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AUGUST 2018

the

TASTE ISSUE

Meals on Reels (movies for the munchies) Infused & Enthralled the art of the elevated dinner party

James Beard winner Mindy Segal brings her brittle West


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from the editor

Publisher Guy Bertuzzi, guy@elevatenv.com

Editor-In-Chief Beth Schwartz, beth@elevatenv.com

Creative Director Brooke Bertuzzi, brooke@finetheagency.com

Contributing Writers: Justin Alexander, Jim Begley, Josh Bell, Amanda Connor, Deborah L. Costella, Payton Curry, Morgan Hansen Cover photo: Erika Dufour, erikadufour.com Media Consultants: Mark Damkroeger, mark@elevatenv.com Marissa Skinner, marissa@elevatenv.com Nicole Verlinich, nicole@elevatenv.com

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Since becoming involved in the industry three years ago, it’s been extraordinary to watch the rapid evolution of food’s integration with cannabis. When we started our ‘Cooking with Cannabis’ monthly recipe feature at elevate in 2015, finding chefs who cooked with cannabis and were willing to submit infused recipes was easier said than done. They were as rare as finding truffles growing in Nevada. Slowly, as cannabis became more acceptable to speak about openly, more chefs outed themselves as having knowledge in the cannabis arena and were willing to share their expertise. Now, there are cookbooks, scads of chefs who are dabbling in the space, loads of edible brands, and even gourmet infused dining experiences. As the former editor of a luxury magazine for over a decade, gastronomic experiences have always been a mainstay of my journalistic wheelhouse and one of the most tantalizing highlights of my job. As I heard whispers of infused dining experiences springing up in Colorado once marijuana was recreationally legal in 2014, I started salivating at the thought of such experiences. I often wondered when such dinners would find a home in a state where an international culinary destination resides and offers an obvious synergy between cannabis and gourmet fare. I didn’t have to wait long. Local food scribe and esteemed bon vivant Jim Begley happily accompanied me to my first canna-infused gourmet dinner in May. Mr. Begley recounts the sumptuous meal prepared by the culinary wizards at Exclusive Chefs in his story Infused & Enthralled on page 8. To say the least, my taste buds were dazzled and satiated into submission as we feasted Game of Thrones-style on the multicourse canna-extravaganza. I was most definitely

not disappointed and if this sounds like something you would like to wrap your tongue around, check out Begley’s story for the feast Exclusive Chefs is planning later this month. Our gourmet coverage continues on page 13 as cannachef Deborah L. Costella contemplates where all the scientists, artists and adventurers have gone only to find some of them have ended up in the kitchen. Finding them behind the stove in her loving paean to The Food Whisperers, Costella explores how chefs are reinventing epicurean delights with the addition of cannabis to create an appetite for sensory seduction. elevate’s cinema expert Josh Bell weighs in on the ten best films to watch when you have the munchies in Meals on Reels on page 32. Also in the food realm, elevate strain and product reviewer Justin Alexander has spent the last few weeks on a terpene search for his latest review The Taste of Terpenes found on page 18. But the most significant cannabisrelated food development of late is in the world of edibles. James Beard Foundation Award winner Mindy Segal has entered the cannabis space staking her fork in edibles and candy. Hailing from Chicago, Segal will be introducing two edible collections, Mindy’s Kitchen and Mindy’s Artisanal Edibles; first launching in Nevada this month then in California and Arizona later this year. This marks a major turning point in the cannabis conversation as the self-described Mistress of Deliciousness ventures from non-dosed treats into the canna-verse. The renowned pastry chef definitely has the gravitas to turn cannabis’ edible space upside down. Welcome Mindy, it’s going to be sweet!


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Cooking Cannabis

CANTALOUPE SALAD WITH HONEY VINAIGRETTE DRESSING & CANTALOUPE SPRITZER by chef Payton Curry, Flourish Kitchens and Exhale Dispensary

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Since cantaloupe’s prime season is summertime in the U.S., Exhale chef Payton Curry chose to showcase a muskmelon salad followed by a juice spritzer in this month’s Cooking with Cannabis. This sunshine daydream is a great lowcalorie start to get the morning off with a merry vibe. Curry used the cantaloupe’s leftovers for total utilization of the fruit for a mid-afternoon pick-me-up spritzer. It is vibrant, cool, and full of cannabinoids. The addition of the local bee pollen and Nevada honey allows for a lot of allergen relief for those who suffer from seasonal sniffles.

"YOU GOT MARRIED IN VEGAS SO YOU CANTALOUPE...." 1:1 HONEY VINAIGRETTE RECIPE 3 Tbsp. avocado oil 2 Tbsp. Flourish 1:1 Honey (32 mg THC:32 mg CBD) 2 Tbsp. fresh orange juice 1 Tbsp. fresh lemon juice 1 Tbsp. fresh lime juice 1 tsp. dried chile flake 1/2 tsp. white truffle salt

PROCEDURE: Place ingredients for 1:1 honey vinaigrette dressing into a cleaned nug jar and screw lid on. Shake your day’s frustrations away knowing your cannabis cuisine is about to be consumed. Soon you will pour this over a bit of melon and have yourself a fresh bowl of muskmelon.

CANTALOUPE SALAD 2 cups, cleaned and cubed cantaloupe 1/4 cup, honey vinaigrette mint for garnish

PROCEDURE: Place melon in a bowl and pour 1/4 cup to a 1/2 cup of 1:1 Honey Vinaigrette dressing over cantaloupe. This dish will fill your body full of natural pollens, phytocannabinoids, and smiles.

CANTALOUPE SPRITZER The beautiful thing about this drink is that it is a mid-afternoon refresher made with leftovers from your breakfast. This zippy cannabis spritzer is full of local honey, fresh citrus, cantaloupe and cannabis. 1 cup of cantaloupe 1/4 cup lemon juice 1/4 cup orange juice dash of chile flake 1 Tbsp. Flourish 1:1 Honey (16 mg THC:16 mg CBD)

PROCEDURE: Place ingredients in a blender and blend away. Pour over some ice and enjoy a phytonutrient spritzer.

Please remember when cooking with medicinal cannabis you are cooking with a medicine and the medicine amount and portions of the food ingested should always be taken into consideration. Always start out with small portions or doses and wait 30 minutes to an hour before eating any additional portions of food that has been medicated.


FLOAT ON US

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Infused & Enthralled

Cannabis goes gourmet with the art of the elevated dinner party by Jim Begley


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ith a warm May evening as a backdrop, an ordinary two-story house in a nondescript Mountain’s Edge neighborhood hosted an extraordinarily unique event. To bystanders, the only hint of something amiss was the dapper-dressed gentlemen welcoming attendees curbside, just a wee bit out of place on an otherwise quiet cul-de-sac. But that only hinted at an evening of surprises yet to unfold. The event was a Game of Thrones-themed cannabis-infused dinner hosted by Exclusive Chefs where attendees were encouraged to dress as their favorite GoT characters. While Executive Chefs co-owners, the aforementioned greeter and operations manager Dennis Hicks, along with corporate chef Greg Chapin, were in more traditional garb, “elevate herban chef” Michael Richardson assumed the role of the spiritual Sherpa of the meal in religious regalia, interacting the most with diners throughout the meal while explaining the genesis of each dish and the event itself. The May event was the second such event Executive Chefs has hosted, each themed because Richardson – the primary driver of the elevated affairs with an extensive background cooking with cannabis – is an amalgam of an artist and a chef; in fact, he’s quite an adept sculptor. And therein lies the secret to such an underground event because while recreational cannabis is completely legal in the Silver State, there is no mechanism for cannabis-infused meals to take place. Instead, the events take place at private residences where the tariff to attend is traded for a piece of art – in this instance, a sculpted dragon egg in the theme of the dinner. Consider it a keepsake from a night of revelry. The evening began with a series of non-cannabis enhanced hors d'oeuvres including Joffrey’s Wedding Pie, a hearty combo of roasted squab, peas and potatoes swaddled inside a puff pastry with a sharp black garlic aioli for dipping. This tasty dish could’ve also been named Walder Frey’s Last Meal, although such connotations might not have been so appetizing to GoT fans. (And if the reference is lost on you, go ahead and give it a Google. That’s alright, we’ll wait…). Daenerys Stormborn’s Persimmon Shrimp Soup was delivered in golden chalices befitting spectacle by servers donned in traditional Dothraki dress. But the highlight was the White Walker – a shard of guanciale (aka pork jowl) jerky nestled atop a dollop of frozen blueberry gastrique and delivered on slate intended to represent the bane of the White Walkers themselves: dragon glass. This simple bite melded sweet and savory seamlessly and was a hit with guests. Infused dining began with the sit-down meal, a breadbasket of Brimstone Bread – bright red rolls with mottled tops reminiscent of Dutch crunch – paired with a somewhat irresistible infused butter. Tyrion’s Head, a saffron rice and lobster-mashed potato fritter served with a foie gras-laced sativa hollandaise, followed shortly thereafter, the savory dish hinting of heat. For those choosing not to partake, a non-infused sauce was also available with both sauces served in spoons to allow diners to self-dose. For the poultry course named after the infamous Red Wedding, braised turkey wing meat with wild hare cornbread stuffing drizzled with red wine and razzleberry demi-glace was served alongside an infused macadamia nut oil sauce which delivered a nuttiness to the dish, contrasting the tart demi-glace. From the sea, the magnificent fish course was named Valar Morghulis with the playful subtitle of Almonds Must Die, a nod to the actual English translation "all men must die" (well, as actual as you can get considering High Valyrian isn’t actually a language…), as the dish was an almond-crusted sole with caperberries. A first for some at the table, the caperberries didn’t disappoint with their characteristic brininess, while the accompanying white truffle oil sauce contributed an earthiness to a spectacular, wellrounded dish. The savory courses finished with the beef course providing the one exception to the infused sauce preparations as the meat itself was infused during the cooking process. Khal Drogo – The Stallion that Mounts the World, was a tableside carving of roast pork in Brobdingnagian portions prepared in an infused demi-glace with pomegranate molasses and farro-date stuffing. The substantial dish didn’t disappoint, much like the rest of the meal.


