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JULY 2018

A STARSPANGLED BANNER YEAR Nevada finishes first year of adult-use on a high note

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Ten

marijuana movies you didn’t know you needed in your life

All-American review highlighted by amber waves of extract and purple mountain majesties Cooking with Cannabis: StrawberryBlueberry Kush Sundae

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from the editor

Publisher Guy Bertuzzi, guy@elevatenv.com

Editor-In-Chief Beth Schwartz, beth@elevatenv.com

Creative Director Brooke Bertuzzi, brooke@finetheagency.com

Contributing Writers:Justin Alexander, Kayla Anderson, Josh Bell, Amanda Connor, Deborah Costella, Celena Esquer, Natice Locke Media Consultants: Mark Damkroeger, mark@elevatenv.com Marissa Skinner, marissa@elevatenv.com Nicole Verlinich, nicole@elevatenv.com

ELEVATION PUBLISHING LLC Chief Financial Officer Cassandra Lupo

FINE THE AGENCY Partner Kelli Maruca, kelli@finetheagency.com

Graphic Designer James Nigbur, james@finetheagency.com

Account Coordinator Kimberly Chang, kim@finetheagency.com elevate nevada magazine makes every effort to ensure the accuracy of the information it publishes, but cannot be held responsible for any consequences arising from errors, false data or omissions. elevate nevada assumes no responsibility for any claims or representations contained in this publication or in any advertisement. elevate nevada magazine does not encourage the illegal use of any of the products or advertisements within. Reproduction in whole or in part strictly prohibited. All rights reserved. To subscribe to elevate nevada, visit elevatenv.com/subscribe/. 7120 Rafael Ridge Way, Las Vegas, NV 89119 Phone: 702.855.3843 | Email: info@elevatenv.com

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CBD is currently enjoying a big ole, blissinducing moment in the spotlight. After years of being overshadowed by cannabis’ most celebrated superstar— the sometimes paranoid and always psychoactive THC—the beatific and subdued healer CBD seems to have finally edged itself back on to the world’s stage to find a slice of the everincreasing pro-cannabis limelight. Interestingly, cannabidiol was on the scene long before tetrahydrocannabinol. It was discovered in 1940 by Dr. Roger Adams and his team at the University of Illinois. While Israeli researcher Raphael Mechoulam and his colleagues at Hebrew University of Jerusalem didn’t discover THC’s star power until decades later in 1964. After being cast aside as a no-talent, devoid of healing properties, in favor of the more dramatic and overacting (if there ever was one in the cannabinoid family tree) THC, the always subtle CBD has finally started getting its due. Cannabidiol, which offers relief from inflammation, pain, anxiety, psychosis, seizures, and spasms, began to build notoriety last year. It started with booths popping up at farmers markets and art fairs where the benefits of CBD salves and lotions were touted for the relief of maladies that included arthritis, fibromyalgia, and chronic pain. Since the calendar flipped to 2018, it seems CBD has finally begun to find the fame and fortune it’s so deserving of receiving. It’s been making a meteoric career turn, breaking away from being known for starring roles in tinctures, lotions, salves, bath bombs and balms to appearing in food items that range from wine, tea, and cold-brew coffee to gummies, honey, and smoothies. Part of CBD’s rising star status is a result of the 2014 U.S. Farm Bill,

which outlines that a state’s Department of Agriculture may grow or cultivate industrial hemp. Nevada’s political leaders didn’t waste any time in seeing the potential and passed Senate Bill 305 in 2015 which allowed hemp cultivation in the state under current federal guidelines. With over 20 states signing on to similar legislation, this has created a big boon in CBD oil production that has resulted in a dizzying array of products. But be careful about the CBD products you purchase. There are enough bad actors in the marketplace posing as CBD-dominant products that the FDA has taken notice. The federal agency tests products that claim to have cannabidiol to ensure their accuracy. (You can find the FDA’s list of products that don’t contain the levels of CBD claimed on the label at https://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/ PublicHealthFocus/ucm484109.htm) The FDA and I have not been the only ones to notice CBD’s recent popularity. In March cannabidiol made a grand debut at Natural Products Expo West when the massive trade show hosted its first-ever CBD Summit. According to a report in the Cannabist, the expo’s goal was to provide a glimpse of the products made with the hemp-based extract. The Washington Post called CBD "the new ‘it’ drug." Quartzy declared that it is a "rapidly rising star for its capacity to deliver mental and physical benefits," which was reported under a headline calling CBD “the next big thing.” We think the next big thing already arrived. Cheers to rising stars, stars and stripes, and the freedom to elevate,


E

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Cooking Cannabis STRAWBERRY-BLUEBERRY KUSH SUNDAE

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elevatenv.com | july

by chef Celena Esquer, a.k.a. the Blaz’n Chef, .cannabisfreshfoods.com With red, white and blue swirling through our patriotic collective in great abundance this month, we decided July’s Cooking with Cannabis should be a dessert that paid tribute to all things stars and stripes and unequivocally American. Additionally, we would be remiss if we didn’t pay homage to National Strawberry Sundae Day (July 7) and National July Belongs to Blueberries Month. So, we tasked chef Celena Esquer with the job of concocting a strawberry and blueberry infused sundae to beat the heat while at the same time is sparked with both a bit of patriotic flair and wholesome berry goodness. And we aren’t gonna lie, cooling off with an iced dairy treat sounds like the best way to take on a shimmering hot summer day in the Mojave. If you don’t want to make your own ice cream or don’t have time, you can always substitute for store-bought ice cream and swirl your sauce into that. Either way, Happy Fourth of July -- we hope it’s a blast!

HOMEMADE VANILLA ICE CREAM INGREDIENTS: 2 cups milk ½ cup whipping cream 2 tsp. vanilla extract 1 cup granulated sugar 1 pinch of salt 1 gram of shatter or decarboxylated flower 1 cup vegetable glycerin

ICE CREAM INSTRUCTIONS: In a medium-sized bowl, add all your ingredients and whisk together until sugar is completely dissolved. Cover and chill in freezer for two hours or until firm. If you are using an ice cream maker, after two hours put it in ice cream maker and mix up until you have a perfect consistency and leave in freezer until firm. To make tincture, procure a small oven-safe glass bowl and add shatter covering with foil or lid. Preheat oven to 250°. Once oven is ready, put shatter in and set timer for 25 minutes. When timer goes off remove shatter and set aside to cool. Do not remove cover until shatter is completely cool. In a double broiler add decarboxylated flower or shatter (I am using one gram of shatter) to one cup of vegetable glycerin and simmer on a low heat for 15 to 20 minutes or until thoroughly combined. Please remember when cooking with medicinal cannabis you are cooking with a medicine and the medicine amount and portions of the food ingested should always be taken into consideration. Always start out with small portions or doses and wait 30 minutes to an hour before eating any additional portions of food that has been medicated.


BLUEBERRY SAUCE INGREDIENTS:

SAUCE INSTRUCTIONS:

2 cups fresh blueberries 1 cup water ½ cup sugar 1 tsp. vanilla ½ cup infused vegetable glycerin (You will also need a can of whipped topping for this recipe.)

In separate pans, add strawberries in one pan and add blueberries to the other. Add all ingredients to each pan except vegetable glycerin. Simmer until strawberries/blueberries are soft enough to blend. Set aside and let cool for five minutes, add strawberry mix into blender and blend until you get a sauce consistency. When done, add back into your strawberry pan and follow the same instructions for the blueberry sauce. Once both sauces are back in their separate pans, add ½ cup of infused vegetable glycerin to each sauce and simmer until sauce has a thicker consistency for a sundae and refrigerate.

STRAWBERRY SAUCE INGREDIENTS: 2 cups fresh strawberries 1 cup water ½ cup sugar 1 tsp. vanilla ½ cup infused vegetable glycerin (You will also need a can of whipped topping for this recipe.)

ICE CREAM PREPARATION: Pull your ice cream out of the freezer and let it sit on counter until ice cream is somewhat soft. Choose one of the sauces to swirl into your ice cream. Pour it onto your ice cream with the help of a spatula, then using a spoon slowly swirl sauce into your ice cream and put back in freezer until firm.

KUSH SUNDAE ASSEMBLY:

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Using your choice of a sundae glass, add 2 Tbsp. of graham crackers to the bottom of the glass followed by three scoops of ice cream, then add 2 Tbsp. of your sauce and drizzle with some whipped topping. Add three more scoops of ice cream and 2 more Tbsp. of sauce, then add one more layer of whipped topping. Garnish is optional; choose from mini chocolate morsels, chopped peanuts, mint leaves, or fresh chopped strawberries/blueberries.


elevatenv.com | july 8

(continued on page 33)


elevatenv.com | july 9

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Keep out of reach of children. For use only by adults 21 of age and older. Š 2017 The Source. All Rights Reserved. 20171024


elevatenv.com | july 10

Independence Day AN ALL-AMERICAN REVIEW HIGHLIGHTED BY AMBER WAVES OF EXTRACT AND PURPLE MOUNTAIN MAJESTIES by Justin Alexander

This month is all about celebrating—from our nation’s birthday to the one-year anniversary of Nevada’s dispensaries opening their doors to recreational users on July 1. With this foremost on our minds, we have compiled a review of allAmerican products and strains that may range in origin but are quintessential in their USA-grown roots. The review’s product array includes everything from Evergreen Organix summer classic of barbeque sauce to 8|Fold’s Blue Dream sauce. Evergreen’s Jillian Nelson describes the brand’s newly released barbeque sauce as “a unique and refreshing twist that is the perfect way to celebrate summer.” While Laura Schmidt of Nevada Organic Remedies, which produces Blue Dream, offers a more patriotic pitch. “Blue Dream is an all-American product. Our country was founded on dreams, ideas and people collaborating with one another to make something great and revolutionary,” says Schmidt. “This sauce is like that—people collaborating to create something awesome and new for everyone.” As you collaborate on your celebratory plans, after hoisting up the old red, white and blue and before you take in some fireworks, serve yourself up some summer smiles with a sampling of these celebratory strains and selections. And remember even though July 4th will be here and gone before you know it, every day is Independence Day in Nevada since the voters declared it so.


