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Carroll White REMC

YOUR INDIANA COOPERATIVE COMPANION

OCTOBER 2 0 1 8

Fall fun

A sampling of Indiana’s autumn attractions

SmartHub: A great tool to manage your account

PAGES 22–25


from the editor

Dressed for success Regular readers of my column won’t be surprised by this revelation: I like

VOLUME 68 • NUMBER 4 ISSN 0745-4651 • USPS 262-340 Published monthly by:

to dress up for Halloween. If I’m confident enough to show 274,000 readers what I look like in clown makeup (see August issue), of course I’m game to wear a silly costume to work! For years, the Electric Consumer staff took top “group costume” honors at the annual office Halloween party and pitchin. The party had always been cohosted by Indiana Electric Cooperatives and Wabash Valley Power Association, which for years shared the office building with us. Our award-winning costumes were always handmade, utilizing lots of creativity but very little — if any — money. One year we were the components of “s’mores.” (See above.) I wore a cardboard placard hand colored to look like a graham cracker. Others were dressed as a chocolate bar and a marshmallow. We made our grand entrance in sequential order (cracker, chocolate, marshmallow, cracker), followed by a Boy Scout with a skewer and a costumed depiction of fire. Another year, we recreated the iconic scene from “It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown” in which the Peanuts gang go trick or treating. All it took were white sheets and a few props. In a nod to the popularity of social media, we were “social butterflies” several Halloweens ago, wearing garb to represent Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Pinterest — and butterfly wings. What will we dress up as this year? I’ve already got my thinking cap on and scissors, markers and glue gun ready. Let the fun begin! (BTW — another office Halloween party tradition is my famous “BOO-ffalo Chicken Dip.” Email me if you want my recipe, a perennial crowd favorite!)

EMILY SCHILLING Editor eschilling@electricconsumer.org On the menu: January — Instant Pot recipes: deadline Oct. 12. February — Cheesecake recipes: deadline Nov. 16. March — Recipes using potato chips: deadline Nov. 16. If we publish your recipe on our food page, we’ll send you a $10 gift card.

Giveaway: Win your own Lil Bub! We’re giving away a plush toy

version of the adorable kitty featured in this issue. Tell us why you love Lil Bub and you’ll be entered to win her likeness. Deadline to enter is Oct. 15.

Three ways to contact us: To send us recipes, photos, event listings, letters and

entries for gift drawings, please use the forms on our website ElectricConsumer.org; email ec@ElectricConsumer.org; or send to Electric Consumer, 8888 Keystone Crossing, Suite 1600, Indianapolis, IN 46240-4606.

ELECTRIC CONSUMER is for and about members of Indiana’s locally-owned, not-for-profit electric cooperatives. It helps consumers: use electricity safely and efficiently; understand energy issues; connect with their co-op; and celebrate life in Indiana. Over 272,000 residents and businesses receive the magazine as part of their electric co-op membership. CONTACT US: 8888 Keystone Crossing, Suite 1600 Indianapolis, IN 46240-4606 317-487-2220 ec@ElectricConsumer.org ElectricConsumer.org INDIANA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVES OFFICERS Gary Gerlach President Walter Hunter Vice President Randy Kleaving Secretary/Treasurer Tom VanParis Chief Executive Officer EDITORIAL STAFF Emily Schilling Editor Richard George Biever Senior Editor Holly Huffman Member Relations/ Advertising Manager Ellie Schuler Senior Communication Specialist ADVERTISING Crosshair Media, 502-216-8537; crosshairmedia.net GLM Communications, Inc., 212-929-1300; glmcommunications.com Paid advertisements are not endorsements by any electric cooperative or this publication. UNSOLICITED MATERIAL: Electric Consumer does not use unsolicited freelance manuscripts or photographs and assumes no responsibility for the safe‑keeping or return of unsolicited material. SUBSCRIPTIONS: $12 for individuals not subscribing through participating REMCs/RECs. CHANGE OF ADDRESS: Readers who receive Electric Consumer through their electric co-op membership should report address changes to their local co-op. POSTAGE: Periodicals postage paid at Indianapolis, Ind., and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send change of address to: Electric Consumer, 8888 Keystone Crossing, Suite 1600, Indianapolis, IN 46240-4606. Include key number. No portion of Electric Consumer may be reproduced without permission of the editor.

OCTOBER 2018

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contents

OCTOBER

12

16

insights 03 FROM THE EDITOR 05 CO-OP NEWS What’s happening at your local electric cooperative. 10 ENERGY Look up for potential energy-efficient lighting improvements. 12 INSIGHTS

Indiana eats 16 INDIANA EATS Christos’ Family Dining: The décor draws you in, the food makes you glad you came. 17 FOOD A slice of heaven: readers’ pizza recipes. 20 SHARE YOUR

14 PRODUCT PICKS Pet perks.

BROADBAND STORY

Find us on Facebook www.facebook.com/ElectricConsumer Follow us on Twitter www.twitter.com/Electriconsumer Find us on Pinterest www.pinterest.com/Electriconsumer Follow us on Instagram www.instagram.com/ElectricConsumer

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OCTOBER 2018

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38

events calendar 21 REGISTER TO VOTE 22 COVER STORY Maze running: a sampling of the state’s autumn attractions. 28 EVENTS CALENDAR 32 OUTDOORS Purple paint means “no trespassing.” 34 BACKYARD

profile

36 H  OOSIER ENERGY/ WABASH VALLEY NEWS 37 READER SUBMISSIONS Pumpkin personalities: Jack-o’-Lanterns are 3-D emojis that you create yourself! 38 PROFILE Here to help you: Boone REMC Customer Service Representative Vicki Hollis.

