scene

1

EARTHEATER

The elegiac, earnest, and intellectually provocative songs of Alexandra Drewchin, aka Eartheater, pinpoint the spirit of the digital age in a way that the work of so many other contemporary artists struggle for without truly achieving. Though she was a staple of the New York experimental scene for years as half of Guardian Alien (with founder Greg Fox), she turned many heads last February with her first full-length solo outing Metalepsis, off Chicago’s Hausu Mountain Records, and her second full-length for Hausu in November, RIP Chrysalis, had many critics doubling back to revise their end-of-the-year lists. Drewchin’s work could best be described as folk balladry swimming through the psychic chaos of simulacra, both lyrically and production-wise—it’s all pretty damn excellent and you’re going to listen to me rave about it. Kate Bush probably gets tired of being compared to every female singer to make a stir on the rock and experimental international scenes via introspection/conceptual-theatricality oscillation. But I digress—Metalepsis featured a version of “Babooshka.” Do you remember that song of Bush’s from The Sensual World, “Deeper Understanding,” about a lonely human’s relationship with a computer? This is the general area that Eartheater explores— how memory, emotional states, and

2

OH WONDER JANUARY 17 | WONDER BALLROOM

With soulful grooves, easy harmonies, and elements of R&B, alt pop, and electronica, it is tempting to immediately compare Oh Wonder to other popular inter-gender duos. Trust me, it will serve you to resist comparisons. There is nothing typical about this London-based twosome. From their method of writing, to their philosophy on

language get endlessly entangled with technology. On ballads like RIP Chrysalis’s “Mask Therapy,” the dividing line between a literary voice addressing the collective consciousness and a personal voice airing a grievance becomes increasingly blurred in the juxtaposition of lines like “You can change your costume in my room” and “Make it how you want it.” Her quiet-to-piercing vocal leaps and wordless multi-tracked coos and howls, along with the psychedelic pastiche of cinematic sound collages backing her guitar lines inject aural drama into her themes—indeed, looking at her work as a producer, one is tempted to view Drewchin as a musique concrète architect. But no matter how you decide to look at Eartheater’s work, it’s clear that 2015 saw the birth of a vision as affecting as it is cosmic. » - Matthew Sweeney

teamwork, to their interaction with fans, Oh Wonder isn’t following the prescribed footsteps of fame. In 2014, Oh Wonder set out to write, record, and release one song per month for a year. At the end of that year Josephine Vander Gucht and Anthony West released their self-titled album and embarked on a world tour. In the first few sentences of their biography, Vander Gucht states, “We’re dependent on one another... there are things we want to achieve, and we can help eachother get there.” Shucking ego, Vander Gucht and West have been able to mix their styles together seamlessly. This playful and refreshing humility is extended not only towards eachother, but also towards their fans. “Since we don’t love talking about ourselves, we wanted to turn the tables and become the interviewers. At every gig, we’re going to be interviewing one person from the audience... If you’ve got a story you’d love to share with us-we’d love to hear from you.” This approach, coupled with an immaculately crafted debut album, has earned Oh Wonder a legion of die hard fans all over the world in a mere two and half years. Perhaps part of the key to their success is that they started off writing music for the sake of fun and collaboration. The songs that they wrote during this time went unplayed for over a year until they decided to release the songs on Soundcloud. The rest is history. » - Stephanie Scelza

www.elevenpdx.com | ELEVEN PORTLAND | 4


new music aural fix something but not being able to pinpoint that desire; it’s teen angst learning how to grow up. On “No Passion,” Toledo drones, “Like a child I am speaking to no one, spitting out words like dirt, in the morning I’m a corpse, drafting my emails to the corporation,” like all of us who want to explore our creativity and passion but find ourselves a slave to ‘the man,’ at the fault of needing work. What better way to sing about not having passion than with an exceptional amount of it. The songs on Teens of Style aren’t the cookiecutter four to five minutes we’ve come to expect. They range from one to six-and-a-half minutes, and it makes them feel complete in their own way. No song

3

CAR SEAT HEADREST JANUARY 23 | MISSISSIPPI STUDIOS

The initial appeal of Will Toledo’s creation Car Seat Headrest is both the abruptness and rawness in the lyrics and it’s percussion-heavy indie sound. Car Seat Headrest was initially just Toledo, but has grown into a full-fledged band. It’s debut album under Matador Records, Teens of Style, is a subtly tweaked compilation of new and old work. Teens of Style is the musical embodiment of an existential crisis that most of us experience in our late teens/early twenties. Songs like “Something Soon” are about desiring

5 | ELEVEN PORTLAND | www.elevenpdx.com

is created equal; it feels natural that some thoughts need more time to express while others don’t need as much. This is a great first album, compiling earlier work nicely into an organized volume with narrative and clarity. However, to sustain itself, Car Seat Headrest’s next work should be more daring. If you listen to Teens of Style on repeat, the songs drone together. Refining the vocals and playing around with the sound so that each song doesn’t sound similar to the last would further establish them as a solid indie band. “It’s been so long since I saw the light, maybe I haven’t been looking at the sky,” wherever you’re looking Will Toledo, it seems to be headed in the right direction. » - Erin Treat


new music aural fix Photo by Frank Hamilton

1 JERRY JOSEPH AND THE JACKMORMONS KORY QUINN

4

2 JERRY JOSEPH AND THE JACKMORMONS

LOWER DENS JANUARY 30 | REVOLUTION HALL

Lower Dens is an indie pop band from Baltimore, Maryland, but before quickly dismissing them to the likes of Coldplay in 2008 or Vance Joy in 2015, who receive the same genre classification, you should know that they are an indie pop band straight out of 1985 who’s here to bring you back to a time and place you might actually never have been. If nostalgic was a genre classification, they belong there more. Lead singer Jana Hunter started as a solo artist and was about ready to take a hiatus when she put together a band for a final tour before taking a break. Turns out, Hunter preferred performing with a band, and Lower Dens was formed in 2010. The band released their third album Escape from Evil last March on Ribbon Music (Laura Marling, Thao and the Get Down Stay Down) and has opened for both Beach House and Yo La Tengo. What makes them nostalgic, however, isn’t only their 1980s technological sound, but also the expressive and emotional quality of the vocals that accompany this music, which often sounds like Future Island’s lead singer Samuel Herring. There is a certain longing in the songs. It’s unclear as to what that

longing is for, especially because most of the lyrics are vague and general. But this fogginess represents the '80s angsty mindset, from Ferris Bueller to Reaganomics. Lower Dens captures this ambiguity and pairs it with pop synths to make you feel more like the MTV and leg warmers side of the ‘80s and less like the Cold War side. » - Sophia June

MEXICAN GUNFIGHT

5 WYE OAK AAN FOG FATHER

A “TO DIE IN L.A.” The single off their newest album sounds like it’s taken straight out of a recording session with Bowie. This song may or may not be inspired by Tupac, but is nevertheless music to cruise Muholland to (or for us Portlanders, the Morrison Bridge).

ETHAN TUCKER BRIGHTSIDE

22 TONY LUCCA 23 EROTIC CITY

LIFE DURING WARTIME

25 GRIZFOLK MAX FROST

7 THE BRILLIANCE 26 FARNELL NEWTON BEAUTIFUL EULOGY & THE OTHERSHIP TOWʼRS CONNECTION YAK ATTACK 8 FOREVERLAND (MICHAEL JACKSON TRIBUTE) 27 CHICANO BATMAN DR. SPACEMAN THE VERNER PANTONS 9 BARON VAUGHN 28 YOTAM BEN HORIN AMY MILLER CURTIS COOK NARIKO OTT HOSTED BY TREVOR THORPE

10 COMMON DEAR HANNAH GLAVOR NATE BOTSFORD

QUICK TRACKS

19 CAS HALEY

BRENDAN SHOLZ BEN BRADEN TY VAUGHN ROBERT RIOS

29 SAINTSENECA DES ARK

15 HALF MOON RUN 30 JESSICA LEA MAYFIELD 16 VANESSA CARLTON SKYE STEELE

FEBRUARY SHOWS ON SALE NOW 2/2 : EMILY KING

2/14 : KING

2/3 : TOR MILLER

2/17 : BIKE THIEF

2/4 : PETER BRADLEY ADAMS 2/5 : THE KNOCKS 2/6 : METTS, RYAN AND COLLINS 2/8 : PANIC IS PERFECT ANYA MARINA

2/19 & 2/20 : EMILY WELLS 2/21 : THE CAVE SINGERS 2/23 : STRIKING MATCHES 2/24 : MIKE LOVE 2/26 : JUST PEOPLE

2/10 : GRIFFIN HOUSE

2/27 : BASIA BULAT

2/11 : JACKSON BOONE & THE OCEAN GHOSTS

2/28 : JOHN MORELAND

B “BRAINS” If “To Die in L.A.” is Bowie, "Brains" is more like Kraftwerk: a driving guitar epic that builds to a crescendo of '80s synth grooves that sound like the end of the world, until an echoey voice cries out, “Don’t be afraid/ everything will change.”

www.elevenpdx.com | ELEVEN PORTLAND | 6


new music album reviews

ALBUM REVIEWS

rock n’ roll tropes such as shooting your baby down and being way, way too high. Strange Faces have ties to fellow Chicagoans Twin Peaks–lead songwriter David Miller used to be in the band and Cadien James of Twin Peaks mixed, mastered and helped produce Stonerism. Few songs can make you want to pogo

THIS MONTH’S BEST

around a PBR-soaked rock club more

R REISSUE

than “Still Lit,” the band’s rowdy ode to

L LOCAL RELEASE

being incredibly stoned, or the hit-theroad rebellion of "Leaving Town.” Miller’s undeniable ear for catchy

Short List Panic! At The Disco Death of a Bachelor Bloc Party Hymns Sia This Is Acting David Bowie Blackstar Tricky Skilled Mechanics Night Beats Who Sold My Generation?