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EVERGREEN ORGANIX INFUSED HOT SAUCE AND BBQ SAUCE What’s more American than a barbecue? And what better way to celebrate than with delicious burgers, ribs and hot dogs slathered with summer’s classic condiments that are canna-infused? “Our cannabis-


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infused Hot Sauce and BBQ Sauce are the quintessential ingredients for a cannabis barbeque. They’re allAmerican,” enthuses Evergreen Organix’ Jillian Nelson of the two products made exclusively for Essence Cannabis Dispensary, and each testing in at 1.5 mg THC. “We wanted to create products that elevated the typical barbeque experience, products that were easy to use and versatile so that DIY edibles would be more manageable for cannabis home cooks. We also dosed the sauces at 100 mg each so that a bottle could be used between multiple servings.” Sauce your ribs and save some for later or sneak a taste with a little pinky dip and kick back, relax and enjoy the effects. For a more controlled dosage, mix the “special” sauce with a noninfused variety in equal parts. “Our sauces delve into the savory and spicy realm of edibles,” adds Nelson. As an added bonus, Evergreen Organix has posted some yummy recipes on its blog for inspiration, visit evergreenorganix.com/blog to check out their sizzling cannabis BBQ recipes.

MEDIZIN’S ANIMAL COOKIES LIVE RESIN During the dog days of summer, look no further than the calming and euphoric effects of Medizin’s Animal Cookies Live Resin, testing in at 70.2 percent THC and 2.74 mg CBD. Live resin, a cannabis concentrate that is extracted from freshly flash-frozen cannabis, retains the terpenes, thus, the flavor and aroma of the living plant. The terpenes that inhabit Animal Cookies include 11.18 mg myrcene, 8.09 mg limonene, 5.74 mg linalool, and 4.51 mg caryophyllene. Animal Cookies, a hybrid cross between the legendary Girl Scout Cookies and Fire OG strains, “is a powerhouse strain for those looking for classic relaxed and happy effects,” says Medizin’s David Farris. “This is a perfect strain to relax and enjoy the fireworks on the Fourth of July. The calming yet euphoric effects make this strain unique. We wanted to introduce this strain because of the overall quality for a hybrid. It was important for us to deliver a sweet and sour cookies strain based on demand. We had overwhelmingly positive results with this strain; it’s one of our top varieties featured in flower, concentrates and more.” So grab your dab rig and settle down for a sweet summer surprise.


KYND TAHOE OG

8|FOLD’S BLUE DREAM BHO SAUCE Celebrate all the colors of the flag with 8|Fold’s first-ever BHO sauce, Blue Dream. “It’s about that red, white, and Blue (American) Dream,” says Laura Schmidt of Nevada Organic Remedies. BHO sauce, popularly known as “terp sauce,” is a highly aromatic cannabis extract that utilizes a BHO (butane hash oil) extraction process to maximize

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Travelling to Tahoe this Fourth for some lakeside fun? Accentuate your patriotic journey with Kynd’s Tahoe OG, a cross between SFV OG and OG Kush, a pair of old-school strains straight out of Southern California. “For us, Tahoe is home, and we couldn’t think of a better name for this homegrown hybrid. The Fourth of July is big at the lake, and there’s no better strain than Tahoe OG for kicking back and watching the fireworks,” says Stacy Castillo, Chief Operations Officer at Kynd. “People enjoy the relaxing effects without lethargy. We love Tahoe OG for ironing out the wrinkles from a stressful day. It’s very euphoric.” Take it easy breezy with this wonderfully balanced strain that is particularly high in isopulegol, a terpene known for its anti-convulsive, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, gastroprotective and stress-reductive properties. Tahoe OG is also high in the more well-known terpenes of myrcene and limonene— and has tested as high as 30.5 for total potential THC. “It’s pretty much an instant classic thanks to its very typical OG characteristics. It has those earthy, citrusy tones, and it’s incredibly effective in reducing stiffness and general tenderness,” Castillo adds. “Anything that can help with pain, insomnia and lack of appetite is something to celebrate.” Nothing says independence like a puff of Tahoe OG.


terpene concentration and extract every bit of flavor. The effects lean toward sativa. “This would be a great product to use with a nectar collector [or dab rig] at a Fourth of July party to share and watch fireworks and grill out. It has 52.49 percent THC so it’s not a heavy hitter, and it provides a nice high that can be continued during multiple seshes throughout the day,” elaborates Schmidt. “The terpene profile on the Blue Dream sauce is incredible. It has both a- and b-pinene in it (24.74 mg and 12.51 mg, respectively), as well as a ton of myrcene (19.24 mg). The entourage effect of the terpenes leaves you with a balanced high, and the focus from the pinene and the relaxation from the myrcene make it unique. Our patient advisors noted that you realize you’ve smoked something but you’re not bogged down or tired, but rather uplifted and energetic.” All that mellow energy is perfect for a relaxing day enjoying the splendor in the skies.

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VIRTUE TRIPLE G FLOWER Searching for something a little more time-tested and traditional on this, the most time-tested and traditional of American holidays? Then check out Virtue’s Triple G flower. Triple G is a hard-hitting hybrid of OG Kush, a cherished cannabis cut of many smokers. Triple G is as American as apple pie—according to Virtue’s Heather Wallace, “the strain was bred right here in the good ole USA by Clade9 genetics. All the genetics that were used to create her also originate in the USA.” Clade9, known for its scrupulously scientific growing methods, “created a higher-yielding OG Kush hybrid. It’s a connoisseur's variety. It has a semi-dense flower structure, copious amounts of resin and a complex terpene profile (7.31 mg limonene, 3.82 mg caryophyllene, 2.89 mg myrcene) that complements the high total cannabinoids,” Wallace says, who added, “the flower structure and trichome structure are very aesthetically pleasing.” Delicious and hard hitting, this super pungent strain carries you away on a super high-high as the great taste of orange and cinnamon lingers behind. At 28.477 percent total potential THC and 32.471 percent THCa, Triple G is recommended for advanced smokers.


DISTRICT EDIBLES’ CHERRY COLA GUMMIES

CANNABIOTIX’S MANDARIN MINT Celebrate all that makes America ‘Murica with an equally exotic blend of Mandarin Mint flower from Cannabiotix. Just like the divergent makeup of Mandarin Mint, America, land of the free, home of the brave is akin to a hodgepodge of friends all mixed up at one crazy summer barbecue. “This strain could be thought of like the melting pot of America. We've taken

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Who doesn’t love cracking open a few cold ones on a hot summer day? No, not beers— edible gummies. “Our cherry cola gummies are not just all-American in flavor, but also Photo credit: Keene Dadian by the integrity behind how we make them so good,” says Margaux Hansberry, Nevada Sales Manager at District. “Every gummy can be considered a mini celebration of our freedom to not only have delicious cannabis-infused gummies, but ones that are flavored as the quintessential American beverage cherry cola.” The yummy gummies made from the Money Maker strain are produced using high-potency distillate oil, keeping the taste and effects both pure and potent. Each gummy is individually packaged in a waterproof blister pack, keeping each dose consistent at 10.49 mg of D9THC per serving. “Even if it's been melted from the unavoidable heat, they stay juicy fresh, a tribute to the candy-store cola gummies we've grown to love. They’re a perfect option for pool or beach time,” Hansberry says of the gummies that are low in sugar, gluten-free and dairy-free. “They taste amazing on their own. Using a high-potency distillate refined from unnecessary plant matter in a soft gummy consistency results in effects that are uplifting and positive. I can chew these up nicely, allowing for a faster sublingual absorption that isn't so heavy or lethargic,” she adds. “The flavor itself is very unique, as it's rare in Nevada's current edible selection. A sweettasting blend of vanilla, cherries and cola paired with our highly refined strain-specific sativa-dominant oil reminds me of the little pick-me-up I get from sipping a true cherry cola.”


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elevatenv.com | july

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an old-school classic sativa, Orange Crush, and crossed it with the famously distinct indica hybrid Thin Mint Cookies to capture the best qualities of both. You'll feel uplifted yet relaxed without mental haziness or getting stuck on the couch,” says Cannabiotix’s David Lloyd. “It’s a great summertime smoke—you can enjoy it all day, and it appeals to users of all types.” Lloyd says Cannabiotix worked hard to create this picture-perfect patriotic blend which registers at 30.20 percent THC and has a terpene profile of 2.535 mg a-pinene, 1.067 mg b-pinene, and 6.307 mg myrcene. “We wanted to cross two Cannabis Cup-winning strains with the hopes of making a great-tasting, uplifting and beneficial strain for patients and recreational users alike. Mandarin Mint’s fat calyxes are covered in dense crystals that almost resemble fur. The high THC levels are great for medicinal users looking for pain management without being weighed down by it. It’s high in THC while not being too couch locking or overly anxious. This is a great strain to bring to the celebration, as it can be enjoyed all day.”

BIO-DIESEL FROM REMEDY Bio-Diesel is named for its effects, which hit you “strong and steady as a diesel engine,” says Randy Villarba, marketing/ wholesale manager for Remedy/TerpX, of the strain that registers at 30.48 percent THC and 33.42 percent THCa. Its parent strain is an all-America variety, Sour Diesel, which has made


its way from New York City to the Hawaiian Islands. “Crossing it with the multi-High Times Cannabis Cup winner Sensi Star, you get a pure 50:50 hybrid that is familiar and offers what most Americans are looking for—a steady balance of body and cerebral effects,” he says of Bio-Diesel which has a terpene mix of 4.4 mg isopulegol, 4.2 mg b-myrcene, 1.6 mg limonene, and 1.2 mg b-caryophyllene. Since Bio-Diesel works both the indica and sativa aspect of its parent strains, it is great for both physical and psychological ailments. Expect a two-in-one effect, whereas most patients would have to smoke two strains to get the punch of the Diesel, it is truly balanced. “They need relief, both body and mind,” Villarba says. “The effect from this strain is intense, but to an experienced cannabis user, also extremely relaxing. Patients dealing with everything from anxiety to chronic pain can mitigate those symptoms with this even hybrid.”