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RECIPE FOR LAVENDER PANNA COTTA from Exclusive Chefs Ingredients • 2 Tbsp. cold water • 1 envelope unflavored gelatin (about 1 Tbsp.) • ⅓ cup sugar • 2 cups heavy cream • 1 cup half-and-half • 1 tsp. lavender buds • 1 ½ tsp. vanilla extract • 2 tsp. of Rick Simpson (RSO) olive oil

Sprinkle gelatin over water and let stand about 1 minute to soften. Heat in small sauce pan until gelatin is dissolved and remove from heat. In a separate saucepan bring cream, half-and-half, sugar, RSO oil and lavender just to a boil over moderately high heat, stirring. Remove pan from heat and stir in gelatin mixture and vanilla extract. Divide cream mixture among eight 1/2-cup ramekins and cool to room temperature.

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Dessert arrived amidst smoke and bubbles from a dry ice preparation, a non-infused lemon lavender panna cotta with a mango yolk in a dragon fruit skin (get it?!?). The pageantry didn’t end until diners were given a “dragon egg elixir” to determine their worthiness for the night’s gift. Made of butterfly pea flower tea, the deep midnight blue drink evolves into a rich violet with the addition of citrus. The event proved itself to be more than a gimmick as the well-seasoned chef team delivered a series of dishes worth ordering regardless of their infusion. Between courses, the group was kept entertained with a variety of activities including GoT trivia questions for prizes, roundtable discussions of favorite quotes from the series (for the record, mine is Tyrion’s epic “I drink and know things” which somehow sums up my life succinctly) and even a choreographed Dhotraki death match for the hand of a fair maiden. Yep, that actually happened. If the above intrigues you, the next Executive Chefs event melding marijuana, art and cuisine will be August 17. The theme will be A Midsummer Knight’s Dream and is billed as “an emotional hors d’oeurves gala” with dishes such as Euphoria, Compassion and Provocative. For more information, reach out to the crew at www.myexclusivechefs.com.

“As soon as I walked inside, I felt comfortable. The staff answered all my questions and made sure I knew how to use the products before I left. It’s so good to be feeling better.” Theresa A., Anxiety Patient Visit us at:

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Canna-chefs serving an appetite for sensory seduction by Deborah L. Costella

Where have all the scientists, artists and adventurers gone? Where are the great thinkers, philosophers and explorers of the 21st century? It appears they are in the kitchen. The Scientist Like a pink flamingo, she stands on one leg at the edge of a long, stainless counter. It has been hours of painstaking and tedious work. Strands of hair dance about her head, while others adhere themselves to her face and neck, dampened with sweat. She wears the uniform of a chef -- a pair of baggy, hound’s-tooth trousers, heavy black clogs, and a white double-breasted coat under which is a lacy camisole. She works in a stark, immaculate room. Windows line one entire wall. She does not notice the rays of sunlight or the hummingbird that flits outside among meandering trumpet vines. Stacks of books are piled to her right, several sit open. Some display stains, all are heavily marked with notes. There is only the hum of the hood fan. Arranged along the opposite end of the counter, are a few recognizable tools -- funnels, bench scrapers, squeeze bottles, and iSi whippers. There are also other tools and pieces of equipment less familiar: a sous vide, siphons, syringes, a smoking gun, and a spherification kit. Her first two years of college were focused on chemistry

and physics. It was while spending a summer in Paris that food drew her attention. Drawing inspiration from the alchemists she had studied during her years as a chemistry major, she integrated the two fields. Not yet widely known, those who have cooked in her kitchens consider her one of the most talented and brilliant culinary alchemists they’ve worked with. After enrolling in culinary school, she supplemented her knowledge and experience with information and experimentations shared by Cook’s Illustrated editor and chef Christopher Kimball. Cooking her way through each issue, she quickly learned how to hypothesize, test and solve the most trying of culinary problems and mishaps. Often making new discoveries and developing methods of transmuting the most mundane of dishes into the extraordinary. But it is the founder of molecular gastronomy, chef Hervé This, to whom she has now hooked her collapsible grocery wagon. This “Florence-Buddingale” of edibles has concocted and incorporated foams, gels and vapors into the most unsuspecting of infused foods. She has smoked a rich, smooth cannabutterscotch gelato with mesquite. Our science-centric chef has presented a table of ten with an appetizer of canna-caviar made from a combination of matcha tea and cannabis. Injected frozen fruit bars with cannabidiol and in a grand gesture of appreciation for what she’d learned from the study of alchemy -- garnished

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THE FOOD WHISPERERS


chocolate mousse with edible gold and a dusting of keif. Guests fortunate enough to be invited to sit at the table of this chef will experience pops and sizzles on their tongues. They begin salivating while watching with glee as swirling vapors dissipate, revealing a resplendent ceviche beneath. Edibles prepared by chefs of this scientific caliber offer a multi-leveled sense of euphoria.

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The Artist A bearded man stands tall and unmoving. His eyes fixed, arms crossed in front, displaying abnormally large forearms decorated in tattoos he’s accumulated over the years, most of which depict his passion for cooking. The assistants standing beside him know better than to disrupt him when he is deep in thought. This chef has developed a reputation for creating edibles that are both atheistically pleasing, gratifying to the palate, and medicinally effective. Heavily influenced by innovators that include chef Massimo Bottura, famous for incorporating artwork into food creations with works such as Beautiful Psychedelic Veal and Caesar Salad in Bloom, this young chef seeks to make his own mark. He seems to possess the natural gifts of the Great Masters -- Da Vinci, Raphael and Titian with a good dose of graffiti artists such as Tyler Ross, Kick Rock and GIRAFA mixed in. Blending his talents in pastry and gardening, the edibles he prepares are lively and effective. For example, the culinary lavender he harvested and served as garnish against a gleaming white infused panna cotta, accompanied by sugared rose petals and a smattering of homemade granola for contrast in texture, received glowing praise from a group of musicians. On another occasion, our artistic chef expressed his own gratitude at being one of the featured canna-chefs for an art gallery opening by preparing a deconstruction of an old family favorite, strawberry shortcake. He showcased gigantic garden-fresh strawberries, fanning them out like the feathers of a peacock. Canals of infused honey-sweetened mascarpone were nestled between the berries and rounds of vanilla shortbread. Droplets of infused-strawberry compote provided accent. The gallery curator was so impressed with the simplicity and natural beauty of the dessert, she arranged the plates of the American favorite directly beneath artist Jerry Lofaro’s Unexpected Growth. Today, chef contemplates how to “paint” a selection of infused monochromatic displays on the three blank canvases of plain white platters sitting before him. Having just come in from the magnificent garden outside his


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The Adventurer Like those restless explorers from days of old, the most exciting among chefs are those adventurers who cook and eat outside the norms. Chefs of this caliber are adept at using the practices of old, the traditions of family and cultures, and turn them on their fiddlehead. Integrating exotic ingredients with home-cooking styles, they create contradictory yet complementary dishes. With knife bag in hand, these chefs scour local farmers markets, alleyways, and side streets in search of their next new taste sensation. Today, chef has decided to raise the bar for a cannacocktail party hosted by one of her high-tolerant clients. The client’s excitement about the strangeness of foods she has prepared for him in the past prompted this host to forewarn his guests NOT to ask what the infusions are, just eat them. Chef’s cooking has taught him, he may not always know what he’s eaten, but the dining experience always leaves him ebullient and in a postprandial pleasantly stoned state. continued on page 46

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restaurant, he considers the elements: earth, wind and fire. Amid the silence surrounding him, he is struck with an idea. One platter will represent earth with foods of brown tones: roasted russets stuffed with an infused wild mushroom ragu. The other canvas will represent wind with infused transparent strands of pasta, twisted into a tangled frenzy of tantalizing deliciousness. The final platter symbolizing fire will be painted with a background of infused white polenta coated with a swath of spicy Arrabbiata sauce. Chef announces his vision and he and his staff get to work. Chefs like this put the art into culinary art. Using an amalgamation of techniques, concepts and emotions when preparing food, they seek to address each one of our senses individually and wholly. They know we first eat with our eyes. Then there is touch. Many of us poke at our food perhaps with only the tip of a finger, but we feel an unexplained urge to ensure our visual perception is accurate. This also has to do with texture. Chefs are aware texture is a factor in measuring how much we enjoy or dislike a dish. All of us lean in to inhale -- allowing the aromatic properties of a dish to envelop us. Then, as the fork delivers that first tasty morsel onto our palates, if the chef has done their job as intended, we are transported. Artisan chefs offer us the opportunity to be swallowed into a technicolor whirl of tastes, textures and scent. Our sensorial experience is complete because we have been shown: food is art.


