Issuu on Google+

DESIGN,
ARTS
&

 AESTHETICS
OF
 INNOVATION
 ELEONORA
LUPO,

 POLITECNICO,
MILAN
 LATIN
DESIGN
PROCESS
FORUM
2010|
AVEIRO
(PT)
 OCTOBER,
28,
2010



thesis
 “aesthetics
of
innovation”
as
the
possible
design
driven
 result
of
an
innovative
integration
between
arts
 (aesthetics)
and
design
(innovation).



hypotheses
 convergences
between
arts
and
design
 art
as
constellations
of
values
for
innovation
 shift
from
arts
to
aesthetic
action
for
innovation



BETWEEN
ARTS
&
DESIGN
 looking
for
convergences
and
analogies



DONALD
JUDD



RON
ARAD



the
aesthetic
function
of
objects
 as
DorUles
remarks,
a
certain
degree
of
aesthetic
 pleasure
is
always
present
in
Italian
design,
that
is
an
 aesthetic
function
associated
with
the
utilitarian
one

 or
a
kind
of
ergonomics‐aesthetics
questioning
the
 taste
for
the
form
of
objects
(DorUles,
1970).
 Interestingly
Brusatin
too
writes,
in
its
book
“Arts
as
 design”,
that
the
ideas
of
pleasurable
utility
and
 useful
quality,
dated
back
to
Enlightenment,
still
are
 part
of
Italian
design
culture
(Brusatin
2007).
 <<
Bruno
Munari,
Falkland,
1962




art
is
a
place
for
design
experimentation
 probably
the
demarcation
between
art
and
design
is
 not
“utility”:
many
designers
are
able
to
use
the
 aesthetic
driver
to
experiment,
giving
to
“no
 functionality”
a
value
in
terms
of
opportunity
for
 research
and
innovation
(Sudijc,
2009)





similarities
between
art
and
design
concern
both
 forms
and
processes

 the
border
is
permeable:
«once
an
artist
decides
on
a
 goal
to
pursue,
his
creative
process
looks
very
much
 like
a
design
process.
Artists
have
effectively
turned
 their
self‐made
challenge
into
a
partly
determined
 design
problem»
(Dorst,
2003).

 Process
models:
 Information
driven
 Problem
driven
 Solution
driven
 Knowledge
driven



challenge
any
cultural
hierarchy
that
exists
 between
art
and
design

 the
permeability
is
not
neither
only
from
art
towards
 design
(Coles
perspective
of
artists
who
make
a
foray
 into
design
to
refresh
their
art,
)
nor
from
design
 towards
art
(Sudijc
idea
of
designers
creative
and
 innovative
detournement
in
a
more
free
environment,
 Sudijc,
2009),
but
a
kind
of
two­ways
blurring
 boundaries.

 <<
Archizoom
associati,
La
superUicie
neutra,
habitable
wardrobe,
1972



ABOUT
ART


exploring
the
boundaries
of
art
as
designed
activity



MARIA
PAPADIMITRIOU
|
T.A.M.A.
TEMPORARY
AUTONOMOUS
 MUSEUM
FOR
ALL,
AVLIZA1998‐2000



STEFANO
BOCCALINI,
WILD
ISLAND,
MILANO,
2002‐2003)



Art
is
a
form
of
knowledge,
and
therefore
of
 reasearch

 «Arts
based
research
practices
are
a
set
of
tools
used
 during
all
phases
of
social
research,
addressing
it
in
a
 holistic
and
engaged
ways
in
which
theory
and
 practice
arte
intertwined»
:
they
are
innovatively
 suitable
to
different
research
questions
of
social
and
 qualitative
research
because
of
the
«profound
 possibility
of
the
arts
to
jar
people
to
see
things
 differently,
to
transcend
differences
and
to
foster
 connections»

 (Patricia
Leavy,
2008)

 <<Marcello
Chiarenza,
What
a
wonderful
world



Art
is
a
visionary,
imaginative
and
creative
tool
 «To
art,
in
every
culture,
has
been
assigned
the
task
of
 creating
a
different
world,
facing
the
daily
one,
in
other
 words
a
different
reality»
(Francalanci,
2006).
 For
Garroni
art
is
a
kind
of
creative
and
“constructive”
 tools
for
humans
in
the
sense
that
functions
to
 compensate
emotionally
the
dif=iculties
of
 adaptation
to
the
environment.
He
considers
art
a
 specialisation
of
creativity
Uinalised
to
practical
 knowledge
and
communication,
in
a
correlation
 between
practical‐intellectual
behaviours
and
 aesthetic
behaviours
(Garroni,
2010).
 <<
Collettivo
Oda
Projesi
|
Appartemento
collettivo
a
Galata,
Instanbul,
1997