We love the American Dream and we’re quite partial to the Blue Dream as well... Apothecarium’s Blue Dream flower, that is! “Part of what makes America awe-inspiring is our tremendous diversity. Together, Americans form a unified melting pot of opportunity, change and hope. Blue Dream originates from the marriage of Blueberry Indica and Sativa Haze—two completely opposing phenotypes— to create one of the most iconic strains of our time. While sativa-dominant, Blue Dream provides a balanced effect of cerebral stimulation, mood enhancement, and relaxation. Its diversity creates harmony, and that’s as all-American as it gets,” says Apothecarium’s Matthew Janz. “Blue Dream is absolutely correlated to elation—its energizing sativa-dominant effects have caused many spontaneous celebrations. It has the right mix of relaxation and mood enhancement, perfect for any celebratory moment.” And like any U.S. citizen, Apothecarium’s flower is tried and true. Janz says: “[We are] Envirocann-certified, which means that our flowers are tested for synthetic pesticides (continued on page 34)

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BLUE DREAM FLOWER FROM STATE FLOWER CANNABIS

MARIJUANA


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elevatenv.com | march


ELEVATE YOUR STATE

cannabis updates from across the United States

MICHIGAN: The Coalition to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol has cleared a major hurdle towards making marijuana legal in Michigan. In April, the Board of State Canvassers approved the petition signatures, and the initiative to regulate marijuana will be on the ballot in November. If approved by voters, Michigan would become the first state in the Midwest with an adult-use cannabis law. In addition to allowing adults age 21 and older to possess and cultivate limited amounts of marijuana, the initiative would: regulate marijuana businesses that cultivate, process, test, transport, and sell marijuana; legalize the cultivation of industrial hemp (used to make textiles, biodegradable plastics, food, construction materials, and fuel); protect consumers with proper testing and safety regulations for retail marijuana; impose a 10 percent excise tax on marijuana sold at the retail level on top of the state’s six percent sales tax; and give local governments the option of whether they want to allow marijuana businesses in their communities.

NEW MEXICO: In April, Albuquerque Mayor Tim Keller signed an ordinance decriminalizing simple possession of marijuana under city law. Under the new law, the possession of up to one ounce of marijuana is classified as a civil infraction, punishable by a $25 civil fine. Council members Pat Davis and Isaac Benton sponsored the ordinance, which passed the council in a 5-4 vote. Albuquerque joins Santa Fe, which decriminalized minor marijuana possession offenses via a 2014 municipal initiative. It will still be possible for a person to be charged under the statewide penalty — a fine of up to $50, up to 15 days in jail, or both.

GEORGIA: In May Gov. Nathan Deal signed HB 65 which significantly expands the number of patients who qualify for the state’s low-THC medical cannabis oil. Beginning on July 1, HB 65 will allow patients with intractable pain and adults with PTSD to qualify for the program, which allows registered patients to possess cannabis oil with no more than 5 percent THC content. Georgia Rep. Allen Peake (R) sponsored HB 65 which includes a study commissioned on in-state access to cannabis. Rep. Peake also sponsored HB 645 which would have allowed in-state production of cannabis oils. Currently, registered patients have nowhere to legally purchase cannabis oil in Georgia. HB 645 didn’t receive a floor vote.


MAINE: In May, the Maine Legislature overrode Republican Governor Paul LePage’s veto of a bill to finally allow commercial cannabis sales demanded by voters in November 2016. The Senate voted 28-6 and the House voted 109-39 Wednesday to override Gov. LePage's veto. The governor argues he can't violate federal law and that adults will flock to Maine's medical marijuana program. Possession of up to 2.5 ounces (71 grams) of marijuana is already legal in the state. The bill eliminates marijuana social clubs, reduces the number of plants that people can have and prohibits sale near schools. Under the bill, Maine could allow retail pot sales to adults as early as next year. The voter-approved law created a 10 percent sales tax on retail marijuana. The bill would require growing facilities to pay an excise tax of $335 per pound of mature marijuana plants and other fees.

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ILLINOIS: On March 20, voters in the largest county in Illinois, overwhelmingly approved a ballot question with 63 percent of voters in favor of legalizing the drug. The measure in Cook County -- the nation's second-most-populous county -- is nonbinding, so the vote does not mean recreational marijuana use will automatically become legal. But its passage sends a strong message to state lawmakers that ending cannabis prohibition is an issue that voters want the legislature to address. The question, approved by voters with a greater than two-to-one margin, read: "Shall the State of Illinois legalize the cultivation, manufacture, distribution, testing, and sale of marijuana and marijuana products for recreational use by adults 21 and older subject to state regulation, taxation and local ordinance?"

july | elevatenv.com

Medical Cannabis is Legal


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CANNABIS CINEMA

MARIJUANA MOVIES THAT WILL MAKE YOU NATURALLY HIGH

Ten

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By Josh Bell

Most people can rattle off a list of “stoner” movies pretty easily, from Cheech and Chong’s oeuvre to Dazed and Confused to Half Baked to Dude, Where’s My Car?, but that just scratches the surface of the long history of movies about marijuana and its usage. There are plenty of movies about the pleasures of getting stoned, but good marijuana movies often go further than that, showing how cannabis plays an important role in the characters’ lives, whether it’s a way for friends to bond or a business proposition for people who don’t fit into mainstream culture. Here are 10 underrated movies from the last 20 years—some funny, some absurd, some affecting, some dramatic—that you might want to check out if you’re looking to go beyond the obvious choices for cannabis cinema.

Homegrown (1998) Billy Bob Thornton, Hank Azaria and Ryan Phillippe play three low-level lieutenants to a major pot grower who come into an unexpected windfall when their boss gets murdered. Of course, unexpected windfalls never work out for hapless losers in movies like this, and their plan to sell off the boss’ crop while keeping up the illusion that he’s still alive quickly spirals out of control. Director and co-writer Stephen Gyllenhaal (father of Jake and Maggie, both of whom make cameo appearances) never lets the story get too dark, but there’s some decent suspense combined with oddball humor, and the storytelling is appealingly off-kilter, never quite going in the direction you expect.

Saving Grace (2000) In the vein of other gentle dramedies about working-class Brits turning to unconventional means to raise money (The Full Monty, Calendar Girls, Kinky Boots, etc.), Saving Grace stars Brenda Blethyn as a middle-aged widow whose late husband leaves her with a mountain of debt and no way to pay it off. Faced with potentially losing her gorgeous English country house to creditors, Blethyn’s Grace teams up with her gardener (played by comedian Craig Ferguson, who also co-wrote and co-produced) to grow a remarkably potent strain of marijuana in her greenhouse. Mild wackiness ensues, especially in the excessively silly finale, but the movie remains mostly grounded, with heartfelt stories about Grace coming to terms with how little she knew about her late husband and Ferguson’s Matthew learning to face adult responsibility when he finds out he’s going to be a father.

Reefer Madness: The Movie Musical (2005) The 1936 anti-marijuana propaganda film Reefer Madness has become something of a cult classic thanks to its laughably hysterical tone and its convenient availability in the public domain. Playwrights and songwriters Kevin Murphy and Dan Studney remix and reinterpret the events, characters and dialogue of that notorious film to create a Rocky Horror-style campy musical, which started out as a stage production before being adapted as a movie. The songs are decently catchy, the performances (from talents including Kristen Bell, Alan Cumming and Ana Gasteyer) are deliberately over-the-top, and the jokes mostly land. Somewhere in the middle between a scathing parody and an indulgent homage, this movie captures the ridiculousness of the original Reefer Madness while adding some entertaining new ridiculousness of its own.

Smiley Face (2007) Perpetually underestimated comedic star Anna Faris gives possibly the best performance of her career as unemployed actress Jane, who inadvertently eats a whole batch of pot cupcakes and goes on an odyssey of self-discovery and self-recrimination as she attempts to pay her power bill, attend an audition and bake a replacement batch of cupcakes for her roommate. Of course, she fails in all of these tasks (as well as many others that arise out of her beatifically altered state), but her failures are delightful both as comedy and as a gleefully inventive meditation on the beauty of existence. Jane may have no idea what she’s doing, but she constantly views the world through a perspective of wonder and amazement, even when absolutely nothing is going her way.


Leaves of Grass (2009) As an actor, Tim Blake Nelson has worked closely with the Coen brothers, and he brings a Coen-esque quality to his fourth film as a writer-director, starring Edward Norton in dual roles as a renowned Ivy League philosophy professor and his ne’er-do-well pot-dealing twin brother. Deceptively devious Brady lures the uptight Bill back to their Oklahoma hometown and ropes Bill into participating in a scheme to get some nasty characters off Brady’s back. The initially antagonistic brothers reconnect over some high-quality bud, while Bill reluctantly learns to appreciate the Southern life he left behind. Nelson (who also plays a supporting role) makes some broad thriller-style swings in the movie’s second half that don’t quite pay off, but the laidback scenes of family togetherness (featuring Susan Sarandon, Keri Russell and Melanie Lynskey as the women in the brothers’ lives) have just the right amount of warmth and wit.

A Very Harold & Kumar Christmas (2011) The first Harold and Kumar adventure, 2004’s Harold & Kumar Go to White Castle, is justifiably beloved, and the second, 2008’s Harold & Kumar Escape From Guantanamo Bay, is justifiably scorned. But the third movie rarely gets its due as both a new holiday classic and a surprisingly poignant conclusion to the story of pot-smoking best friends Harold (John Cho) and Kumar (Kal Penn). With a madcap quest storyline (to replace a destroyed Christmas tree) similar to the first movie’s journey to White Castle, plus an examination of how friends can grow apart as they grow older (and one retains a certain recreational habit while the other doesn’t), Christmas brings the laughs and the pathos, anchored by the enduring, appealing chemistry between the two leads.

The Wackness (2008) Teenager Luke Shapiro (Josh Peck) spends the summer of 1994, after his senior year of high school, dealing weed out of a portable ice cream cart, falling in love with his classmate Stephanie (Olivia Thirlby) and bonding with his psychiatrist and top client Dr. Squires (Ben Kingsley) in this wistful coming-of-age dramedy. Peck and Thirlby make for a winning teenage couple, and Kingsley has a lot of fun as the dissolute, melancholy adult whose only friend is his teenage drug dealer. Writer-director Jonathan Levine infuses the movie with nostalgia for the New York City of the ’90s, with all its flaws and opportunities, but more than that he captures that liminal time between the end of adolescence and the beginning of adulthood, when life is full of possibilities but also full of potential disappointment.