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THE TASTE OF TERPENES

THE SAVOR THAT MAKES THE FLAVOR WORLD GO ‘ROUND By Justin Alexander

Without terpenes your cannabis experience would be a flavor void. Terpenes are the aromatic oils in cannabis that make up the distinctive and tasty flavors found emanating from the plant. Responsible for both the flavor profiles and medicinal effects of cannabis, terpenes are a determining factor in the kind of experience you will have. As more and more consumers become educated about terpenes, they are becoming more instrumental in how people shop. “The cannabis community is educating itself one flower at a time. Compared to several years ago, terpenes weren't even part of the discussion when it came to cannabis. As the market continues to mature, cannabis users will start reading terpene profiles the same way people read beer, alcohol by volume,” explains Remedy’s Randy Villarba. Nevada’s lab testing regulations and labeling requirements make it easy for users to find their favorite terpenes. “I would say the scent has always been an important factor in purchasing cannabis, but Nevada terpene testing is starting to shape people's choices in more than just taste. We like to teach that ‘your nose knows best’ because oftentimes if you are subconsciously drawn to a specific scent profile, you indeed could benefit from the medicinal effects of the terpenes making up that scent profile,” says TGIG’s Jonathon Cline, who adds, “increased understanding of terpenes has shaped a new appreciation for the scents and flavors associated with a specific strain.”


TGIG’S STRAWBERRY CHEM OG FLOWER AT THE GROVE

REMEDY'S KING LOUIS XIII “I'm not sure if it's the official story, [but] I heard the King Louis strains were named because of their extremely strong and powerful stink dank smell. Much like the post-Renaissance kings of France, King Louis XIII has a distinct odor that can easily fill a room,” says Remedy’s Randy Villarba. “The Remedy cultivation team selected King Louis

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Strawberry Chem OG flower from TGIG offers a complex bouquet of flavors and scents that fit right in with today’s photo by Keene Dadian curious gastronomic palate. It’s definitely a bespoke mixture, according to TGIG’s Jonathon Cline, “it’s a cross between Strawberry Dogshit and Chemdawg with pronounced characteristics of Chemdawg and OG.” Chemdawg is known for its sharp, pungent, diesel-like taste and odor that can be detected from miles away, and Strawberry Dogshit…well, we’ll just leave it at that. “The strain's genetics provide an interesting terpene profile on their own,” Cline says about the terpene mix of 1.425 mg of b-myrcene, 1.328 b-caryophyllene, and 1.256 b-pinene. TGIG puts a lot of TLC into their strains' terpene characteristics beginning in the grow room where they use all-natural living soil and manipulate their LED light spectrum to pack a hefty THC punch (in the case of Strawberry Chem OG it’s 16.56 percent) into each draw. “Those who want to better themselves and enhance their comprehension definitely are becoming more aware of terpene profiles,” Cline says. “There are still some consumers who only care about THC potency and price, but many don't realize they can save money by understanding what [terpene] profiles will work best for what they use cannabis for. As we learn more about the effectiveness of terpenes, we are beginning to rejoice over the medicinal benefits that allow consumers to decide their own fate, taking their health into their own hands.”


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XIII due to its above-average THC levels, potency, and terpene profile. King Louis XIII’s vibrant terpene profile is attributed to its parent strains, OG Kush and LA Confidential. King Louis XIII is a heavy indica-dominant hybrid with uplifting sativa effects. Remedy's latest batches of King Louis XIII tested in the mid-20s, reaching as high as 28 percent THC.” A heavy smoke, King Louis is a deep relaxing body high that hits quick and creates a super sedated effect. Perfect for insomniacs, this will also help curb stress, anxiety, and chronic pain. Like TGIG, Remedy emphasizes the importance of powerful and balanced terpenes. “Flavor is a key factor, but what really moves the needle is terpene profile. As more and more cannabis users are being educated about terpenes, people are realizing they can choose the right strain or concentrate to cater to the effects they want by reading a terpene profile. It's not a secret that patients are number-hunting THC percentages. [But] as more people are educated about terpenes, they'll realize it isn't always about that THC percentage when it comes to flavor and overall effects,” Villarba says. So, scan those labels—not all flower is created the same. As for his favorite terpene, Villarba says it is myrcene. “I'm a bit high strung, I need it for antianxiety and sedation at the end of the day. Myrcene's anti-inflammatory effects are also great for this aging snowboarder's bones and joints,” he explains.

MEDIZIN’S THC SYRUP What better way to refresh your parched palate this summer than with a swallow of crisp mineral water and a splash of THC syrup? It’s the green goddess’ answer to La Croix, except instead of the merest hint of flavor, you get a sip of a high. “Medizin sought to create a great-tasting beverage for those looking to mix it up,” says Medizin’s David Farris. “Our flavors offer a great pairing to your choice of soda water or tonic water. We currently offer sour green apple, watermelon (.138 percent THC), lemonade (.125 percent THC), blue coconut, and strawberry-kiwi. Our syrups have little to no marijuana taste, making this a go-to infused product.” You can add Medizin’s 100mg THC Syrup to your favorite summer libation, or you can take the plunge with


a teaspoon straight to the dome—it’s up to you. This is a fast-acting product, cutting down on the time that it normally takes for an edible to kick in.

DADDY MACK’S CHILL POWDER

CANNABIOTIX SOUR GRAPEFRUIT FLOWER Cannabiotix’s Sour Grapefruit flower is so flavorful it could count as one of your recommended daily servings of fruits and vegetables. Because it photo by Timothy Marez is a cross of Grapefruit Kush and Sour Diesel, “it only made sense to call it Sour Grapefruit,” says Cannabiotix’s David Lloyd. “When we bred Sour Grapefruit we wanted to blend the lemoncitrus OG flavor with the sour spiciness of the classic Sour Diesel. What we ended up with was a beautiful flower that expresses high levels of limonene (9.1 mg) and b-caryophyllene (10.4 mg). Enjoyable at all times of the day, its high is euphoric and relaxing, with notes of sweet citrus and that classic ‘gas’ smell that true connoisseurs all love.”

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You can tickle your taste buds with terpene-free treats or you can turn anything—literally, anything—into an edible with Daddy Mack’s Chill Powder. This miraculous powder is odorless, tasteless, vegan, and gluten-free, and it can be “mixed in your water, protein shake, coffee, tea; shaken on your pancakes or burger; or even used in baking, as it is decarboxylated and will not change through the baking process,” says Nevada Powders’ Steve Mack. “You do not need to hide our product in your foods, and your recipes will taste like they should. Our powder makes anything an edible.” According to Mack, the namesake of Daddy Mack’s, of course, “people who want to medicate but do not like the taste or do not like to vape or smoke will love this product. It is discreet because it looks like you are adding powdered sugar or a powdered supplement to your food and drink.” Chill powder is made using a hybrid strain from Evergreen Organix and contains 100 mg of THC with each 1/3 teaspoon measuring in at 10 mg.


For Lloyd, terpenes are king and his favorite is myrcene, a relaxant that makes lower level THC strains seem heavier. “At first, everything was about THC. The bigger the number the better. And one could argue that THC is still the number one constituent driving sales. But as budtenders are helping to educate the consumers more and more, I have noticed a shift towards paying more mind to terpenes and their effects.” Sour Grapefruit is part of the popular trend toward fruity cannabis flavors that still pack an OG punch. At 25.8 percent THC, Sour Grapefruit is a great strain for painrelief, anxiety, depression and many other ailments and it equally hits the mind and body for a balanced effect.

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EXHALE CHOCOLATE CHIP SQUARE The classic chocolate chip cookie is an edible slam dunk. You can’t go wrong with a warm cookie studded with gooey chocolate chips. “Who doesn’t love a chocolate chip cookie?” asks Exhale’s Marc Baldwin. Unlike the original chocolate chip cookie, which was created by accident when Ruth Wakefield ran out of baker’s chocolate in her Massachusetts kitchen, this cookie “was definitely not an accident,” says Baldwin. “We continually strive to acquire the best genetic profiles. We pride ourselves on having the best strain/ terpene profile on the market.” Exhale’s chocolate square maximizes the terps. “The effect users feel has a lot to do with the terpenes and flavor profiles. As end users become more educated and sophisticated, they are developing awareness of the ability to craft the experience through specific dominant terpenes and also secondary cannabinoids, which are extremely important—though they do not seem to be getting the same press as terpenes are these days,” explains Baldwin. This cookie tastes true to form and it also has a hint of vanilla bean. With a total of 100 mg divided into 10 pieces for the perfect dose, remember to wait a few hours before upping consumption—even though it tastes to good not to. Then ride a sweet delicious wave of euphoria.