Art
is
an
organised
and
structured
form&
process
 According
with
de
Monthoux,
in
art
there’s
no
 creativity
that
it’s
not,
at
the
same
time,
organisation
 too:

 many
artists,
by
one
side,
have
developed
 organisational
and
productive
models
inspired
by
the
 rationalist
paradigm
(Markus
Bandur,

“serial
 thinking”),

 by
the
other
side
organisation
can
refer
to
processes,
 structured
in
wide
range
of
variations.
From
artists
 who
control
and
follow
the
full
process
from
ideation
 to
prototyping
and
personally
realize
the
work
 manipulating
the
matter
(the
work
of
art
is
the
piece,
 with
its
tangible
quality),
to
artists
who,
after
the
 conception,
rely
on
a
relatively
complex
supply
chain,
 from
materials
to
Uinal
realisation,
not
participating
to
 any
practical
activity
(the
work
of
art
is
the
idea,
the
 conception).
 <<
Piet
Mondrian
 <<
Arnaldo
Pomodoro



Art
is
a
social
system

 exploring
art
as
society,
that
is
art
as
a
social
system
of
 relations
and
actors
in
the
evolutive
process
of
making.
 Being
a
such
complex
system,
art
can
be
examined
as
a
 set
of
activities
like
production,
intermediation
and
 reception
that
are
relations
and
processes
that
happen
 by
means
of
artefact,
speciUically
works
of
art
(Nathalie
 Heinich,
2004)
 Alfred
Gell
calls
“art
nexus”
this
system
of
relations
 which
connect
production,
circulation
and
reception
of
 works
of
art
(Gell,
1998).




Art
is
an
identitary
consumption
practice

 For
the
collectors
the
possess
of
art
is
a
communicative
 medium
for
an
immaterial
consumption
of
social
 status
and
prestige.

 For
the
general
public,
the
accessibility
to
art,
through
 museums,
exhibitions,
events,
democratises
and
makes
 possible
this
consumption
practice.

 For
both
of
them
the
consumption
of
arte
is
more
than
 mere
and
passive
fruition
but
a
practice
to
participate
 the
“aura”
of
art.
 <<
Barbara
Kruger




FROM
ART
TO
AESTHETICS
 for
an
art
“in
action”



MIRCEA
CANTOR,
LANDSCAPE
IS
CHANGING,
TIRANA,
 2003



the
aesthetic
perspective
 arts
have
a
“cold
polarity”,
self‐referred,
and
a
warm
 polarity,
that
is
the
one
that
crosses
the
borders
of
 social
behaviours
and
worlds.


 This
second
aspect
is
called
“aesthetic
action”
and
is
 marking
the
difference
from
art
to
court,
being
an
 aesthetic
action
prone
to
expand
in
a
denser
and
blur
 effect
(Menna,
1968).

 Coherently,
Menna
proposes
an
“aesthetic
perspective”,
 conceived
not
as
a
contemplative
action,
but
as
a
way
 to
act
within
a
situation
to
understand
and
 transform
it,
thus
in
order
to
make
dialogue
politics,
 technique
and
aesthetic.
 <<
Eva
Brunner
Szabo,
Gert
Tschögl
|
Museum
of
memories
,
Calaf,
2000



aesthetics
from
performative
to
conformative
 This
aesthetic
dimension
of
action
and
practice
seems
 more
able
to
dialogue
with
the
social
and
politic
 practices
than
institutional
interventions
do:
for
its
 attention
to
the
process
(the
performance)
and
 probably
being
not
deliberately
addressing
the
 achievement
of
results
but
simply
the
enabling
of
 behaviours,
the
aesthetic
action
results
to
be
more
 effective
in
turning
performances
in
performative
 actions,
able
to
produce
or
permanently
change
a
 form
or
a
context,
to
enable
expressions,
to
create
 community,
to
become
a
cohesion
and
integration
 factor.

 <<
Add
on
(http://www.add‐on.at
)



AESTHETICS
OF
INNOVATION
 the
role
of
aesthetics
and
the
modalities
in
which
 it
“functions”
in
the
settlement
of
the
innovation




drivers
of
innovation


design
driven
forms
of
innovation


technology
 languages
 behaviours


>
 new
forms‐function
(adoptation)
 >
 new
forms‐
meanings
(signiUication)
 >
 new
forms‐process
(enabling)



aesthetics
of
innovation
 Our
proposal
is
based
on
a
triad
of
interactions
among
 aesthetics
(art)
and
innovation
(design)
that
identiUies,
 as
possible
replicable
processes:

 technological
aesthetics
(driven
by
new
technologies
 and
leading
to
new
forms‐function
through
languages
 and
behaviors),

 symbolic
aesthetics
(driven
by
new
languages
and
 leading
to
new
forms‐meaning
through
technologies
 and
behaviors)

 relational
aesthetics
(driven
by
new
behaviours
and
 leading
to
new
forms‐process
through
languages
and
 technologies).