Richard Linklater’s 1993 high school ensemble comedy Dazed and Confused is justifiably considered a classic, but this “spiritual sequel” set in 1980 (just a few years after Dazed’s late-’70s time period) has many of the same charms, with its authentic portrait of college baseball players hanging out and goofing off in the few days before the start of their freshman year. Of course, that involves smoking plenty of pot, and Wyatt Russell steals every scene he’s in as the main characters’ marijuana guru, who introduces them to new ways of smoking and new philosophical ideas about the universe. As he does in Dazed, Linklater captures the everyday feel of the time period, not just the fashion and the music, with grounded characters you’d want to spend time with, and a warm, casual vibe.

Dude (2018) The stars of comedies about young people hanging out and smoking pot are almost always dudes, but Olivia Milch’s directorial debut Dude flips the formula by starring a quartet of young ladies. Lucy Hale, Kathryn Prescott, Awkwafina and Alexandra Shipp play four high school seniors who are all facing uncertainties as they move on to a new phase of their lives—but one thing they’re never uncertain about is their love for smoking together. The mix of exuberant comedy and stark drama is sometimes uneven, but the four leads are all immensely appealing, and at its best Dude is an affecting teen hangout movie that takes teenage problems seriously, with room for both silly rap sing-alongs and heartfelt talks about grief, privilege and sexual exploration.

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Everybody Wants Some!! (2016)

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Inherent Vice (2014) Serious film auteur Paul Thomas Anderson adapting serious novelist Thomas Pynchon sounds like a recipe for a heavy, serious movie, but while Inherent Vice can be a bit narratively overwhelming as its plot twists pile up and its running time heads past two hours, it’s mostly a lighthearted lark. A sunny Southern California mystery in the vein of The Long Goodbye or The Big Lebowski, Vice stars Joaquin Phoenix as pot-smoking private investigator Doc Sportello, who gets in way over his head when he’s hired to look into the disappearance of a real estate mogul. As the story gets increasingly incomprehensible, Doc is as baffled as the audience, but his laid-back, chemically enhanced approach to life allows him to come out on top of the various nefarious characters he encounters, even if he doesn’t always understand how he does it.


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Nevada celebrates first year of recreational marijuana

It all started on November 8, 2016 when 54.47 percent of Nevadans voted to legalize the use of recreational marijuana and, in turn, launched the process to end cannabis prohibition. With the passing of Nevada’s Marijuana Legalization ballot question, also known as Question 2, more than 602,000 voters throughout the state legalized recreational use of up to an ounce of marijuana (or up to 1/8 ounce of concentrate) at a time for people age 21 and over. A few months later, the Nevada Department of Taxation approved regulations to allow medical marijuana dispensaries in good standing to sell recreational marijuana starting July 1, 2017. To follow is a review of how legalizing adult-use cannabis has inpacted Nevada since it went into effect one year ago, and a look at where the state is headed.

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By Kayla Anderson

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Toke ’em if you got ’em!


CANN BIS

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JULY 1, 2017

OPEN 24HRS

Opening The Dispensary in Reno to recreational marijuana users on July 1, 2017 was “pandemonium and awesomeness all at the same time,” says Manager Jeff Grossman. “We had lines out the building, wrapped around, and tents set up outside where we offered beverages and a barbeque.” Overall, The Dispensary accommodated more than a thousand people that day who were mainly buying flower and pre-rolls with a bit of hysteria in the backroom as budtenders tried to sell everything they could without totally running out of product. “(The transition from) medical to rec sales is not even in the same ballpark, it was an immense jump. In the medical market people still need to obtain an MMJ card so that keeps it limited,” observes Grossman. On that same day, Mynt Cannabis Dispensary in Downtown Reno also experienced a huge uptick in business. “I showed up and there was already a line around the block, it was busy from the start. There was awesome energy, it being a day to make history. The most common thing I heard was from the older crowd saying, ‘we’ve been waiting for this our whole lives’,” says Mynt Supervisor Kayla Fiore, who adds, “people waited 45 minutes to an hour to get in. We had water bottles and stuff for them, but they were just amped to be there.” “Many Nevadans spent their whole lives here with the strictest laws in the state (on cannabis), so to be able to go out and get the help they need…it’s huge,” recalls Cayden Martilla, another Mynt supervisor. “March 9, 2017 was when we opened up medicinally and I would say business went up 180 percent due to the legalization of rec use.” While Reno was on the ball with getting everything in place by July 1, Sparks dispensaries were a few weeks behind them. In mid-July, after the Sparks City Council passed a new business application, most of its dispensaries opened up their recreational marijuana counters immediately. “We went live on July 15 -- it was a good day, we did a lot of transactions and there was a lot of education,” says Steve Duque, vice president of Sparks’ Greenleaf Wellness. “We were a couple of weeks behind Reno but people were very excited to try out our products in Sparks. We had a couple hundred people, it was a tremendous boost in business.” As the newness of the rec use law is starting to wear off, Duque is seeing customers starting to settle in, finding their favorite dispensary and products. “We see a lot of repeat business,” he says. Over in North Lake Tahoe, it was obvious when rec


use went live (on August 5, 2017). At NuLeaf in Incline Village, part of unincorporated Washoe County, locals and visitors were also lined up around the building and spilling over onto adjoining streets. Some kids even set up a lemonade stand outside to try to grab a piece of the business. Staff was ready when NuLeaf opened its doors at 11a.m. that day, and the excitement in the air was palpable. “The feeling in the room was excitement, anxiousness, and relief. It was a celebration a lot of people had been waiting for,” recalls NuLeaf Dispensary Specialist Justin Beckelman of the couple of thousand people who came through during its opening weekend of adult-use legalization.

A TAX BOON

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Money has been flowing into state coffers with the legalization of recreational marijuana. With three months still left in the fiscal year, as of March 31st the State of Nevada Department of Taxation had already raked in 97 percent ($48.97 million) of the combined marijuana tax revenue that was projected for the entire year, which had been forecasted at $50.32 million (see graph on page 30). July 2017 was the smallest month of sales (with $3.68 million in tax revenue) and March 2018 comes in as the highest ($7.09 million). “As we see the industry grow and mature from its initial start date last July, we’ll continue to see this kind of growth,” says the Department of Tax’s Executive Director Bill Anderson. “The potential isn’t unlimited, we have 60-plus dispensaries right now throughout the state and we can double that amount but at some point, the industry will stabilize.” Countless factors can impact adult-use marijuana sales and tax revenue fluctuations, but special events held in Reno and Las Vegas are thought to make a difference. “March Madness draws a lot of people to those areas. Anecdotal evidence suggests that Super Bowl weekend is a busy weekend and then in April there was the whole 4/20 observance,” Anderson says. Mynt’s Fiore also noticed the trend, noting, “Days like 4/20 we’ve broken over a thousand people.” So, who is benefiting from all the marijuana tax monies rolling in during the past year? • Operations: Revenues from the 15 percent Wholesale Marijuana Tax, which is paid by cultivators on both medical and adult-use marijuana, and application/license fees pay for the Department of Taxation’s administration of the state’s marijuana program.


• Back to Local Governments: $5 million per fiscal year from the Wholesale Marijuana Tax is funneled annually back to local jurisdictions (see sidebar on age 32). The first $1.5 million is split between Nevada’s 17 counties, each receiving around $88,000 in April 2018. The remaining $3.5 million goes to the towns and cities (the aforementioned revenue split of the Wholesale Marijuana Tax among local jurisdictions was outlined in the Nevada Marijuana Legalization ballot question, aka Question 2).

• Rainy Day Fund: The 10 percent Retail Marijuana Tax that dispensaries collect from customers on adult-use marijuana purchases, which was tacked on by Nevada Governor Sandoval and was not part of the Nevada Marijuana Legalization ballot question, goes directly into the state’s Rainy Day fund. $48.97M in excise tax collections through March vs. $50.32M forecasted for entire year

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• Education: Whatever remains of the 15 percent Wholesale Marijuana Tax is distributed to the state’s Distributive School Account also per the Nevada Marijuana Legalization ballot question.

An abundance of tax revenue aside, state officials believe the implementation of Nevada’s marijuana program has been a relatively smooth one. “From the Department’s standpoint we were able to get the program up and going, the regulations are solid, we have tax revenues coming in and have not had any significant hiccups. All in all it is going pretty well,” the Department’s


Public Information Officer Stephanie Klapstein says. “Our role is to regulate the industry and Nevada be viewed as the gold standard on how industry oversight happens. We implement the regulations to protect the health and safety of Nevadans,” says Anderson, who adds, “Nevada is perceived as a state with a relatively well-run program.”

THE FUTURE OF CANNABIS IS HERE

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“(The future of cannabis) is not so much a hope as it is a reality,” says Martilla of Mynt. “It’s growing exponentially and creates such a fantastic employment opportunity. It has so many medicinal benefits and it’s cool that we’re always helping people.” Cannabis is evolving fast in Nevada with major marijuana brands starting to come into the market. MedMen just opened a 45,000-square-foot cultivation facility in Sparks that will be able to accommodate up to 25,000 marijuana plants and Terra Tech, also in Sparks, has recently started cultivation at its new 30,000-square-foot facility. As cannabis consumption is becoming more socially accepted, natural food markets, farmers markets and general stores are carrying more hemp-derived and strictly cannabidiol or CBD products. Products like disposable vape pens have also become popular for those who want to keep their cannabis use discreet. “People like those because they don’t give off an odor; it makes it more convenient,” Fiore says. “Our clientele is 35-55 years old, they have kids, responsibilities. Vape pens offer a non-intrusive way to get the medicinal effect,” adds Martilla. “I’ve been the executive director for the last three months and the first thing I learned is that the marijuana industry is continuously evolving and until stabilization, it will continue to grow. We deal with regulations and issues as they arise,” says the Department of Taxation’s Anderson. For instance, a big concern from the opposing side of legalizing rec use was how products would be packaged and promoted. “If the proposed packaging looks potentially too attractive to minors, then we will work with the licensees to correct that,” Anderson says. However, in looking at the overall taxable sales in the state and how marijuana taxable sales have been on the rise since adult-use has been legal, one can tell that passing recreational use marijuana has had its benefits. “Despite Nevada’s extreme laws and restrictions on marijuana in the past, we’re also the most liberated state in allowing certain vices. Our current politicians in power have really done a good job in protecting our liberties. Attitudes have changed, minds have been opened, now there’s a strong understanding on what people are consuming,” Martilla says. “Nowadays we can consume safely, not in the shadows anymore.”