Strange Faces Stonerism Autumn Tone Records From the opening one-two punch of “I Saw Your Face” and “Don’t Feel Bad,” it’s clear that Strange Faces’ debut album Stonerism is going to be a heavily guitar-centric affair. The record’s title says it all, as Stonerism’s eleven tracks are filled top to bottom with riffs galore, catchy '60s-endebted refrains and frontman David Miller’s lyrics, which are chiefly concerned with oft-discussed

songs is accentuated wonderfully by the rest of the band, giving his songs a confident and rebellious swagger that helps Strange Faces and Stonerism stand out from the other 67,000 bands out there with a fuzz-filled garage sound. Strange Faces aren’t reinventing the wheel on Stonerism, but they’ve made a hell of a good ole fashion rock n’ roll record, and one that’s filled front-toback with quality songs. » - Donovan Farley

St. Lucia Matter Chairlift Moth Hinds Leave Me Alone Megadeth Dystopia Buy it

Steal it

Toss it

Daughter Not To Disappear 4AD

facebook.com/elevenmagpdx @elevenpdx

7 | ELEVEN PORTLAND | www.elevenpdx.com

The new Daughter albums arrives this month and it’s a keeper. It’s been three years since If You Leave was released and admittingly, I had a lot of catching up to do. I was aware of this trio from London, but had not yet fully appreciated the work they were doing. My loss. Your gain. After listening all night and falling asleep to If You Leave, I was eager to listen to the ten new songs from Not To Disappear. While Elena Tonra has her own

vocals and lyrics on lock, it’s hard to deny the similarity between other artists. With bandmates Igor Haefeli and Remi Aguilella on guitar, bass, drums and percussion, they create what I call a “quiet urgency” in the music, songs that gather momentum as they progress, leaving you wanting more long after the song ends. Instant comparisons to Ola Hungerford from Cock & Swan, The xx and Poliça can be made. The music itself is a real nice conglomerate of ambient, shoegaze, and experimental indie folk. The guys are excellent at their job, building that anticipation and letting Elena shine. Upon first listen, it was obvious “Numbers” is the first single. This song clearly demonstrates that quiet urgency. The opening line states, “Take the worst situations; Make a worse situation.” I’m well on my way to getting sick of it as it has already been on repeat for days. Then, I can do the same thing to “Fossa,” an almost seven minute long song that turns into a bit of a jam on the back half. I get more of a summertime vibe from this album, but it’s perfect to melt my cold, dead heart this winter. » - Kelly Kovl


new music album reviews mainstream, and they do so seemingly

adore life?” that calls upon the ground-

effortlessly.

shaking apparition that is Savages’

Like it’s predecessor, Adore Life’s

Savages Adore Life Matadore It’s been nearly three years since the London-based post-punk-revival band, formed in 2011, released their debut album Silence Yourself—an album that had music lovers and critics-alike agreeing that it’s one of rock music’s most commanding and mercilessly crafted albums of the last few years. The release of their second album, Adore Life, doesn’t fall short, either. The band combines a clear vision with the stripped down back-to-basics version of guitar rock that has emerged into the

Tortoise The Catastrophist Thrill Jockey As humans, we are so enamored with placing things into neat little boxes, regardless of how much we ruin the box in the process. Like most genres, post-rock suffers mightily from this innate boxing of things. Post-rock is ever expanding; boundaries are increasingly muddled, and the unfortunate result is that we group up Swans with Explosions

music style. The song combines Beth’s

music is tumbled down with heavy

manic vocals and layers them perfectly

percussion, and the same summoning

with Ayse Hassan’s paranoia-inducing

battle cries of Jehnny Beth’s vocals—such

bass.

vocals that would make Siouxsie Sioux

However strong this song is, though,

proud—however, in contrast to Silence

my personal favorite is the album’s third

Yourself, this sophomore album is less

track “Sad Person,” which utilizes the

Joy Division and Gang of Four in its

very true-to-Savages way of repetition

thematic darkness and anxiety about

to get a point across. Beth repeats in

the dehumanizing effects of media

the track, “The more you have, the

and technology, and is more about the

more you crave/ I’ve always been a

human spirit and its capabilities.

sad, sad person,” over and over again,

Adore Life is an introspective

and its effects are haunting. It’s not a

album that delves into the power of

desperate plea to be heard, but as the

change, the power of alteration, and

track continues, an homage to showing

the evolution of the human condition.

weakness to be identified as strong, and

The band released a statement with

to not letting self-doubt and the shit

the announcement of their album that

everyone has done to you dictate your

read, “It's about claiming your right to

life and happiness, a thesis that can be

think unacceptable thoughts... It’s about

equated the entire album itself.

knowing what it means to be human

Adore Life is a mean approach to a

and what it might mean one day”–a

clear vision, shown more brightly with

statement most explored in what has to

each song: life is a collection of moments

be the album’s strongest track, “Adore.”

that in the end weave together to create

The fourth track is a heartwrenching desperate plea that asks: “Is

a story, and however the outcome, it’s something to adore. » - Samantha Lopez

it human to ask for more/ is it human to

in the Sky and Godspeed You! Black Emperor, despite the obvious differences in their sounds. So where does this leave Tortoise, a long time player in the post-rock game? It’s hard to say; is it post-rock anymore, or something else entirely? At times their latest album, The Catastrophist, fits the post-rock bill perfectly. Long, droning drums build up slowly to reach a crazy climactic peak with neat synth arpeggios and really smooth bass lines that are at the forefront of the mixing, only to dramatically peel it all back again. The rising and falling action inherent to post-rock makes the album feel cinematic in a way. Not only does each song run with the theme by itself, the album is sequenced with similar rising and falling actions in mind. Tracks “The Catastrophist” and “Gesceap” fit neatly into a synth heavy iteration of modern post-rock, whereas tracks like “Yonder Blue” is clear cut indie-pop. The majority of the album is

instrumental, and it’s often difficult for artists to find the right way to convey moods and ideas without the clear definition lyrics provide, but Tortoise does very well without them. The scarcity of the vocals makes them that much more impactful on the tracks they appear on. The vocals are not used as a crutch to instruct you how to feel about the track, they are used to enhance the mood created by the instrumentals. The best example of this comes on track “Yonder Blue,” where the foggy dreamlike instrumentals set the perfect tone for guest vocalist Georgia Hubley (of Yo La Tengo fame) to sing to us of lost love. At different times the album reminded me of Swans, Aphex Twin, and A Sunny Day in Glasgow, and I’m hard pressed to compare a lot of this album to other post-rock outfits. So while I was uncertain of how to properly classify the genre of The Catastrophist, I do know that I thoroughly enjoyed the sounds that I heard, and ultimately that’s what it comes down to. » - Tyler Sanford

www.elevenpdx.com | ELEVEN PORTLAND | 8


live music

KNOW YOUR VENUE Alberta Street Pub

Photo courtesy of Alberta Street Pub

A

fter finishing a dinner on Alberta Street

fiddle extraordinaire who came from a family of artists

recently, a friend and I landed in front of

and musicians which also flipped houses. From there the

the aptly named Alberta Street Pub. “Wanna

Amerson siblings began a nine month remodel in late 2012.

go into this dive bar?” he asked? “Heck yeah

With the help of other musicians, they set out to fine-tune

I do!” I said, but after I slipped inside and

the sound aesthetic of the performance space to its best.

perused the bourbon list I realized that it was not a dive bar. When I returned for a live music performance, I was

The stage was moved and a great deal of sound treatments were added throughout the house. The nice

double checking that I was at the right place. There are a

striped panels on the wall are actually quadratic diffusion

few other places on the street with “Alberta” in the name,

for acoustics. Ear Trumpet Labs, a local craft producer

and from the outside, the pub looks like a small, simple

of condenser microphones for stage and studio use, was

block of a building. As it turns out, Alberta Street Pub is an

secured for new mics to aid with intimate performances.

illusion, a hidden small venue gem in Portland.

ASP’s booker Chris Andersen says they are just trying to

The establishment was once called The Love Train, and

provide a great space for musicians to come and perform in,

one of the disco-pink signs still hangs out back. It was

and that the kinds of shows are pretty broad: There is some

later owned by Mikey Beglan, who hails from Ireland, so it

rock, with a lot of bluegrass, Americana, singer-songwriters,

became the Alberta Street Pub as an Irish-style bar. Beglan

and showcases like "Control Yourself," a stand-up comedy

discussed selling with friend Django Amerson, an Irish

night on Sundays. The venue is cozy, with a capacity of

9 | ELEVEN PORTLAND | www.elevenpdx.com


live music

Local band Astro Tan playing Alberta Street Pub. Photo by Heather Hanson

about 100 standing. The residential noise ordinance can be tricky to plan around but has led to some early all-ages shows. Today everything is operated by Laina Amerson and her partner-behind-the-bar Robert Bouchard. They have completely reworked the decor (a group of musicians also re-built the bar), the lighting, and the menu. They cleared the unused lot out back to make a huge, heated patio space. The Alberta Street Pub has a familial feel to it, and some warm nods to its Irish pub past. There is an extensive whiskey list, housemade ginger beer, and Shepherd's pie as a winter favorite from their completely scratch kitchen. There has been an attention to detail and craftsmanship from both sides of food and drink and performance venue. Laina says they have done a pretty good job keeping things secret while they settled in, but they have a New Year’s resolution to invite more people to visit their place for great food, drinks, and live music.  - Brandy Crowe

Local band Ezra Bell playing Alberta Street Pub. Photo by Todd Walberg

www.elevenpdx.com | ELEVEN PORTLAND | 10


live music JANUARY CRYSTAL BALLROOM

1

2 20 21 23 24 29 30

16

ALBERTA SKIDMORE ST.