On the cover Picking out the perfect pumpkin is just one activity to enjoyed during a family outing to a local pumpkin patch. Farms throughout the state offer a myriad of additional autumn activities. Turn to page 22 for a list of just a few fall attractions a car ride away.


co-op news “This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer.” CARROLL WHITE REMC P.O. Box 599; Monticello, IN 47960 800-844-7161 (Toll Free) www.cwremc.coop MONTICELLO OFFICE 7:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m., Monday – Friday DELPHI OFFICE 7:30 a.m. – 1 p.m., 2 p.m. – 4:30 p.m., Monday – Friday EMAIL info@cwremc.coop CEO Randy W. Price BOARD OF DIRECTORS Kevin M. Bender, 574-686-2670 4280 W, 700 N, Delphi

Margaret E. Foutch, 219-279-2677 7535 W, 500 S, Chalmers

Gary E. Gerlach, 574-595-7820 9833 S. Base Road, Star City

What is the ‘monthly access fee’ on my bill? WHY DO I HAVE TO PAY IT?

Kent P. Zimpfer, 765-479-3006 4672 E. Arrow Point Court, Battle Ground

Tina L. Davis, 219-204-2195 7249 W, 600 S, Winamac

Milton D. Rodgers, 765-566-3731 3755 S, 575 E, Bringhurst

Ralph H. Zarse, 219-863-6342 1535 S, 100 E, Reynolds

MISSION STATEMENT The mission of Carroll White REMC is to provide members with superior energy and related services, meaningful contributions to their communities and a safe, productive environment for employees. “No job is complete until the member is satisfied.”

IMPORTANT DATES Cycle 1 September bills are due Oct. 5 and are subject to disconnect Oct. 24 if unpaid. Cycle 2 September bills are due Oct. 20 and are subject to disconnect Nov. 8 if unpaid. Meters are read using the Automated Meter Reading system. Cycle 1 meters will be read on Oct. 1. Cycle 2 meters will be read Oct. 15.

IS YOUR HEATING SYSTEM READY FOR COLD WEATHER? Replace furnace filters once a month or as recommended. If you heat your home with warm-air registers, baseboard heaters or radiators, remember to clean them regularly to increase efficiency. — U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK www.facebook.com/ carrollwhite.remc FOLLOW US ON TWITTER www.twitter.com/cwremc

One of the most recurring questions we receive from CW REMC members is, “what is the monthly service or access fee on my monthly bill?” A key cooperative value is “openness and fairness,” and CW REMC adheres to this principal of being open and fair. On your bill, the monthly service/access fee is each member’s portion owed to cover the costs of the “physical facilities” needed to provide electricity. Every CW REMC member pays his or her fair share. The “physical facilities” cost includes providing your meter, service drop and transformer. A portion of this fee pays for the poles and wires that connect you to the nearest substation. In essence, this charge covers CW REMC’s cost to connect your home, farm or business to the electric grid. The service/access fee is not dependent on individual members’ electric use. Basically, it is each member’s share of the minimum amount of equipment the cooperative must install, provide and maintain to give members access to safe, dependable and affordable electricity. “Because we are member-owned, CW REMC puts accountability at the forefront,” said Cathy Raderstorf, CW REMC COO. “We know what the cooperative’s true costs are. We employ a Cost of Service study by

an independent third party to help determine what it actually costs to serve each member — whether you are a residential, commercial or industrial member.”

CATHY

A cost of service RADERSTORF study takes all of CW REMC’s actual expenses and allocates them to various classes of customers based on use patterns, equipment necessary to provide service and types of service. The service/access fee recovers the cost of the minimum amount of equipment that is necessary to provide a member access to the electric grid. There are monthly service charges on many bills we receive for our cell phones, internet, cable, etc. You can be confident that CW REMC is distributing costs in a fair and equitable way that benefits all members. Connecting you to the electric grid is our job, and we accomplish this by being fair to each member. If you have any questions about our access fee, please call us toll-free at 800-844-7161.

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co-op news

Capital credits Do we owe you money? Carroll White REMC is requesting your assistance in locating these members.

BRENDA L. GEISLER: $14.90 BRENDA WALKER: $20.57 BRIAN ECKERT: $51.15 BRIAN LANE: $37.73 BRIAN VANHORN: $20.68 BRIM GRAVEL CO.: $481.25 BRUCE EMERSON: $25.78 BRUCE GOAD: $42.81 BUFORD ELLISON: $61.98

If you recognize a name on

C

the list, notify the person. If the

C. R. WILLIAMSON: $24.65 CARL ATKINS: $24.92 CARL L. WILSON: $94.77 CAROL PAUL: $44.34 MRS. CAROL P. SHINNEMAN: $86.89 CAROL SMITH: $33.10 CARTER REAL ESTATE: $28.87 CECIL WALLACE: $20.26 CENTRAL PORK: $130.75 CHARLES E. MILLER: $30.14 CHARLES FISCHER: $43.94 CHARLES H. SHANKS: $185.96 CHARLES J. BOONE JR.: $22.16 CHARLES JENSEN: $43.10 CHARLES R. FARRELL: $22.59 CHARLES R. GERLACH: $21.52 CHARLES T. SKURKA: $72.19 CHARLES TRIBBETT SR.: $51.71 CHARLES YOUNG: $68.22 CHESTER R. VAWTER: $90.13 CHRIS CONKLIN: $37.98 CHRIS FOUTS: $33.90 CHRIS J. SABO: $20.28 CINDY ACEBEDO: $27.09 CLARENCE ROSS: $59.04 CLEONA MILLER: $23.99 CLINTON COUNTY BANK: $30.70 CLYDE O. BUCHANAN: $20.87 CLYDE V. BEAN: $32.92 CLYDELL PENDLETON: $22.73 CONNIE CREWS: $37.89 CONNIE ROBERTS: $58.17 CONRAIL CORPORATION: $44.99

person is deceased, let one of his or her relatives know about the unclaimed check. Have him or her contact our office at 800-844-7161 to give us a current address. A complete list of outstanding capital checks is available at cwremc.coop. Please look for names you know or recognize. Names are listed in alphabetical order by first name.

