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ELEVEN PDX MAGAZINE ISSUE NO. 7

THE USUAL 3 Letter from the Editor 3 Staff Credits

VOLUME 4

FEATURES Local Feature 13 Psychomagic

Cover Feature 17 Courtney Barnett

new music 4 Aural Fix In The Valley Below Roadkill Ghost Choir Dream Police Francisco The Man

FILM Watch Me Now 22 Film Review: Interstellar

7 Short List 7 Album Reviews Damien Rice Rocket 3 Brakemouth

COMMUNITY Literary Arts 23 Portland writer Liz Mehl

Neighborhood of the Month 26 NW 21st Avenue

LIVE MUSIC 9 Show Reviews Fleetwood Mac

Visual Arts 27 Portland artist Nalena Kumar

11 Musicalendar An encompassing overview of concerts in PDX for the upcoming month. But that’s not all–the Musicalendar is complete with a venue map to help get you around town.

more online at elevenpdx.com


HELLO PORTLAND! My dear friends recently opened a boutique (slash indie label slash something new every day) for local crafts and music that resonates the tender loving energy that surrounds this city. In the rear of the shop on the wall above the office door is a (handcrafted, no doubt) neon sign that reads "You are a part of this place." On a very basic level, yes, we are all physically here and a part of this place, but from day one of ELEVEN and back further in my time here, the thing that drew me into the heart of Portland in the very first place is this sentiment. We are this place, this Portland community, and even while a new three story complex grows over favorite old haunts, our legacy and our roots remain strong. There is a sense of progress that permeates most of our culture and reckless optimism that keeps our spirits up even through the most dreary days. It allows us and inspires us to create. You are a part of this place. Everything we do here is living proof that the whole is greater than the sum of the parts, even though each part has its magical place. I thank my lucky stars that while I sometimes lose myself, I always find myself entangled in Portland. Âť

- Ryan Dornfeld, Editor in Chief

3 | ELEVEN PORTLAND | www.elevenpdx.com

EXECUTIVE STAFF EDITOR IN CHIEF Ryan Dornfeld CREATIVE DIRECTOR Dustin Mills SECTION EDITORS LOCAL FEATURE: Wendy Worzalla LITERARY ARTS: Billy Dye, Scott McHale VISUAL ARTS: Mercy McNab FILM: Rachael Haigh, Bex Silver graphic DESIGN Dustin Mills Alex Combs COPY EDITING Megan Freshley Paul Maziar COVER PHOTO Leslie Kirchhoff CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Brandy Crowe, Billy Dye, Eric Evans, Donovan Farley, Veronica Greene, Rachael Haigh, Casey Hardmeyer, Kelly Kovl, Travis Leipzig, Ethan Martin, Scott McHale, Aaron Mills, Jacob Schraer, Matthew Sweeney, Charles Trowbridge photographers Mercy McNab, Aa Mills, Todd Walberg, Caitlin M. Webb DISTRIBUTION / PROMO The Redcoats

online Mark Dilson, Kim Lawson Michael Reiersgaard

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eleven west media group, llc Ryan Dornfeld Dustin Mills

SPECIAL THANKS Our local business partners who make this project possible. Our friends, families, associates, lovers, creators and haters. And of course, our city!


AURAL FIX

new music aural fix Photo by Eddie Chacon

UP AND COMING MUSIC FROM THE NATIONAL SCENE

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IN THE VALLEY BELOW DECEMBER 4 | CRYSTAL BALLROOM

In The Valley Below (Jeffrey Jacobs and Angela Gail) met in LA at a rock and roll show. Jacobs grew up in Memphis, Gail in a small town in Michigan. Sometimes musicians, sometimes beer brewers, the duo are themselves a bit like a craft beer from a West Coast hip-hub city. Looking at the pair, who play shows in stark, old-fashioned garb, one would just make the assumption that they are a folk duo. . . well, not so. They could be described best as a dark, hoppy synth pop act—there are some vague echoes of “indie rock” and even alt-country here and there in these dramatic dance tunes. At heart, they are synth-pop revivalists who have effusively praised Phil Collins in the same breath as Bob Dylan in interviews. Indeed, The Belt, their first fulllength record, released last year, was more or less an 11-track collection of power ballads that would have been right at home being played over the ending credits of imaginary '80s movies. Gail and Jacobs share “lead vocal” duties, which gives off the impression of an equal artistic partnership. The over-the-top romanticism of these tunes can be sort of affecting and sweet.

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ROADKILL GHOST CHOIR DECEMBER 9 | DOUG FIR

When the deep South produces alt-rock bands, they really do the hell out of it. Roadkill Ghost Choir is no exception to this. Their southern-fried flare gives one the feeling that it’s a little more than okay to wear plaid shirts with pearl snaps for formal occasions. All of you bearded hipsters out there should love it. The fact that this sound originates in central Florida makes it perfect for Portland. The road-weary, bleary-eyed meander of the music conjures visions of a battered traveler who has come from a very far distance and took the long way

Perhaps they have taken a page or two from Depeche Mode, as well as the influences they’ve made more clear. The insistent, often almost frantic melodies are propped up competently by guitar fuzz and stylish synth hooks. While the arrangements and chord progressions in this band’s songs are nothing at all remarkable, the charming little touches thrown in here and there (as well as the duo’s effortless chemistry) make it all work. To tell the truth, their debut efforts were rather shockingly self-assured and polished. They obviously have a good ear for production. Fans of “indie pop” will appreciate the lyrical sincerity, soulful vocal harmonies, and fresh hooks of In The Valley Below. There is some darkness hiding within the polished escapism and romance. » - Matthew Sweeney

to get here. Sometimes it can be tempting to dismiss music that seems palatable to a wide audience, but I submit that, in the right context, this doesn’t have to be such a bad thing. There are some obvious comparisons that can be made to Tom Petty and Radiohead, but there is enough Floyd in there to keep you from hanging yourself with your belt. Roadkill Ghost Choir released their most recent album In Tongues this past August. Singer and songwriter Andrew Stephens can weave a serpentine trail through varied landscapes. The twangy, aquatic-like guitar playing forms a sunset horizon in the backdrop and gives one the sense that leaving a place just means that you are arriving somewhere else. At times the album is reminiscent of listening to warbly old records in a very small, oddly wallpapered room. At other times Stephens will burst through his melancholy wall like the Kool-Aid man—only you’ll be the one saying, “Oh yeah!" This is an exciting time for music folks. All throughout history we have always gone through peaks and valleys. Now that we are clawing our way out of the drudgery of the aughts, our music is finally making a comeback. Bands are beginning to go back to their roots. To a simpler time. A more creative time. The phoenix is rising, and its inevitable explosive destruction is going to be the most beautiful thing this world has ever seen. I’m not going to say that Roadkill Ghost Choir is going to be at this epic apex, but they are definitely at the short end of the fuse. » - Aaron Mills

www.elevenpdx.com | ELEVEN PORTLAND | 4


new music aural fix

3

DREAM POLICE DECEMBER 10 | HOLOCENE

Side projects of bands that are already successful can be interesting specimens. Often overshadowed by their main venture, they sometimes have the capacity to blow the original act out of the water. And other times they just straight up blow. Dream Police, a darker and more experimental side project of Brooklyn’s The Men, fall somewhere closer to the former side of that spectrum.

5 | ELEVEN PORTLAND | www.elevenpdx.com

Self described as “future primitive psychedelia with glimmering electronics,” Dream Police consists of The Men’s core members Mark Perro and Nick Chiericozzi along with the collaboration of Kyle Keays-Hagerman. Dating back to 2010, the project originated as an outlet for spill-over material that did not make it onto The Men’s recordings. But the full manifestation of Dream Police was a slow one, with only a self-released two-song cassette and live recording in their first three years. Then in 2013, after returning from a fivemonth tour as The Men, Dream Police rallied off of the creative momentum from tour and put together their debut full length LP, Hypnotized, out on Sacred Bones. While still holding onto some of the punk-meets-countrymeets-Bruce-Springstein feel of The Men’s recordings, Hypnotized showcases a heavier dosage of psych warbling and proggy grooves. The album features a healthy combination of acoustic and electronic drums, with both approaches arriving at similarly pleasant ends. Reminiscent of everything awesome about '80s aerobicise videos minus the sexy ladies, lead single “Pouring Rain” is an upbeat and dancy number that rides an electronic beat layered in synth. “My Mama’s Dead” boasts a driving, fuzzed out rhythm section that carries the song, accented by blown-out vocals and the occasional alien ray gun guitar squeal. Currently in the middle of their first full-fledged national tour as Dream Police, catch them live at Holocene on December 10 before they get caught back up in their more full-time band and don’t resurface for another year. » - Travis Leipzig


new music aural fix

DECEMBER AT

1 ALVVAYS

ABSOLUTELY FREE

4

FRANCISCO THE MAN DECEMBER 8 | MISSISSIPPI STUDIOS

Sometimes you just want some rock. You don’t want the orchestral strings, the tinkling synthesizers or the cute beats. You want some ripping guitar. You want heavy bass lines and some goddamned kick drum. There’s a place for the rest, obviously, but the trends of present-day rock have rolled on a different tide. That is what makes Francisco The Man so refreshing. It’s rock, and it’s good. The quartet’s ambitious debut, Loose Ends, fires on all cylinders: huge guitar hooks, garage-rock power, jammy explorations–it’s all there, complete and polished. As well it should be. According to the group, it took about seven years to put this album together amid line-up changes and a two-year hiatus. But here they stand. What sets Francisco The Man apart from similar outfits is the confidence that oozes out of every track. From “In The Corners,” an angsty, bellowing stomper, to “It’s Not Your Fault,” a wailer with a killer hook, to “In My Dreams,” one of two eight minuteplus treks, the group knows which buttons to push and when to push them. The most attractive part about Loose

Ends lies in its ability to be both heavy and exuberant. The tones and emotions cycling throughout the album suggest concentrated craftsmanship and a commitment to developing the highs along with the lows, a strength usually only present among seasoned vets. » - Charles Trowbridge

QUICK TRACKS A “it's not your fault” On an album of standouts, this track shines, putting together the pieces with rocking guitar work, strong vocals and a beat that won’t let you relax.