KYND’S LA OG FLOWER

STATE FLOWER CANNABIS’ PINEAPPLE TONIC FLOWER What luau or exotic barbecue is complete without a pineapple in one form or another? Pineapple upside-down cake, pineapple pizza, even just a plain old plate of sliced pineapple. Purple City Genetics’ Pineapple Tonic is a delicious CBD-rich strain that crosses Pineapple OG with Cannatonic. “Their breeding was no accident,” says The Apothecarium’s Matthew Janz. “It was a deliberate, methodical

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Everyone loves the classics. The tried-andtrue, the go-to, the timetested and time-honored favorites. Think baked Alaska, filet mignon, a glass of Champagne—and Cheech and Chong. Into this celestial realm enters Kynd’s LA OG flower. “LA OG is a cross between two powerhouse strains—LA Confidential and none other than staple indica OG Kush. When you combine them, you make LA OG. It clearly pays homage to its hometown of Los Angeles,” says Kynd COO Stacy Castillo. Leaving aside Los Angeles’s obvious place as second best city (Las Vegas is clearly number one), who isn’t captivated by hallowed OG Kush’s earthy pine and lemon scent, as well as its mysterious genetic origins reaching deep into ’90s LA lore? Combine that mystique with LA Confidential’s powerful psychedelic punch and classic skunk aroma, and you’ve got a winner. You can count on Kynd’s superior staff to do justice to this strain. “Flavor has always been an important factor in our grow cycle. Our cultivation team takes pride in its processes, which we have down to a science. It’s also not a one-approach-fits-all strain process—every strain has a tailored process, and we treat them all individually in both the grow cycle and the curing to foster the most flavorful cannabis possible,” Castillo says. “LA OG was one of the very first strains that we grew, and it remains a standard in our lineup, as well as one of our most favored and popular indica strains.” With a terpene profile of 3.9 mg b-caryophyllene, 3.5 mg limonene, and 8.1 mg myrcene, expect notes of coffee and fresh green with sweetness and the classic OG flavor. With 20.51 percent THC, the effects are a therapeutic body high with extended relaxation, perfect for right before bed.


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creation. Pineapple OG is known for its tropical, pineappleesque terpene profile. It has a vibrant nose and is potent. Cannatonic, on the other hand, is a well-known CBD strain which has a more earthy terpene profile. Combine the two and you get the best of both worlds—powerful effects and tantalizing taste.” With a terpene profile of 8.06 mg b-myrcene, 3.84 mg a-pinene, and 1.93 mg caryophyllene, Pineapple Tonic calms the nerves, expands the mind AND relieves the kink in your back. “Despite being a CBD-heavy strain (12.14 percent), Pineapple Tonic carries much of its Pineapple OG parent qualities. From its strong lineage comes a sativa dominance— it’s a CBD strain that’s great for relief and getting your day started. It boasts a large spread of medicinal benefits that can help manage the symptoms of a multitude of ailments.” When talking terps, Janz touts the benefits of myrcene, found in both indica and sativa strains lending analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and, in some cases, sedative properties. “Myrcene can even be powerful enough to create typical indica effects in sativa strains. One of our favorite parts of myrcene is that it lowers the resistance in the blood-brain barrier, allowing for easier absorption of other terpenes and cannabinoids. When myrcene is combined with other terpenes and cannabinoids it can open up our body’s responsiveness, thus making each component more effective.”

NEVADA MADE’S KABUNKY SUGAR COOKIE FLOWER Can you ever have enough cookies, especially cookies of the cannabisinfused variety? The answer is no, you can’t. Celebrate palate-popping sweetness and all its delicious iterations with Nevada Made’s Kabunky Sugar Cookies. This indica-dominant hybrid is a cross between Crystal Gayle, a Northern Lights descendant; Blue Hawaiian, a Blueberry and Hawaiian sativa; and Sensi Star, a powerful indica known for its cerebral effects. Combine all three and expect a tropical berry aftertaste resulting in a terpene mix of 1.3 mg caryophyllene, 3.09 limonene, and a smidge of terpinolene at .10 mg as well as deep, full-body relaxation from 22.1 percent THC. This flower smokes deep in the throat, is potent, takes effect very quickly, sweeping your cerebrum away on a confectionary journey that relieves ailments such as migraines and back pain. You might want to save this cookie for an afterdinner treat rather than an afternoon pick-me-up, unless you like long, delicious naps with your sweet, sweet sugar snaps. We may have to dub this one the “med for bed.”


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effexsupply.com KEEP OUT OF REACH OF CHILDREN • FOR USE ONLY BY ADULTS 21 YEARS OF AGE AND OVER


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REBEL WITH A CAUSE Pastry chef Mindy Segal stakes her fork in edibles

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By Beth Schwartz Photography by Erika Dufour, erikadufour.com


T

his is the day I have been waiting for. Most would tell you the day they were holding their breath for was when they could finally buy marijuana legally. Others will tell you it hasn’t happened yet, and for them it will be when the federal government lifts the ban on cannabis prohibition. For me it’s now. For someone who treats her taste buds as a temple and regularly worships at the altar of the food gods -- taking enormous pleasure in morsels that range from intricate omakase delights to the simplicity of her mother’s just-out-of-theoven coconut bread -- I recognize that a turning point in cannabis’ evolution has arrived. This is a watershed moment to be acknowledged because nothing says an industry has made it like a James Beard Foundation Award-winning chef joining the fray and bringing the cred. In my way of thinking (and eating), normalizing an outlier begins when someone from the mainstream joins the movement and gives it their stamp of approval. In this case, a well-worn path has just been turned into a street with the arrival of a culinary badass who brings all the sass and substance necessary to fit it into a rebellious industry -- causing the masses to sit up, take notice, and realize it’s much more than a movement. It’s now a lifestyle.

MEET MINDY

FEEDING THEIR SOULS Don’t think that Segal is jumping in the fray just because it’s the trendy thing to do. At 50 years old she’s most definitely already made it and doesn’t need the hassles that go with cannabis as inherently as marshmallows go with graham crackers. She is 30 years into a culinary career that includes opening a popular restaurant called HotChocolate in Chicago in 2005. Had a best-selling cookbook "Cookie Love" published in 2015. And, of course, the aforementioned Beard award she won in 2012 for Outstanding Pastry Chef. For all intents and purposes, she could sit back and rest on her accomplishments and accolades. But for the self-taught chef, cannabis is as familiar for her as the recipe she concocted decades ago for her famous brittles.

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Because a James Beard award is the food world’s version of an Oscar, chef Mindy Segal is someone who should be on your radar. You need to know about her because of the way this ginger-tressed, artfully-tatted visionary is parading into the cannabis space all sweetness and light. By virtue of being the first big-name chef to come into the cannabis industry, launching her edibles in Nevada, California and Arizona this year, Segal is bringing food cred to a space that really could use it. “I am the first James Beard award-winning chef in the arena, there is nobody like me in the industry as of late and I think that just alone is huge,” Segal says of shifting the edible paradigm. It is huge -- because with her entry into the space, cannabis takes another step toward normalization. Sure, there are plenty of products in the edible space but how many are bringing culinary talent at this level? And Segal gets the gravity of what she is doing with regards to the rest of the culinary community. “I don’t think I am bringing the gourmet product to the space, I think that other people are doing really great products. I don’t want to own that, but I do want to own that I’m the chef who has recognition on my side and I am bringing that to the edible community. I am saying, ‘Hey, so let’s all do it, let’s all do this’,” she enthuses, her voice rising. “Take our knowledge and our side of the thought process and bring it to the cannabis industry.”


S TA Y GOLDEN...

“For me it was such an obvious parallel to what I do in my restaurant. In my profession I make people happy, I feed them, I feed their soul. For whatever reason or whatever occasion, they’re eating in my restaurant or eating my food and I felt like it was such a parallel to what I am doing in the cannabis industry,” explains Segal, who calls herself “a huge advocate for cannabis.” “The whole idea was to bring a girl who owns her own restaurant, has a cookbook, and is passionate about pastry and food and bring it into the cannabis arena and not only make it approachable like I’m doing it, so anybody can do it, but to also show that there’s nothing wrong with this beautiful plant and to make this great chef-driven product.”

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elevatenv.com | august

FAMILIARITY BREEDS SUCCESS

A V A I L A B L E AT EXHALE

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JENNY’S

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A great product best starts with something you already know. For Segal, it’s her line of artisanal edibles which have been patterned after her signature decadent brittle bars that have made her a sweetheart of the confections world. In addition to milk chocolate peanut brittle, dark chocolate almond toffee, white chocolate raspberry cream and marshmallow graham, she has also perfected homespun baked goods for the line that include snickerdoodles, chocolate chip cookies and chocolate fudge brownies. Segal hasn’t changed her baking philosophy and her cookie love continues with cannabis. “My approach is to be chef-driven and ingredient-driven. I think my artisan brand is very high quality. I am so proud of them,” she explains of Mindy’s Artisanal Edibles, describing them in her high spirited way as "fucking excellent." “I’ve been making my toffee smoked almond brittle and the milk chocolate brittle for years. I don’t even remember when I haven’t been making them and we wanted them to taste exactly like my brittles, so we put clear [distillate], which has no taste or odor, in the brittles. I want to give people in the cannabis arena the same experience they would have in my restaurant or at a party if they brought my brittles without being dosed.” She is quick to add that cannabis is just another ingredient. “I just think about cannabis as another ingredient I am adding to my candy. It’s just another ingredient on the list,” she relays. The only major difference is she now works in a kitchen as well as a lab. “Our kitchen is in the same facility as Cresco’s lab, so they are making the oil for us,” says Segal of the company she sources her distillate from. “You get to see the process from start to finish. So, you can go in the clone room, you can go in the grow room, then the drying room and can go into the lab and see them doing all the processes that it takes to get to the clear liquid. It’s very inspiring as a chef.”