A A.C. HORN: $28.20 ALFRED C. MILLER: $72.13 ALFRED R. NEESEN: $26.25 ALLAN MONROE: $21.95 MRS. A. M. ZOOK: $90.64 ANITA KEENEY: $23.17 ANTHONY HART: $22.51 ARLEIGH WILLIS: $20.68 ARLOS C. HERRICK: $20.86 ART HADLEY: $49.93 AUGUST J. HUGE: $91.28

B BARBARA CHANDLER: $29.30 BARBARA J. MOSS: $100.18

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OCTOBER 2018

BEN F. BENHAM: $61.29 BENJAMIN J. HOWARD: $23.60 BERNARD S. PARRISH: $59.42 BERNIE J. CRISWELL: $28.51 BERT R. MORRIS: $33.48 BETTY A. GARDNER: $67.46 BETTY J. ALBEE: $20.26 BETTY J. RHODE: $120.95 BETTY MEYER: $42.34 BILL KNIESLY: $113.17 BILL OGBORN: $45.84 BILLY MOORE: $33.72 BOBBI BUNCH: $54.74 BRAD BOYER: $23.86 BRAD BRUMMETT: $38.73 BRENDA K. DOWNHAM: $39.63

D D. STRAWN: $28.41 DALE PLATT: $25.21 DAN GANGWER: $27.00 DAN HILL: $33.14 DANIEL B. WATTS: $26.86 DANIEL C. RICHARDSON: $30.89 DANIEL F. SNYDER: $61.52 DANIEL GRIBBINS: $20.31 DANIEL HALL: $27.54 DANIEL J. KENDALL: $21.95 DANIEL L. SCHILLING: $46.54 DANIEL R. SMITH: $86.86 DANIEL SHANK: $141.45 DANNY JOHNS: $79.64 DARRELL JUDKINS: $35.29 DAVE GULLION: $21.48 DAVE MAHANEY: $24.58 DAVE WEBER: $41.11 DAVE WILLIAMS: $40.68 DAVID BORING: $38.04 DAVID BOYS: $65.54 DAVID CALL: $20.80 DAVID HORTON: $94.91 DAVID RAYBURN: $47.56 DAVID S. FAWLEY: $22.68 DAVID STEVENS: $56.84 DAWN ELMAN: $124.55 DEAN CRITES: $64.20 DEBRA SCHMIDT: $106.02 DENNIS E. MURPHY: $32.76 DENNIS WEAVER: $28.51 DENNIS WEBB: $24.12 DEVON SCOTT: $22.85 DIRK SLUSSER: $45.34 DON L. SMITH: $24.81 MRS. DON WISE: $73.53 DONALD E. MYERS: $46.06 DONALD KISTLER: $45.95 DONALD PAUKEN: $84.03 DONALD RHINE: $36.30 DOROTHY M. DULIN: $29.04 DOROTHY WHITEMAN: $24.39 DORTHY HECKARD: $50.55 DOUG GERMAN: $37.70 DWAINE PARADIS: $20.54

E EARL A. PERRY: $34.68 EARL BENNETT: $38.28 EARL MILLER: $37.33 ED LAWHEAD: $37.37 ED LOHRMAN: $20.40 EDWARD FINNEGAN: $21.19

EDWARD J. GRUENER: $20.85 EDWARD STOUT: $164.07 EDWIN F. HARGITT: $22.91 ELDON FOLEY: $31.76 ELLEN DELANEY: $113.69 ELLEN K. RIVERS: $44.42 EMMALEE K. GARATE: $22.20 ERIC SANDELL: $26.92 ESTHER KATHLEEN BRUMMETT ESTATE: $107.14 ETHEL M. CLARKSON: $26.13 EVALYN DENMAN: $48.11

F FORREST C. STONE: $21.98 FORREST R. EVANS: $47.20 MRS. FORREST WILSON: $28.20 FRANCES PULLEN: $39.10 FRANCIS GRACE: $86.87 FRANK L. GICK: $22.99 FREDA COLLEY: $22.01 FREDERICK H. MOSHER: $30.19

G GABRIELLA BROOKBANK: $58.08 GALLERY OF HOMES: $81.99 GARRY L. NEUMEYER: $62.63 GARY FRENCH: $20.76 GARY L. KRUGER: $23.57 GARY LANGSTON: $95.33 GARY LYNCH: $51.26 GARY W. GANGWER: $69.56 GENE BLANCK: $93.29 GENE GODBY: $38.87 GENE MICHAEL: $92.94 GENE SPRADLING: $22.49 GENEVA F. KERKHOFF: $67.75 GEORGE C. LAWLIS: $57.23 GEORGE GAUSE: $30.52 GEORGE HEIN: $51.58 GEORGE RICHEY: $43.28 GERALD OVERMYER: $72.41 GERALD W. FOSTER: $82.34 GERALD W. MCVAY: $40.44 GLEN JONES: $28.30

GLENN WILLIAMS: $69.48 GREG GOOD: $20.68 GREG SHIRAR: $42.48 GREGORY A. EAGIN: $35.66

H HAROLD DENTON: $35.08 HAROLD PICKETT: $37.46 HAROLD STERRETT: $30.50 HAROLD W. SWATTS: $26.59 HARRY ALBAUGH: $79.91 HARRY DAY: $27.53 HARRY J. HAMELMAN: $31.77 HARVEY SPANGLER: $52.86 HAZEL L. STARKEY: $111.12 HENRY E. GLESING: $23.78 HERB FORD ESTATE: $58.91 HUBERT KRUZICK: $25.61