ROSELAND THEATER

WILLIAMS AVE. MLK BLVD.

3

4

VANCOUVER AVE.

Silent贸 | Get It Squad | Romeo | And Chloe Lupe Fiasco | Rachel West | Vinnie Dewayne Madeon | Skylar Spence STS9 Bryson Tiller | They Excision | Figure | Bear Grillz Infected Mushroom The Wood Brothers

MISSISSIPPI AVE.

8 NW 6TH

INTERSTATE AVE.

2 8 14 19 21 24 26 29 30

1332 W BURNSIDE

Dead Moon | Don't | Long Knife Tribal Seeds Bone Thugs-N-Harmony Super Diamond | Petty Theft Divers | Edna Vazquez | Bloco Algeria The Radical Revolution | 80s Video Dance Attack Unchained | Crazy Train | Lovedrive

28

DOUG FIR

830 E BURNSIDE

1-2 Jerry Joseph & The Jackmormons

4

3939 N MISSISSIPPI

Foxy Lemon | The Hill Dogs | Beach Fire Haley Johnsen | Moorea Masa | Slater Smith And And And | There Is No Mountain | Rare Diagram Federale | David J | The Upsidedown Goodnight, Texas | Whiskey Shivers Haunted Summer | Sama Dams | Tender Age Little Star | Alien Boy | Drunken Palms Nick Jaina | Stelth Ulvang | Ezza Rose Band Blackberry Bushes Stringband | Sugarcane Shigeto | Groundislava | Philip Grass Crow & The Canyon | The Lil' Smokies The Hood Internet Car Seat Headrest | PWR BTTM | Naked Giants Majical Cloudz | She-Devils The Ghost Ease | Mega Bog | Bitch'n The Bright Light Social Hour | James Supercave The Lavender Flu | Patsy's Rats Eagle Rock Gospel Singers

WONDER BALLROOM 128 NE RUSSELL

9 13 15 16 17 18

Ramble On | Pseudoboss | Spirit Lake JD McPherson | Honeyhoney Big Head Todd & The Monsters | Mike Doughty Boombox | Ryan Bauer Oh Wonder Langhorne Slim & The Law | Sawyer Fredricks 23-24 Nathaniel Rateliff & The Night Sweats | Paper Birds 29 Talib Kweli & DJ Hi Tek 31 Godspeed You! Black Emperor | Marisa Anderson

11 | ELEVEN PORTLAND | www.elevenpdx.com

TA VE

15

.

NORTH WEST BROADWAY ST.

14

5

5

PEARL OLD TOWN 2

BURNSIDE ST.

22

1

405

26 18

7

23

9

10

30

GRAND AVE.

5

RUSSELL ST.

ON

MLK BLVD.

2 6 7 8 10 11 13 14 15 20 21 22 23 24 26 28 29 31

MISSISSIPPI STUDIOS

FR

DOW NTO WN

Wye Oak | Aan | Fog Father The Brilliance | Beautiful Eulogy | Tow'rs Foreverland | Dr. Spaceman Baron Vaughn | Amy Miller | Curtis Cook | Nariko Ott Common Dear | Hannah Glavor | Nate Botsford Half Moon Run Vanessa Carlton | Skye Steele Cas Haley | Ethan Tucker | Brightside Tony Lucca Erotic City | Life During Wartime Grizfolk | Max Frost Farnell Newton & The Othership Connection Chicano Batman | The Verner Pantons Yotam Ben Horin | Brendan Sholz | Ben Braden Daintseneca | Des Ark Jessica Lea Mayfield

23RD AVE.

5 7 8 9 10 15 16 19 22 23 25 26 27 28 29 30


live music JANUARY HOLOCENE

1001 SE MORRISON

13

TA ST.

12

ALBERTA ARTS

15TH AVE.

11TH AVE.

PRESCOTT ST.

RONTOMS

600 E BURNSIDE

EASTBURN

24TH AVE.

1800 E BURNSIDE

KELLY’S OLYMPIAN 426 SW WASHINGTON

HOLLYWOOD

KNOTT ST.

33RD AVE.

28TH AVE.

D. BLV Y D AN

S

BROADWAY ST.

25

84

LAURELHURST

21 29

GLEASON ST.

REVOLUTION HALL 1300 SE STARK

8

6

20

STARK ST.

MORRISON ST.

BELMONT ST.

24

11TH AVE.

8TH AVE.

HAWTHORNE BLVD.

HAWTHORNE DIVISION ST.

POWEL

L BLVD.

31

CHAVEZ BLVD.

19

CLINTON ST.

CESAR

LADD’S ADDITION

10 11

Devotchka 13 Shoot To Thrill | Steelhorse 16 Josh Ritter & The Royal City Band | Elephant Revival 22-23 Ladysmith Black Mambazo 27 Unknown Mortal Orchestra | Lower Dens 30

THE KNOW

2026 NE ALBERTA

17 27

2 3 6 7 8 9 10 13 14 15 20 21 22 23 28 29 30 31

Godheadsilo 30-31

BURNSIDE ST. 11

BUNK BAR

3

8 9

Bunker Sessions Open Mic | Eye Candy VJs(Mondays) Skull Diver | The Wild War | The Sensory Level KPSU Presents: Calisse | Don Quixote Jonny Ampersand | Indira Valey | Blake Austin Thesis Space Shark | The Hoons | The Golden Country The Cry | Piss Test | The Lovesores Wicked Shallows | The Broad Strokes Husky Boys | Soccer Babes | The Toads Madam Officer | Small Million | Young Elk | Chelsea Appel Towering Trees Light Creates Shadow | Second Sleep | Waver Clamor Bellow TheWelfareState|ThePinehurstKids|ComplaintDepartment Months | The Pynnacles | Excuses Free Throw | Young & Heartless | Sinai Vessel Showdeer Presents: Focus Focus Wave Action | Ladywolf Haute Garbage Podcast Eggplant | Eleanor Murray | The Secret Sea

1028 SE WATER

2 6 7 9 13 14 15 16 22 29 30

7

The Builders & The Butchers | The Jackalope Saints

FREMONT ST.

3

6

DJ Pocket Rock-It | DJ Hold My Hand | DJ Sappho Hustle & Drone | Michael Finn | Gold Casio Holla n Oats | Barisone | Daniela Karina Falcons | Promnite | Gang$ign$ | Quarry | Photon Love Lies Deep Within: A Tribute to Janet Jackson Thanks | Cat Hoch | Astro Tan Dimitri | DJ Maxx Bass | DJ Nathan Detroit Gaycation w/Mr. Charming ARCO-PDX Dr. Adam | Colin Jones | Freaky Outty DJs Kiffo & Rymes | Jamie Burton | Drexler

12

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Lee Allstar | Small Souls | Harm Willow House | Whim Grace Scratchdog Stringband | Timberbound KMUZ Local Roots Live Series

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features JANUARY ALBERTA ST. PUB (CONTINUED) 15 16 23 28 30

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13 | ELEVEN PORTLAND | www.elevenpdx.com

LOCAL FEATURE Rare Monk

P

ortland’s Rare Monk

ELEVEN: How did your EP release

cut their teeth playing

show at Mississippi Studios go last

packed U of O dorm

Wednesday?

parties half a decade ago, but since those messy, jammed-out

Forest Gallien: We had a lot of people come out, which was nice to see.

shows, they’ve chiseled their sound

We took a break for a little bit, weren’t

into concise, progressive rock songs

playing shows for eight months or so,

ready for the airwaves. On December

and this was the first show where it felt

9, 2015, they released their third EP at Mississippi Studios, backed by their label mates Hunny, from L.A. With the new EP they’ve evolved out of the spacey, reverb-laden aesthetic of previous singles like “Splice,” and into a more straight ahead pop rock. Threading its way through the catchy choruses of songs like “California (Will Burn)” and “The Only Reason to Tour the Midwest” is a lyrical sarcasm that pushes them past pop clichés and into the company of groups like Modest Mouse and Cold War Kids.

like we were back. It’s a good venue, and a lot of our fan base came out, rather than just our close friends. I feel like we’ve gathered a pretty good following here over the last four or five years. All the bands we played with are great. We played with another local band, Mothertapes. And then the headlining band was on the same label as us, B3SCI Records, and they’re called Hunny, from Los Angeles. 11: Are you guys building up steam to take on a new tour, or are you mainly trying to get people’s attention again?


Dorian Aites: Well, we just released

features 11: It’s very tongue-in-cheek

that new self-titled EP, and I think

though. The whole EP’s theme is post-

we’re gonna be going into writing and

apocalyptic.

recording mode again. Seems to be the way of it. Write new stuff again, and take a break from logistical things. FG: There’s a lot of rehearsing for

DA: A lot of it is jokey. It plays on happy songs that in most cases would be like a love song or something, but

the EPs. We actually recorded this EP

instead it’s a love song about the end of

last November. Our producer was in the

the world.