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august | elevatenv.com 31

When the rebel with a cause decided to make her foray into the edible space her goal was to develop two lines. “I would have my higher-end Mindy’s Artisan Edibles line and they are recipes exactly from my cookbook,” she explains. “Then I wanted a more approachable line like Mindy’s Kitchen which is the fruit-forward candies, gummies and chews with the winterized oil. It’s just a different price point than the luxury brand with the whole idea that I am hoping I have something for everybody.” Segal’s line of fruit focused candies is infused with RSO and winterized sativa, indica and hybrid oil and is geared to the cannabis lover who likes the taste of cannabis in their edibles. “It has strain-specific cannabis and flavor profiles, so we match the natural flavor with the indica and sativa we are using. I really believe that the flavors we are getting are pretty good,” offers Segal. “There are multiple types of people who are eating edibles and some people are connoisseurs who want to taste the strain, so we use winterized oil which has flavor, and we match it with the fruits we are using. We didn’t want it to be so harsh or bitter and plant- or herb-forward. Some of that herb goes with the strawberry, cherry, and champagne flavor of the candy in the gummies -- they all kind of match each other and complement each other which I think is great because I get the best of both worlds.” Later this month Nevadans will have the chance to see for themselves just what the self-named Mistress of Deliciousness is bringing to the dessert table as she launches her two lines in local dispensaries. “To see this project actually be put in a package and have cannabis in it is one of the proudest moments of my career,” Segal enthuses. “I have worked on this for so long to get the right blend of different kinds of chocolate together to create these flavors and to see this hard work come to fruition -- it’s just like my cookbook, it’s exactly the same feeling -- I feel like a proud parent. I am so excited about my brand being in Nevada, and to see people enjoying it.” As our interview winds down, Segal’s can-do attitude is unflagged even though she is battling a cold. “Let’s make a great product and let’s make it be effective. Let’s make it a great experience for people, let’s destigmatize it,” she says, summing up her entry into the cannabis space. An entry she will make as seamlessly as she makes her famous brittles while bringing us all along for the sweet ride.


MEALS ON REELS CINEMATIC FEASTS TO FEED THE FAMISHED By Josh Bell

Getting the munchies isn’t just about stuffing your face with whatever food is nearby. Sometimes it’s about appreciating the craftsmanship of a great meal, whether that’s gourmet cooking at a fancy restaurant, on-the-fly creativity from a food truck, or a home-cooked spread made with love. Before you rush out to grab some quick eats, immerse yourself in the variety of cuisine presented in these movies, which make food on the big screen look good enough to eat.

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Babette’s Feast (1987) The titular feast doesn’t begin until half an hour before the end of this sedate, quiet Danish movie, which won an Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film. But the slow pacing proves that anticipation is one of the best things about enjoying a decadent meal. The meal cooked by Babette (Stéphane Audran) is indeed decadent, a multi-course French dinner made for a crowd of austere Protestants in a remote 19th-century coastal Danish village, where French refugee Babette has been living for 14 years. Although the two elderly sisters who took Babette in are serious about carrying on their pastor father’s legacy of self-denial, Babette’s cooking opens sensual pleasures for the sisters and their fellow congregants. One of the first movies to be renowned mainly for its culinary delights (restaurants offered themed menus following the movie’s success), Feast takes its time getting to the good stuff, but makes every lavish dish worth the wait.

Like Water for Chocolate (1992) Based on Laura Esquivel’s acclaimed novel, Like Water for Chocolate is a magical-realist fable in which food becomes the expression of various passions and anguishes for Tita (Lumi Cavazos), a young woman living on a ranch in early 20th-century Mexico. Tita cooks hearty, delicious meals for her family, including a cruel, domineering mother who forbids her from marrying or leaving home. Tita’s strong spiritual bond with the food she prepares infuses it with her emotions, often causing chaos for the people who eat the meals she makes. Director Alfonso Arau shows cooking as an inherently emotional act, and Tita’s dishes look enticing as much for their ingredients and presentation as for the way she prepares them. Esquivel’s novel included recipes at the beginning of each chapter, and the food in the movie is appealing enough to make viewers wish the movie included those, too.


Eat Drink Man Woman (1994) This early film from director Ang Lee opens with a lengthy dialogue-free sequence following veteran chef Chu (Sihung Lung) as he prepares an elaborate meal for his weekly Sunday dinner with his three adult daughters, and food is a key factor in how the Chu family remains close. As his daughters (a chemistry teacher, an airline executive and a college student) navigate new romances and major decisions in their lives, Chu struggles with letting go of the restaurant he’s run for decades and the children he’s had living with him since they were born. Lee’s Taipei-set drama is a low-key family story in which all important life changes are announced around the dinner table, where great food brings the family together no matter what challenges they’re dealing with.

Big Night (1996)

Waitress (2007) Pie is both an escape and a profession for Jenna Hunterson (Keri Russell), a waitress at a small-town diner in the South. She’s trapped in an abusive marriage and dealing with an unwanted pregnancy, but she’s incredibly gifted at making creative, colorful and delicious pies with unconventional names that reflect what she’s going through in life. Russell is fantastic in this sweet but melancholy dramedy, as Jenna falls in love with her doctor (Nathan Fillion) and tries to plan a new life. The pies are a highlight, each depicted lovingly and vibrantly, even the ones that Jenna imagines creating out of anger or frustration. Everything about the movie is warm and inviting, just like the diner where Jenna whips up her signature creations, and where you might find yourself wanting to order some pie by the time the movie’s over.

Julie & Julia (2009) Two chefs, decades apart, cook the same food in this adaptation of Julie Powell’s 2005 memoir. The dual structure finds Powell (played by Amy Adams) attempting to cook every recipe from renowned chef Julia Child’s landmark cookbook Mastering the Art of French Cooking, while in the 1950s, Child (played by Meryl Streep) develops the very recipes that will catapult her to culinary stardom. The personal drama experienced by each woman is minimal (Powell is escaping her dead-end job by focusing on cooking; Child is adjusting to life in a foreign country after moving with her diplomat husband), but the challenges of getting fancy French dishes right, whether in a cramped apartment kitchen or for the posterity of a cookbook, are conflict enough. The dishes themselves look wonderful, of course, even when they aren’t quite successful; it’s no surprise that Child’s book has endured for 50-plus years, or that it inspired Powell decades after its first publication. continued on page 48

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Stanley Tucci (who also co-wrote and co-directed) and Tony Shalhoub play a pair of Italian immigrant brothers running a failing restaurant in 1950s New Jersey, who stake their entire future on a visit from jazz legend Louis Prima. Prima’s potential arrival is just the pretext for a massive, lovingly prepared traditional Italian meal, cooked by the rigidly principled Primo (Shalhoub), who refuses to compromise his artistry for money or fame. And that’s a good thing, because Primo’s meal is a parade of amazing dishes that completely obliterate the tired spaghetti and meatballs being served at the sell-out joint across town. The big night turns out to be bittersweet for the brothers, who end up consumed by personal and professional drama, but the food is completely fulfilling.


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DISPENSARY MAP A Guide to Cannabis in Southern Nevada