I INEZ R. STEELE: $23.36 INEZ WERTZ: $26.23 IRA CAMPBELL: $22.03 IRENE DEWINTON: $44.95 IVA E. BARNHART: $46.06

J J. F. OVERMAN: $24.46 J. T. RILEY: $31.09 JACK E GRIFFITH: $32.00 JACK GREGORY: $40.57 JACK HARRISON: $56.35 JACK PARKS: $127.59 JACK TURNER: $78.82 JACKIE E. PRATHER: $50.90 JAMES A. BUTLER: $31.89 JAMES A. PAYNE: $72.52 JAMES C. LANE: $33.65 JAMES HAYWORTH: $54.52 JAMES MCGREEVEY: $106.27 JAMES R. GRANDSTAFF: $24.91 JAMES R. SCHNEIDER: $32.67 JAMES W. RILEY JR.: $24.98 JAMES WOOD: $21.67 JANE FISHER: $31.25 JANE GEORGE: $84.54 JANET E. GOSSETT: $37.78 JAY SPARKS: $53.48


co-op news JAYD JOSLYN: $57.21 JEFF DICK: $56.58 JEFF WAGNER: $24.15 JEFFERSON SUMMERS: $25.27 JEFFREY SIMMONS: $24.71 JENNEFER LOWERY: $106.80 JERALD YOST: $54.40 JERRY D. ALLEN: $75.44 JERRY HOON: $44.75 JERRY L. HARDY ESTATE: $74.19 JERRY L. HARDY ESTATE: $165.96 JERRY MIKELS: $41.42 JERRY MITCHEL: $25.23 JERRY OLDFIELD: $123.76 JERRY WATTS: $29.07 JIM HOUSER: $27.06 JIM WAGNER: $52.34 JIMMY HAMPTON: $27.24 JOANN MINNIEAR: $50.95 JOE FRANTZ: $27.12 JOE HUFFMAN: $35.31 JOE STARKEY: $74.96 JOELLEN GRIFFITH: $29.73 JOHN A. HECKARD: $72.38 JOHN A. STEVENS: $48.93 JOHN COX: $28.98 JOHN DICKS: $23.58 JOHN E. DUTTON: $92.33 JOHN E. KNOY: $30.67 JOHN E. LEPPER: $20.16 JOHN I. BRIM: $20.29 JOHN KENNEDY: $117.07 JOHN LAMB: $58.07 JOHN R. HARRIS: $21.56 JOHN S. BRINEY: $20.33 JOHN SINES: $64.68 JOHN W. BRITTON JR.: $21.58 JOSEPH COLLETT: $55.44 JOSEPH L. BRADY: $40.06 JOYCE E. RICHTER: $28.98 JOYCE MILLER: $66.85 JOYCE PEARCY: $21.06 JOYCE SHAW: $20.23 JUANITA STURGILL: $28.51 JUDITH L. ROOD: $39.05 JULIA V. DAWSON: $22.76 JULIE A. GERARD: $69.02 JUNIOR HARMON: $66.30 JUNIOR HOUSER: $99.16

K KAREN PHILLIPPO: $58.19 KARL H. ANDERSON: $20.67 KARL RUTHERFORD: $82.11 KATHERYNE W. KETCHUM: $23.07 KATHRYN E. HARMON: $21.32

KATHY HYMAN: $21.31 KATHY S. HARDESTY: $47.37 KEITH HOLLOWELL: $45.36 KEITH O. GRUBEL: $22.61 KENNETH D. NICHOLSON: $56.15 KENNETH E. PARKER: $30.99 KENNETH F. STRONG JR.: $24.28 KENNETH FLORY: $52.72 KENNETH T. SCHWARTZ: $30.54 KINLEY E. SIZEMORE: $33.88

L L. G. HARRIES: $21.16 LARRY BURNS: $34.36 LARRY KNOY: $40.95 LARRY LYONS: $28.56 LARRY MCKINNEY: $26.21 LARRY MOORE: $33.58 LARRY R. HUNTER: $20.77 LATRICIA G. LERMA: $21.45 LAVONNA LANE: $64.06 LAVONNE SCHEFFEE: $24.68 LEE ADAMS: $28.25 LELAND GOLEY: $20.36 LEO LEFFERT: $37.19 LEON GROSS: $24.53 LEON WOOD: $35.66 LINDA HEINZELMAN: $32.73 LOGN GALE W. PAXSON: $63.29 LOREN RASMUSSEN: $50.13 LOST ACRES RV PARK INC.: $233.90 LOUIS L. DAWSON: $54.66

M MCI COMMUNICATIONS: $74.44 M. L. ABBOTT: $31.50 M. O. THOMAS: $28.55 MABEL L. CHAPMAN: $31.11 MAE SIMMS: $25.56 MARGARET WALLY: $28.55 MARGIE E. NIX: $27.65 MARK D. FARMER: $21.33 MARK HOFFMANN: $85.54 MARK OVERMYER: $66.12 MARK UTTINGER: $61.00 MARK WICKERSHAM: $25.62

MARLENE BOWEN: $43.41 MARLENE WOLF: $106.31 MARTHA I. DRYBREAD: $138.82 MARTHA J. SHANNON: $27.14 MARVIN RICE: $50.40 MARY E. DOWNING: $65.91 MARY E. HETZNER: $66.25 MARY E. ROACH: $54.52 MARY LAVY: $71.08 MATTHEW MANNIES: $26.56 MAX BROWN: $23.11 MAX BROWN: $75.15 MAX EBERT: $25.70 MAX STAFFORD: $30.23 MEARS KEITH ESTATE: $72.91 MELVIN DALEY: $25.09 MERL D. WALL: $32.56 MERLE SPANGLE: $64.35 MERVAN FELLURE: $33.20 MICHAEL A. METZGER: $30.70 MICHAEL D. BOUCHER: $22.16 MICHAEL GARTIN: $58.68 MICHAEL L. SMITH: $26.84 MICHAEL LYNCH: $67.97 MICHAEL P. DAWSON: $60.03 MICHAEL W. SCHROEDER: $36.14 MICHELLE HOLCOMB: $63.64 MIKE BLACKBURN: $47.92 MIKE L. BOZELL: $28.74 MILDRED BISHOP: $41.16 MOSHER FARMS: $22.61