UK, so we had to mix overseas back and forth with emails. And in the middle of that cycle, our original guitar player left and that’s when Hugh joined, and that was about four months ago. So yeah, I think the plan is just to start fresh. We want to try and pump out as many demos as possible. 11: [to Hugh] How do you feel about joining Rare Monk? Hugh Jepson: It’s great, it’s a new experience for me. Especially going on tour, I’ve never done that before. Never played Mississippi Studios before. I’ve known these guys since college, so it’s great to play music with them… FG: And hang out in a bunch of sketchy motels together on tour… 11: In the song “The Only Reason to Tour the Midwest,” the chorus goes “Orlando’s sinking underwater, San Francisco too, it’s time we toured to the Midwestern states again, both the coasts are through,” clearly a reference to climate change and the reality of rising seas. How did it feel writing about such a subject? DA: A little dicey. A lot of charged opinions there. But I dunno, it’s kinda something I fixate on, whether I’d like to or not. Seems to be pretty relevant to everybody’s future. 11: Do you feel like it’s either gonna resonate with people, or that it’ll come off as preachy? DA: I think it’s a mixture of both.

11: You have another song on there, titled “California (Will Burn),” and it’s loaded with apocalyptic imagery, cannibals at the gates, seas piling up with garbage, survival, pandemics and hunger. DA: Children eating their parents… 11: You mentioned that the lyrics are tongue-in-cheek, but do you feel elements of sincerity in these lyrics as well?

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MERCY MCNAB PHOTOGRAPHY

DA: Absolutely. It’s a fun way to play with a potentially really scary reality. FG: When we came out with “California (Will Burn),” we were supposed to release it right when the fires were happening, so we actually had to postpone the release of that song for a little bit. We didn’t want people to be upset. DA: But to be fair, I mean California’s always going to burn every year. FG: And we did write that song two years ago, really. 11: Do you think as the reality of climate change sinks more fully into our heads that artists will begin drawing more and more upon it for content? DA: I’m sure. Already it’s becoming a part of our consciousness of WHAT IS. I think the ranks of anybody saying that it’s not a real thing will be dwindling. It’s not even so much about climate change, it’s about people not caring about

Then on the other side you have the

what happens in general–politically,

staunch opposition to anything being

anything, you know, not giving a shit or

talked about like that. But yeah, it did

giving up I guess. Which is a pretty real

feel a little risky. Because you’re trying

thing. I think it’s pretty easy to feel like

to listen to an album, you’re not trying to

there’s no real thing that a single person

get preached at.

can do about anything… recognizing

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features JANUARY ASH STREET SALOON (CONTINUED) 9 10 12 13 14 19 20 21 22 23 24 26 27 28 29 30 31

John Dough Boys | Shootdang | Ether Circus The Wooden Sleepers | Jake McNeillie & Company Farm Animals Battalion of Saints | Scalped | Steel Chains theGoodSons | Latter Day Skanks | God Bless America Nuclear Nation Salo Panto | Motown Motha Fuckas | The Mayor's Office Die Like Gentlemen | Wolfaut | Fasala Cellar Door Perfect Families | Olivia Awbrey | Floating Pointe King Mob | The Adnas | Austin Morrell Ados 33 | William Borg Schmitt Bitter Budda | Wolf Meetings | The Folly Stone Sky | Noise Complaint | Papermachine Dead Last Place | Arachnid Dead Memedy | The Hoons | Space Shark | Heavy Hustle We The Wild | Vox Vocis | And Then Suddenly

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that feeling, and approaching that as

FG: Yeah I think that’s exactly

a trap, hopefully that is gonna be less

what we’re trying to do. “California”

common. Don’t just give in to the feeling

and “Midwest” are both pretty poppy,

that you can’t do shit about anything.

predictable A-B format songs, but

Gotta do something. Even if it’s a tiny

then the lyrics are all fucked up. And I

little thing.

think that contrast is something we’ve been consciously moving towards. But

11: As a band you’ve toured your fair share, right?

yeah, we do want to write music that’s accessible but still fulfilling artistically. It’s a difficult balance to nail down, but

FG: We’ve done three or four national tours. Toured the UK once. We’ve done about twelve tours. I think we’ve played

I think this EP is the first time when I think that was more fully realized. HJ: But also the process for writing

forty of the states, and seen a lot of

songs is very experimental because we

America. Stayed in a lot of Motel 6’s, and

often just jam on an idea until it sounds

ate at a lot of Denny’s.

right, and then we try and make it fit more of a pop format. Since I’ve been in

11: So you’ve toured the Midwest.

the band, at least the new stuff, we jam

Other than a sinking east and west

on it for a good amount of time before

coast, there must be another “reason”

shrinking it down into a song, and that’s

to tour the Midwest?

where the more progressive stuff comes out of.

DA: Well, when we were on tour with The Dangerous Summer, we encountered a lot of the young-uns out

11: How do you feel about this new EP compared to past releases?

there, and they’re all really fun. You know, the twenty-one and younger

DA: It’s definitely more just

crowd always give a lot of hope for

straight rock, than the previous spacey

humanity.

escapades.

FG: And out in the Midwest there

FG: I think it’s the most complete

are not a lot of bands coming through,

thing we’ve done in terms of

so when you play there you get a lot of

songwriting. I think we really hit our

people coming out cause that’s the thing

stride, and honestly, working with

13 Aethyrium | Dark Measure | Ruines Ov Abaddon | Thorin 19 Suma | Zirakzigil | Hands of Thieves 27 Embryonic Devourment | Truculence

to do there that night. Whereas in L.A.

the producer (Tom McFall) he helped

or New York there’s a hundred shows

us really bring everything together,

26 350 W BURNSIDE

happening at any given moment. We also

stripping everything down, and letting

get called out immediately wherever we

certain parts shine.

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go in the Midwest just for how we dress. 11: They just peg you as Pacific NW hipsters?

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Lowlight & Guests' New Years Jam Jack Dwyer | Freak Mountain Ramblers Anita Margarita | Kung Pao Chickens Jackstraw | Hilary Scott Lynn Conover & Gravel | Pete Kartsounes Will Stenson | Eight Belles Woodbrain | The Low Bones | Wilkinson Blades Libertine Belles The Hollerbodies | Freak Mountain Ramblers

15 | ELEVEN PORTLAND | www.elevenpdx.com

DA: Tom took us through the ringer. It was cool. We broke everything apart, crystallized it down to its most amazing form and then reassembled it. FG: Definitely the most intense

FG: Yeah. Immediately, all the time.

recording process we’ve ever done.

We don’t even dress that crazy. Feel like

Seven days for four songs. And Tom was

we are on the mild side of that, but when

the first engineer we’ve worked with

you get outside of Portland and go to the

who has done work for bigger bands,

center of the country, you get a lot of

like Weezer and Bloc Party, Snow Patrol.

funny looks walking into the subway.

He had a lot of experience with what it takes to write a song that can be on the

11: The new EP has mature and

radio.

progressive instrumentation though still dwells in the realm of accessible

11: Has one member played a

pop. Do you strive to strike a balance

stronger role in shaping the music, or

between accessibility and artistic

have you all evolved collectively into

independence?

the sound that Rare Monk now plays?


FG: Definitely as a group. We

DA: Well yeah it’s kinda tricky. We’re

go through musical phases, more

a lot scarier than others, and not as

experimental phases, and more pop

scary as some.

ones. But it’s an evolution as a whole. No

FG: I think when people think of

one ever brings a song that’s completely

Portland indie rock they think of folk-

finished, and so then everybody gets a

tinged music, and we definitely aren’t in

chance to put their stamp on it. Trying

that sphere.

to write accessible music, but keeping ourselves happy with artistic merit. DA: Yeah, couching little artistic

11: Are there any local bands you really admire?

parts inside more accessible wholes. FG: that new Mothertapes album 11: What bands in the local Portland scene do you typically bill with?

that just came out is fucking awesome. HJ: Months. They are just so nice. The drummer in Months just kills it. FG: I really like Wild Ones. I think

FG: It’s kinda all over the place.

they’re great and that they deserve

I don’t think we’ve found a specific

every element of respect and admiration

pocket, like these are the bands we play

that they’re getting these days. »

with every time. I feel like every show is

- Ethan Martin

a different group every time. I think the

not alternative rock.

With a deft instrumental touch and evocative vocals, Portland quintet Rare Monk wends its way successfully through the excellent new four-track Rare Monk EP. The group’s first official EP is an amalgamation of tasteful balance, nuanced detail and beautiful production. Poking around on Rare Monk’s website reveals a solid collection of singles from the last year or so that illuminate a group that knows its sound and has a distinct flavor. From the originals to the excellent cover “Ain’t No Sunshine,” the trail points toward a rapid maturation.