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Per Nevada’s Marijuana Legalization ballot question, aka Question 2 passed in November 2016, $5 million per fiscal year from the Wholesale Marijuana Tax is funneled annually back to local jurisdictions. The first $1.5 million is split between Nevada’s 17 counties, each received around $88,000 in April 2018, the remaining $3.5 million goes to towns and cities. To follow is a snapshot of how various jurisdictions plan to spend the marijuana money that was disbursed in April.

Carson City “The city has not allocated the state’s marijuana distribution to a specific purpose. It is merely another source of revenue in the city’s general fund,” offered Nancy Paulson, CPA, City Manager, Carson City of the roughly $160,000 the city received.

Churchill County The Board of Churchill County Commissioners allocated the $88,235.29 it received in April for various projects. Commissioners approved $50,260 for the Board of Health Strategies Program, with a focus on education for pregnant women and youth, a Too Good for Drugs instructor for the schools, FASTT Jail systems program, and BHT Data collections. New Frontier received $5,000 for an adolescent substance abuse prevention program. The remaining $32,975.29 went to help defer some of the cost of the state mandated body cameras for county law enforcement.

Elko The $88,235.29 received by Elko in April will partially fund a new narcotics detective for 2019.

City of Henderson “The City of Henderson has used the reimbursement to hire an additional staff member for the department who oversees medical and recreational marijuana licensees in our jurisdiction and to fund a vehicle used for monitoring compliance and other related activities. This funding is also used to offset the costs associated with recreational and medical marijuana sales and consumption in our community that are now paid for through the city’s existing budget,” said Communications and Intergovernmental Relations Manager David Cherry of the approximately $392,000 Henderson received.


City of Las Vegas The City of Las Vegas received a disbursement of approximately $826,000 in April which went into its general fund and will contribute toward the addition of more public safety positions.

North Las Vegas The $317,687.01 North Las Vegas received in tax disbursement money will go into the city's general fund.

Nye County

City of Sparks

Washoe County Within its budget, Washoe County has set up a separate account to house monies received from the State of Nevada at the direction of the Board of County Commissioners. “We are currently preparing the actual expense plan to be recommended by the County Manager to the Board of County Commissioners for approval,” said Dave Solaro, Washoe Assistant County Manager. “The proposed budget will be focused on items associated with marijuana within Washoe County. We have been tracking the impacts to various departments within the county and will focus needed funds on those impacts. It is anticipated that the Manager’s recommendation will be provided to the Board in August or September of this year.”

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In April 2018 the City of Sparks received $126,542.67 in tax revenue from the state, which officials will put into its operating budget. Sparks also received three percent of gross sales in business license fees, totaling just under $1.2 million. Since the marijuana business license fees create a new funding source that is not totally reliable, the City will use the money to replace one of its sports turfs at Golden Eagle Regional Park.

MINT BLACK 40mg THC

july | elevatenv.com

Nye County doesn’t separate out marijuana revenues for specific projects, it’s rolled into the county’s general fund and used for operations. The additional revenues of approximately $142,000 were added to the general fund and are contributing to funding jobs that were lost, reinforcing and rebuilding infrastructure, replacing fleet, etc. The Board of County Commissioners added $1M to the expenditure budget in Fy19, and a portion (while small) is due to medical and recreational marijuana growth.

GOURMET TASTE


(continued from page 17) and sustainability through each stage of growth instead of just the finished product.” What can users expect from Blue Dream, which registers at 19.01 percent THC and has a terpene profile of 2.93 mg a-pinene, 6.49 mg b-myrcene, and 2.55 mg b-caryophyllene? “[Its] sativa-dominant effects yield a strong cerebral focus, mood elevation and creativity—whereas its indica traits provide a sense of warm relaxation, like a big hug of cannabis bliss. Blue Dream’s users range from patients looking for relief from anxiety or depression, to users who just want to relax after a long day of work,” Janz says, who adds, “One of the most unique qualities of Blue Dream is its mouth-watering taste. As soon as you inhale, your mouth is enveloped with an explosive sweet berry flavor. Blue Dream’s indica parent (Blueberry Indica) is the true star of the flavor show and makes Blue Dream that much more desirable.”

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CITY TREES’ JACK HERER 300MG DISPOSABLE VAPE PEN Celebrate America’s founding fathers with a legendary founding father with a streak of independence from the annals of marijuana history—Jack Herer. Locals may recognize the name from the Jack Herer Cup held annually in Las Vegas. Known as the Emperor of Hemp, Herer was a colorful cannabis rights activist and the author of the classic The Emperor Wears No Clothes—as well as a two-time

presidential candidate, which makes him the perfect namesake for a red, white and blue Independence Day smoke sesh. Testing in at 66.43 percent THC, the Jack Herer disposable sativa pen is “perfect for a night out celebrating,” says Don Decatur, City Trees’ director of operations. “It has amazing, unmistakable flavor and uplifting effects—great for active people and hardworking adults on the go.” The unmistakable flavor results from a terpene blend of 14.8 mg terpinolene, 7.55 mg a-pinene, 7.24 mg b-pinene, 3.74 mg limonene, 3.46 mg carene, and 3.32 mg myrcene. This strain hits quick and leaves you feeling energized immediately with its mood enhancing capabilities that wipe away stress and sadness. Seek out a spot to view the fireworks, take a puff (or three) of Jack and celebrate America—Herer-style.


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OP-ED

CELEBRATING PROGRESS WHILE FIGHTING FOR OUR RIGHTS

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By U.S. Rep. Jacky Rosen (NV-03)

T

his month marks the one-year anniversary of recreational marijuana legalization in Nevada, a historic milestone for a change in policy that is creating jobs, diversifying our local economy, and boosting tax revenue for the state. In March alone, recreational marijuana sales topped $41 million and generated more than $7 million in tax revenue. Since joining Congress, I’ve put my support behind a number of commonsense bills to protect the will of Nevada voters. Earlier this year, after U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions put us at risk of potential federal intervention, I signed on to the bipartisan Respect State Marijuana Laws Act -- a bill that would prevent federal marijuana prosecution for cannabis businesses operating legally in state like Nevada. During the 2018 appropriations process, I co-sponsored an amendment that would stop the Department of Justice from prosecuting individuals who comply with their states’ medical marijuana laws. I’ve also supported a separate bipartisan amendment to prohibit federal funds from being used to penalize financial institutions that serve legal marijuana businesses. Now I’m co-sponsoring the Strengthening the Tenth Amendment Through Entrusting States (STATES) Act. This long-awaited bipartisan marijuana reform bill would give states the right to make decisions regarding their own marijuana regulations, while prohibiting the federal government from interfering with these laws. The bill also aims to remove industrial hemp from the prohibited substances list under the Controlled Substances Act (CSA). Just recently, President Trump suggested that he’ll probably end up supporting the STATES Act. Despite the President’s potential support, his remarks still put him at odds with his own Attorney General, who ended the Obama-era policy that effectively allowed states to legalize marijuana and still staunchly opposes what states like Nevada are doing. Congress needs to take action and put an end to this uncertainty for businesses and consumers. A majority of Nevadans made it clear at the ballot box in 2016 where we stand on this issue, and states should be able to legalize and regulate marijuana as they see fit without interference or roadblocks. It’s now up to Congress to work together and advance this mandate from voters, and that’s what I hope we can accomplish and I will keep the pressure on to make sure it happens.


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The author envisions a dimly lit room with comfy papasan chairs, cozy beanbag chairs, and cushy loveseats as the main décor for a “coming down” sanctuary created especially for cannabis novices who have over-enjoyed marijuana edibles.

OMG! THC in the ER!

Novice cannabis users’ naivety about edibles result in need for invention of "coming down" sanctuaries

I

by Deborah Costella, aka Cosmic Muffin

t’s beginning to happen, but no one’s openly talking about it. Except when the scenario is inflammatory, then it makes news. It’s a phenomenon that results in states that have recently introduced recreational marijuana and brought edibles into the market. With the entry of cannabis in the marketplace the truism -- the greater the freedoms given, the more vital education and experience become -- appears to be applicable. This concept applies to almost everything in the cannabis world but is especially true when novices are considering which products, strains, and potencies to purchase for an evening or weekend of fun and recreation. Arming oneself with information and knowledge becomes vital when seeking alternative medications and remedies. Consider those stoners from the ‘60s and ‘70s who have been working on their weed-ucation for years. There are some who have earned their doctorates on the subject. Whether they take a couple of hits off their bong prior to heading to the office in the morning


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sensations and socially unacceptable behaviors when one engages in smoking marijuana. With compassion for Ms. Dowd and less animosity toward cannabis, a gentleman from Vice commiserated with Dowd’s unpleasant experience sharing what happened when he purchased his first infused brownie from a “well-meaning hippie” outside of a Grateful Dead concert. Mr. Bienenstock wrote, in hindsight, he probably should have asked a few questions about potency and freshness. Of course it was too strong! He bought it from a “deadhead.” Mr. Bienenstock states in his article, even as an intelligent man in his early 60s, he failed to research how consuming edibles differs from smoking weed. Likely he assumed the weed of today is like the weed of yesterday. Which it isn’t. Smoking brings on sensations almost immediately then wears off within the hour. The time delay for edibles can be anywhere from 30 minutes to nearly two hours and may last as much as eight. The misadventures of Ms. Dowd and Mr. Bienenstock occurred in 2014. One year later, there hadn’t been much more offered in mainstream weed-ducation. This is clear when recalling the incident involving a Detroit police officer who many are still snickering about. Instead of turning in contraband confiscated during a “drug” raid the officer kept it. He then instructed his wife to bake up some brownies with the stolen weed. After the infused brownies had cooled, the officer and his wife proceeded to eat one, then two, then three (they weren’t feeling anything) until the entire batch of brownies had been devoured. The following day we all watched and heard on television as newscasters played back the officer’s call to 911 dispatch. Speaking clearly and deliberately (he wasn’t slurring his words or speaking especially slow) he requests dispatch send emergency rescue. We hear our stoned super sleuth tell dispatch, “I think we overdosed. No, I’m just...I think we’re dying. Time is going sooo slooowly. Yes, I think we’re dead.” The 911 operator finally figures out what they’ve done and asks how many brownies were consumed; the officer doesn’t really know. She then asked how much cannabis they put into the batch of brownies; which he wasn’t completely sure of either. The dispatch operator continues to ask excellent questions, though you hear her sighing at his foolishness. You just know she was rolling her eyeballs during the call then as soon as the call was complete, collapsed in a fit of laughter. Even newscasters were giggling as they read the story. Not to embarrass the officer (he did that just fine on his own), but you can’t overdose on marijuana! It is possible to eat or smoke more than you need, just like eating too much food on Thanksgiving. Overeating from the cornucopia of delights on the table may cause discomfort on Turkey Day, but you can’t overdose on the meal. Same with cannabis -- you may manifest uncomfortable symptoms of dizziness, nausea, sweating (same symptoms after consuming too much turkey and fixin’s), but it’s unlikely you’ll permanently damage any internal organs.