2 THEE OH SEES

JACK NAME 5PM-ALL AGES

2 THEE OH SEES JACK NAME

14 ROCK FOR A REASON HOLIDAY TOY DRIVE! AUSTIN LUCAS RYAN SOLLEE TY VAUGHN IKE FONSECA

3 WHITE LUNG

15 HAAS KOWERT TICE

4 GOAPELE 5 MY BRIGHTEST DIAMOND

16 JESSICA HERNANDEZ & THE DELTAS

6 CASS MCCOMBS & MEAT PUPPETS 7 THE BARR BROTHERS 8 MUSEUM OF LOVE & NEW BUILD 9 ROADKILL GHOST CHOIR

17 SAMA DAMS

10 COLLEGE 11 BLUETECH

28 REIGNWOLF 31 WEINLAND'S NYE SUPERGROUP

MORMON CROSSES

RABBIT RABBIT

BALTO NEIGHBOR WAVE

MANATEE COMMUNE

12 AUGUSTANA

THERE IS NO MOUNTAIN

RIO GRANDS THE FUR COATS

GRANDPARENTS • WL

18 THE MUFFS

SUMMER CANNIBALS THE SUICIDE NOTES

19 THE LOWER 48 BROWNISH BLACK MOON BY YOU

20 WORTHY

ASTRONOMAR • LASSI GANG$IGN$ • ASW TOURMALINE B2B VALEN

HOOK & ANCHOR

SCARS ON 45

B

13 K.M.R.I.A.

“in the corners” Comparatively restrained, “In The Corners” builds and builds behind a tom-heavy beat and wailing vocal work, before ultimately setting you gently back down to earth.

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Download our 830 E BURNSIDE / 503.231.WOOD Twitter@dougfirlounge FREE iPhone App! www.dougfirlounge.com Instagram@dougfirlounge Advance tickets at ticketfly.com

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www.elevenpdx.com | ELEVEN PORTLAND | 6


new music album reviews

ALBUM REVIEWS

On this album he has teamed up with Rick Rubin to create something new, yet very familiar. Missing is Lisa Hannigan, who split with Damien on tour back in ‘03 and moved on with her own solo career. Her absence is felt in the lyrics, and her voice definitely missed, but the new songs do not disappoint. “I Don’t Want To Change You” is a sonic masterpiece with

This Month’s best

Damien’s emotive vocals paired with

R Reissue

gorgeous strings. “Colour Me In" feels

L Local release

like the musical continuation of “Older

Short List AC/DC Rock or Bust She & Him Classics

L

The Woolen Men Live from the Banana Stand Lil Wayne Tha Carter V Nicki Minaj The Pinkprint

Damien Rice My Favorite Faded Fantasy Vector Recordings/Warner Bros. After eight years of relative isolation from the public eye, Damien Rice has finally emerged with a new album. Much like O, there are moments of sparseness followed by lush orchestral finales in this latest record. Damien has always been skilled in building his songs up from the ground to a higher plane.

Charli XCX Sucker JMSN JMSN Circa Survive Descensus Smashing Pumpkins Monuments to an Elegy

Buy it

Steal it

Toss it

L Rocket 3

Burn Self-released

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Readers of a certain vintage will recall a prehistory during which MTV played music videos to the exclusion of everything but the occasional music news. So popular were these short films that they were even categorized by genre into blocks of specialized programming, which is where Rocket 3 comes in. Based on their melodic new album Burn, Rocket 3 is the kind of group that would have been a lock

Chests” from his debut album, like picking up a decade old conversation with an old friend. There’s always been that deeply melancholic feeling to Damien Rice’s music that somehow is uplifting instead of depressing. It’s quite obvious that our Irish poet has been doing some serious introspection over the years and is not afraid to share it with the world. Welcome back, Damien. We’ve missed you. » - Scott McHale

on 120 Minutes, sandwiched between Belly and They Might Be Giants. In fact, fans of Tanya Donelly who pine for the simple, clean pop of “Feed The Tree” would find a lot to like in Burn. Tracks like “Catch Me” and “Never Again” have a classic kind of rock band balance: your ear can follow the guitar or bass or drums or vocal cleanly through entire songs. There’s studio polish; the record sounds very professional in the best possible way. You can hear that this is a band playing, not disparate elements assembled to create structures. Ramune Nagisetty’s vocals are just this side of delicate, ranging from the straightforward rock of Kristin Hersh to the breathy ethereality of Miki from Lush. Her voice works well with the band’s chunky pop-rock; her guitar, Drew Anymouse’s drumming, and Tony Guzman’s bass recall the ‘90s bands who were throwbacks to ‘70s bands like The Knack. There are no gimmicks here, just solid, straightforward,refreshing, fun pop songs. » - Eric Evans


new music album reviews

L Brakemouth

Marlene Self-released

One of the best parts about music is coming across pure, genuine energy in a project. It’s easy to leaf through groups and sounds that fit, more or less, into neatly arranged packages. What separates the compelling from the runof-the-mill is the passion. Brakemouth, the one-man band of Casey Frantum,

has energy and passion in droves, and his new, self-released EP Marlene flies at you unrelentingly. Marlene’s ten tracks are packed to the gills with pumping drum beats, vibrant synth, and quality guitar hooks. Frantum is a capable musician with an ear for catchy rhythms and a mind for clever lyrics. Searching out videos of his live shows, one is treated to an impassioned performer who looks as if he’s having a hell of a lot of fun onstage. On tracks like “Rhian” and “Wired,” Frantum is at his best. The backing beats are clean, and the instrumentation is tight. "Rhian” is deceptively introspective, lyrically, and Frantum exerts clear control over the ebb and flow of the track. “Wired” features a strong kick beat and a bouncy synthesizer hook that breeds an infectious energy from start to finish. One of my favorite parts of the album comes on “Built to Last,” toward the end, when Frantum steps back and unleashes a soaring guitar line that evokes some serious ‘80s rock nostalgia.

He runs up the fretboard and lets the guitar line breathe on its own. While Frantum is indeed a capable and talented musician (especially impressive are his guitar chops), the vocals throughout Marlene leave something to be desired. At their best, on the aforementioned “Rhian” and “Wired,” they offer a nice counterpoint to the busyness of the instrumentation. At other moments, however, they can be distractingly ragged—missed harmonies and weird doublings that don’t quite work. Take those statements with a grain of salt, though, and acknowledge that the record is self-produced. On the next go-round, when the vocal lines can be cleaned up a tad, Frantum will be left with delightfully upbeat and enjoyable synth pop. Marlene is an enjoyable album, all things considered. It’s clear that Frantum knows what he’s doing, and that confidence should translate into some seriously fun music moving forward. Keep an eye on him as he continues to come up in the Portland scene! » - Charles Trowbridge

www.elevenpdx.com | ELEVEN PORTLAND | 8


live music show reviews

SHOW REVIEW: FLEETWOOD MAC

NOVEMBER 22 | ROSE QUARTER to stand still. At 8:10pm on the dot, the stadium darkened and there I was, clutching the stage for support as my most revered dream came true, Mick, Lindsey, John, Christine, and Stevie (along with backup keys, guitars, and vocals) were standing in front of me. For an audience whose median age was a good bit above your typical Portland show, an unreal cacophony was produced as the first few notes of “The Chain” were hammered out. I made it through that, as well as their second song, “You Make Loving Fun,” before I broke down sobbing. The crystal

I

’m not sure that I actually went to see Fleetwood Mac at the Rose Quarter. I know I have a ticket stub that says I went, as well as no less than 250 photos that are evidence of my attendance. To be honest the whole experience was a blur of emotions that left streaky mascara runs as evidence. Let’s start with the fact that Fleetwood Mac is one of the greatest bands that the 20th century has produced. Their music in inescapable. Even if you think you haven’t heard their music, I guarantee you would recognize at least two of their songs. As a child of a baby boomer, I have been connected to Fleetwood my whole life. Like so many others, Stevie Nicks is my mother, my goddess. Steeped in mysticism, black velvet and a shawl, Stevie has taught me so many things about life, including when to pay attention to your intuitions. When I found out that I would be able to attend the Fleetwood Mac experience at The Rose Quarter on November 22, 2014 as a member of the press, my heart skipped a beat, it pounded, and I felt a surge of adrenaline like I was in line for a roller coaster. Obviously I dropped what I was doing and rushed out to buy a new dress (velvet, of course). The dream really started when I received my tickets from the box office. The little white envelope bearing my name was rather unremarkable for the treasure it contained… it was unbelievable, in fact, that front row tickets should not come in a gilded chest and be heralded by angels singing “Little Lies.” Excitement, unabashed joy, exuberance, I’m not sure if there are adjectives to describe the agonizing anticipation I felt clinging to my chest as I waited. It took all of my energy