Portland Country Underground | Kung Pao Chickens Jackstraw | Clyde's On Fire Lynn Conover & Gravel | Cascadian Airship | Dig Deep The Ukeladies | Thin Rail | Stubborn Lovers Michael Hurley & The Croakers | Yogoman Redray Frasier | McDougall | Left Coast Country Jack Dwyer | Freak Mountain Ramblers Anita Margarita & The Rattlesnakes | Kung Pao Chickens Jackstraw | Will West Annie Corbet | The Wayward Ones King Columbia | Jimmy Boyer Band Old Flames | Cascase Crescendo The Yellers | Gold Dust Pagan Jug Band | Freak Mountain Ramblers Portland Country Underground | Kung Pao Chickens Jackstraw Lynn Conover & Gravel | The Hillwilliams Lewi Longmire & The Left Coast Roasters | Ridgerunners Pretty Gritty | Life During Wartime Max's Midnight Kitchen | Oly Mtn. Boys Freak Mountain Ramblers

ANALOG CAFE & THEATER 720 SE HAWTHORNE

Rare Monk EP, as a showcase, toys with the darkened hue of an apocalyptic cynicism that easily swings back toward wistful self-awareness. “California (Will Burn)” is an interesting concoction of instrumental work that vaguely recalls the alt-rock of the mid-2000s while simultaneously managing to maintain an anxious earnestness that comes across as surprising, considering the lyrical subject material. “Light Tricks” is airy, dripping with syrupy vocals and muted guitar fuzz. That it stays compelling throughout is a testament to the group’s understanding of dynamics and My Morning Jacket-style layering. “The Only Reason to Tour the Midwest” doubles as a bit of a punchline, pairing nicely with “California” as a counterpoint to the occasionally overwrought vibe that seeps through. “Warning Pulse” quietly closes the EP with a soundscapey instrumental background and measured vocals with finely placed harmonies. Rare Monk EP is a fitting debut for a band that already feels comfortable in its own shoes. Never overreaching and always well-considered, the album is a good indicator of what we have to look forward to. » - Charles Trowbridge

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Strictly Platonic | Metropolitan Farms | Nourish The Youth

a certain genre, it’s not indie rock, it’s

Rare Monk B3SCI Records

JANUARY LAURELTHIRST PUB (CONTINUED)

The Banned | Water Water | Stinkbug Smoochknob | Slow The Impact | Hot Tub Fantasies

music is somewhat hard to pin down into

L Rare Monk

features

Bob Marley Review Live | The Roaring Lions | Simba Puma Blackline | Judas Wake The Wilds | Belfry | Emily Davis | Aux. 78 Capricornucopia Garcia Birthday Band Traitors | Enterprise Earth | Critic Cool Nutz School of Rock Lee Corey Oswald | Downsing

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www.elevenpdx.com | ELEVEN PORTLAND | 16


H

inds is a band whose entire existence captures the idyllic west coast view of what it’s like to be young: hanging out with your best friends, chasing the sun, listening to rowdy music at even more rowdy parties. With their surfy, lo-fi guitar melodies to lyrics about getting trashed and sleeping around, you would never guess that Hinds started anywhere but sun-soaked southern California. Their laidback attitude and disregard for how music “should” sound–at least judging by their motto “Our shit, our rules”–is so at home on the west coast it’s a shock to learn they started thousands of miles away, in Madrid, Spain.

17 | ELEVEN PORTLAND | www.elevenpdx.com Photo by Aaron Serrano

The rock 'n roll scene in Madrid is decidedly small, with a handful of truly great garage-rock bands, many of which are Hinds’ closest friends, flying under the radar. It is this tightknit community, and the support of bands like The Parrots and Los Nastys that have allowed Hinds to take the gritty global garage scene by storm. After going away on holiday together, best friends Ana Perrote and Carlotta Cosials decided they wanted to start making music together. All their closest friends were in bands and they were obsessed with the music and the scene, so they thought to themselves, why not give it a shot? They each picked up a guitar, wrote a few songs together, and with the help of their friends in The Parrots were able to record “Bamboo” and “Trippy Gum.” Eventually they released the songs online and found near instantaneous success. No one had ever fathomed how quickly things would take off, but that’s part of the charm of people who are great at what they do: they often don’t realize how great they are as quickly as the rest of us. It’s this humility, this


genuine excitement to be playing and making music that makes them so alluring. Their reverb-heavy, ultra-fuzzy lo-fi sound isn’t for everyone, but its their home-grown kindness, their infectious smiles, their rambunctious personalities, the warmth and sincerity you hear in the recordings that is hard for anyone to resist. With time they will become supremely proficient instrumentalists, but that will never be the first thing people will notice about them. It is their brightness as people and performers that people will always gravitate toward. After releasing “Bamboo” and “Trippy Gum” on Bandcamp, Hinds began receiving acclaim from publications around the world, regularly being listed as a band to look out for. It is undoubtedly from this success that Ana and Carlotta decided to find a drummer and bassist to add to their permanent lineup. Friend Ade Martin was gifted a bass by the pair and quickly learned to play alongside Ana and Carlotta, who were both becoming steadily more confident on guitar. Not long after that they met Amber Grimbergen online,

noticing she played drums in a profile picture and taking a chance, asking if she might be interested in playing with them. Finally, with a full-fledged band, they began touring the world together, playing both Burgerama last spring and the main stage of Glastonbury last summer, recording their first fulllength, Leave Me Alone, in their free time between. Leave Me Alone is out January 8 with an early release party happening in New York January 6, just days before they begin part one of their world tour, supported by Tall Juan, Sun Club and Public Access TV. Most recently Hinds toured North America with Public Access TV, stopping by Holocene in Portland, a raucous show and a venue well suited for their frenetic energy that causes even the primmest of Portlanders to dance and sing along to. While nothing has officially been announced yet we definitely have our fingers crossed for another Portland date, but until then you can check out their new album Leave Me Alone through Mom+Pop and Lucky Number. Even as they are preparing to leave in just a few days for the first part of their world tour, singer and guitarist Carlotta Cosials took some time to chat with ELEVEN about how Hinds got its start and their incredibly quick rise to the top.

www.elevenpdx.com | ELEVEN PORTLAND | 18


features national scene ELEVEN: You guys are kicking off the first part of

CC: No, we met Public Access in London like a year

your world tour in a couple weeks, starting in New

or so ago and we get on very well so that’s why we

York for an early album release and then all around

proposed we do that American tour together, and it was

Europe. Are there any really special venues or cities

the best decision we could ever make. We had a lot of

you guys are playing in this time around?

fun. We learned so much about them. And doing that tour we did this KEXP thing, and in the entrance of the

Carlotta Cosials: Actually all of them. Even if you

studio there was this band with super cool kids going

don’t believe it, we are realizing that the world is huge

out of there and it was Sun Club. And they were like,

and we can find the time to go everywhere we want to.

“Hey you’re Hinds!” And we said, “Yeah!” and they said,

We really want to go everywhere where people want

“Did you just do the KEXP?” And we hung out for like 15

us but it’s pretty difficult because there aren’t enough

minutes, enough time to like each other. Our drummer

days in the year. So we really love every city we go

had listened to them before so we decided to listen to

because for them it is special, so it is special for us.

them and they are pretty, pretty cool; so let’s see what happens!

11: You guys are touring with Public Access TV, Tall Juan, and Sun Club.

11: This tour is supporting your new album, Leave Me Alone, do you guys think that this album is

CC: Yeah!

different for you guys in any way? Do you think you guys tried some new things? How do you think you

11: You just toured with Public Access TV very

guys grew?

recently, have you played with the other two bands before?

CC: I think it’s exactly what we have been this year. Actually right now I find it a little bit old. We recorded in April and it’s going to be released in January. I, right now, feel that we are better musicians and that we have a little bit different appreciation of music. You keep growing up every day. We are a baby band still and growing up is super fast. Right now we would do