RENO

PECOS RD

SIMMONS ST

SILVERADO RANCH BLVD

15

HIG SO HL UTH AN ER DS N PK W

Y

PEBBLE RD

CACTUS AVE

WY

K EP OS .T R HENDERSON S MUNICIPAL AIRPORT

D BLV PARADISE RD

AS VEG LAS

VD

215

Y

29b

RACETRACK RD

HENDERSON

HORIZON RIDGE PKWY

HORIZON DR

515

GE SUNRSIDPKWY HEIGHT

16b

MARYLAND PKWY

WES

L RD

BL

PKW

RD

6TH ST

COMMERCE ST MAIN ST 3RD ST

VE

TER

NA

RANCHO DR

AVE

ND

WARM SPRINGS RD

13b

RIA

HLA

SET

31b 16a

HIG

9b

WINDMILL LN

18 AVE

SAM BOYD STADIUM

SUN

WIGWAM PKWY

OD

AD

SUNSET COUNTY PARK

BERMUDA RD

DECATUR BLVD

LAS VEGAS BLVD SOUTH

JONES BLVD

RUSSELL RD

WO

WY

AM

E DI

BLU

515

RH

5a

RD OND

LLY

33

4c DESERT INN RD

DE

WINDMILL LN

E TWAIN

HO

KAREN AVE

UL

8

GREEN DISTRICT

FLAMINGO RD

SUNSET RD

SAHARA AVE

E ME

MCCARRAN INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

215

WARM SPRINGS RD

LAMB BLVD

PECOS RD

21

OAKEY BLVD

9a 14 24 ST. LOUIS AVE

LAK

30b

23a

NELLIS BLVD

IP STR THE LVD AS B LAS

15

25

DESERT INN RD

4a

BO

SUNSET RD

18

17

SAHARA AVE

12

4c

LAS VEGAS TROPICANA AVE

22

11

GIBSON RD

RUSSELL RD

24

STEPHANIE ST

29a

14

CHARLESTON BLVD

9a

PKWY

9c

4a

PECOS RD

15

NELLIS BLVD

D

15

GREEN VALLEY

34

6

23a

10 28 JONES BLVD

RAINBOW BLVD

BUFFALO DR

TROPICANA AVE

PAHRUMP

17

4b

FLAMINGO RD

1

VEG

SAHARA AVE DESERT INN RD SPRING MOUNTAIN RD

30a

VALLEY VIEW

DECATUR BLVD

31a

2

DURANGO DR

FT APACHE RD

TOWN CENTER DR

HUALAPAI WAY

CHARLESTON BLVD

160

N 5TH

32b 5b 3 20

1

UST

27

3 20

SAHARA AVE

BONANZA RD MAI

ALTA DR

26

L OS EE R

WASHINGTON AVE

EASTERN AVE

215

OAKEY BLVD

5b

32b

CHARLESTON BLVD

OWENS AVE

WASHINGTON AVE

95

VEG

LAKE MEAD BLVD

19

SANDHILL RD

WY

B AS

IND

VEGAS DR

PK

159

DECATUR BLVD

CAREY AVE BLVD

LAS

5c

MARYLAND PKWY

LIN

23b

32a NORTH LAS VEGAS AIRPORT

RTH NO LVD NELLIS AIR FORCE BASE

CRAIG RD

MARYLAND PKWY

ER

15

NORTH LAS VEGAS

CAMINO AL NORTE / MLK

MM

WASHBURN RD

N ST

SU

MESQUITE

CENTENNIAL PKWY

DR

BUFFALO DR

ALEXANDER RD

ANN RD

HO NC RA

RAINBOW BLVD

LONE MOUNTAIN RD

CHEYENNE AVE

13a

JONES BLVD

GRAND CANYON DR

DURANGO DR

95

LAKE ME AD

7

215

BOULDER CITY AND LAUGHLIN

11


9a. Essence Cannabis Dispensary essencevegas.com 2307 S Las Vegas Blvd Las Vegas, NV 89104 702.978.7591

17. Nevada Wellness Center nvwellnessctr.com 3200 S Valley View Blvd Las Vegas, NV 89102 702.470.2077

28. The Apothecary Shoppe theapothecaryshoppe.com 4240 W Flamingo Rd Ste #100 Las Vegas, NV 89103 702.740.4372

2. Apothecarium apothecariumlv.com 7885 W Sahara Ave Las Vegas, NV 89117 702.778.7987

9b. Essence Cannabis Dispensary essencevegas.com 4300 E Sunset Rd Ste #A3 Henderson, NV 89014 702.978.7687

18. NuLeaf www.nuleafnv.com 430 E Twain Ave Las Vegas, NV 89169 702.297.5323

29a. The Dispensary thedispensarynv.com 5347 S Decatur Blvd Ste #100 Las Vegas, NV 89118 702.476.0420

3. Blackjack Collective blackjackcollective.com 1860 Western Ave Las Vegas, NV 89102 702.545.0026

9c. Essence Cannabis Dispensary essencevegas.com 5765 W Tropicana Ave Las Vegas, NV 89103 702.500.1714

19. NuWu Cannabis Marketplace Nuwucannabis.com 1235 Paiute Circle Las Vegas, NV 89106 702.844.2707

29b. The Dispensary thedispensarynv.com 50 N Gibson Rd Ste #170 Henderson, NV 89104 702.476.0420

4a. Blüm LetsBlum.com 1921 Western Ave Las Vegas, NV 89102 702.718.Blum

10. Exhale Nevada www.exhalenevada.com 4310 W Flamingo Rd Las Vegas, NV 89103 702.447.1250

20. Oasis Medical Cannabis oasismedicalcannabis.com 1800 S Industrial Rd Ste #180 Las Vegas, NV 89102 702.420.2405

30a. The Grove TheGroveNV.com 1541 E Basin Ave Pahrump, NV 89048 775.556.0100

4b. Blüm LetsBlum.com 3650 S Decatur Blvd Las Vegas, NV 89103 702.627.Blum

11. Inyo Fine Cannabis Dispensary inyolasvegas.com 2520 S Maryland Pkwy Ste #2 Las Vegas, NV 89109 702.707.8888

21. Pisos Dispensary pisoslv.com 4110 S Maryland Pkwy Ste #1 Las Vegas, NV 89119 702.367.9333

30b. The Grove TheGroveNV.com 4647 Swenson St Las Vegas, NV 89119 702.463.5777

4c. Blüm LetsBlum.com 1130 E Desert Inn Rd Las Vegas, NV 89109 702.536.Blum

12. Jardin jardincannabis.com 2900 E Desert Inn Rd Ste #102 Las Vegas, NV 89121 702.331.6511

22. Planet 13/Medizin medizinlv.com 4850 W Sunset Rd Ste #130 Las Vegas, NV 89118 702.206.1313

31a. The Source thesourcenv.com 2550 S Rainbow Blvd Ste #8 Las Vegas, NV 89146 702.708.2000

5a. CANOPI canopi.com 6540 Blue Diamond Rd Las Vegas, NV 89139 702.420.7338

13a. Jenny’s Dispensary Jennysdispensary.com 5530 N Decatur Blvd North Las Vegas, NV 89030 702.718.0420

23a. Reef Dispensaries reefdispensaries.com 3400 Western Ave Las Vegas, NV 89109 702.475.6520

31b. The Source thesourcenv.com 9480 S Eastern Ave Ste #185 Henderson, NV 89123 702.708.2222

5b. CANOPI canopi.com 1324 S 3rd St Las Vegas, NV 89104 702.420.2902

13b. Jenny’s Dispensary Jennysdispensary.com 10420 S Eastern Ave Henderson, NV 89052 702.718.0420

23b. Reef Dispensaries reefdispensaries.com 1366 W Cheyenne Ave North Las Vegas, NV 89030 702.410.8032

32a. Thrive Cannabis Markeplace thrivenevada.com 2755 W Cheyenne Ave Ste #103 North Las Vegas, NV 89032 702.776.4144

5c. CANOPI canopi.com 2113 Las Vegas Blvd North North Las Vegas, NV 89030 702.420.2113

14. Las Vegas ReLeaf lasvegasreleaf.com 2244 Paradise Rd Las Vegas, NV 89104 702.209.2400

24. Sahara Wellness 420sahara.com 420 E Sahara Ave Las Vegas, NV 89104 702.478.5533

32b.Thrive Cannabis Marketplace thrivenevada.com 1112 S Commerce St. Las Vegas, NV 89102 702.776.4144

6. Cultivate Las Vegas cultivatelv.com 3615 Spring Mountain Rd Las Vegas, NV 89102 702.778.1173

15. MMJ America mmjamerica.com 4660 S Decatur Blvd Las Vegas, NV 89109 702.565.9333

25. Shango Las Vegas goshango.com 4380 Boulder Highway Las Vegas, NV 89121 702.444.4824

33. Top Notch THC topnotchthc.com 5630 Stephanie St Las Vegas, NV 89122 702.418.0420

7. Deep Roots Harvest deeprootsharvest.com 195 Willis Carrier Canyon Mesquite, NV 89034 702.345.2854

16a. Nevada Made Marijuana nevadamademarijuana.com 3195 St. Rose Pkwy Ste #212 Henderson, NV 89052 702.737.7777

26. ShowGrow showgrowlv.com 4850 S Fort Apache Rd Ste #100 Las Vegas, NV 89147 702.227.0511

34. Zen Leaf zenleafvegas.com 9120 W Post Rd Ste #103 Las Vegas, NV 89148 702.462.6706

8. Euphoria Wellness euphoriawellnessnv.com 7780 S Jones Blvd Ste #105 Las Vegas, NV 89139 702.960.7200

16b. Nevada Made Marijuana nevadamademarijuana.com 1975 S Casino Dr Laughlin, NV 89029 702.737.7777

27. Silver Sage Wellness sswlv.com 4626 W Charleston Blvd Las Vegas, NV 89102 702.802.3757

Cannabiotix products are sold here

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1. Acres Cannabis acrescannabis.com 2320 Western Ave Las Vegas, NV 89102 702.399.4200


LEGALEASE

BEHIND THE LABEL: REGULATING CANNABIS IN FOOD

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by Amanda Connor, Esq. and Morgan Hansen

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis once said, “It is one of the happy incidents of the federal system that a single courageous State may, if its citizens choose, serve as a laboratory; and try novel social and economic experiments without risk to the rest of the country.” This is to say, states have the flexibility to implement laws and try things that the federal government is currently unwilling to achieve. In the realm of marijuana regulation, these manifest in different laws across different states. Citizens have voted to legalize medical and recreational use of marijuana, but in different forms. One of the areas that sees different regulation is the use of marijuana in food where different states take different approaches. The basis of Nevada law regulating marijuana in food

is found in Nevada Revised Statutes 453A.360 and 453D.310. Both portions of the statutes break the regulation into sections, including: labeling, packaging, serving size, marketing and other. NRS 453D.310 lays out the requirements and restrictions placed on recreational edible marijuana products. Some of the restrictions include: 1) labeling clearly and unambiguously that “this is a marijuana product”; 2) not presenting the product in packaging that contains an image of a cartoon character, mascot, action figure, balloon or toy; 3) selling on the basis of the concentration of THC in the products and not by weight;