9 | ELEVEN PORTLAND | www.elevenpdx.com

Photo by Ryan Dornfeld

vision started as soon as the bass line for “Dreams” made its

appearance. It was clear at this point that Fleetwood had lost none of their talent over the last 40 years. They were not simply storied, proud musicians, whose hype alone could sell out shows, even if their musical edge had waned. They were hot, they were on it, they sounded so much better than my scratched up 1977 pressing of Rumors. It was as if they were a new band again, I bet it had something to do with the return of Christine McVie after 16 years on hiatus. Hit after hit was perfectly on point, from “Rhiannon” to “Tusk” and “Sisters of the Moon.” The love for each other and the love for the music they had been performing over the years was palpable in their ebullient performance and affectionate onstage demeanor. I think I held my breath until the moment I had waited for: a Stevie monologue. I wanted tales from the glory days (the late '60s through the '70s) and I got them. Taking us back to when Fleetwood Mac was only the opener to greats like Hendrix and Joplin, Stevie described her first trip to the place where the rock royalty of San Francisco acquired their legendary threads: The Velvet Underground. Gripping her mic stand dripping in black ribbon and rhinestone strands, Stevie described the premonition she experienced standing on the painted floor of the small, posh shop. Her heart beat faster, adrenaline filled her to the brim, and in that instant she knew that one day she would be so successful that she could have anything and everything in the Velvet Underground. Her message: Chase your dreams, follow your intuition, and keep on achieving what you think is impossible.


live music show reviews

MISSIS SIPPI STUDIOS S

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DUSTIN WONG & TAKAKO MINEKAWA SOFT SHADOWS

(LATE SHOW)

CATHERINE FEENY & CHRIS JOHNEDIS THE BREAKING YARD LUZ ELENA MENDOZA

THE WOOLEN MEN LITHICS / GRANDHORSE

16. TUE

HOLIDAY MARKETPLACE

4. THU

ORQUESTRA PACIFICO TROPICAL

17. WED

TEZETA BAND /DJ MICHAEL BRUCE

SWAHILI

5. FRI

18. THU

JOHN CRAIGIE

SECRET DRUM BAND / DANA VALATKA PAPER/UPPER/CUTS / BEN STOLLER

MAGIC MOUTH THE DRUM ALSO WALTZES

SHOOK TWINS

6. SAT

HOT BUTTERED RUM THE JACKALOPE SAINTS

19. FRI

JUNO WHAT?! YAK ATTACK

7. SUN (EARLY SHOW) AN EVENING WITH

CHARLIE HUNTER & SCOTT AMENDOLA DUO (LATE SHOW) AN EVENING WITH

She shook her tambourine, decked out in a moody palette of velvet ribbon, through “Gypsy,” and the song took on a whole new meaning. Lindsey Buckingham shredded harder than men half his age through “Go Your Own Way,” while Mick Fleetwood similarly showed up every drummer I know with a 4 minute drum solo in “Don’t Stop.” Four shawl changes later, Stevie closed with “Silver Springs,” not gunning for the high notes like she used to, but still embracing every syllable with the slightly flat ferocity which she is famous for. Each member of the band bowed, Stevie said some parting words of love and admiration, then Mick dispensed some sage wisdom (which was impossible to understand through his thick British brogue) and we thought it was over... But the applause did not end, and a grand piano was wheeled out on stage. Christine McVie, the beautiful, understated backbone of Fleetwood took a seat and played her 1976 tune, “Songbird,” accompanied by Lindsay on guitar. The song finished, they bow, it was over. The crowd was in a haze of emotions, but all are thankful that they have been in the presence with such overwhelming talent. On the trudge up the stair and out into the cold November I spied several people gripping tissue boxes and people dressed in black velvet exchanging smiles. The experience charged us, we resonate at a higher frequency now, and I hope it lasts. » - Bex Silver

(EARLY SHOW)

MVM STUDENT SHOWCASE

3. WED

Photo by Ryan Dornfeld

14. SUN

IRON AND WINE 8. MON

FRANCISCO THE MAN JACKSON BOONE

20. SAT

PSYCHOMAGIC MINDEN / TALKATIVE

21. SUN

JENNA ZINE PRESENTS: COMEDIANS & COMEDIES WITH BAD SANTA DAN WEBER

26. FRI

10. WED

A WINGED VICTORY FOR THE SULLEN HILDUR GUDNADOTTIR

(TWO SHOWS)

THE VON TRAPPS 27. SAT

HOLIDAY FRIENDS

11. THU

THE WEATHER MACHINE

PHONE CALL

PURSE CANDY / FRINGE CLASS

12. FRI

ASSEMBLY OF DUST DOOBIE DECIBEL SYSTEM

13. SAT

28. SUN

JOE MCMURRIAN & THE ECLECTICA

SMUT CITY JELLYROLL SOCIETY THE HOW LONG JUG BAND

(EARLY SHOW)

31. WED

(LATE SHOW)

HOUNDSTOOTH / DJ COOKY PARKER DJ BOBBY D

THE MYSTERY BOX SHOW MRS. PRESENTS QUEEN

URAL THOMAS & THE PAIN

DJ BEYONDA

SHOWS you’ll remember, presented in an independently run, best-sounding music listening environment with great staff (mostly musicians), drinks, burgers, and PATIO.

mississippistudios.com

www.elevenpdx.com | ELEVEN PORTLAND | 10


live music DECEMBER crystal ballroom

1

WILLIAMS AVE.

VANCOUVER AVE.

4

AV E.

Roseland Theater

30

8 nw 6th

FR

16

LOVEJOY ST.

PEARL

5

84

OLD TOWN 2

GOOSE HOLLOW

28

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11TH AVE.

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8TH AVE.

11 | ELEVEN PORTLAND | www.elevenpdx.com

14 5

32

GRAND AVE.

Juno What?! | Yak Attack Psychomagic | Minden The Von Trapps Holiday Friends | The Weather Machine Joe McMurrian & Electica | Smut City Jellyroll Society Ural Thomas & The Pain | Houndstooth | DJ Bobby D

15

MLK BLVD.

Secret Drum Band | Paper/Upper/Cuts | Dana Valatkta | Ben Stoller

RUSSELL ST.

23RD AVE.

3939 n mississippi

Dustin Wong & Takako Minekawa | Soft Shadows Catherine Feeny & Chris Johnedis | Luz Elena Mendoza Orquestra Pacifico Tropical | Tezeta Band | DJ Michael Bruce Shook Twins | John Craigie Hot Buttered Rum An Evening with Iron & Wine Francisco The Man | Jackson Boone A Winged Victory For The Sullen | Hildur Gudnadottir Phone Call | Purse Candy | Fringe Class Assembly Of Dust | Doobie Decibel System The Woolen Men | Lithics Magic Mouth | Swahili

TA VE .

DDOOW WNN TTOOW WNN

830 e burnside

mississippi studios

ON

NORTHWEST

Doug fir

Alvvays | Absolutely Free Thee Oh Sees | Jack Name White Lung | Mormon Crosses Goapele My Brightest Diamond | Rabbit Rabbit Cass McCombs & Meat Puppets The Barr Brothers Museum Of Love | New Build Roadkill Ghost Choir | Balto | Neighbor Wave College Bluetech | Manatee Commune Augustana | Scars On 45 K.M.R.I.A Austin Lucas | Ryan Sollee | Ty Vaughn | Ike Fonseca Haas Kowert Tice Jessica Hernandez & The Deltas | Rio Grands | Fur Coats Sama Dams | Grandparents | WL The Muffs | Summer Cannibals | The Suicide Notes The Lower 48 | Brownish Black | Moon By You Worthy | Astronomar | Lassi | Gang$ign$ | ASW Reignwolf Weinland's NYE Supergroup | Hook & Anchor

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SKIDMORE ST.

Monophonics | PigWar Billy Idol | Guster | Spanish Gold Weezer tUnE-yArDs | Cibo Matto Dillon Francis Skinny Puppy | Front Line Assembly | Youth Code Warrant/Jack Russell's Great White | Black 'N Blue Brillz | Snails Paper Diamond | Milo & Otis

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ALBERTA ST.

MISSISSIPPI AVE.

2 5 9 10 12 15 17 19 20 31

1332 w burnside

J. Roddy Walston | Adventure Galley | Bike Thief The War On Drugs | Summer Cannibals Kongos | In The Valley Below Wild Cub | Priory | Superhighway Glass Animals | Mackintosh Braun Vance Joy | Holiday Friends Cage The Elephant | Just Lions Fitz & The Tantrums | Dresses Spoon | Future Islands | A Giant Dog TV On The Radio | Natasha Kmeto Big Data | Joywave | Hustle & Drone Alt-J | Great Wilderness Phantogram The Dandy Warhols | The Upsidedown NYE w/The Motet | Polyrhythmics | Deejay Weather

INTERSTATE

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live music

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DECEMBER wonder ballroom 128 ne russell

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PRESCOTT ST.

BEAUMONT FREMONT ST.

28TH AVE.

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24TH AVE.

KNOTT ST.

BROADWAY

ODY BLVD. O D W SAN Y LL O H

holocene

1001 se morrison

rontoms

LAURELHURST

eastburn

1800 e burnside 47TH ST.

BURNSIDE ST. STARK ST.

22

MORRISON ST.

BELMONT ST.

HAWTHORNE DIVISION ST. CLINTON ST. POW

ELL B

DD

17TH AVE.

28TH AVE.

BROOKLYN

LVD.

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CESAR CHAVEZ BLVD.

LADD’S

722 E Burnside

FO

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HOLGATE BLVD.

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kelly’s olympian 426 sw washington

bunk bar

1028 se water

20 31

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Bleach Blond Dudes | The Handles | Sean Connery Ah God | Tamed West | Sad Sad Bicycle Light Creates Shadow | Bangbakc Willow House | Perfect Families | Le Printemps Land Of The Living | Slow Looks | Random Axe Load B | Milc | Daelonze | Chance | Mikey Fountaine Mic Capes | Big Mo | Keegan | Abstract Arlo Indigo | Fog Father | Tigerface Brakemouth | Hart & Hare Benefit For XRAY.FM Dead Man's Hand | Double Deuce Hyperstar | Mercy Graves Roselit Bone | The Cry | PDX Punk Rock Collective

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Puddle Of Mud | Smoochknob DJ Anjali & The Incredible Kid

50TH AVE.