technological
aesthetics
 When
technology
is
the
driver
for
a
change,
according
 to
De
Kerckhove,
art
is
a
“corrective”
in
elaborating
 new
strategies
and
interpretations
(languages,
 behaviours)
of
these
new
technologies
and
their
 representations;
similarly,
according
to
Carmagnola
art
 “translates
in
forms
the
technological
essence
of
our
 time”.
 paradigm:
“objecti=ication”
(Hustwitt,
2009)
 Super
design:
elazioni/afUinità/ibridazioni
linguistiche
 e
metodologiche
con
altre
discipline
artistiche
 (Petroni,
2008)
 hyper
design:
design
and
imagination
at
Shanghai
 Biennal
2006



technological
aesthetics



new
forms­
function
(from
art…)


action
(paradigm:
objectiRication)




images



























object


























spaces


Alteration
 ibridation


Johann‐
Johannsson


Decostruction/reconstruction
 Gordon
Matta
Clark


deformation
 trasformation
 Rachel
Whitered


reparation


Gordon
Matta
Clark



technological
aesthetics



new
forms­
function
(…
to
design)


action
(paradigm:
objectiRication)




communication













product


















interiors


alteration
 ibridation
 Decostruction/reconstruction


Anna
Ter
Haar
 www.pem.org/sites/ibc/


deformation
 trasformation
 Pieke
Bergmans


reparation
 Liliana
Ovalle



symbolic
aesthetics
 When
a
new
language
is
the
driver
for
change,
the
 Return
of
the
Real
(Hal
Foster,
1996)
is
the
reference
 for
meanings
that
go
beyond
Uiction
 paradigm:
re­econtextualisation



symbolic
aesthetics



new
forms­
meanings
(
from
arts…)


action
(paradigm:
re­contextualisation)


images



























object



























spaces


Citations
 simulations/Uiction


narrations
 Matthieu
Laurette


Liam
Gillik


translation/interpretation


intermediation


John
Armleder


Gordon
Matta‐Clark



symbolic
aesthetics



new
forms­
meanings
(…
to
design)


action
(paradigm:
re­contextualisation)


communication













product


















interiors


Citations


Dubini


simulations/Uiction


narrations


Anke
Weiss


Tom
Price


translation/interpretation


intermediation


Forma
fantasma


Tom
Price



relational
aesthetics
 when
the
drivers
for
change
are
new
behaviors,
art
 uses
its
participative
and
diffusive
skill
to
adopt
or
 develop
those
techniques
and
languages
in
order
to
 enable
the
new
behaviors

 "a
set
of
artistic
practices
which
take
as
their
 theoretical
and
practical
point
of
departure
the
whole
 of
human
relations
and
their
social
context,
rather
 than
an
independent
and
private
space”:
artists
 produce
social
models
(Bourriaud,
2000)
 paradigm:
post­production
 Artists
who
use
existing
forms,
selecting,
interpreting,
 mixing,
reproducing
and
including
them
in
their
work
 through
new
protocols
of
representation:
artist
 produce
forms
and
objects
informed
by
other
 objects
 ‐ using
forms
 ‐ 
using
objects
 ‐ using
images
 ‐ the
society
as
repertory
of
forms
 <<Félix
González‐Torres
 <<
Rirkrit
Tiravanija



relational
aesthetics



new
forms­
processes
(from
art…)


action
(paradigm:
post­production)


use
of:

images


















object


























spaces


incorporation
 addition
 John
Miller


ricombination
(mixage,
trickster)


Douglas
Gordon


Lucy
Orta


Jorge

pardo


dominique
gonzalez
foerster,



Carlos
Garaicoa



relational
aesthetics



new
forms­
processes
(…to
design)


action
(paradigm:
post­production)


communication













product


















interiors


incorporation
 Frank
Willems


Adami


Tim
Vinke


addition


Jurgen
Bey


ricombination
(mixage,
trickster)


Peter
Marigold



conclusion
 art
as
open­ended”
repertory
of
forms
function,
 meaning
and
process
for
design
 from
the
use
value
of
aesthetic
elements
(images,
 object,
spaces)
 to
the
aesthetics
(technological,
symbolic,
relational)
 of
use
value



thanks
 eleonora.lupo@polimi.it
 http://designview.wordpress.com



aestetics of innovation