Other states that have legalized the recreational use of marijuana and marijuana products mirror the restrictions that Nevada has implemented. For example, in California the Business and Professions Code states that edible cannabis products shall: not be designed to be appealing to children or easily confused with commercially sold candy or foods that do not contain cannabis; and be produced and sold with a standardized concentration of cannabinoids not to exceed 10 milligrams of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) per serving. In addition to California’s protection of children, Colorado passed a law that imposed “a prohibition on the production and sale of edible retail marijuana products that are in the distinct shape of a human, animal, or fruit. Geometric shapes and products that are simply fruit flavored are not considered fruit…” Colorado, likewise, passed laws regulating the amount of THC per serving of edible marijuana products. The Colorado Revised Statutes state that labels of marijuana products must, at a minimum, show the amount of THC per serving and the number of servings per package. Colorado further limits the amount of total THC per individually sealed products to 100 mg of THC with each serving equaling 10 mg of THC. When looking at how different states approach labeling edible marijuana products, the main concern and similarity

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4) not packaging and labeling in a manner which is modeled after a brand of products primarily consumed by or marketed to children; 5) measuring in servings of a maximum of 10 milligrams per serving; and 6) not labeling or marketing as candy. Also, under NRS 453D.310, a marijuana product sold as a food product must not contain more than 100 mg of THC in a single package. Furthermore, under NRS 453D.310 marijuana product manufacturing facilities are not allowed to produce marijuana products that: 1) appear to be a lollipop or ice cream; 2) bears a likeness or contains characteristics of a real or fictional person, animal or fruit; 3) is modeled after a brand of products primarily consumed by or marketed to children; 4) or is made by applying concentrated marijuana to a commercially available candy or snack food item other than dried fruit, nuts or granola. The common thread among these restrictions on marijuana products is the states’ concern for children as well as clear and unambiguous labeling. In comparison with regulations in other states, Nevada’s approach is roughly par for the course.


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is the clearly defined serving size as well as the prevention of any child mistakenly consuming these products. By not allowing edible marijuana products to resemble products marketed directly towards children, the hope is that these food products will look less appealing than if they were to resemble candies, fruit, or other child-friendly products. As is the nature of statutes, the implementing regulation is constantly changing. Under recent changes to the implementation of NRS 453D, the Nevada Department of Taxation has made a couple significant alterations to the labeling and design of edible marijuana products. One of the major changes is the requirement that “each single serving in a multiple-serving edible marijuana product must be physically demarked in a way that enables a reasonable person to intuitively determine how much of the edible marijuana product constitutes a single serving.” Additionally, Nevada’s Dept. of Taxation is implementing regulations that require marijuana products to be packaged in servings of 10 milligrams of THC with a total of 100 milligrams of THC per package. Furthermore, beginning after January 1, 2019, where it is practicable, “each single-serving edible marijuana product and each individual serving containing not more than 10 milligrams of THC of a multiple-serving edible marijuana product

must be stamped or molded with a symbol developed by the Department to indicate that the product contains marijuana.” These regulations are not much different than those in Colorado or California. In California, edible cannabis products must be “delineated or scored into standardized serving sizes if the cannabis product contains more than one serving and is an edible cannabis product in solid form” as well as “marked with a universal symbol, as determined by the State Department of Public Health through regulation.” Again, the main goal is to prevent accidental consumption by children and accidental overconsumption. While Nevada regulations may seem to be restrictive, they are not much different than other states that have voted to legalize marijuana. Ultimately, the goal of every state government that regulates recreational marijuana is to make it as safe as possible and hope that the federal government does not step in and put an end to the noble experiment each state has embarked on.

INFUSED HONEY GRANOLA YOU WILL NEED

DIRECTIONS

2 cups (170 grams) Old Fashioned Rolled Oats

Heat oven to 350 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or aluminum foil.

3/4 cup (75 grams) Sliced Almonds

Combine Oats and Sliced Almonds in a medium bowl. In a small bowl, stir Olive Oil, Cannabella Infused Honey, Vanilla Extract, Cinnamon, and a pinch of Salt then toss with the Oats and Nuts until well coated.

3 tablespoons Cannabella Infused Extra-Virgin Olive Oil (you can also substitute with Cannabella Ghee, Melted Coconut Oil or Butter)

Spread into one layer on baking sheet, and then bake, stirring every 8 to 10 minutes, until golden brown; 20 to 30 minutes. Towards the end of the baking time, check your granola every few minutes to prevent it from over-browning.

3 tablespoons Cannabella Infused Honey

Transfer to a cooling rack and let the granola cool completely. Store cooled granola in an airtight container up to two weeks.

1 tablespoon Vanilla Extract

Eat with your personal edible dose in mind. It is best to start with a low dose and increase slowly. If you are new to edibles, pace yourself.

1 teaspoon Ground Cinnamon

Onset time is 45 mins -2 hours. Recommended starting dose for new edible users is 2-5 mg.

1 pinch of Sea Salt

This Is A Marijuana Product. Keep Out Of Reach Of Children. For Use Only by Adults 21 Years of Age and Older.


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EXHALENEVADA.COM

PROFILE

You may have noticed that a new cannabinoid has entered the marketplace. You have probably heard about it or even seen it on the shelf at your dispensary. So, what exactly is delta-8 and is it right for you? Credible information on the up-and-coming cannabinoid delta-8 is not in abundant supply. With that in mind, we went to extract producer Cody Nelson of Exhale Nevada, who works with cannabis daily, to find out the basics of delta-8. What is delta-8? In a nutshell, you are just converting delta-9 to delta-8, which is a matter of rearranging the double carbon bond using heat and pressure to change the isomerization and relocate that second double bond to the other side of the molecule. It’s almost like a puzzle piece, whenever your body eats any food, for instance vitamin C, there’s a receptor for that, and it just fits into that particular receptor and your body just turns the key. With cannabinoids it’s the same exact thing. Delta-9 enters in and turns the key one way, and delta-8 turns it the other way which is toward an anti-anxiety, more clear-headed high. This begs the obvious question: during the conversion process from delta-9 to delta-8 are any medicinal qualities lost? Delta-8 doesn’t degrade. You never lose anything when you convert delta-9 to delta-8, you are just rearranging the molecules. No cannabinoids are lost, they are just converted to new cannabinoids such as CBC. What are the benefits of CBC or cannabichromene? It has a giant list of medicinal benefits, CBC is anti-bacterial, antifungal, and anti-microbial. It’s also a pain reliever and it increases your

neuroprotective pathways. People who have Alzheimer’s don’t have neurogenesis which is the creation of new pathways and CBC reverses Alzheimer’s degeneration of their neuropathways. Does delta-8 have any anti-depressant properties? CBC is very interesting because its works synergistically with delta-8. CBC on its own is an anti-depressant so for people who are having a really hard time it helps with depression and add that to the antianxiety, those two just make it a clean calm experience. For those users who don’t like delta-9 because of the paranoia or anxiety it can cause, does delta-8 distillate have a different effect? Delta-8 is literally the opposite of anxiety, it’s anti-anxiety. If you need a high dosage because you are having a bad day, with delta-8 you should have no fluttery feelings. It will calm you down without being overly psychoactive and allow you to keep a clear head. Plus, it is by far the most versatile product in the marketplace. You can use it topically, you are able to eat it by itself, or you can mix it into edibles. You can vaporize it in a dab rig, you can put it on top of flower, you can vaporize it in cartridges -- it really has any application that you want.

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Discovery of delta-8 brings with it host of medicinal benefits


OPEN FOR BUSINESS Exhale Brands Nevada has purchased one of the city’s Blüm dispensaries from its owner Terra Tech Corp. Exhale has acquired Blüm’s 1921 Western Avenue location which sits adjacent to the Las Vegas Strip. This will be Exhale’s second dispensary in Las Vegas, their other location is at 4310 W. Flamingo Road. Blüm’s other Las Vegas dispensaries are located on Desert Inn Road and Decatur Boulevard. Blüm also has a dispensary in Reno, has opened a 30,000-squarefoot cultivation facility in Sparks, and is awaiting state approval for a 15,000-square-foot extraction lab in Reno.

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Medical marijuana dispensary Cultivate has opened at 3615 Spring Mountain Road on the southwest corner of Procyon and Spring Mountain Road. cultivatelv.com MedMen, a national cannabis cultivator, producer and retailer, has announced plans for two dispensaries in Las Vegas. The brand assumed ownership and licensed operation of the New Amsterdam dispensary at 823 3rd Street in Downtown Las Vegas and opened under their own name in mid-July. The second location, which recently won county approval, is at 4503 Paradise Road, near the Hard Rock Hotel and McCarran International Airport. MedMen also has a dispensary in North Las Vegas at 4235 Arctic Spring Ave. Toronto-based Green Growth Brands has purchased a majority stake for $56 million in Nevada Organic Remedies, which owns The+Source dispensaries in Las Vegas and Henderson as well as a production and two cultivation facilities. Under the proposed deal, The+Source’s Las Vegas dispensary, one cultivation facility, the production facility, and a license to distribute marijuana to dispensaries would be transferred to Green Growth Brands. Nevada Organic Remedies will retain The+Source dispensary in Henderson and a grow house in Pahrump. Canadian firm C21 Investments has made a move to acquire Sparks-based Silver State Relief and Silver State Cultivation for more than $50 million. The terms of the acquisition give C21 the option of buying the company's real estate over the next five years which includes a 155,000-squarefoot cultivation and an 8,000-square-foot dispensary in Sparks. Billed as being among the world’s largest cannabis dispensaries, Planet 13 will be opening at 2548 W. Desert Inn Road this November. The cannabis entertainment complex will include 40,000 square feet of multi-faceted entertainment space featuring interactive attractions and more than 16,500 square feet of cannabis retail space. www.planet13holdings.com


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continued from page 15 Having just returned from a trip to Puerto Rico and enjoying her childhood favorite of membrillo (quince paste) and manchego, our adventurer chef has decided to infuse umeboshi (paste made from pickled plums). This will be served alongside manchego. Keif will be sprinkled onto fried sea stars served on sticks like giant edible lollipops. Adhering to her theme of street food of other countries, chef is preparing snowcone containers of chapulines (fried grasshoppers) sautéed in canna-oil and seasoned with salt, pepper, chili powder and more keif. “My guests will eat these by the handfuls like popcorn!” exclaims the host. Another adventurous infusion chef has concocted is a play on the Chilean Completo or hotdog -- infused guacamole, diced tomato and mayonnaise (yes, infused) stuffed inside a soft hotdog bun. Chef and staff are certain tonight’s array of foods will catapult every guest from their chairs to someplace far, far away. Meals prepared by chefs who inhabit worlds that spin around science, art and adventure as described above are meant to take us on a journey, give us experiences not usually associated with food. Many chefs, if you are present and open during your dining experience, are telling a story that ignites the senses. Should you find yourself lucky enough to dine at a table of canna-chefs like these, you will not be disappointed.