䘀刀䤀䐀䄀夀 ㄀⸀㄀㨀 䠀䄀倀倀夀 一䔀圀 夀䔀䄀刀 圀䤀吀䠀 䔀夀䔀 䌀䄀一䐀夀 嘀䨀匀 ⴀ 㤀倀䴀⼀䘀刀䔀 匀䄀吀唀刀䐀䄀夀 ㄀⸀㈀㨀 匀䬀唀䰀䰀 䐀䤀嘀䔀刀簀吀䠀䔀 圀䤀䰀䐀 圀䄀刀簀吀䠀䔀 匀䔀一匀伀刀夀 䰀䔀嘀䔀䰀 ⴀ 㤀倀䴀⼀␀㔀 匀唀一䐀䄀夀 ㄀⸀㌀㨀 䬀倀匀唀 倀刀䔀匀䔀一吀匀㨀 䌀䄀䰀䤀匀匀䔀簀䐀伀一 儀唀䤀堀伀吀䔀 圀䔀䐀一䔀匀䐀䄀夀 ㄀⸀㘀㨀 䠀䤀䐀䔀伀唀匀 刀䄀䌀䬀䔀吀 圀䤀吀䠀 䐀䨀 䘀䰀䤀䜀䠀吀 刀䤀匀䬀 ⴀ 㤀倀䴀⼀䘀刀䔀䔀 圀䔀䐀一䔀匀䐀䄀夀 ㄀⸀㘀㨀 䔀夀䔀娀 䘀刀伀一吀 䈀伀伀䬀䤀一䜀 倀刀䔀匀䔀一吀匀㨀 䨀伀一一夀 䄀䴀倀䔀刀匀䄀一䐀簀䤀一䐀䤀刀䄀 嘀䄀䰀䔀夀簀 䈀䰀䄀䬀䔀 䄀唀匀吀䤀一 ⴀ 㤀倀䴀⼀␀㔀 吀䠀唀刀匀䐀䄀夀 ㄀⸀㜀㨀 圀䔀 伀唀吀 䠀䔀刀䔀 䴀䄀䜀䄀娀䤀一䔀 䄀一䐀 堀刀䄀夀 䘀䴀 倀刀䔀匀䔀一吀㨀 吀䠀䔀匀䤀匀 ⴀ 㤀倀䴀⼀␀㔀 吀䠀唀刀匀䐀䄀夀 ㄀⸀㜀㨀  䘀刀䤀䐀䄀夀 ㄀⸀㠀㨀 匀倀䄀䌀䔀 匀䠀䄀刀䬀 䔀倀 刀䔀䰀䔀䄀匀䔀 倀䄀刀吀夀㨀 匀倀䄀䌀䔀 匀䠀䄀刀䬀簀吀䠀䔀 䠀伀伀一匀簀 吀䠀䔀 䜀伀䰀䐀䔀一 䌀伀唀一吀刀夀 ⴀ 㤀倀䴀⼀␀㔀 匀䄀吀唀刀䐀䄀夀 ㄀⸀㤀㨀 䐀䔀䄀一✀匀 䐀䤀刀吀夀 ㌀  倀伀伀䰀 䄀刀吀 匀䠀伀圀㨀 吀䠀䔀 䌀刀夀簀倀䤀匀匀 吀䔀匀吀簀吀䠀䔀 䰀伀嘀䔀匀伀刀䔀匀 ⴀ 㤀倀䴀⼀␀㔀 匀唀一䐀䄀夀 ㄀⸀㄀ 㨀 䔀夀䔀娀 䘀刀伀一吀 䈀伀伀䬀䤀一䜀 倀刀䔀匀䔀一吀匀㨀 圀䤀䌀䬀䔀䐀 匀䠀䄀䰀䰀伀圀匀簀吀䠀䔀 䈀刀伀䄀䐀 匀吀刀伀䬀䔀匀 ⴀ 㤀倀䴀⼀␀㔀 圀䔀䐀一䔀匀䐀䄀夀 ㄀⸀㄀㌀㨀 䠀唀匀䬀夀 䈀伀夀匀簀匀伀䌀䌀䔀刀 䈀䄀䈀䔀匀簀吀䠀䔀 吀伀䄀䐀匀 ⴀ 㤀倀䴀⼀␀㔀 吀䠀唀刀匀䐀䄀夀 ㄀⸀㄀㐀㨀 䴀䄀䐀䄀䴀 伀䘀䘀䤀䌀䔀刀簀匀䴀䄀䰀䰀 䴀䤀䰀䰀䤀伀一簀夀伀唀一䜀 䔀䰀䬀簀䌀䠀䔀䰀匀䔀䄀 䄀倀倀䔀䰀 ⴀ 㤀倀䴀⼀␀㔀 䘀刀䤀䐀䄀夀 ㄀⸀㄀㔀㨀 吀伀圀䔀刀䤀一䜀 吀刀䔀䔀匀 ⴀ 㤀倀䴀⼀␀㔀 䘀刀䤀䐀䄀夀 ㄀⸀㄀㔀㨀  圀䔀䐀一䔀匀䐀䄀夀 ㄀⸀㈀ 㨀 䰀䤀䜀䠀吀 䌀刀䔀䄀吀䔀匀 匀䠀䄀䐀伀圀簀匀䔀䌀伀一䐀 匀䰀䔀䔀倀簀圀䄀嘀䔀刀 䌀䰀䄀䴀伀刀 䈀䔀䰀䰀伀圀 ⴀ 㤀倀䴀⼀␀㔀 吀䠀唀刀匀䐀䄀夀 ㄀⸀㈀㄀㨀 吀䠀䔀 圀䔀䰀䘀䄀刀䔀 匀吀䄀吀䔀簀吀䠀䔀 倀䤀一䔀䠀唀刀匀吀 䬀䤀䐀匀簀䌀伀䴀倀䰀䄀䤀一吀 䐀䔀倀䄀刀吀䴀䔀一吀 ⴀ 㤀倀䴀⼀␀㔀 䘀刀䤀䐀䄀夀 ㄀⸀㈀㈀㨀 䴀伀一吀䠀匀簀吀䠀䔀 倀夀一一䄀䌀䰀䔀匀簀䔀堀䌀唀匀䔀匀 ⴀ 㤀倀䴀⼀␀㔀 匀䄀吀唀刀䐀䄀夀 ㄀⸀㈀㌀㨀 䘀刀䔀䔀 吀䠀刀伀圀簀夀伀唀一䜀 䄀一䐀 䠀䔀䄀刀吀䰀䔀匀匀簀匀䤀一䄀䤀 嘀䔀匀匀䔀䰀 ⴀ 㤀倀䴀⼀␀㔀 匀唀一䐀䄀夀 ㄀⸀㈀㐀㨀 䈀䄀䈀夀 䬀䔀吀吀䔀一 䬀䄀刀䄀伀䬀䔀 ⴀ 㤀倀䴀⼀䘀刀䔀䔀 吀䠀唀刀匀䐀䄀夀 ㄀⸀㈀㠀㨀 匀䠀伀圀䐀䔀䔀刀 倀刀䔀匀䔀一吀匀㨀 䘀伀䌀唀匀 䘀伀䌀唀匀 ⴀ 㤀倀䴀⼀␀㔀 䘀刀䤀䐀䄀夀 ㄀⸀㈀㤀㨀 圀䄀嘀䔀 䄀䌀吀䤀伀一簀䰀䄀䐀夀圀伀䰀䘀 ⴀ 㤀倀䴀⼀␀㔀 䘀刀䤀䐀䄀夀 ㄀⸀㈀㤀㨀  匀䄀吀唀刀䐀䄀夀 ㄀⸀㌀ 㨀 一䤀䜀䠀吀 䄀一䐀 䐀䄀夀 ⠀䌀伀䴀䔀䐀夀 䄀一䐀 䴀唀匀䤀䌀 圀䤀吀䠀 䠀唀吀䌀䠀 䠀䄀刀刀䤀匀⤀ ⴀ 㐀倀䴀⼀䘀刀䔀䔀 匀䄀吀唀刀䐀䄀夀 ㄀⸀㌀ 㨀 䠀䄀唀吀䔀 䜀䄀刀䈀䄀䜀䔀 倀伀䐀䌀䄀匀吀 ⴀ 㤀倀䴀⼀␀㔀 匀唀一䐀䄀夀 ㄀⸀㌀㄀㨀 䔀䜀䜀倀䰀䄀一吀簀䔀䰀䔀䄀一伀刀 䴀唀刀刀䄀夀簀吀䠀䔀 匀䔀䌀刀䔀吀 匀䔀䄀 ⴀ 㤀倀䴀⼀␀㔀 匀唀一䐀䄀夀匀㨀 吀䠀䔀 䔀䄀刀䰀夀 䔀䄀刀䰀夀 䌀伀䴀䔀䐀夀 伀倀䔀一 䴀䤀䌀 ⴀ 㐀倀䴀 䘀刀䔀䔀

another album for sure, like another kind of album. But I think it’s the perfect representation of the whole year and it is super, super, super lo-fi. It’s cool that we’ve kept the vibe of the demos and the EP of before. So yeah, I think it’s a great first album. 11: I’m very excited to listen to it. Are you guys writing some new stuff then, in a different direction? CC: Uh-huh. We have two songs now. 11: Oh. CC: Yeah, we are very, very slow at writing. We are perfectionists with the songs. We write music as if we are the listeners and if we don’t find the music perfect

圀䔀䔀䬀䰀夀 䘀刀䔀䔀 䌀伀䴀䔀䐀夀 伀倀䔀一 䴀䤀䌀⸀ 匀䤀䜀一 唀倀 䄀吀 ㌀㌀ ⸀

as listeners we don’t feel like the song is finished. We

伀倀䔀一 䴀䤀䌀 䠀伀匀吀䔀䐀 䈀夀 䰀䔀䔀 䄀唀䰀匀伀一 䄀一䐀 吀䄀䰀伀一 䈀刀伀一匀伀一⸀ 匀䤀䜀一唀倀 䄀吀 㜀㌀ ⸀ 匀䠀伀圀 㠀⸀ 

spend like two months or so with every song we write,

䴀唀匀䤀䌀 嘀䤀䐀䔀伀 刀䔀儀唀䔀匀吀匀 䘀伀刀 吀䠀䔀 匀伀唀䰀⸀ 匀䔀䰀䔀䌀吀 䘀刀伀䴀 䄀 匀吀伀唀吀 䌀䄀吀䄀䰀伀䜀℀

so it’s really cool that we already have two!

䴀伀一䐀䄀夀匀㨀 䈀唀一䬀䔀刀 匀䔀匀匀䤀伀一匀 伀倀䔀一 䴀䤀䌀 ⴀ 㠀倀䴀⼀䘀刀䔀䔀 䴀伀一䐀䄀夀匀㨀 䔀夀䔀 䌀䄀一䐀夀 嘀䨀匀 ⴀ 㤀倀䴀⼀䘀刀䔀䔀

䌀䠀䔀䌀䬀 伀唀吀 刀伀匀䔀䌀䤀吀夀刀伀唀一䐀⸀䌀伀䴀 䘀伀刀 倀䄀匀吀 倀伀䐀䌀䄀匀吀匀℀ 一䔀圀 匀䔀䄀匀伀一 匀吀䄀刀吀匀 䤀一 䘀䔀䈀刀唀䄀刀夀⸀

11: Is the writing process collaborative for you guys?