HAWTHORNE BLVD.

bossanova ballroom

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Ryan Joseph Anderson Switchgrass plugg88 | Peter The Chair DJ Espinoza '90s Video Night Ben Larsen DJ Rhienna Cider Fest Music: Mimi & Jay | New Solution | DJ Wobli Laura Ivancie Foggy Mental Breakdown Banjo Troupe DJ Kenny | Buddy Jay's Jamaican Jazz Band DJ Gregarious NYE Party!

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Rare Monk | The Weather Machine Old Age | Blue Skies For Black Hearts Us Lights | The Domestics | Moniker Rick Bain & The Genius Position | The Hugs | Mister Tang

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Deafheaven | Lesbian | Usnea Drew Victor | Old Friend | Ryan Stively | Montclaire Beat Connection | Shaprece | Small Skies Kingdom | Massacooramaan | DJ Rafael | Coast2C Peaking Lights | Ancient Heat | Unicorn Domination Denitia & Sene | Neka & Kahlo Frack | wndfrm | Minigorille Dream Police | Mercury Living Body Party: Holla n Oats | Barisone Nadus | Gang$ign$ | SPF666 | Demonslayer | Quarry Tender Age | Appendixes | Warm Hands Rockbox: DJ Kez | Matt Nelkin DJs Kiffo & Rymes | DJ Spencer D | DJ Quincy NYE: Les Sins | Ben Tactic | DJs Kiffo & Rymes | Like A Villain

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Lindsey Stirling Erotic City | Candy O | Precious Johnny Marr | Hooded Fang Hillstomp | Good Luck Thrift Store Outfit | Jeffrey Martin Sallie Ford | Old Light Saves The Day | Say Anything | Reggie & The Full Effect The Grouch & Eligh | Cunninlynguists | Illmaculate | DJ Fresh Jason Webley & Friends Fruition | Quick Easy Boys

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Nick Dellfs (of Shaky Hands) | Bud Wilson (of Aan) Say Hi

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features Photo by Todd Walberg

DECEMBER the know

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Paradox | Reactor | Dead Hunt Rebels & Traitors | Hungry Tiger | Inside Information Cosmonauts | Mope Grooves | Ladywolf Lures | Sister Palace | Golden Hour | Memory Boys Stag Party w/ Blap DJ's Motrik | Terwilliger Curves | The Harvey Girls Big Crux | Dark/Light Shadowhouse | Papal Order Queer Aggression Feel Young | Pill Wonder | Chris Sutton Levon's Helmet | Sweeping Exits The Siege Fire | Year Of The Coyote Mysterious Skin | Spetsnaz C.Z. | Panzer Beat Order Mundial | PMS 84 The Whines | Woolen Men | Still Caves | Therapists

knock back 13 the 2315 ne alberta THE SECRET SOCIETY 14 116 NE RUSSELL 2-7 Jane Siberry's Holiday Hoes & Hosers

8 11 12 13 18 19 20 21 26 27

Yeah Great Fine | Everyone Is Dirty | Maggie Morris Jacob Miller & The Bridge City Crooners The Barn Door Slammers | Cahalen Morrison The Breaking | Screens | Spirit Lake The Ukeladies (6pm) | Karaoke From Hell (8pm) The Student Loan Stringband | Wild Rabbit Everything's Jake Ashleigh Flynn & The Low Arc Of The Sun Orchestra Pete Krebs & His Portland Playboys Karen Lovely's 1920s Prohibition Blues

15 836 n russell

white eagle

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Wandering Zero | Wooden Sleepers | Pretty Gritty Michelle Chamuel | Christopher Norman Nails Hide Metal | When We Met | We Are Brothers Garcia Birthday Band Ninjas With Syringes | No More Parachutes Bob Frank | Barna Howard Ancient Eden | The Bass Mints | Brian Odell Band The Hill Dogs The Lonesomes | The Low Bones | Matthew Lindley Michele Ari | Levity | Naomi Tee & Josh Makosky Trio Toyboat Toyboat Toyboat | Cotton & Raymond Anderson

White Eagle Blues Jam hosted by Travers Kiley Snowblind Traveler | Evan Way | Supercrow My Goodness Jim Creek DoveDriver Promise The Moon | Nicole Andrews Chris Baron Jokers & Jacks | Josh Nielsen Garcia Birthday Band Jake London Anthemtown Artist Showcase

16 1033 nw 16th slabtown

Want to have your show listed? E-mail listings@elevenpdx.com

LOCAL FEATURE: PSYCHOMAGIC

P

sychomagic started like

space. It’s rock opera storytime, morbid

a lot of bands. Five guys,

at times, and completely fun.

a handful of Portland

songs , and continue to build their sound

instruments, looking to

and connection together and with the

express themselves through crazy rock.

audience. Their energy as a group and

The guys, Steven Fusco (vocals, guitar),

with other bands has them finishing

Stone Laurila (guitar), Scott Page (bass),

their first national tour and releasing

Anthony Brisson (drums, vocals), and

their second album, Bad Ideas, on Los

Eddie Bond (keyboards) create an ode

Angles label Lolipop Records.

to art, mysticism, surfy guitar riffs, and silliness. It’s what they call “Avante Bubblegum Freak Psyche." Each song

ELEVEN: Where is everyone from? How do you know each other?

is rhythmic, catchy and danceable, often revving up with an explosion

Psychomagic: We were all guys

of rowdy outbursts and raucousness,

who pretty much had a lot of mutual

before dropping into wide interludes of

friends with a lot of common interests

psychedelia. There are also '50s-styled

in music. None of us are actually from

sad teenager songs with pretty strums.

Portland. Steve is from the Bronx, NY,

The organ gets freaky, the drums are

Anthony is from Minnesota, Stone is

shifty, and the performance cuts loose.

from Vancouver, and Scott is from Bend.

They make use of slacker choruses with

Eddie met us through Craigslist. We

plenty of “Lalalala’s," encouraging sing-

had an audition for a keyboardist lined

a-longs. Steve Fusco’s voice holds a lot of

up for two guys. Eddie showed up early

versatility. He vents, rants, and croons.

before the other guy and killed it. It was

Songs shift character with stories that

kind of awkward like “sup” when the

channel Dracula, zombie killers, , or

other guy showed.

visiting Elvis and go-go dancers in

13 | ELEVEN PORTLAND | www.elevenpdx.com

They are talented at layering their

transplants and their


11: How did you guys get hooked up with Lollipop Records?

Psychomagic: Alejandro Jodorowski, The B-52s, Gun Club, a lot of the contemporary bands on Lolipop,

Psychomagic: We played a show with one of their artists Mr. Elevator and The Brain Motel. I was a big fan of theirs, and we ended up playing this show with them. It was kind of love at first strum. We were totally digging each other. We ended up giving him this cassette we had made ourselves, it was a really ratty recording. But they ended up loving it and playing it on the rest of their tour. Later on Lolipop hit us up and said “We want to put out music with your band.” 11: What is Psychomagic? Psychomagic: Alejandro…. Alejandroooo… 11: Alejandro Jodorowski? Psychomagic: Yes. Anything out of the ordinary, all aspects…we are dancing space hippies, with lots of sea witches, guard dogs, astral projection, meatballs, seances during performance… 11: So I keep seeing this picture from the film Young Frankenstein popping up on your social media. What's the connection? Is it because Steve kind of looks like him? I mean, you do kind of have the Gene Wilder hair and eyes going. Psychomagic: That was the greatest compliment of my life. Once this girl came up to me randomly and said “You look like a more brooding Gene Wilder” and I got down on my knee and proposed. It was awesome. I have always had a place for Mel Brooks and Young Frankenstein and not taking ourselves too seriously. But we do take the music seriously. 11: For those who have never heard of or seen your band–how do describe what you are doing?

everyone at Lolipop. The sound of Albert Einstein writing, and I mean you can just hear his notes, his scribbling in German, its very stimulating. When Clowns Cry. 11: So you are coming up on your 2nd album after your self-titled debut. Is there anything new about what you did with Bad Ideas? Psychomagic: I feel like its a maturation of evolution. The first album was just more of some guys getting together and figuring out what we were doing. This time around we had like a clear goal of what we wanted to do and what we wanted to express. We have new voices in the band. 11: Yeah I notice a bit more key work and space noise? Psychomagic: That's our keyboardist Eddie. Eddie was raised by martians who only knew strange sounds. His mother was named Martian Washington. The first lady of Mars. 11: What is the story behind the title track Bad Ideas? Psychomagic: Yeah, we wanted to make a 21st century Monster Mash, played on every radio station during Halloween, we want it to covered by many, played on NFL commercials. I dont know. It’s just something that was coming out. 11: You seem to play a lot of different characters with your voice, and I heard you dabble in puppet plays? Psychomagic: I had this weird period where I was totally into puppets, it was kind of like Lars and The Real Girl. It was very strange. I used to fabricate stuff, starting when I was working at a stop-motion animation studio. I have

Psychomagic: Psycho. Magic. That’s really it! It’s psyche rock. Or avant bubblegum freak psyche.

always been drawn to silliness. Being being surrounded by Eddie and Anthony and Stone and these guys we kind of run with that vibe. We are trying to make

11: Who are some of your Inspirations and influences?

really good music but it’s important to keep it light-hearted. But with this

features DECEMBER alhambra theatre 4118 se hawthorne

17

Dirty Kid Discount Railyard Ghost | Rachael Miles Lemuria, Into It. Over It Scissors For Lefty | Swansea | Dangermaker (lounge) Sagittarius Gala VIII When We Team Up | Divides | Orgncs | Initiatives | Hollywise Smoke Season | Coco Columbia (lounge) Rock Collection Bottom Shelf | Subconscious Culture | Unsafe Dartz (lounge)