N NED A. GANGWER: $43.78 NOREEN HANSELL: $20.09

O OPAL MILLER: $53.43 OSCAR HICKS: $21.82 OTTIS J. R. BAILEY: $34.63

P PAGE DINSMORE: $22.37 PAM D. KINCAID: $65.64 PATSY DELANEY: $52.90 PAUL F. KIMBERLIN: $32.99 PAUL SNELL: $20.38 PAUL T. DIENER: $34.56 PEARLIE RODGERS: $20.23 PEGGY ROGERS: $40.63 PHILIP E. ZIMMERMAN: $21.88

PHILIP HATFIELD: $66.13 PHILIP SNOW: $21.35 PHILLIP PENN: $29.91 PHYLLIS J. MILLS: $154.49 PYRMONT METHODIST PARSONAGE: $126.20

R RALPH BODLE: $20.29 RALPH BRITTON: $46.51 RALPH D. WELLER: $148.33 RALPH R. ANDERSON: $26.81 RANDAL L. HORTON: $63.22 RANDY TROXELL: $29.94 RANDY VANVOORST: $26.82 RANDY YEAKLEY: $25.44 RAY BELK: $42.94 RAYMOND E. MOONEY: $39.94 RAYMOND JOHNS: $36.96 RAYMOND L. ZIEMER: $54.93 RAYMOND WIENRANK: $36.74 REBECCA DOWNHAM: $29.17 RICHARD A. MCCLOSKEY: $24.79 RICHARD C. COCHRAN: $49.49 RICHARD D. GRAY: $89.85 RICHARD DEHAVEN: $21.00 RICHARD FAULKNOR: $37.94 RICHARD GETZ: $36.89 RICHARD SPENCER: $34.53 RICHARD WAGONER: $24.53 RICHARD ZARSE: $35.95 RICK PRICE: $42.00 RICK SCHRODER: $20.12 RICKY D. RHINE: $35.34 RITA BRYANT: $41.16 RITA J. HARRIS: $48.36 ROBERT ADAMS: $24.56 ROBERT B. PETRIE: $49.97 ROBERT F. BARNHART: $80.66 ROBERT FERN: $29.54 ROBERT ISOM: $46.28 ROBERT L. HERREN JR.: $74.53 ROBERT L. MCKINNEY: $32.52 ROBERT L. WARD: $32.90 ROBERT MCKIBBEN: $41.05 ROBERT TYGART JR.: $45.75 ROBERT WALLS: $29.53 ROBERT WALSH: $32.94

ROBIN KOPKA: $53.57 RODNEY L. BALL: $45.50 ROGER DAGGETT: $41.25 ROGER PETTINER: $34.49 MRS. ROMAN FREY: $35.13 RON GILLESPIE: $29.66 RON ROACH: $71.81 RONALD APPLETON: $23.83 RONALD BEARD: $34.13 RONALD KNIGHT: $61.64 RONDAL L. SHUMATE: $24.84 ROSALIE LAYTON: $89.04 ROSCOE DENNY: $73.12 ROSCOE LITTLETON: $101.19 ROSE ABSHIRE: $23.16 ROY L. HEDRICK: $62.47 RUBY M. JONES: $37.04 RUSTY HICKS: $47.78 RUTH EIDSON: $20.22

S SEE HOGS: $172.90 SAMUEL T. SMITH: $32.03 SANDHILL PIGS LLC: $102.53 SANDY BIGGS: $38.97 SHANKS FARM: $27.90 SIDNEY BOLES JR.: $76.19 STAN K. MCVAY: $44.12 STANLEY STRUS: $23.38 STEPHEN CLARK: $20.68 STEPHEN FISHER: $25.12 STEVE KOHNE: $53.27 STEVE LAUDERDALE: $53.51 STEVE SCARFF: $35.55 STEVE SPARKS: $66.90 STEVEN D. COX: $22.72 STEVEN D. SHAW: $35.88 STEVEN HOCH: $40.04 STEVEN HURST: $95.19 STEVEN R. KLOPFENSTEIN: $41.89 STOVER ELTON: $8.76 SULA COOPER: $38.72 SUSAN E. DEWS: $92.64 SWINE ENTERPRISES INC.: $197.13

T MRS. TEDD ANTHONY: $80.72 TED J. HRYCAK: $20.85 TED TAYLOR: $50.17 TELMA KAMSTRA: $59.97 TERESEA GRIFFITH: $24.07 TERRY MARTIN: $22.86 THOMAS C. MINNIEAR: $26.19 THOMAS F. WEIMER: $58.85 THOMAS FREEHILL: $23.82

THOMAS PENNINGTON: $30.02 TIM ADDISON: $47.36 TIM KENDALL: $25.84 TIMOTHY L. WARD: $38.81 TOM ALLEN: $22.85 TOM BROWNING: $24.24 TOM C. FOUTS ESTATE: $256.65 TOM FETTERHOFF: $26.01 TOM HAYDEN: $41.18

V VERNA NORTON: $20.68 VICTOR W. GALBREATH: $28.01 VIOLA D. MARTIN: $21.98 VIRGIL E. JOHNSON: $40.07 VIRGIL MYERS: $49.72