19 | ELEVEN PORTLAND | www.elevenpdx.com


features national scene CC: Ana and me, the two guitarists and singers, we write all the melodies and the structure of the song, and the lyrics. Pretty much everything. Ade and Amber do their parts: bass and drums. But we always have a conversation, like, “We were thinking about the drums like this.” Everyone has an opinion, which is cool. And so it’s collaborative; I mean the fact that we are two writers and two lyricists makes it very open. It’s not that I’m at home and I’m writing my shit because I feel like that and I tell my mates, “Let’s do this song,” and they don’t understand anything. It’s just the opposite– we only write when we are together, Ana and me. We don’t write separately, we maybe come up with some sentences, but not a whole song at all. I think it’s a sharing thing. 11: Do you find that collaborating brings you guys closer? Are you guys close friends? CC: We were friends before having the band. We were best friends. Not like, “I know you.” She’s been my best friend since ever. We have gone everywhere for holiday together. Seriously, we have been very,

Photo by Aaron Serrano

very, very, very, very close friends. And then the band started. 11: Changing tracks a little bit, I had watched your “San Diego” video and I noticed that you guys speak predominately in Spanish to one another but all your lyrics are in English and I wondered how you approach lyric-writing and what your perspective is on that? CC: You know it’s a very good thing that we have. It makes us make an extra effort to write a song. We talk about what we feel and about the images and what we want to talk about in Spanish. I don’t talk to Ana in English at all. But then the trip of finding how we are going to say it in English is a very poetic thing. Trying to find the correct word and all this stuff, because sometimes it’s not that easy to translate feelings because there are just some expressions that don’t exist in the other language. It’s cool because we are fighting to find the correct translation to a feeling we’ve had in Spanish. But sometimes it’s the opposite and the way we say it in English is prettier than in

www.elevenpdx.com | ELEVEN PORTLAND | 20


features national scene Spanish. Sometimes it’s even more right, the way we say it in English than in Spanish. Like the lyrics of “Chillitown,” where suddenly it’s impossible to think of the lyrics in Spanish. 11: Your sound fits very well in the west coast garage scene, I wondered what music culture was like in Spain, how you guys feel like you fit in and what it was like to grow up with the music scene there. CC: Actually we have listened to music a lot from your part of the world. What we have in common with the west coast is the sun. I think that really, really, really makes a huge difference. For example, with English music, they are obsessed with the sun. Looking for the sun. There are a lot of metaphors about the sun and happiness. And I think we do music having the sun and having a blue sky over our heads and I think you really can tell in our songs that we haven’t written in weather under 20 degrees. I think it’s pretty cool. Plus all the friends we have here, all the music we have been growing with during these years, they are the same of course. This is the scene we know, the garage scene. We started to listen to this music around 2009 and we started listening to Los Nastys and after that we started listening to The Parrots. I don’t know, it was cool because it’s a very small scene so everyone knows each other. Like the other day Los Nastys came to our rehearsal and every time The Parrots are about to release a song they show it to us first. Everyone helps each other and if someone is playing in town everyone is going to go if they’re in town. It’s cool. It’s like having your friends and they also have bands. So instead of going to the square and having a beer you go to a gig and see them play. 11: Amber joined the band in 2014. Is that how you met her or did you know her previously and she just joined later? CC: Actually we met her because she shared, when it was only Ana and me, she shared a post of Deers in the Facebook comments. She shared a poster or a photo or something, and we had so few fans that we saw everything on the Facebook page, and she had a profile picture playing drums and we were like, “Ohhhhh!!!” And so Ana added her on Facebook and asked her if she had a band and she said, “No,” so we asked her, “Do you want to be in a band?” and she said, “Yeah, maybe.” So we had like a blank slate and we really, really fit and it was perfect.

21 | ELEVEN PORTLAND | www.elevenpdx.com


features national scene 11: That’s awesome. It’s like a cute little rom-

"Shit, this name is probably going to be in the lineup

com love story; that’s very adorable. You just

of Glastonbury. We really have to choose a good

mentioned when your band used to be called Deers,

name." It was pretty tough.

was it hard to dissociate yourself from that name 11: What was your thinking behind choosing

and come up with a new name?

Hinds? How did you land on that? CC: Yes. It was horrible. We are starting to forget CC: We wanted one word for sure. We’ve always

it, of course. It was seriously the worst thing you can do to someone. Okay, imagine your name is Sarah

liked that. And we didn’t like “The Something” and

and suddenly you have a lawyer telling you, you have

it was cool because it means the same thing, but in

to change your name because my name is “Saradon”

feminine. It’s a female deer. It was a good idea for us

and it sounds so similar. You really have to do it. And

because we are girls and stuff. I don’t know, we just

you go, “No, no no.” And they go, “Yeah, yeah, yeah

had to do it, and we had to do it fast. So we just did

because I have a lawyer and blah blah blah,” and you

it.

don’t have the money or the time, I mean you don’t want to fight, so you just have to change your name.

11: That makes a lot of sense. You guys are doing

The worst time was choosing a new name. That was

the first part of your tour, and I assume at some

the worst time. Like it’s not choosing a new name

point soon you will announce the second part. Is

like you don’t know what you’re going to do with

that going to include some North American dates?

your life. When you start a band you choose a name and you really don’t care, you don’t know where it’s

CC: Of course! We love America! »

going to be. But when we chose a name it was like,

www.elevenpdx.com | ELEVEN PORTLAND | 22


making waves at Portland State since 1994

CH A I N — MA I LLE . com

23 | ELEVEN PORTLAND | www.elevenpdx.com

KPSU

Portland’s College Radio broadcasting 24/7 at kpsu.org


8. Magnolias corner 9. Antique Alley 10. Velo Cult bike shop 11. Aunt Tillies deli and pub

community

NEIGHBORHOOD OF THE MONTH Hollywood

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5

NE HANCOCK ST

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LVD B Y D N SA NE 44TH AVE

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NE BROADWAY ST 1. BUST SOME BALLS

Sam's Billiards - 1845 NE 41st Ave

2. LOCAL SHOEMANCER

PDX Shoe Repair - 4049 NE Sandy Blvd

3. GEAR FROM EVERY ERA

Hollywood Camera - 4039 NE Sandy Blvd

BEST OF HOLLYWOOD

Location photos by Mercy McNab

4. BBQ, SNOOP STYLE

Reo's Ribs - 4211 NE Sandy Blvd

5. BOMB SLICES

Atomic Pizza - 4144 NE Sandy Blvd

6. SMOKE, NO MIRRORS

Tobacco For Less - 4071 NE Sandy Blvd

7. CINEMA PARADISO

Hollywood Theatre - 4122 NE Sandy Blvd

8. COZY WINE BAR

Magnolia's Corner - 4075 NE Sandy Blvd

9. ECLECTIC COLLECTIONS

Antique Alley - 2000 NE 42nd Ave

10. BIKES AND BREWS

Velo Cult Bike Shop - 1969 NE 42nd Ave

11. SWEET SANDWICHES Aunt Tillie's Deli & Pub - 2000 NE 42nd Ave

www.elevenpdx.com | ELEVEN PORTLAND | 24


community literary arts a small computer lab with desktop publishing softwares, two copiers, a very large zine library, an assortment of staplers, stack cutters, two classrooms, and large desks and work areas. But there are so many moving parts here and the makerspace that you see when you walk in is just one of them. We have the tools and materials to make and publish print and digital publications and we have the space here to host workshops and an event space to celebrate new releases. But we also have outreach programs: a prison creative writing workshop, and the Media Action Project which aims to engage youth in critical analysis of mass media.

Photo by Scott McHale

LITERARY ARTS

Independent Publishing Resource Center

A

ll writers and artists need that place of comfort and solace to stimulate creativity, a communal space to bounce ideas off fellow artists, a place to be inspired. The IPRC provides that vital space, serving as an incubator for many of the burgeoning writers, poets, and visual artists in Portland. Located in an unassuming industrial building on lower Division Street, it is the epicenter of the local DIY publishing community. When you walk in to the IPRC, the room is alive with makers and thinkers of all age groups and backgrounds. I was immediately greeted by Hajara Quinn, the Operations and Volunteer Coordinator, who kindly sat down with me to discuss the many facets that make the center so important to the creative community at large.

11: Kind of like a Rhetorical Analysis class for kids?

HQ: Exactly. It emphasizes the importance of critical thinking and independent writing. It encourages and invites youth to begin to make their own independent media and to feel empowered to participate in their own reception of the messages and images that we confront daily. The other outreach program that we have is a prison creative writing program that publishes an annual anthology called From a Number to a Name. As with other programs, like the Certificate Program, there’s a dual emphasis on the generation of creative work and the publication of that work. 11: Can you tell me about the workshops? HQ: Sure. On top of the tools that members have access to, we also offer workshops that cover the gamut of the resources that we offer. They’re very informative, affordable, and also a requirement to using the studios. We have workshops in letterpress, screenprinting, and bind-fast (a book binding machine) and we also offer occasional bookmaking workshops, comics class for kids (youth age 10-17) and graphic design classes that cover Illustrator, Photoshop, and In Design. All of our computers have the Adobe Suite.

ELEVEN: What is the IPRC? What goes on here? 11: How do people get involved? Hajara Quinn: The IPRC stands for Independent Publishing Resource Center. We’ve been around since 1998, and our mission is to provide access to the resources necessary to making media–whether in the form of books, zines, posters, chapbooks, digital books, art, comics. To that end we have screenprinting, bindfast and letterpress studios,

25 | ELEVEN PORTLAND | www.elevenpdx.com

HQ: Our memberships start at a really reasonable rate six dollars a month, or $75 a year. If people are interested in becoming members for a brief period of time, if they’re working on a project that is limited in scope and they just want access to the space for a small amount of time, we


community literary arts do have a three month membership option as well. Other membership levels include a Zine of the Month membership level, and household memberships. 11: That definitely sounds affordable for someone who’s trying to jumpstart a creative career. There’s also that Certificate Program, right? HQ: Yes, the Certificate Program is our year-long Creative Writing Program in Prose, Poetry, Comics, and a new Image and Text Track. The Certificate Program is similar to a one year MFA program. You work in a small group setting with an instructor and are mentored for an entire year. The difference between the Certificate Program and a traditional MFA is you’re also taking workshops in print-making and design. Again, the emphasis is not only generation of a creative body of work, but also on publication of that work, which is a really special opportunity, I think. The second term is when you learn all of the tools. You learn letterpress, screen print and bind-fast. At the end of the year, Certificate Program students design, layout and publish their own books. We’re lucky to have such an amazing group of writers and artists come through the program, on both sides. All of our instructors are accomplished writers and artists and generous teachers. And coming out of the program are so many amazing writers and artists that add so much to our writing and arts communities in Portland. Our instructors this year include Coleman Stevenson, who does image and text, prose instructors Justin Hocking and A.M. O’Malley, who are also the co-founders of the Certificate Program, poetry instructor Emily Kendall Frey, and Kinoko Evans and Sean Christensen teach the comics track.