Potluck | Johnny Richter | Liquid Assasin | Black Pegasus

hawthorne theatre 1507 se 39th

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Rockstar Karaoke The Ataris | Ninjas With Syringes | Teenage Kicks | Brigadier The Birthday Massacre | New Years Day | The Red Paintings Pageantry | Souvenir Driver | Ghost To Falco Pallbearer | Solstafir | Mortals Rockstar Karaoke Side O'Slaw | Snarl Exodus | Spazztic Blur | Cemetery Lust | Sarcalogos Stick To Your Guns | Being As An Ocean | Trial | To The Wind Z-Man & True Justice | Vocab Slick | Pure Powers | Metric Joyce Manor | Toys That Kill | Drivers Steven Roth | Wooden Sleepers | Feral Harp Love And Light | Vibesquad Yung Lean & Sad Boys Girl On Fire Rockstar Karaoke Air Sex Championships Rockstar Karaoke

VALENTINES

232 SW ANKENY

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MOLOKO

Taste the nightlife of Mississippi. Over 40 house infused liquors. Specialty absinth cocktails. Open until 2am every day. N PORTLAND 3967 N Mississippi (97227) 503.288.6272 molokopdx.com

ALADDIN THEATER 3017 SE MILWAUKIE

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The Best Of Rufus Wainwright | Danny Fingers 4 Portland Cello Project | Ural Thomas & The Pain 5-6 Andy McKee 10 Hot Rize 11 NW Natural Holidays w/The Trail Band 12-14 Josh Garrels & Liz Vice | Evan Way | Wesley Randlph Eader 19 NYE w/Hot Tuna 31

21 the goodfoot 2845 se stark 22 east end

203 se grand

Motown On Sundays (Sundays) Sonic Forum Open Mic (Mondays) Boys II Gentlemen(Tuesdays) Soul Stew w/DJ Aquaman (Fridays) Shafty Buddy Jay's Jamaican Jazz Band | Los Estupidos First Friday Superjam w/DJ Magneto & Friends Family Funktion Presents: A Tribute To The Meters Shafty Asher Fulero Band | Dark Matter Transfer Polecat | The Hilldogs Trio Subtonic | Philly's Phunkestra Garcia Birthday Band Shafty NYE w/Scott Pemberton Trio

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www.elevenpdx.com | ELEVEN PORTLAND | 14


features DECEMBER white owl social club

23 1305 se 8th theater 24 star 13 nw 6th 6 7 9 12 13 17 18 19 21 31

The Allah-Las | Tashaki Miyaki | Daydream Machine Lewi Longmire & The Left Coast Roasters | Mexican Gunfight

Kina Grannis | Imaginary Future Haerts | Mikky Ekko Critters Buggin | Master Musicians Of Bukkake Nick Thomas | Kaia X | The Blasters Grand Royale | The Reason | DJ Zimmie X | The Blasters NYE w/Jerry Joseph & The Jackmormons | Haymaker

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The Underground Resistance DJ Night (Mondays) Intolerance | Dendeavors | Amorus Fluid Spill | Feral Drollery | The Cronicles Of Bad Butch Root Jack | Van Eps | Robert Jon & The Wreck Proven | Kingdom Under Fire | Dead Last Place Stoning Giants | Catherine Loyer & Strawberry Roan Dan Daniels | Jesse Curran Daisy Deaths | No Gentleman | Noise Complaint Ripe Red Apple | Forest Beutel | Lumberjack | Sara Wolf TheGoodSons | Last Giant | Mother's Whiskey The Israelites | Kingston a Go Go | DJ Club Impact The Smothers Fuckers | Dwight Dickinson Die Like Gentlemen Decoro | Ghost Of Fowler | Pass Margo Earth To Ashes | Divides | Dreizehn | Ditch Digger | Deverra The Want Ads | The Lovely Lost | Sun Kids | Salvo Idly Stolte Boys | Nails Hide Metal | Lojia | Boat Race Weekend | Night Of Elegance THE FIRKIN TAVERN Located on the west side of Ladd’s, the Firkin Tavern features an astounding selection of craft beers to enjoy inside or on our patio. Art enthusiasts will enjoy a variety of local artwork on display and sold comission-free! SE LADD'S 1937 SE 11th Ave (97214) 503.206.7552 | thefirkintavern.com

26 315 SE 3rd

ROTTURE/BRANX

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Black Cobra | Wolvhammer Ryan Hemsworth Phutureprimitive MK (Marc Kinchen) Burials | Wayfarer | Bastard Feast

LOUNGE 27 TONIC 3100 NE SANDY 9 10 12 13 20 20 31

Karaoke Night (Mondays) King Parrot | Author & Punisher | 3 Teeth | Behalf Burning Rain | Garden Of Eden Angry Snowmen | Rescendents | Mormon Trannys | Mr Plow Sponge | The Rodeo Clowns | Dead Remedy (6pm) Puddle of Mudd | Smoochknob | Silversafe (9pm) Thundering Asteroids | The Tanked Wold War IV The Mentors | Nekro Drunks | Schroeder Bomb | Truculence

28 dantes 350 w burnside 5 6 10 11 12 13 17

Photo by Todd Walberg

album too we are taking a step, we are

us stay upstairs above the bar, helped

trying to be a bit more mature.

us dry our laundry. They got us blackout drunk.

11: What can we expect from your live shows? There seems to be a lot of paint and costumes. Psychomagic: Live shows vary

We have an amazing tour guide. He’s

experimenting and perfecting what we

our booker and he actually lives here.

want from live shows. We are trying

He is exactly like The Dude from The

to work in more pyrotechnics, but we

Big Lebowski. Hes like “Whats up dude,

are just starting. So bottle rockets will

lets chill dude, lets do this. Have some

have to do for now.

spaghetti.”

11: Um, so you guys are setting off

11: He made you spaghetti? Damn.

bottle rockets in little tiny bars across the U.S. right now?

Psychomagic: Yes he’s been hooking us up the whole time. And Stone has

Psychomagic: Ummmmmm. Yeah.

family here in Asheville, so he is currently off galavanting with them.

11: Is this your first tour? 11: Steve, was it good coming back Psychomagic: It’s our first national

to New York City to play shows?

tour, we have been traveling caravan style with the other bands, like Santoros.

Psychomagic: Well, I didn't go to the Bronx where i’m from, but we were in Brooklyn where I lived for a short

11: What have been some of your favorite stops?

while. It was nice to see some family and friends. I think most of the band had not ever been to New York so it was a whole

amazing. There are a bunch of small

Supersuckers | I Can Lick Any SOB In The House | Dead Volts

weird and great. They just treated us

15 | ELEVEN PORTLAND | www.elevenpdx.com

Psychomagic: We are in Ashville.

from town to town. We are still

Neon Culpa | Cupcake Delphine De St. Paer Suter | Massy Ferguson | Exquisite Corps A Giant Dog Down Gown & The Drawing Board | Bubble Cats Zepparella | The Shrike | Daniele Gottardo Solo Artist Awards & Local Showcase

11: And tonight you are in Asheville, N.C.?

Psychomagic: Minneapolis was

new experience for them. (singing) Tralalalalaaa!!

amazing places. Ft. Wayne Indiana was like rockstars, just super nice. They let

11: What do you see happening in Portland’s music scene?


Psychomagic: It’s like It’s a fertile zone right now. The pieces are kind

11: What are some of your favorite venues?

of falling apart in some respects, in regard to venues closing and stuff. But

Psychomagic: We love Revival Drum

people are trying to pick them up. So

Shop, their new space is so crisp and

we are really just trying to re-group

clean. The Know .We love Mississippi

and band together and try to figure out

Studios, but haven't played there yet.

how to make stuff happen in the way

That will be our “Return to Portland”

we want. It’s really cool how Portland

record release show there on December

is very saturated with artists and

20th. Its gonna be rad.

musicians, it actually helps to motivate and stimulate us. We are actually hoping to see more all ages venues pop

11: What do you see lining up for the future?

up. We need an influx of youth. Not just young people, but youthful energy at shows that’s supporting what's going on. There can be a lot of stale shows at

Psychomagic: Pizza, love, and happiness for the entire world. » - Brandy Crowe

21 plus venues sometimes, so we are all about incorporating all ages. Literally we would like to play for audiences that are six to sixty years old. 11: You would welcome kids to your shows? Psychomagic: Yeah, fuck yeah.

Psychomagic celebrates the release of Bad Ideas December 20 at Mississippi Studios “Sun Song." The title track “Bad Idea” has him transforming for a monster mash delivery about being scared of strange love. Often, the band chimes in for completely unrestrained choruses of “Lalalalala." Songs seem to rise and fall with shifts in tempo, such as “Waste My Time," which focuses on slow rhythms and mini-guitar solos, only to pick up speed and unravel into a finale of crashing rock obscurity. Wasting time is a recurring theme for this album,

L Psychomagic

cassette layout

Bad Ideas Lolipop Records

it’s mentioned again after the warped carnival intro of “Gumball." There is a lot of hilarious, real, storytelling and candor. “EBT” is somewhat angry (it can’t buy love.