W W. C. DELANEY: $23.44 W. J. PEDEN: $56.33 W. S. WEAVER: $25.23 WARDA S. BARKHO: $21.95 WAYNE LONG: $26.68 WAYNE VINEY: $72.92 WELDON HUDSON: $75.66 WESLEY VINCENT: $84.24 WILBUR WISLER: $30.19 WILLIAM ADAIR: $43.46 WILLIAM B. BRIGHT DVM: $20.71 WILLIAM E. KAISER: $21.60 WILLIAM E. SCHULTZ: $20.88 WILLIAM H. ALEXANDER: $22.11 WILLIAM JACOBY: $78.28 WILLIAM JOHN WOODS: $24.42 WILLIAM NACE JR.: $67.11 WILLIAM PARKER: $39.65 WILLIAM R. BROWN: $53.03 WILLIAM R. FELLMY: $48.13 WILLIAM SHEPHERD: $26.14 WILLIAM TROBAUGH: $44.31 WILMA BECK: $56.90 WM T. JACKSON: $22.3 WM YEAKLEY: $32.72

Z ZANE TARTAR: $65.71 ZELMA GERMAN: $21.12

OCTOBER 2018

7


co-op news

Manage your account anywhere anytime with CW REMC SmartHub SmartHub is a member portal that makes

action run.

it easier to stay connected with CW REMC

No personal

by using today’s internet technologies.

information

With SmartHub, members can check use,

is stored on

pay their bill, report an outage, and stay

your mobile

up-to-date on their business or personal

device. Mobile

account.

devices offer

SmartHub will have all the information you need on your computer, tablet or mobile device. If you have more than one account with CW REMC, the website will show each of your accounts with the amounts due and with links for detailed information. Members can view billing history, payment history and use.

individuals the option of storing login information for apps installed on their mobile devices. If members

The information members see on

choose to

SmartHub is shown in “real-time.” It is

store login

always accurate. Remember: If you have

information,

the app or website open for extended

people with access to your mobile device

periods, refresh the page to ensure the

can access your account.

information is still current.

How do I sign up for SmartHub? There are two options for signing up for SmartHub. Simply stop by one of our offices and speak to one of our member services representatives. You can also sign up on your own by visiting our website

Do CW REMC members have to purchase the SmartHub app? No, the CW REMC app is free to download and install.

Do I have to change the

“SmartHub.”

way I pay my CW REMC bill if I have SmartHub?

Please select the option that best fits your

Do I have to change the way I pay my CW

needs. To use the SmartHub app on your

REMC bill if I have SmartHub?

at www.cwremc.coop and clicking on

phone or tablet, sign up on the website first.

No, CW REMC members can take advantage of all the features of SmartHub and

Ready to register for SmartHub? OPTION 1 Stop by our office! One of our representatives will guide you through the process and

We would love to assist you in signing up

continue to pay their bill as they currently

for SmartHub.

do.

introduce you to SmartHub.

Is SmartHub secure?

If you have any questions, visit us at www.

OPTION 2

The SmartHub app is secure. All critical

office for assistance.

information is encrypted in every trans-

cwremc.coop or stop at the Monticello

Go to cwremc.smarthub.coop. Register as a new user by entering your account info. Log in on any device.

8

OCTOBER 2018


FAMILY OWNED SINCE 1960 SERVING YOU FROM 25 INDIANA LOCATIONS!


energy

Look up for

potential energy-efficient lighting improvements no insulation!

more insulation!

vs. People considering home

More options available to retrofit into

especially when compared with older

improvement projects typically think

tight spaces. Can-less recessed LEDs

bulbs. LEDs can last years before they

about tackling particular areas of the

have all of the technology needed built

ever need to be replaced – and they are

house. Yet one item that affects the

within the light fixture. There’s no need

brighter while using less energy, saving

entire dwelling – lighting – is often

for additional wiring or elements other

you money in the long-run.

overlooked. With recent technological

than simply properly installing the light!

developments, it is easier than ever to

Because of this, they can more easily be

retrofit existing houses with recessed

installed into tight areas without having

lighting. Can-less recessed LED lights

to install additional equipment.

can lead to significant savings in

You can review different types of can-less recessed LED lighting on the Internet. You also can reach out to your local energy cooperative for some

Variety of styles for virtually any

general ideas, as well as suggestions on

room. Because can-less recessed LEDs

other efficiency improvement projects

fit easier into cramped spaces, they also

that can help lower your monthly

are available in a variety of applications.

energy use. And as new technologies

Going slim can help reduce costs.

You can find lights available for attics,

develop, more options likely will

Look at all that wasted space in the can!

bathrooms, kitchens, living rooms,

become available. Can-less recessed

Compare that to the profile of a slim

bedrooms, and more! You also can install

LEDs can help you see the light!

LED. Slim LEDs free up more space in

them against a wall to highlight artwork

the attic for insulation. Most recessed

or other features, or elsewhere in a room

lighting also have several holes in the

for proper illumination. They can be

“can” part that are potential sites for air

added to a planned room renovation to

by

leaks. Slim LEDs have fewer places that

provide an entirely different look.

Miami-Cass REMC, Peru, Indiana

energy costs beyond lighting alone. Some advantages to consider about can-less recessed LEDs are:

must be air sealed, making can-less recessed LEDs a great choice to help reduce your heating and cooling costs.