july | elevatenv.com

or those who sit in “couchlock” binge watching The Office after work, these people have done their research. They know the differences between sativa and indica and how much to smoke, eat or apply. They know how CBD (cannabidiol) works in conjunction with THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) and when it may be more appropriate to utilize only CBD and skip the high. Over the years, amateur chefs who used to prepare Alice B. Toklas’ brownies by just throwing an entire “lid” (a small baggie of weed) into a boxed brownie mix have honed their skills and brought edibles to new elevations in taste and texture (no more bits of stems and leaves to pick out of your teeth). Incorporating their knowledge of the nuances of terpenes and how they impact flavor when combined with other ingredients has yielded edibles worthy of consumption in a three-star restaurant. Users new to cannabis who don’t do their homework or ask the right questions who are gung-ho on recreational alternatives or reducing the number of meds they’re taking may end up with a perverted understanding of the correct way to use marijuana. There’s more to the cannabis experience than applying fire to the end of a tightly rolled joint, inhaling, holding your breath, then exhaling amid a coughing fit. Information gaps when using cannabis can result in some scary or even ridiculous situations. The most prominent example of using before obtaining a weed-ucation is that of New York Times columnist Maureen Dowd. During her efforts to research an article she was writing on the subject, Ms. Dowd purchased her first ever edible, a caramelchocolate bar, from a Colorado dispensary. I’m not sure if the budtender who assisted with her purchase failed to explain how much she should eat as a novice or if she simply failed to ask or yield to his/her instructions. After nibbling off a small corner of the candy bar she decided, like many new users, it wasn’t working. She didn’t feel anything. She ate a little more, then waited; ten minutes? Still nothing. Ms. Dowd nibbled away like a mouse with a wedge of Cornish Kern cheese and ended up biting her way through 160 milligrams of THC. Two hours later, I’m sure that poor woman’s head felt as though it was floating six inches above her body. Likely her arms and legs didn’t feel attached either. That scene from Monty Python’s Holy Grail, when the Black Knight calls the sword fight a draw after noticing he has no arms or legs, comes to mind. Currently, the recommended dosage for low tolerance persons is between 10 and 15 milligrams of THC. Our uninformed journalist ate enough ganga to get Snoop Dogg, Cheech and Chong and my son to strip off their clothes, grab hands in canna-chain formation and run naked down the halls of their hotel (which, by the way, was an actual experience of other uninformed, new-to-cannabis individuals). Ms. Dowd suffered several hours of anxiety and paranoia. Sadly, she returned to New York and wrote an anti-cannabis/edibles column reminiscent of the 1936 film Reefer Madness. For those unfamiliar with this film, it depicts far-fetched, unpleasant


elevatenv.com | july

Which in the most round-aboutest of ways brings me to my friend, Louise. After slapping our knees in hysterics at this new phenomenon, my very creative and entrepreneurial friend was struck with a terrific idea -- a “coming down sanctuary,” as she referred to it. Louise and I envision a dimly lit room with comfy papasan chairs, cozy beanbag chairs, and cushy loveseats. There would be assorted munchies (not brownies or Rice Krispy treats, that’s probably what got them there in the first place) such as honeybuns, egg salad sandwiches, cinnamon toast, and my personal favorite, those cheddar cheese and peanut butter crackers. Of course, there would be plenty of water available. A widescreen TV playing shows like How It’s Made, Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee, or my go-to program when in a I’m-too-high-and-don’t-wantto-get-paranoid state, anything with Dave Chappell in it. One television will suffice. People who are that stoned are too relaxed and don’t usually argue over what to watch on TV. I think Louise’s idea is an inspired one. Creating a space that allows these folks to comfortably “come down” while avoiding taxing an overworked ER staff with patients who aren’t really patients. In the meantime, while we get our plans for the sanctuary organized, to follow are two recipes (page 41 and 42) for munchies -- one sweet, one savory -- for you to prepare and have on hand when creating your own “coming down sanctuary.”

40

Even I’ve experienced a phone call in the wee hours of the morning from a friend who consumed too many edibles. After gently reminding him I’m a chef not a doctor, I suggested the best remedy I’ve found when ingesting too much cannabis -- a tall glass of water and sleep. Dehydration accounts for many of those uncomfortable sensations associated with consuming too much THC. Sometimes a bit of CBD tincture under the tongue can help counter the psychoactive effects of THC. Those reports of feeling like they’re dying (how do they know what that feels like?) can occur when your head is swimming in THC. Despite cannabis’s organic properties thanks to Mother Nature some people still think of it as a chemically manufactured product that can be remedied with more medicine. As states legalize marijuana, hospitals have experienced an influx of emergency room visitors who, after checking in, patiently wait to get their vitals taken and then just hang out. Of course, ER doctors know exactly what to do in the event of an alcohol or other chemically produced drug overdose but weed? – not so much. After checking these “patients” in and ensuring nothing else is wrong and everything registers as normal, there’s nothing ER staff can do for them. These over-indulgers don’t need any medication, they don’t need induced vomiting, they don’t need surgery. What they need is time, rest, quiet, and water...and munchies.

“As soon as I walked inside, I felt comfortable. The staff answered all my questions and made sure I knew how to use the products before I left. It’s so good to be feeling better.” Theresa A., Anxiety Patient Visit us at:

7885 W Sa ha ra @ Buffa lo 8 a m to 10 pm Ever yday

(702) 778 -79 87 | Ap oth e c ar ium .co m Keep out of reach of children. For use only by adults 21 years of age and older.


COSMIC MUFFIN’S SUGGESTED RECIPES FOR COMING DOWN GELATO DIRECTIONS:

In saucepot combine heavy cream, milk, cocoa powder, sugar and salt. Over medium heat bring mixture to a simmer then remove from heat. In large mixing bowl, whisk egg yolks until they lighten in color. Temper yolks then add to milk mixture. Return pot to low heat, stirring constantly until mixture thickens, reaching 175-180°. Do not allow mixture to boil. Strain custard through a sieve and allow to cool. Pour into ice cream machine and churn according to manufacturer’s directions.

CHOCOLATE GELATO WITH MARSHMALLOW CREAM INGREDIENTS (MAKES 1 QUART OF ICE CREAM)

½ cup granulated sugar ¼ cup meringue powder

MARSHMALLOW CREAM DIRECTIONS:

In bowl of stand mixer, combine ¾ cup boiling water and ½ cup granulated sugar until sugar has completely dissolved. Set aside and allow sugar-water to cool completely. Using whisk attachment, whip the cooled sugar-water mixture with ¼ cup meringue powder until very stiff peaks form, 10-15 minutes. Spoon onto individual servings of ice cream then using small kitchen torch, evenly toast marshmallow cream.

july | elevatenv.com 41

2 cups heavy cream 1 cup whole milk ½ cup processed cocoa powder ¾ cup granulated sugar ¼ tsp. salt 6-8 egg yolks 1 tsp. vanilla bean paste

INGREDIENTS FOR MARSHMALLOW CREAM


AVOCADO TOAST INGREDIENTS (MAKES 1 SERVING)

1 slice of thick crusty artisan bread (your choice: multigrain, wheatberry, rye, sourdough, etc.) ½ fresh, ripe avocado – pitted and peeled 2 Tbsp. good mayo or ranch dressing 1 tsp. freshly squeezed lime juice ⅛ tsp. cumin seed dash or two of Frank’s Hot Sauce or other favored hot sauce small handful fresh alfalfa sprouts 1 fried, poached or soft-boiled egg salt/pepper to taste

42

elevatenv.com | july

AVOCADO TOAST DIRECTIONS:

Toast slice of bread to desired doneness. While bread is toasting, in small mixing bowl, using a fork, smash avocado with mayo or ranch dressing and lime juice. Season to taste with salt, pepper, cumin and hot sauce. Spoon mashed avocado mixture onto slice of toasted bread, top with sprouts and egg.


july | elevatenv.com 43


NEVADA DISPENSARY ASSOCIATION

MARIJUANA TAXES

INFORMATION GUIDE

STATE EXCISE WHOLESALE 15% MEDICAL 15% ADULT USE

FEDERAL

*

GOES TO DISTRIBUTIVE SCHOOL ACCOUNT AFTER COSTS OF THE PROGRAM

RETAIL EXCISE

26 U.S. CODE SECTION 280E

10%

ADULT USE

No deduction or credit shall be allowed for any amount paid or incurred during the taxable year.

*

GOES TO RAINY DAY FUND PER GOVERNOR SANDOVAL LEGISLATION

STATE SALES TAX ~8% MEDICAL ~8% ADULT USE

q

IN EFFECT, INCREASES “TAXABLE INCOME.” BUSINESSES CANNOT DEDUCT PAYROLL, MARKETING, ETC.

*

2% GOES TO THE STATE. THE REMAINDER GOES TO CONSOLIDATED DISTRIBUTIVE TAX (C-TAX)

LOCAL Up to

3%

of gross revenue on each establishment.

(CULTIVATION, PRODUCTION, AND DISPENSARY)

BUSINESS LICENSING

STATE LOCAL

*

APPLICATION AND LICENSING FEES

$5,000

TO

$20,000

UP TO

$75,000

CROSS-JURISDICTIONAL LICENSING (SOME JURISDICTIONS)

BUSINESSES ARE ALSO SUBJECT TO MODIFIED BUSINESS TAX, COMMERCE TAX AND PROPERTY TAXES.