Psychomagic’s sophomore release

features DECEMBER dantes (continued) Hot Panda | Page Turner The Stumptown Soul Holiday Spectacular

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29 the waypost 2120 n williams 30 Laurelthirst pub 2958 ne glisan 31 FIRKIN TAVERN 1937 SE 11TH

Copper & Coal | Kung Pao Chickens Dicky Pig Ryan Joseph Anderson | Jeffrey Martin | Taylor Kingman Tree Frogs | Baby Gramps Pete Krebs | Jimmy Boyer & Dan Haley Band Freak Mountain Ramblers | Open Mic Portland Country Underground | Kung Pao Chickens Jackstraw | Melissa Ruth | Robert Richter Big E. & The Stomp | Redwood Son Redray Frazier | Yur Daddy Emma Hill & Bryan Daste | Small Souls Water Tower | Life During Wartime Freak Mountain Ramblers | Open Mic Copper & Coal | Kung Pao Chickens Jackstraw | Jordan Anderson | Nicholas Clark Big E. & The Stomp | Max's Midnight Kitchen Redray Frazier | Amelia Circle Michael Hurley & The Croakers | Medicine Family | Lowlight Alice Stuart | Fernando | Smokey Brights Freak Mountain Ramblers | Open Mic Portland Country Underground | Kung Pao Chickens Jackstraw | Fields Of May Old Flames The Yellers | Reverb Brothers Freak Mountain Ramblers | Open Mic Portland Country Underground | Kung Pao Chickens Jackstraw The Crackpots' Reunion

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HOLLYWOOD THEATRE A not-for-profit organization whose mission is to entertain, inspire, educate and connect the community through the art of film while preserving an historic Portland landmark. NE HOLLYWOOD 4122 NE Sandy Blvd (97212) 503.493.1128 | hollywoodtheatre.org

analog cafe & Theater 720 se hawthorne

32

Wave Sauce Scofflaw Soiree w/Pink Lady & John Bennett Jazz Band Rule Of Bone | Booyah Boys | John Clark | Eric Allen Blues Band Afro Cuba Rumba Party Neon Culpa | Cupcake

5 11 19 26 27

Or beer. Or dogfood), and “Go Go” is a

Bad Ideas has a fuller sound and tighter

shimmying song about amazon dancers

execution of instrumentation. They are

from space that jams with guitar riffs

focused, but have a lot of fun. Vocalist

and chemical noise. Still experimenting,

Steven Fusco is still lackadaisical,

they up the distortion on “Lover” to

delivering even the moodiest of

create a thick, somewhat crude track.

concerns with carefree rants. He’s got

With swelling guitars, tight drums,

amazing enunciation, baby talking

organ, silly stories, and real feels, it’s a

love and sunshine and “our heads were

release of energetic, imaginative rock

hazy but our tongues were sharp” on

hitting all of the sweet spots: punk,

“Flowers In The Sun," then singing a

vintage surf tones, '60s lounge music,

sad melodic ballad about faded time on

and a lot of freak. » - Brandy Crowe

Want to have your show listed? E-mail listings@elevenpdx.com

www.elevenpdx.com | ELEVEN PORTLAND | 16


17 | ELEVEN PORTLAND | www.elevenpdx.com

Photo by Caitlin M. Webb


A

ustralia is typically (well, stereotypically) known for kangaroos, surfing and boomerangs, but one may be surprised by the vast musical talent that the continent regularly exports, and the phenomenal Courtney Barnett is no exception. While U.S. radio may grace your speakers with a regular run of tracks "Avant Gardner" and "History Eraser," Courtney is anything but a stereotype. Back in 2010, Barnett's first garage grunge project titled Rapid Transit released a self-titled cassette album, and if that sounds like the makings of a Portlander, it was just the beginning of a string of DIY and personal-explorations/ creations to come. In 2011 Courtney made another Portland connection, befriending Brent DeBoer of The Dandy Warhols and launching psych country band Immigrant Union. (DeBoer would later play drums on Barnett's first EP.) Keeping the do-whatever-feels-right mentality alive, Barnett created indie label Milk! Records and released her own EP I've Got A Friend Called Emily Ferris, which received warm reviews. While continuing to work a bar in Hobart, AUS and arranging additional releases on her label, Courtney cobbled together her next EP, How To Carve A Carrot Into A Rose. While Got A Friend had shake, Carve A Carrot was an earthquake both locally and abroad. Her latest release was the combination of the two EPs released in May of 2013, but she's been sitting on a full-length recorded in April of this year, due out early 2015. In the meantime, Courtney and bandmates Bones Sloane (bass), Dave Mudie (drums) and Dan Luscombe (lead guitar) have been touring with ferocity. Anyone who caught one of the band's two amazing sets at Pickathon this year made a point to see them again at the Wonder Ballroom on November 1 coheadling with Sam Fermin. Judging by the crowd response and small migration after her set, it was obvious that people were most interested in one act: The gritty, honest energy shots delivered by the empyreal lyric doctor Courtney Barnett. Though last month's appearance was Courntey's first ever visit to Portland, she felt a natural level of comfort here. When your interests are creating conversation through artistic outlets like illustration, photography and writing, I suppose it's hard not to feel at home in Portland. ELEVEN elaborated on these sentimental feelings over a drink with Courtney in the sub-level of the venue, prior to her wonderful showing. ELEVEN: Courtney, earlier this year you played one of my all-time-favorite festivals. Did you enjoy your experience at Pickathon? Courtney Barnett: I thought it was an amazing festival. Every festival is kind of different [either] city or forest-y or on a farm and Pickathon was just a very memorable place. It was good vibes. The setting and the mood that the setting seemed to create. Everyone was in a really positive and friendly mood. The atmosphere was good. It makes a huge difference [compared to] a total rock and roll thing where everyone is taking lots of drugs and trying to bash each other up and shit. No one likes that kind of atmosphere. 11: What are some of your other favorite festivals to play?

features national scene CB: We’ve kind of only done festivals [for the first time] this year. Coachella was amazing because it’s in the middle of a desert and it was just beautiful out there. We got to stay in Joshua Tree, away from the festival. It was very cool. It was one of the first festivals we’d ever done. It was really huge and I think it made it extra special because of where we stayed. We really got to spend some time away from all the people and just kind of look out across the nothingness, climb a couple of mountains and looked over the hills. 11: Looking back a couple years, when did the transition occur in your mind that being a musician could be a full time professional gig? CB: Well, technically it would be from February of this year. We started to do a lot more touring and international touring and I had to quit my bar job because I was going to be away. Up until then I considered myself a musician but it’s a different kind of career, a lot of the arts, obviously, because you have to balance it somewhere else to get more living money to be able to keep creating art and doing what you like to do. At the moment, that’s where I’m at. *laughs* It's fun. 11: Do you feel like it's your calling? CB: *laughs* Maybe for now. It is what it is, maybe in five years I’ll be working another job. 11: What are some of your other hobbies if music ends up not being your forever-career? CB: Well, I’ve always made music. I do a lot of visual artwork, illustration, photography kind of stuff. That’s my main stuff. I just write a lot. I write a lot of songs, poetry, short story type stuff. Doing stuff. Making things. *laughs* 11: And now you're putting out albums, with 2013's A Sea of Split Peas, right? CB: We put out the double EP. We recorded another album which we’re going to release early next year. 11: Has it been easy to integrate new songs into the mix with how much you're writing? CB: I'm kind of always writing, but I’ve started writing [more] new stuff anyway. This album has taken ages to get out because we’ve been touring so much so it’s been hard to do all the planning shit that goes around the album release. We recorded in April... so it’s been a while. But yeah, I’m already thinking about the next album *laughs* ... and the one after that! 11: Do you have a lot in the vault for those or is it a process? CB: It’s ongoing. I definitely don’t have any songs...*thinks* I’ve got a couple of little songs that have been floating around

www.elevenpdx.com | ELEVEN PORTLAND | 18 Photo by Jarred Gastriech


features national scene

that haven’t made it on to any albums, just because they don’t seem to fit somewhere correctly, but most things are brand new. The album that is about to come out, I pretty much wrote [within] the last year while I was touring. 11: Now that you’ve been getting more and more attention, what are the biggest challenges in transitioning into the world of (maybe borderline) celebritydom? Or has it all been fun and games? CB: I find it all a bit weird. When someone seems to think that I’m any more special than anyone else, that’s a kind of weird concept that I don’t know how to deal with, really. I find it hard to be away from home a little bit, because I’ve never really travelled [so much] away from friends and girlfriend and family and normal stuff. That's the biggest thing, but [at the same time] it's kind of nice, people connecting with your music and talking to you and all that stuff. Not too many creepy people. 11: Ha, let's keep it that way. With a style based in singer/songwriter folk rock and influences like Nirvana and Hendrix, which can be more pure or basic, where does technology meet your music? How much of a part does it play in what you do?