COSMIC MUFFIN’S RECIPE FOR SQUID INK RISOTTO

This unusually colored, textured entrée is less atypical than the recipes of our alchemist, artist and adventurer chefs but you won’t be timid about eating it either.


Risotto ingredients 3 Tbsp. infused olive oil 2 Tbsp. canna-butter 1 large shallot, minced 4 cloves garlic, minced 1 cup Arborio or short-grain rice ¼ cup white wine ½ tsp. squid ink 3 cups infused seafood or vegetable broth salt and pepper to taste Squid and Scallops ingredients ½ pound squid, bodies cleaned and sliced ¼ pound scallops, rinsed and patted dry 3 tsp. canna-butter 2 tsp. infused olive oil salt and pepper to taste lemon slices for garnish

Deglaze pan with wine. Allow wine to reduce by half then whisk in squid ink. Ladle ½ cup of warm broth to rice mixture – stirring almost constantly. Continue adding broth; allowing each ladle full to almost completely absorb into rice. Keep stirring. Do this until rice is cooked to desired firmness – about 20 minutes. When rice is almost done, add a smidge more squid ink until desired color is obtained. Squid ink is salty (like caviar); a little goes a long way. Squid and Scallops directions Add 3 tsp. canna-butter and 2 tsp. infused olive oil to medium skillet. Once butter/oil becomes shimmery, add scallops and squid, along with about 3 Tbsp. water. Cook until seafood is no longer translucent but thoroughly cooked. Do not overcook or seafood will be tough and chewy. Stir seafood into cooked risotto – adjust seasoning and serve. Drizzle with additional infused olive oil and lemon slices.

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Risotto directions In medium saucepot, heat broth over low heat – keep warm. Heat 3 Tbsp. infused oil and canna-butter in heavy saucepot. Stir in shallot, cooking until fragrant. Stir in

garlic. Stir in rice and cook just until barely toasted – about 3 minutes.


CANN BIS

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continued from page 33

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Jiro Dreams of Sushi (2011) Viewers will probably also end up dreaming of sushi after watching this sumptuous documentary about master sushi chef Jiro Ono, whose Michelin three-star-rated restaurant is just a tiny counter inside a Tokyo subway station. Director David Gelb tells a compelling family story about a man who’s devoted his entire life to making one kind of food and is having trouble passing on the business to the son who’s always worked in his shadow. The drama is secondary to the meticulous documentation of Jiro’s sushi-making, though, with Gelb following every small detail of the process as Ono constructs some of the most sought-after dishes in the world. It’s nearly impossible to get a reservation at Ono’s restaurant (and even more so since this movie was released), so watching Jiro Dreams of Sushi is the next best thing.

The Lunchbox (2013) A man and a woman fall in love via cooking without ever meeting in this gentle, sweet romantic drama from Indian filmmaker Ritesh Batra. A mix-up with a lunchbox delivery service finds a gruff widower suddenly getting homemade meals from a frustrated housewife, and the two form a bond when they start writing notes to each other to send back and forth in the containers. Ila (Nimrat Kaur) pours all her emotions into the food she makes, revealing as much about herself through her cooking as she does in her notes, and Saajan (Irrfan Khan) falls for her the same way. It’s an understated romance that’s as much about regrets and ambitions as it is about cheesy love notes, and it uses the comfort of food made in a family kitchen to represent the possibility of a deep, long-term connection.

Chef (2014)

– BEST DISPENSARY –

After spending years building up a major Hollywood directing career with movies like Iron Man, Jon Favreau wanted to get back to basics, and so he wrote and directed this small-scale dramedy in which he stars as a one-time high-profile restaurant chef who decides to get back to basics (after losing his big-time gig following a scandal). The food-world equivalent of a mid-budget indie movie is apparently a food truck, and that’s what Favreau’s Carl Casper launches, selling only the most amazing-looking Cuban sandwiches ever filmed. Chef doesn’t have much of a plot, but it has enough mouth-watering food preparation (and fun celebrity cameos) to fill an entire season of a Food Network or Travel Channel culinary docu-series.

The Hundred-Foot Journey (2014)

SHOW THIS AD AND GET A $40 1/8TH ON SELECT KANNABIS STRAINS.* Keep out of reach of children. For use only by adults 21 years of age and older.

The fusion of French and Indian cooking gets a spotlight in this pleasant dramedy about an Indian immigrant family who set up a restaurant in a small French town directly across the street from an upscale French establishment. Helen Mirren plays the snooty French chef who eventually comes around to the charms of Indian cuisine and helps her rival’s son (Manish Dayal), a culinary prodigy, launch a high-profile cooking career. The plot is slight, but the cooking is top-notch, with loving depictions of traditional French and Indian dishes, innovative fusion recipes and the kind of experimental avantgarde menu items that are popular in trendy urban restaurants. It’s a benign culture-clash story in which all problems can be solved by a good meal.


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Elevating the Conversation

C

with Jay Matos, president/owner, Jay Matos Consulting

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annabis compliance expert Jay Matos has dedicated the past six-and-a-half years to help reform Nevada’s medical marijuana program. Matos helped develop the regulatory framework of SB 374 which laid out the state’s medical marijuana laws and passed in 2013. “There is just such a lack of understanding about marijuana’s value,” he says. “When I started learning about kids who were dying of reactions to medicines that weren’t working and marijuana was their last alternative, I then made it my mission to educate people. Our minds perceived that this was criminal, and we were just wrong, dead wrong. Now we are waiting on the federal government to be able to see the light and move it to schedule II or III.”

How did you become involved in Nevada’s cannabis industry? In 2012 I was meeting with Senator Segerblom about passing a GPS second time sex offender bill and he said he needed my help with a medical marijuana bill he was developing. As a volunteer, my job was pretty much to travel the West Coast to figure out which state had the best bill for Nevada to follow, which was Arizona’s. At the time Arizona was a medical state and they had tight regulations and we figured those were the regs Nevada needed. I hosted a trip of Nevada legislators to Arizona to go visit the very first dispensary in Glendale called Arizona Organix so they could get educated on dispensaries. From there I went out and got the votes necessary to pass the bill because we needed both Democrat and Republican involvement. How much did you know about the cannabis industry? I didn’t know anything about the regulated cannabis industry, but it was something that I wanted to lobby for and support especially when I learned the medical marijuana law at the time was a broken law. Nevada law said you could grow 12 plants, however seeds were illegal, plus you had the elderly and others who didn’t know how to grow and they were inviting strangers into their homes to help them grow their medicine whether it was for a migraine, seizures or other ailments. Also, there were minors in some of the home grows. I thought we needed to address some of those issues. One of the things you had to figure out was licensing of medical marijuana dispensaries. We came up with the number of dispensary licenses (60) by calculating that for every 10 pharmacies in the state of Nevada we would have one dispensary. Now with recreational coming in we are finding that more licensed dispensaries are needed. Why did you all include reciprocity? We just knew that this was the Entertainment Capital

of the World and tourists should be allowed to get their medicine. If you have a tourist coming in from another state they would not be able to carry their medicine on a plane, however if they could show a card from a state that had medicinal marijuana patient cardholders, we would allow the businesses here to sell to them. We figured that would be a good thing, and we could protect the tourists because it’s such a transient town of tourists coming here from neighboring western states where they also have legal marijuana. Why was lab testing an important part of the regulatory framework? Lab testing was just part of making sure that the patients had quality medicine. We needed mandatory testing and part of the broken law was that patients had no idea what pesticides or other things were being put into the plant and patients should know that; especially if they had a disease they are treating. Mandatory testing only made sense at the time. Where is the Clark County Commission’s Green Ribbon Panel, on which you serve, on approving consumption lounges? We all believe there should be consumption lounges. The issue becomes how are these businesses that want to be consumption lounges going to sustain themselves -- there’s no alcohol, no food, so how does a business sustain itself? One thing about a special use permit is the County wants to know that the business receiving the permit is going to be successful, how are they going to make a return on their investment? It must be a sustainable business. I think it will eventually happen sometime next year. What has been the most surprising thing you have learned about cannabis? To be truthful, how much people are willing to pay to participate in the industry. Although it’s a good investment, it takes a lot of money.


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