VISIT NVDISPENSE.COM FOR MORE INFORMATION.

NEVADA

DISPENSARY ASSOCIATION


EXHALENEVADA.COM

PROFILE

Delta-8: The Dawn of a New Super Med july | elevatenv.com

By Richard S. Gubbe

To date, the few and far between studies conducted on delta-8 have shown it to be both a potent appetite stimulant and antinausea treatment showing promise for combating the side effects of chemotherapy or other cancer treatments. As well, delta-8 has shown the ability to shrink tumors and possesses neuroprotective properties with potential applications in Alzheimer’s and traumatic brain injury.

In short, delta-8 THC is delta-9’s friendly alter ego. It’s chemically different from delta-9 THC by only a few atomic bonds—some say providing the body high people feel rather than the head high experienced from delta-9. Anecdotal reports from the cannabis community also suggest delta-8 creates a pleasant stoned feeling that is a different sensation compared to delta-9 THC. In addition, it’s rumored that delta-8 not only offers a functional high, but users don’t suffer the same kind of intense paranoia sometimes reported from delta-9 consumption.

With so much in the way of medicinal potential, products are beginning to be sought out with delta-8 as the only or predominant ingredient though it exists naturally only in fractions of a percent. Cannabis companies are taking notice of the value of delta-8 and extract products have begun to appear in marketplaces in Nevada, California and Washington.

Delta-8 binds to both CB1 and CB2 receptors in the body, producing different sensations than delta-9. They both hit the same receptors, but one is more potentiating than the other with delta-9 having stronger psycho-activity or stronger psychoactive effects than delta-8. Delta-8 binds to the cannabinoid G-protein coupled receptor CB1, located in the central nervous system. To dig deeper than that, the explanation of the physiology needs a chemistry/physiology interpreter.

More studies, of course, are needed to further understand the potential of delta-8. Targeted treatments and the mixture of delta-8 with other cannabinoids and terpenes also need to be further researched. The delta-8 cannabinoid is a powerful antiemetic capable of drastically reducing nausea and vomiting. This, along with its ability to stimulate appetite, make it extremely viable as a treatment for a multitude of diseases and conditions ranging from AIDS to cancer, and the neuroprotective properties have great potential application in nerve center regeneration and protection.

45

Considering that delta-9 THC or tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabis’ most prominent and well-known cannabinoid, was identified only 54 years ago, the discoveries of what cannabinoids have the power to do has only scratched the surface. As cannabis’ marquee molecule, the delta-9 THC isomer has gotten the most attention, followed closely by CBD (cannabidiol) and then CBN (cannabinol). But what of the relatively unknown delta-8 tetrahydrocannabinol?


DISPENSARY MAP A Guide to Cannabis in Southern Nevada

RENO

PECOS RD

JONES BLVD

CACTUS AVE

Y KW EP OS .T R HENDERSON S MUNICIPAL AIRPORT

D BLV PARADISE RD

AS VEG LAS Y RACETRACK RD

PKW AD E ME

HORIZON DR

515

16b

MARYLAND PKWY

WES

L RD RIA

IND

HORIZON RIDGE PKWY

GE SUNRSIDPKWY HEIGHT

6TH ST

COMMERCE ST MAIN ST 3RD ST

TER

NA VE

RANCHO DR

AVE

ND

215

29b

LAK

PECOS RD

12b

UST

HLA

RD

HENDERSON

31b 16a

HIG

NELLIS BLVD

SET

WARM SPRINGS RD

GIBSON RD

BERMUDA RD

DECATUR BLVD

HIG SO 15 HL UTH AN ER DS N PK WY

PEBBLE RD

VD

WY

SILVERADO RANCH BLVD

8b

WINDMILL LN

18 AVE

SAM BOYD STADIUM

SUN

WIGWAM PKWY

DESERT INN RD

BL

RH

AMO

E DI

BLU

SUNSET COUNTY PARK

OD

4c

DE

5a

D ND R

515

RUSSELL RD

WO

33

KAREN AVE

UL

WINDMILL LN

LLY

SANDHILL RD

MCCARRAN INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

SAHARA AVE

E TWAIN

HO

OAKEY BLVD

8a 13 24 ST. LOUIS AVE

GREEN DISTRICT

FLAMINGO RD

SUNSET RD

7

LAMB BLVD

PECOS RD

22

23a

STEPHANIE ST

15

25

DESERT INN RD

EASTERN AVE

VEG

30b

LAS VEGAS TROPICANA AVE

14

NELLIS BLVD

RD

N 5TH

LOS EE N ST

MAI

STR

18

17

SAHARA AVE

11

4c

THE

23a

215

WARM SPRINGS RD

10

1

4a

BO

SUNSET RD

24

PKWY

RUSSELL RD

8a

GREEN VALLEY

34

15

MARYLAND PKWY

JONES BLVD

RAINBOW BLVD

BUFFALO DR

15

TROPICANA AVE

13

LVD

17

9 28 8c 29a

4a

3 20

SAHARA AVE

CHARLESTON BLVD

IP

1

4b

FLAMINGO RD

32b 5b 3 20

AS B

SAHARA AVE DESERT INN RD

PAHRUMP

OWENS AVE

BONANZA RD

LAS

DURANGO DR

FT APACHE RD

TOWN CENTER DR

HUALAPAI WAY

31a

2

OAKEY BLVD

5b

32b

CHARLESTON BLVD

WASHINGTON AVE

27

CHARLESTON BLVD

RTH NO LVD NELLIS B AS AIR FORCE VEG LAS BASE

LAKE MEAD BLVD

19

MARYLAND PKWY

95

ALTA DR

30a

5c

WASHINGTON AVE

215

160

23b CAMINO AL NORTE / MLK

WY

26

SIMMONS ST

VEGAS DR

PK

159

DECATUR BLVD

RAINBOW BLVD

BUFFALO DR

BLVD

LAS VEGAS BLVD SOUTH

LIN

NORTH LAS VEGAS AIRPORT

CAREY AVE

21

CRAIG RD

32a

DECATUR BLVD

ER

15

NORTH LAS VEGAS

R

MM

MESQUITE

CENTENNIAL PKWY

WASHBURN RD

OD

SU

ANN RD

H NC RA

ALEXANDER RD

CHEYENNE AVE

12a

JONES BLVD

DURANGO DR

GRAND CANYON DR

LONE MOUNTAIN RD

LAKE ME AD

6

215

95

BOULDER CITY AND LAUGHLIN

10


17. Nevada Wellness Center nvwellnessctr.com 3200 S Valley View Blvd Las Vegas, NV 89102 702.470.2077

28. The Apothecary Shoppe theapothecaryshoppe.com 4240 W Flamingo Rd Ste #100 Las Vegas, NV 89103 702.740.4372

2. Apothecarium apothecariumlv.com 7885 W Sahara Ave Las Vegas, NV 89117 702.778.7987

8c. Essence Cannabis Dispensary essencevegas.com 5765 W Tropicana Ave Las Vegas, NV 89103 702.500.1714

18. NuLeaf www.nuleafnv.com 430 E Twain Ave Las Vegas, NV 89169 702.297.5323

29a. The Dispensary thedispensarynv.com 5347 S Decatur Blvd Ste #100 Las Vegas, NV 89118 702.476.0420

3. Blackjack Collective blackjackcollective.com 1860 Western Ave Las Vegas, NV 89102 702.545.0026

9. Exhale Nevada www.exhalenevada.com 4310 W Flamingo Rd Las Vegas, NV 89103 702.447.1250

19. NuWu Cannabis Marketplace Nuwucannabis.com 1235 Paiute Circle Las Vegas, NV 89106 702.844.2707

29b. The Dispensary thedispensarynv.com 50 N Gibson Rd Ste #170 Henderson, NV 89104 702.476.0420

4a. Blüm LetsBlum.com 1921 Western Ave Las Vegas, NV 89102 702.718.Blum

10. Inyo Fine Cannabis Dispensary inyolasvegas.com 2520 S Maryland Pkwy Ste #2 Las Vegas, NV 89109 702.707.8888

20. Oasis Medical Cannabis oasismedicalcannabis.com 1800 S Industrial Rd Ste #180 Las Vegas, NV 89102 702.420.2405

30a. The Grove TheGroveNV.com 1541 E Basin Ave Pahrump, NV 89048 775.556.0100

4b. Blüm LetsBlum.com 3650 S Decatur Blvd Las Vegas, NV 89103 702.627.Blum

11. Jardin jardincannabis.com 2900 E Desert Inn Rd Ste #102 Las Vegas, NV 89121 702.331.6511

21. Panacea Quality Cannabis lvpanacea.com 4235 Arctic Spring Ave Las Vegas, NV 89115 702.405.8597

30b. The Grove TheGroveNV.com 4647 Swenson St Las Vegas, NV 89119 702.463.5777

4c. Blüm LetsBlum.com 1130 E Desert Inn Rd Las Vegas, NV 89109 702.536.Blum

12a. Jenny’s Dispensary Jennysdispensary.com 5530 N Decatur Blvd North Las Vegas, NV 89030 702.718.0420

22. Pisos Dispensary pisoslv.com 4110 S Maryland Pkwy Ste #1 Las Vegas, NV 89119 702.367.9333

31a. The Source thesourcenv.com 2550 S Rainbow Blvd Ste #8 Las Vegas, NV 89146 702.708.2000

5a. CANOPI canopi.com 6540 Blue Diamond Rd Las Vegas, NV 89139 702.420.7338

12b. Jenny’s Dispensary Jennysdispensary.com 10420 S Eastern Ave Henderson, NV 89052 702.718.0420

23a. Reef Dispensaries reefdispensaries.com 3400 Western Ave Las Vegas, NV 89109 702.475.6520

31b. The Source thesourcenv.com 9480 S Eastern Ave Ste #185 Henderson, NV 89123 702.708.2222

5b. CANOPI canopi.com 1324 S 3rd St Las Vegas, NV 89104 702.420.2902

13. Las Vegas ReLeaf lasvegasreleaf.com 2244 Paradise Rd Las Vegas, NV 89104 702.209.2400

23b. Reef Dispensaries reefdispensaries.com 1366 W Cheyenne Ave North Las Vegas, NV 89030 702.410.8032