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features national scene

WEDNESDAY 12.3: EYEZ FRONT PRESENTS : BLEACH BLONDE DUDES|THE HANDLES|SEAN CONNERY|ANDY MACDONALD - 9PM/$5 THURSDAY 12.4: AH GOD|TAMED WEST|SAD SAD BICYCLE - 9PM/$5 FRIDAY 12.5: LIGHT CREATES SHADOW|AMOS VAL|BANGBAKC - 9PM/$5 SATURDAY 12.6: WILLOW HOUSE|PERFECT FAMILIES|LE PRINTEMPS - 9PM/$5 SUNDAY 12.7: EYEZ FRONT PRESENTS : LAND OF THE LIVING|SLOW LOOKS|RANDOM AXE - 9PM/$5 WEDNESDAY 12.10: BRIDGECITY TRIVIA - IN THE BAR - 8PM/FREE THURSDAY 12.11: KPSU + WE OUT THERE MAGAZINE PRESENT: LOAD B|MILC|DAELONZ|CHANCE|MIKEY FOUNTAINE|MAC - 9PM/$5 FRIDAY 12.12: GREEN LUCK MEDIA GROUP PRESENTS: MIC CAPES|BIG MO|KEEGAN|ABSTRACT|THE PHILOSOPHERS OF A DIFFERENT NATION - 9PM/$10 SUNDAY 12.14: THE PHOENIX VARIETY REVUE - 8PM/$10 TUESDAY 12.16: EYEZ FRONT PRESENTS : ARLO INDIGO|FOG FATHER|TIGERFACE - 9PM/$5 THURSDAY 12.18: BRAKEMOUTH|HART AND HARE|MERMAID IN CHINA - 9PM/$5 FRIDAY 12.19: A BENEFIT FOR XRAY RADIO: THE MORALS|AMANDA SPRING (IOA)|COLIN JENKINS (RIO GRANDS)|STEVE HEFTER (ST. EVEN)| NATE WEY (SOUVENIR DRIVER)|LEONARD MYNX|TOBIAS BERBLINGER (VERNER PANTONS) WITH MARISA LAURELLE (THE SLUTTY HEARTS) - 9PM/FREE WITH SUGGESTED DONATION SATURDAY 12.20: DEAD MAN'S HAND|DOUBLE DEUCE|THE BONE SNATCHERS - 9PM/$5 SUNDAY 12.21: BABY KETTEN KARAOKE - 9PM/FREE THURSDAY 12.25: CHRISTMAS DAY - CLOSED FRIDAY 12.26: HYPERSTAR|MERCY GRAVES|FELLS ACRES - 9PM/FREE WEDNESDAY 12.31: ROSELIT BONE|THE CRY|PDX PUNK ROCK COLLECTIVE - 9PM/FREE SUNDAYS: THE EARLY EARLY COMEDY OPEN MIC - 4PM FREE WEEKLY FREE COMEDY OPEN MIC. SIGN UP AT 330.

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OPEN MIC HOSTED BY LEE AULSON AND TALON BRONSON. SIGNUP AT 730. SHOW 8.

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MUSIC VIDEO REQUESTS FOR THE SOUL. SELECT FROM A STOUT CATALOG!

TUESDAYS: LATE TUNES WITH KPSU DJʼS - 9PM/FREE SONGS CURATED JUST FOR YOU

CB: It doesn’t play a part in the creative side for me, [I just] write and play on whatever I have around, but for the other side of it, the sharing [on] the internet... I remember when I was in primary school and got shown the internet when it started or whatever, and to look at how I’ve released my music and kind of did it myself because I just saw that... I’m not saying that it’s so easy, but the possibility is there to reach so many people. It’s kind of crazy, it’s kind of weird. Facebook and stuff like that, it’s kind of creepy that someone can put up a video and then within five minutes, a billion jillion, however many people share it...

and this band Dick Diver that I like. *laughs* Again, I always hear stuff and people show me stuff and I’ve got a slow memory. 11: What is the question you least like getting asked? CB: I don’t think there’s any particular question, it’s just the way they are asked that can be frustrating. The "music or the lyrics first?" question can be frustrating but only because I think I don’t know how to answer it probably. 11: It’s an evolution, too though, right?

11: And there’s so much noise to sort through, too. CB: It’s completely overwhelming. I don’t even know how people discover new music. I’m still listening to John Lennon songs that I’ve never heard before. I don’t even know how people are up with the new hip fucking bands, I can’t keep up with that stuff. 11: Even though it's tough, are there any that you’ve found that you're digging on right now? CB: There’s a couple Australian bands I like. Total Control, is this kind of punk [band], I think they are on their second album,

CB: Yeah. They both happen at the same time but they come together at a different time so it’s a confusing back-to-front scenario. *laughs* Yeah. 11: Are we going to get you back to Portland in 2015? CB: I hope so. I sure hope so. It's funny because I’ve got so many friends who I’ve met in Melbourne who used to live here or have lived here and moreso than anywhere in the world, everyone just goes on and on about it, so it’s nice to finally come here and see what it’s like. »

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film

WATCH ME NOW

FILM AND TELEVISION

FILM REVIEW: INTERSTELLAR

E

arth is a perilous place. Humanity continues to plunder its resources in the attempt to become masters of our domain, and we continue on our eons-long path of attempting to destroy one another. While we are plundering and destroying, nature reveals its upper hand. Yet, despite everything, there are a select few upon which we can hang our hopes, and who can perhaps usher us into a new era through acts of bravery and exploration. This is the dream in Christopher Nolan’s gorgeous space drama, Interstellar. In Nolan’s future Earth, the dire consequences created by humanity’s reckless stewardship of our pale blue dot have reached its apex, and it isn’t good. Food has become scarce, decimated by blight. Luckily, beings with unimaginable knowledge of the mysterious mechanisms of the universe have created a wormhole next to Saturn to whisk us away from our dying planet to colonizable planets elsewhere. As is true with most of Nolan’s movies, Interstellar is a universe unto its own. Complete with bracing cinematography and a jarring, pulsating score by Hans Zimmer score propelling along Nolan’s usual escalating, harmonic tension. It is the stuff we go to see Christopher Nolan movies for—magnificent optical and aural landscapes that make art out of familiar tropes. On one level, it is a heroically realistic tale of space exploration, and the idea that humanity must go to the stars if it wishes to continue its existence (cue endless Jean-Luc Picard references). On another level, it’s a story about father-daughter relationships, as well as a meditation on the human spirit and what can occur when humans take their eyes off the stars and keep them tunneled to profit and expansion. Blended between truly phenomenal imagery lies a heavy-handed mix of personal sacrifice metaphor and convoluted theoretical physics doesn’t leave much room for nuanced storytelling. Is it a movie about time? Gravity? Multiple Dimensions? Blackholes? While all these quantum capers are portrayed, we barely get enough time to delve into anything more than a Carlos Castenada hypothesis. More than anything, this is a movie that wants to focus on love. Transcendent, all consuming love that evolves into a coercive metaphor for every narrative thread of this film. While love is a wonderful, commendable thing, it should be nary a whisper here. In one scene, a dolorous Anne Hathaway (playing some kind of planetary scientist? It's unclear) mentions that perhaps the crew should do away with all this science crap and think more metaphysically—perhaps the fifth dimension is LOVE. If we silly humans think beyond our numbers and our drive for hard answers and accept that maybe LOVE has brought us here…what? Love is the fifth dimension? This swerve into the mawkish, and truly dull esoteric hogwash begins to unravel an already convoluted, disjointed plot. And boo to Nolan for providing Anne Hathaway with the film’s most contrived monologue. There are other red flags here—warning, spoiler

ahead!—such as Michael Caine somehow being the only brilliant physicist on the planet left in charge of an underground NASA. Matthew McConaughey shines as the roughneck Coop, and the film’s most poignant and simple expression of tenderness is when he watches video dispatches from his children, decades of them, from a distant earth. The combination of Nolan’s exceptional visual and world building prowess coupled with superstar theoretical physicist Kip Thorne’s hand in directing the science, has had me filled with great anticipation as to how these two men of imagination would craft this film. Full disclosure, I am a flagrant and wholly unrepentant sucker for a good space opera. And in one sense, Nolan delivers with bells on. As I have mentioned, the creation of the universe beyond the wormhole (not to mention the jaw-dropping wormhole itself) is so stunning my eyes welled with tears. Side note: if any of you have some time, look up how they created the effects, it is fascinating and I wish had ten more pages to discuss them. However, even this cannot save Interstellar from itself. The film pays particular homage to that other blockbuster space opera, 2001: A Space Odyssey, yet could can’t even be claimed as some kind of 2001:A Space Odyssey-lite. Clocking in at almost three hours, Interstellar’s moments of incredible magnitude and wonder cannot ballast the multitudes of storytelling Nolan wants to convey to his audience. Art is also a perilous thing and Nolan wants more than art; he wants to say something. He desperately wants to agitate and electrify our souls like he does our senses. Regrettably, we are left scratching our heads not at the physics of Einstein’s relativity, but at a confused and rambling narrative » - Rachael Haigh

Illustration by Drew Bardana

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community literary arts and you’re lost. The poetry readings that took place in San Francisco in the '60s— you've got bars and people tuning in and out. . . that’s kind of the feeling we want to invoke again. You’re free to move around. You’re free to take photos. You’re free to record. We do say in the beginning that nothing can be reproduced in its entirety only because this is work available for publication. So it’s never been published before. 11: So it’s the the birth of a poem?

LITERARY ARTS Portland poet & curator Liz Mehl

I

magine sitting on a blanket at Holocene or Mississippi Studios and hearing Modest Mouse cover your favorite local band’s new song for the first time. This is the concept Liz Mehl has come up with, but for poets. She based Poetry Press Week on Fashion Week, started by a single woman in 1943 to introduce the general public to fashion designers' new clothing lines. This is where the runway was invented. With fellow local poet Justin Rigamonti, Liz invites both the press and the general public to sit down, relax, and hear some brilliant poets' work read by a model, performed by a dancer, or even presented by a seven-year-old in a ghost costume. On the local lit scene, she believes “It will have it’s own Wikipedia entry, the Portland School.” As a curator, she recognizes the level of talent we’ve been fortunate to have over the last few years, and believes that there are still many great years to come. “Do you orient yourself so as to see what’s coming, or what has just gone by?” she read, as she opened the most recent poetry reading at Mother Foucault's. With Poetry Press Week, it’s apparent that Liz Mehl has a pretty good idea of how the tide is turning in Portland. ELEVEN: What made you start up Poetry Press Week? Liz Mehl: The thing Justin and I wanted to get away from was that precious feeling of some poetry readings where you have to be so quiet—and poetry is hard enough on the page. . . but to hear it, and try to listen to it, and maybe you miss a few lines,