11: It seems like a nice alternative for an expensive college education or creative trade school. You can come here and really develop your talent. HQ: Yes, absolutely. It is a wonderful place to practice. 11: That opportunity is so important for young people who strive to have a creative career. It seems that many schools are out just to make a buck, there are a lot of degree mills out there, but it’s clear that the IPRC really cares about the creative community. HQ: It really goes back to our mission to do our best to create that space. The more people writing and making art and feeling empowered to make their own publications, the better. Down with the gatekeepers. » - Scott McHale

LOCAL LITERARY EVENTS SALON SKID ROW PRESENTS 1 JANUARY 5 | THE CORNER BAR | 401 SW ALDER Come see three former ELEVEN lit section featured artists in one night! Drew Scott Swenhaugen is the co-creator of Poor Claudia and the Bad Blood Reading Series, and is a book designer for Octopus Books. He will be reading from his new chapbook BIG. Walt Curtis is a living legend who wrote the

11: Who are some of the writers who have come out of the IPRC? HQ: So many! Tyler Brewington, Kelly Schirmann, Dehlia Ackley, Lindsay Allison Ruoff, Michael Heald of Perfect Day Publishing, Noland Chaliha of SNOOT Books, Asher Craw and Lucy Bellwood, in comics. Really so many. 11: This whole DIY movement is very popular here in Portland, how important is it to the literary community? Because there are a lot of literary outlets online as well. I feel like having the tangible book makes a big difference, as opposed to just a blog or website. HQ: I think those things go hand in hand. We have a lot of analog resources, but we fully embrace the digital world too. There are so many artists and writers who utilize all of those resources that we have here. I think that the IPRC is so important to our city in general as a model... at a time when education can be so prohibitive, I think that the center offers an opportunity for the public to get really awesome educational experiences around all different forms of print making, and to come together and be excited about artmaking and writing.

book Mala Noche, which Gus Van Sant adapted into his first movie. Dusty Santamaria is a talented poet, singer/songwriter and painter who you need to check out.

À READING 2 JANUARY 27 | VALENTINES | 232 SW ANKENY Join host Robert Duncan Gray in celebrating the two year anniversary of the popular poetry reading series. This installment's poets are Lillian Rose Wakefield, Georgia Wood, Manuel Arturo Abreu, and Dao Strom.

KATRINA DODSON WITH LIDIA YUKNAVITCH 3 JANUARY 27 | POWELL'S CITY OF BOOKS | 1005 WEST BURNSIDE The Chronology of Water author Lidia Yuknavitch will sit down with Katrina Dodson, who translated Brazilian author Clarice Lispector’s The Complete Stories, which has been described as epiphany inducing. This is a can't miss! »

www.elevenpdx.com | ELEVEN PORTLAND | 26


community visual arts

Photo by Mercy McNab

ELEVEN: What type of visual artist would you consider yourself to be? Steele Walston: I would say that I am in the realm of a hyperrealism type of art. There is a pretty good group of younger artists in their 20s-30s out there right now that are doing this kind of hyperrealism art which is characterized by a mix of realistic drawing elements, a high intensity use of color and the use of weird illustrative abstract elements. There is a big group of artists that exist in the zone between being super figurative and realistic and being more on the complete color abstraction side. I feel like I exist a little bit in that realm and am definitely inspired a lot by artists like that, who definitely effect my work and the direction it goes.

VISUAL ARTS

O

Portland artist Steele Walston

riginally from a small mountain town in Colorado, hyperrealist artist Steele Waltson has been pursuing art and drawing since he was in the sixth grade. After moving to Oregon and being accepted to the Oregon College of Art and Craft, his reflections on the relationships he left back home inspired his senior thesis portraiture work. Through his work utilizing markers and other innovative mediums, as well as abstract pours mixed with realistic drawing, he allows the viewer to take an intimate look into his mind and visualize his most memorable friendships.

11: Who are some of the inspirations of your work right now? SW: I kind of separated myself from artists like New York’s Jenny Morgan and Erik Jones, who I draw a lot of inspiration from, by going into a medium that nobody really works in. My portraits are made with all marker ink and markers, so not only do I mix marker ink to do pours that make the big shapes but I also brush them on and find different ways to apply them, and then add the detail with actual markers. I am very interested in trying to blend mediums and use different techniques and materials to create some different looks that are both realistic and illustrative. Right now where I am at is trying to get into some more pure illustrative things over these hyperrealistic figures. 11: Can you tell me a little bit about the progression that got you into this specific style of art? SW: One of the final projects that I did for my last life drawing class in art school was to draw a human figure on a scale bigger than on a one-to-one scale. I ended up drawing a six foot portrait of one of my friends using markers. I wanted to show that markers could really get to a super realistic point because I didn’t think that people realized that before. From there I went into making more large scale portraits and began to think more about who I was drawing and why I was drawing them. Next, I started to use the people I was taking pictures of and drawing and began incorporating little writing vignettes of memories I had with them. This really allowed me to get more into the "why" I am drawing people and why it was important to me. After visiting back home, I gathered some pictures of long-time friends to make portraits of and developed this idea of how a friendship or relationship with somebody can be changed when being distanced from them. I noticed situations with friends where distance from them seemed to make us grow apart, while with other friends distance seemed to make us even closer than before I left.

27 | ELEVEN PORTLAND | www.elevenpdx.com

"High Frequency" (marker, graphite, and white charcoal, 2015)


community visual arts writings that corresponded to each portrait in it. This was a

The idea that distance can affect friendships was interesting to me and ended up being what my project turned

big theme for my thesis and had to do with why I love drawing

into. I took pictures of four friends and did abstract pours

who I am drawing. The process was always a combination

and added details based on things I remembered about them.

of making a move on a page and then doing some writing,

How much detail ended up back in the drawing was a sort of

followed by maybe drawing some more detail. I worked on all

reflection on the nature of our relationship. For example,

four of the portraits at the same time, so they were all kind

on some of the ones where I was more distanced from them,

of influencing each other, as well as being influenced by my

there was less information in the drawing about them, like

thesis paper and writing.

only two eyes and an eyebrow and everything else is just color 11: Those portraits are 50 inches x 72 inches, why did

pours.

you choose to make those portraits so large scale. 11: How are the names of the drawings related to the message in the image, some seem abstract, like “We Chased

SW: Originally the scale was just based on my influence

Adventure,” or “You Need Me to Get ThroughThis?”

from other artists that I like who also work on a large scale. I feel like a large scale

SW: The titles were pulled from the

portrait is very commanding and it is important for there

memory vignette writings that

to be something about it

accompanied each picture,

that makes it different

each about a paragraph to

from real life. If

a page long. When I had

a portrait is to

a showing of these

scale to human

portraits, I also

size then it’s

displayed a book

almost too

that you could

similar

go through

to the

with all the

Photos for the band Quilt

"Concrete" (marker, graphite, and white charcoal, 2015)

www.elevenpdx.com | ELEVEN PORTLAND | 28


community visual arts self and then can be easily overlooked as just a portrait. Sometimes with portraiture you have to take it further and make it a little bit more self-important for people to be able to recognize it. Portraiture is generally a thing that people don’t buy and don’t necessarily want it up in their house so having it enlarged makes it have a little more validity to the viewer. 11: Are your newer portraits part of a different series than the original four that you made of your friends? SW: After the thesis, I actually did small portraits that were still in the same vein and are all pictures of friends I have in Portland this time around. They were all created with the same idea of trying to make artistic moves based on what I know about each person and what our relationship is like. The inspiration could come from anything and didn’t always have to be super personal in nature. A good thing about being out of school is that you can do what you want because you want to do it versus being in a school setting and being pulled in different directions by people inspiring, questioning, or influencing you in one way or

"Note To Self" (marker, graphite, and white charcoal, 2015)

another. In the newest portraits, I get more into making pure illustrative moves on top of my theme of hyperrealism and I tried to create more color compositions and things that I felt talk well with each other. I was also trying to bring in more materials outside of just the marker ink. I am more interested in getting into how I can use those materials in different ways, to make different marks that have a different language, even if the process is the same as before. Bringing all of these aspects into it is what has been interesting me lately, on a more illustrative level and with less of a focus on who the person is. » - Lucia Ondruskova

FIND THIS ARTIST ONLINE WWW.STEELE-WALSTON.SQUARESPACE.COM INSTAGRAM: STEELEWALSTON

Please enjoy Steele's piece "Alpine" (marker, graphite, and white charcoal, 2015) decorating our inside back cover this month.

29 | ELEVEN PORTLAND | www.elevenpdx.com


Eleven PDX Magazine January 2016  
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