10

OCTOBER 2018

Great long-term savings over the life of the bulb. Of course, the cost-saving attributes of LEDs are always a plus –

Kim Burton


insights

TO THE EDITOR THE ROAR OF THE GREASEPAINT I just read your interesting article on your stint as a face painter! (From the editor, August 2018 issue) But the thing that really got my attention was your mention of “greasepaint.” I have not heard that word since my dad passed away. He would never let his

Project Indiana helps developing co-ops Over the past few years, Electric Consumer has chronicled the work Indiana electric cooperative linemen have done to bring electricity to remote villages in Guatemala. Through Project Indiana, Indiana’s electric co-ops are empowering global communities like

three daughters wear any makeup.

those in Guatemala one village at a

He always said “You don’t need to

time.

be wearing that greasepaint.” When

The last Project Indiana trip was in

I was in a high school play (in 1957) and came home from a production, I was wearing makeup plus my costume. Mom suggested I show dad how I looked. He took one look and said: “Why in h... are you wearing that d.. greasepaint?” Needless to say, I went off crying. Can laugh today but it sure hurt back then. Anyway, you provoked a strange memory for me with your use of “greasepaint.”

from Elsie Kerr, Tipmont REMC consumer

12

OCTOBER 2018

March 2017. We revisit the challenges and grueling efforts of the crew of 16 linemen — and the local villagers who assisted them — in a new video “The Challenges and the Work.” Visit youtu.be/jfbPPUKfNro to watch the video and to also learn how you can help change lives in impoverished countries that don’t have access to electricity, adequate healthcare, fresh drinking water, educational opportunities, economic development or public safety.

P RO J E CT IN DI AN A P HO TOS BY R O N HO L CO MB

letter


How to get your hands on the 21st art calendar The 2019 Cooperative Calendar of Student Art is available at participating Indiana electric cooperatives. Supplies may be limited. Kankakee Valley REMC and Newton County County REMC are delivering calendars to consumers with this issue of Electric Consumer. Complimentary copies will be available at these offices: • Bartholomew County REMC, Columbus

• Kosciusko REMC, Warsaw

• Boone REMC, Lebanon

• LaGrange County REMC, LaGrange

• Carroll White REMC, Delphi/

• Marshall County REMC, Plymouth

Monticello

• Miami-Cass REMC, Peru

• Clark County REMC, Sellersburg

• Newton County REMC, Goodland

• Decatur County REMC, Greensburg

• Noble REMC, Albion

• Dubois REC, Inc., Jasper

• Northeastern REMC, Columbia City

• Fulton County REMC, Rochester

• Orange County REMC, Orleans

• Harrison REMC, Corydon

• RushShelby Energy, Manilla

• Heartland REMC, Markle/Wabash

• Southeastern REMC, Osgood

• Hendricks Power Cooperative, Avon

• Tipmont REMC, Linden

• Henry County REMC, New Castle

• Whitewater Valley REMC, Liberty

• Jackson County REMC, Brownstown

• WIN Energy REMC, Vincennes

• Jasper County REMC, Rensselaer • Jay County REMC, Portland • Johnson County REMC, Franklin • Kankakee Valley REMC, Wanatah

Copies of the calendar are also available through the mail from Electric Consumer. (Please see below to order.)

Order your 2019 calendar today! Please send ______ copy (copies) of the Cooperative Calendar of Student Art 2019 at $6 each to: Name:

__________________________________________

Address:

__________________________________________

City, State and ZIP:

__________________________________________

Price includes shipping and Indiana sales tax. Send this completed form to “Indiana Electric Cooperatives” at Electric Consumer Calendar; 8888 Keystone Crossing, Suite 1600; Indianapolis, IN 46240.

PHO TO BY RI CHARD G . BI E V E R

Student artists whose works appear in the 2019 Cooperative Calendar of Student gather at the Indiana State Museum’s “Indiana” statue after meeting Indiana First Lady Janet Holcomb (second row, far left).

Day dedicated to students Eighteen first place and honorable mention winners of the 2019 Cooperative Calendar of Student Art Contest were honored at a VIP reception at the Indiana State Museum in Indianapolis on Aug. 3. Among those congratulating the winners was Indiana First Lady Janet Holcomb who also addressed all the attendees during the reception. The reception was held on the first day of the annual Hoosier Salon art exhibition. The students’ artwork is being displayed at the entrance to the Hoosier Salon exhibit until Oct. 14. Reception attendees included winners’ family, friends and art instructors along with representatives from reception cohost Hoosier Salon, electric cooperatives throughout the state, and Indiana Electric Cooperatives. The contest winners were selected in late March. Their artworks illustrate the 21st annual Cooperative Calendar of Student Art which is available beginning this month.

OCTOBER 2018

13


product picks

Pet perks

1

6

Oh, how we love our pets. From cats and dogs to rabbits and reptiles, we spoil them as much as we can. And because they can’t do it themselves, we shop for them, too.

2

by JAY N E C A N N ON

4

3 1

2

FELINE FUN Keep your cat amused for hours with a classic hide-and-seek toy, featuring electronic mouse sounds. The OurPets Catty Whack Electronic Motion Cat Toy has a feather that moves in and out of the mouse holes, as Kitty pounces and purrs. $30. 800-672-4399; chewy.com

14

OCTOBER 2018

5 5

6

3

4

NOT HERE, ROVER

WELL-GROOMED

HYDRATED & HAPPY

FIDO CALLING

MORE THAN A DOOR

Ever notice that your dog or cat always heads straight for the places you don’t want him/her to go? Until your pet learns to read “Keep Off” signs, here’s a solution. The PetSafe ScatMat Electronic Training Mat emits a safe but annoying three-second burst of static pulse when Rover or Kitty go into forbidden area. No yelling involved. $40. 800-672-4399; chewy.com

Your pet deserves to look snappy, but groomer costs can add up. Do it yourself with an all-in-one tool, the Wahl Lithium Ion Pro Series Pet Clipper Kit. You’ll get an assortment of blades, combs, scissors and more, all in a convenient carrying case. $60. 800-767-9245; wahlusa.com