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LM: Yes, It’s the first time it was revealed. Two manuscripts have been picked up so far because of Press Week. Publishers are getting it now. One of the main functions of it is to have poets submit in real time. So they’re submitting directly Photo by Mercy McNab to the publishers in the audience. We stock the audience with publishers. And we say, “You’re going to be able to pick up this work tonight if you want it.” Which is why we project the poems on the wall during all of the performances so that not only can everyone follow along, but the publishers see what it looks like on the page. So they can say right there, “I want to sign up for that. I’ve got to talk to this poet tonight.” 11: So you can hear it, feel it, and see it—plus there’s a model? LM: Any model. Every poet is completely responsible for their own show, just like in Fashion Week every designer is responsible for their own show—picking the model, what they’re going to wear, all the rest. Ultimately we want the poets to say, “Here is what I believe is the best representation of my work.” For the first Press Week, singer/songwriter Laura Gibson, who was a good friend of one of the poets presenting, wrote original songs for all the poems, and sang them live. It was amazing. And last time Zach Schomburg had Kyle Morton from Typhoon played ambient music. It delivers the message in such a way. . . the focus of poetry is language, but there are so many other ways in which to deliver the language. What I want people to see is how poetry can come to life. The whole cross pollination is nothing new. But what I hope is new is it being unpublished work, an audience of press and publishers, and to have everyone mingle, and talk about it. 11: You have come up with this new concept—Poet as a Producer. What is that all about? LM: I’m all about taking analogs from other industries and applying them to poetry to further poetry’s cause. I was recently in studio with my best friend who’s an independent musician, and watched her work with a producer. She doesn’t have any more money than a poet, but she saved up four thousand dollars to afford five days with him because of what he can bring to


community literary arts her music. She came in with completed songs, but she wanted his input. So I took that and said, "This can apply to poetry." I tested the concept with Carl Adamshick, who was willing to be paid in sandwiches and beer. We met every day for a week. Craig Florence of Mother Foucoult’s heard about this idea and thought it was controversial, and it made sense for him as a publisher and book seller to put something that credits a producer on the cover of a book. 11: So it’s like a musical collaboration where the producer influences the sound? That reminds me of Dave Grohl’s new project. LM: Yes, and people don’t get it. In fact, a prominent older poet tried to convince me not to put “produced by” on the cover. He’s said “You’re going to live to regret it, and you don’t mess with a system that’s been working just fine for three hundred years." And I said that’s exactly why I’m doing it. If you know Carl’s work, you can hear it in there. So if it’s on the shelves and my name isn’t recognized, they might pick it because they love Carl’s work. And this goes back to Press Week, because it might get people out because they might go see their dancing friends and it’s introducing them to unknown poets. 11: So you might be launching careers. Kind of like an opening act for a popular band? LM: Exactly, that’s what it is. And that’s all it is. I do plan in two years to take it to Chicago or New York, and in five years I’m taking it to Paris. . . and maybe Israel. That’s really the goal—to have it spread. » - Scott McHale

LOCAL LITERARY EVENTS SALON SKID ROW PRESENTS: COLDGOLDCHAIN (2.0) 1 DECEMBER 2 | THE CORNER BAR Witness the insane rapping ability of local poet Robert Duncan Gray. Seriously, he’s got skills. Ryan Mills and Joshua Nathaniel Covington White will be presenting, and there will be an open mic for you aspiring poets.

POETRY PRESS WEEK 2 DECEMBER 5 - 6 | DISJECTA CONTEMPORARY ART CENTER Come experience the Fall/Winter installment of Liz Mehl and Justin Rigamonti’s vision. Showcasing the work of poets Carl Adamshick, Jeff Alessandrelli, Samiya Bashir, John Brehm, Lisa Ciccarello, Natalie Raryet, James Genron, Jamalieh Haley, Brandi Katherine Herrera, Coleman Stevenson, Jessalyn Wakefield, Sara June Wood.

BONE TAX 3 DECEMBER 20 | FORD FOOD & DRINK Hosted by the hilarious Ross Robbins, Bone Tax is becoming an important event for emerging poets. The Happy Hour prices are a nice option for starving writers and artists alike.

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7 Urban Fondue 8 Dark Horse community 9 muu 10 Cinema 21 11 City Market NEIGHBORHOOD OF THE MONTH

NW 21ST AVENUE

3

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2. MEAT-CENTRIC MEETUP

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BEST OF NW 21ST AVE

Location photos by Mercy McNab

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Cha Taqueria & Bar - 305 NW 21st Ave #203

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Archibald Sisters - 518 NW 21st Ave

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Bishops - 326 NW 21st Ave

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Sterling Coffee Roasters - 417 NW 21st Ave

7. FONDUE IT TO IT

Urban Fondue - 2114 NW Glisan St

8. NEIGBORHOOD ALEHOUSE

Dark Horse Pub - 519 NW 21st Ave

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Muu Muu's - 612 NW 21st Ave

10. CLASSIC ARTHOUSE REVAMPED Cinema 21 - 616 NW 21st Ave

11. FRESH UPSCALE GROCERY City Market - 735 NW 21st Ave

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12 13


community visual arts NK: Animation is such a diverse medium that exists in so many different forms. Not many people know what it takes to bring one second of animation to life. What seems to pass by in a fews seconds on screen can take days to design and execute. It's this aspect of animation that makes the challenge exciting, different, and new every time. I tend to loose myself in my work, sometimes forgetting what day it is and becoming a complete night owl. 11: Who are your art heroes? NK: I admire artists from a lot of different genres—painters, illustrators, and film directors. First name that comes to mind is Dave McKean. I admire his method of storytelling through mixed mediums and even his film directing. He is an example of an artist who has ventured down so many different paths and taken great creatives risks to get to where he is now. I also follow a lot of street art. One street duo in particular is Herakut from Germany. I love them because they just fucking do it. They put themselves where they need to make an impact and where the art is needed the most. Also, Tim Burton, Sofia Coppola, and Ralph Steadman, to name a few more. 11: What is your greatest artistic accomplishment? NK: Dispelling the starving artist myth. I’ve been able to support myself through my art and animation. Also getting to use my skill­sets in different work environments, such as music videos productions, commercials, and motion graphics projects.

VISUAL ARTS Artist Nalena Kumar

11: School, mentors, inspirations? NK: CalArts Character Animation peers and faculty. It was both inspirational and a little intimidating to be constantly surrounded by incredibly talented film makers and artists everyday. 11: Do you have favorite themes to work with?

ELEVEN: What is your medium? Nalena Kumar: I tend to use a multitude of different mediums. What ever is necessary to convey an idea or a story. Sometimes its digital, paint, hand drawn, ink, animation, stop-motion... 11: How did you come to do this type of art? NK: I always came up with characters in my sketchbook. If I could draw it out or put eyes on it, it became a character with a backstory. I grew up watching stop­motion animated films such as Wallace and Gromit and The Nightmare Before Christmas. I became obsessed with the subtle details of animation production, character design, visual development, and the sounds that made it all come to life. I wanted to make my own characters come to life and tell their story. If I’m painting or sketching a character illustration, it's usually an idea for a short animation, as I tend to envision my characters in motion. 11: Why do you like this type of art?

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NK: Since I was little, nature has always inspired me. My imagination often takes charge where I create worlds and narratives for creatures. I love creating characters, which means I also get to create the environment they live in and personality traits as well. Where do they sleep? Where do they live? Do they wake up grumpy in the morning? Do they have emotional turmoil? These are the sorts of questions I ask myself as I’m creating a new character. 11: What has been your biggest challenge in your career?


community visual arts NK: Getting the opportunity to work on projects where I am hired specifically for my artistic style. Also, Living in LA right out of college was a giant hurdle for me. The pace is crazy there. A lot of big studios wanted you to work for free if you were just starting out. But I managed to navigate though the mess toward clients who saw the value I was offering with my animation work. 11: What's the difference between working as an artist in San Diego versus working as an artist in Portland? NK: San Diego is up-and-coming, but they are still very supportive of local artists. Personally, I have more roots in Portland and I feel like I’ve yet to contribute to what’s going on in the Portland art scene. 11: What do you miss most about living in Portland, and the best thing about living in San Diego? NK: I miss the changing seasons. It’s always a nice 70 degrees in San Diego. But sometimes I want it to be overcast and rain so I can sport a pair of boots, eat soup, and listen to moody music inside all day. Portland will always have a nostalgia for me because I grew up there. I especially miss Short Sands Beach, hiking whenever I want, and snowboarding on Mt. Hood. But San Diego does offer amazing year-round surfing and is right next to Mexico to satisfy the international travel urge and get some really amazing food. I am also lucky enough to live really close to the San Diego Zoo, where I can go and draw strange looking birds to my heart's desire. 11: How has your art changed the most recently? NK: Recently, I have been working on Vine campaigns for different brands. The work is really fun because they’re stop m ­ otion and less than six seconds long. It's fun to jump into new short projects with different themes while animating in my own style.

"Kowabunny"

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community visual arts 11: What direction do you feel like you're headed in artistically? NK: I think I will always be an animator. I’ve always wanted to experiment with animation installation and more public art. 11: What's your dream job (any job)? NK: I feel extremely lucky to be able to work on animation projects from my studio. I’ve always enjoyed the independence associated with working for myself. One week I’ll be animating characters, the next week maybe storyboarding or building a stop motion set. 11: Do you have a current obsession? NK: My cat. I always look at him for story ideas because he’s always ending up in weird places or doing something ridiculous. 11: Please give a shout out to a few artists that you would like to see recognized. NK: I would definitely have to give a shout out to Eliza Ivanova. She is a really cool lady and a badass artist. » - Veronica Greene

"Story Of Wolf"

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Please enjoy Nalena's painting "Little Fox" decorating our inside back cover this month. Find more from Nalena at www.nalena.com


@ THE WONDER BALLROOM

@ THE WONDER BALLROOM

@ THE CRYSTAL BALLROOM

@ ALADDIN THEATER

Eleven PDX Magazine December 2014  
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