32a. Thrive Cannabis Markeplace thrivenevada.com 2755 W Cheyenne Ave Ste #103 North Las Vegas, NV 89032 702.776.4144

5c. CANOPI canopi.com 2113 Las Vegas Blvd North North Las Vegas, NV 89030 702.420.2113

14. Medizin medizinlv.com 4850 W Sunset Rd Ste #130 Las Vegas, NV 89118 702.206.1313

24. Sahara Wellness 420sahara.com 420 E Sahara Ave Las Vegas, NV 89104 702.478.5533

32b.Thrive Cannabis Marketplace thrivenevada.com 1112 S Commerce St. Las Vegas, NV 89102 702.776.4144

6. Deep Roots Harvest deeprootsharvest.com 195 Willis Carrier Canyon Mesquite, NV 89034 702.345.2854

15. MMJ America mmjamerica.com 4660 S Decatur Blvd Las Vegas, NV 89109 702.565.9333

25. Shango Las Vegas goshango.com 4380 Boulder Highway Las Vegas, NV 89121 702.444.4824

33. Top Notch THC topnotchthc.com 5630 Stephanie St Las Vegas, NV 89122 702.418.0420

7. Euphoria Wellness euphoriawellnessnv.com 7780 S Jones Blvd Ste #105 Las Vegas, NV 89139 702.960.7200

16a. Nevada Made Marijuana nevadamademarijuana.com 3195 St. Rose Pkwy Ste #212 Henderson, NV 89052 702.737.7777

26. ShowGrow showgrowlv.com 4850 S Fort Apache Rd Ste #100 Las Vegas, NV 89147 702.227.0511

34. Zen Leaf zenleafvegas.com 9120 W Post Rd Ste #103 Las Vegas, NV 89148 702.462.6706

8a. Essence Cannabis Dispensary essencevegas.com 2307 S Las Vegas Blvd Las Vegas, NV 89104 702.978.7591

16b. Nevada Made Marijuana nevadamademarijuana.com 1975 S Casino Dr Laughlin, NV 89029 702.737.7777

27. Silver Sage Wellness sswlv.com 4626 W Charleston Blvd Las Vegas, NV 89102 702.802.3757

Cannabiotix products are sold here

47

8b. Essence Cannabis Dispensary essencevegas.com 4300 E Sunset Rd Ste #A3 Henderson, NV 89014 702.978.7687

july | elevatenv.com

1. Acres Cannabis acrescannabis.com 2320 Western Ave Las Vegas, NV 89102 702.399.4200


We Specialize In:

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Services We Offer:

• Graphic Design • Mailing Solutions • Ez-Net Online Ordering • Warehousing/ Product Management • Kitting Fulfillment Services

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elevatenv.com | july

• EZ-Net: Online Ordering & Proofing • Collateral Management & Distribution: Move projects & Packages... with your mouse.

• Direct Mail Solutions:

Ongoing effort or one time campaign


july | elevatenv.com 49


LEGALEASE

50

elevatenv.com | july

STATE TO ANNOUNCE NEW MARIJUANA LICENSING PERIOD THIS MONTH by Amanda Connor, Esq. and Natice Locke of Connor & Connor

T

hose hoping to enter the retail marijuana business may be in luck because the Department of Taxation (DOT) is gearing up to issue the latest round of marijuana licenses. This includes licenses to operate retail marijuana stores (and possibly other retail stores). It is anticipated that the DOT will announce when they will accept the applications for new retail stores sometime this month. This announcement will tell us in which 10-day period the Department will begin accepting these applications. Those who do not meet the requirements this time could potentially have other chances in the future. However, those hoping to earn big in the state’s newest industry may fi nd that obtaining a license to operate a retail marijuana business is quite prohibitive. First, only existing medical marijuana establishments are eligible to apply for the new round of licenses. To clarify, the applicant for the new retail store must be the company who has the medical marijuana registration certificate to operate the medical marijuana business. Any operational medical marijuana business in good standing is eligible to apply for these new retail stores – including cultivation, production, laboratories and dispensaries. The application must include the proposed name of the marijuana business, as shown in the medical marijuana registration certificate, along with the articles of incorporation, and, of course, any applicable fees.

Although capable of yielding large returns, marijuana licenses can be costly. In addition to a non-refundable $5,000 application fee, applicants must pay additional licensing fees depending on the establishment: Marijuana Cultivation Facility- $30,000 Marijuana Distributor- $15,000 Marijuana Production Manufacturing Facility- $10,000 Marijuana Testing Facility- $15,000 Dispensary- $20,000 People who do not have medical marijuana registration certificates will not stand a chance of obtaining a license until November 16, 2018 at the earliest, but DOT would have to determine that there is an insufficient number of licenses and open an additional application period. For the upcoming retail store applications, pursuant to law, the applications will be merit based. This means they will be ranked and scored. In addition to assessing information about the actual business, DOT will take the owners, officers and board members affiliated with the business into account as well. Applicants must provide the proposed name of the establishment, the type of business (corporation, LLC, partnership, etc.), business registration, and operating hours. A proposed business plan must address the size of the establishment, floor plans, a “seed to sale” inventory tracking system, testing procedures, how the product will


july | elevatenv.com 51

be transported and security procedures. All businesses must demonstrate that adequate funds and resources are available to sustain operation. An education plan must provide education and training to the business’s staff. And lastly, a business must show their operation will not negatively impact the environment and the community. Additionally, the Department requires information about those individuals who plan on being part of the business. The application must include a chart showing the organizational structure of the business. Further, a list of every owner, officer and board member must be provided, along with a substantial amount of information about each. This includes their title and role in the company, race, ethnicity, gender, any affiliation with another medical marijuana business, past agent card revocation and financial investments in other medical marijuana businesses. As well, the DOT will consider other factors designed to measure such individual’s qualifications and suitability. These key businesspersons must not have been convicted of a felony. They must also provide a short biography highlighting experience with government agencies, community service, previous business experience, knowledge about the marijuana industry, along with a resume. Current government employees, government contractors, and law enforcement officers should also identify themselves in the application. Marijuana licenses are highly coveted, as only a limited number are available. This is sure to create a lot of competition for the upcoming licensing period and other licensing periods in the future. DOT will rank applications by factoring the operating member’s relevant experience, diversity, educational achievements, philanthropic ventures, taxes paid, and direct experience in the marijuana industry. DOT will also rank applications based on the applicant’s financial plan and resources. To discourage monopolies, DOT will not allow the same individual or group to operate more than one retail marijuana store, or more than ten percent of the retail marijuana store licenses allowed in the county, for counties with a population of 100,000 or greater. It is possible that future rounds of licensing will be available to those who are not already in the industry, however, only a set number of licenses will be available. For now, marijuana, by law, belongs to those already in the industry.


Elevating the Conversation

P

with Pelin Thorogood, president and co-founder of Wholistic Research and Education Foundation

52

elevatenv.com | july

elin Thorogood, along with partners Andy Noorda and Steve Sakala, co-founded Wholistic Research and Education Foundation in June of 2017 with the objective to fund clinical and scientific research to explore the medical benefits of cannabidiol or CBD-rich therapeutics. This year Wholistic awarded two grants with this objective in mind. One went to the University of Utah to examine how cannabinoids influence brain networks and the other went to the University of California San Diego School of Medicine to determine if and how CBD provides therapeutic benefit to children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

You pivoted from tech entrepreneur to cannabis innovator, how did you find your way from web analytics to championing the exploration of cannabinoids? I am an entrepreneur first and foremost – which to me is about driving change, not just creating companies. It is about finding real-world problems we are passionate about solving while staying true to our purpose. My transition to the wellness industry was fueled both by family health issues as well as an increasing dissatisfaction with certain elements of my tech career – primarily a desire for real impact. Why did you start the Wholistic Foundation? The research to date and the anecdotal patient stories all pointed to the potential for whole-plant CBD to deliver significant health benefits across a multitude of ailments from chronic pain, anxiety and sleep disorders to PTSD, addiction, Parkinson’s disease and cancer. While this list is quite impressive, we saw additional research was clearly warranted to understand not only if CBD is effective for any specific condition, but also when, how, and why. Wholistic is funding research at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine to determine if and how cannabidiol (CBD) provides therapeutic benefit to children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). What are the study’s goals? The UC San Diego research project “Investigating Cannabinoids in Autism Spectrum Disorders” is exploring whether CBD therapies can reduce behavioral abnormalities in children with autism, and if so, how. The goals of the study are three-fold: (1) to determine if CBD is safe and tolerable and whether it alleviates adverse symptoms of autism; (2) to find out if and how CBD alters brain wave activity, neurotransmitters and/or brain network connectivity; and (3) to uncover whether biomarkers of neuro-inflammation (which are thought to be associated with autism) are altered by CBD. Wholistic is also funding a study at the University of Utah Health (UUH) that would study effects of cannabinoids through

advanced brain imaging. What is its potential? The University of Utah investigation, “Brain Effects of Cannabinoids,” will use advanced imaging to visualize personalized effects of CBD and THC on individuals at a molecular level, and analyze how this may result in changes across entire brain networks. The findings of this groundbreaking study have the potential to shape the developing field of cannabinoid therapy by understanding the personalized effects of cannabinoids. Because cannabis is classified as a Schedule 1 drug, has it been hard to procure cannabis for the studies? We have certainly experienced just how difficult and restrictive the procurement process is. There are very few federally approved sources from where the universities can procure cannabis for research. The other interesting twist of the federal Schedule 1 classification of cannabis is that the studies are not conducted with the products generally available to patients in the marketplace. We are looking forward to acting as a change agent by helping translate research results to impact drug policy at the federal level. On a personal level, what has been the most fascinating cannabis discovery you have made? The more I learn about the medical potential of CBD, the more excited I get. Given its anti-anxiety, anti-inflammatory and neuro-protectant properties, CBD is involved in the regulation of our immune system, sleep, stress response, appetite, mood and pain management. As such, everyone in my family is now a regular user: CBD has greatly helped my chronic insomnia, my kids use it to get much needed pain relief from their athletic injuries, my husband takes CBD as a neuro-protectant following a heart surgery and my mom for relief from her arthritis. Just two years ago, I would have been hard-pressed to believe there was any one supplement that could help us across so many conditions. To read the entire interview with Pelin Thorogood, visit elevatenv. com/Elevating_the_Conversation.


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