Pets need water for health and hydration. Make sure there’s always fresh water for your fur baby with the Pioneer Pet Stainless Steel Drinking Fountain Raindrop Design. An included charcoal filter rids tap water of impurities. It’s easy to clean too — unplug it and put it right in the dishwasher. $36. 800-672-4399; chewy.com

When you’re having a bad day at work, seeing your dog’s smiling face may be just what you need. The PetChatz Digital Daycare lets you see your pet, talk to him, dispense treats, play games and even record your pup’s activities. $380. 855-444-6544; petchatz.com

Nifty idea, the pet door — but let’s face it, you don’t want just any creature coming through it. That’s not a worry with the SureFlap Microchip Pet Door. A collar microchip ensures that only your pet gets in, and there’s a timer so Rover only goes out when you want him to. $200. 800-826-2871; petdoors.com


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The NEW Gold Standard of Walk-In Bathtubs


Indiana eats

All-day dining

CHRISTOS’ DÉCOR DRAWS YOU IN, THE FOOD MAKES YOU GLAD YOU CAME

S

ince the 1980s, Christo’s Family Dining in Plymouth has been serving up delicious, American-

style food in an welcoming atmosphere. Christo’s architectural elements, both inside and out, are notably stunning. When you pull into the parking lot, you’re immediately greeted by the stone columns, a large inviting porch and a big “Christos’” sign overhead. As you step into the restaurant, the warm and charming décor — featuring stained glass, ornate woodworking, fireplaces, and other detailed finishes — provides a cozy ambiance. While the décor draws you in, Christos’ mouthwatering dishes will ensure you stay awhile. The family-owned restaurant offers a variety of menu options to enjoy throughout the day. Signature menu items include fruit pancakes and sirloin butt steak and eggs for breakfast; a charbroiled salmon salad; half-pound burgers; fancy fried chicken, prepared with the restaurant’s own blend of seasonings; and BBQ ribs. For dessert, be sure to try Christos’ Napoleon: Bavarian cream with strawberries between layers of puff pastry. Other choices include various flavors of cream pie or homemade rice, tapioca or bread puddings. If ice cream or old-time candy are what you crave, Christos’ has a small ice cream parlor ready to serve your sweet tooth.

CHRISTOS’ FAMILY DINING

In addition to its Plymouth location, Christos’ Family Dining welcomes hungry

2227 N. Michigan St.; Plymouth, Indiana

guests in nearby LaPorte and Knox.

574-935-5100

The hours vary at each location, so be sure to check the restaurant’s website at christosfamilydining.com.

16

OCTOBER 2018

Sunday through Thursday: 6 a.m. – 10 p.m. Friday through Saturday: 6 a.m. – 11 p.m.


food

Easy Pesto Pizza

SLICE

heaven of

New OrleansStyle Pizza

New Orleans-Style Pizza by Ruth Ann King, Warsaw ½ cup finely chopped celery ¼ cup chopped pimiento-stuffed green olives ¼ cup chopped pepperoncini peppers 2 T. olive oil 1 small clove garlic, minced Hash Brown Pizza

1 t. oregano 3 oz. diced ham 3 oz. diced salami 1½ cups (6 oz.) shredded provolone cheese 1 12-inch pre-made pizza crust Combine celery, olives, peppers, olive oil, garlic, and oregano. Stir in meats and cheese and spoon on the crust. Bake at 375 F for 12-15 minutes or until heated through and cheese is melted.

OCTOBER 2018

17


food FO O D PREPARED BY ELECTR I C CO NS UME R S TA FF PHO TO S BY RI CHA RD G . B I E V E R

Hash Brown Pizza by Charlotte Rymph, Monterey CRUST 1 package (26 oz.) frozen hash browns, thawed 1 can (10¾ oz.) Cheddar cheese soup, undiluted 1 egg 1 t. salt ½ t. pepper TOPPING 1 lb. ground beef 1 med. onion, chopped 2 T. flour 1 can (10¾ oz.) tomato soup, undiluted ½ t. salt ¼ t. garlic powder ⅛ t. pepper 2 cups shredded cheddar cheese, divided In a large bowl, combine crust ingredients; mix well. Press firmly into a greased 12-inch pizza pan. Bake at 450 F for 20-25 minutes. Meanwhile in a skillet, brown ground beef; drain. Add onion. Stir in flour until blended. Stir in soup, salt, garlic powder and pepper. Bring to a boil; cook and stir for 2 minutes. Sprinkle with 1 cup cheese. Top crust with meat mixture and remaining cheese. Bake 5 minutes longer or until cheese is melted. Let stand for 5 to 10 minutes before slicing. Yield: 4 to 6 servings Cook’s note: If desired, add 1 cup chopped tomatoes or green pepper (or combination of the two) to the filling for color and more flavor.

18

OCTOBER 2018

Pizza Pancakes

Easy Pesto Pizza

by Marilles Mauer, Greensburg

by Rosemary Stanton, Bridgeview, Illinois

2 cups biscuit mix 2 t. Italian seasoning 2 eggs 1 cup milk ½ cup shredded mozzarella cheese ½ cup chopped pepperoni ½ cup chopped tomatoes ¼ cup chopped green pepper 1 can (8-oz.) pizza sauce, warmed In a large bowl, combine biscuit mix and Italian seasoning. Combine eggs and milk; stir into dry ingredients just until moistened. Fold in cheese, pepperoni, tomatoes and green pepper. Pour batter by ¼ cupfuls onto a lightly greased hot griddle. Turn when bubbles form on top. Cook until

Flatbread (purchased in store) Pesto, either homemade or store bought Olives (black or green) Feta cheese Mozzarella cheese Cherry tomatoes sliced in half Olive oil Preheat oven or barbecue grill to 400 F. Brush olive oil on both sides of the flatbread. Place on pizza pan, spread on pesto, add cherry tomatoes, olives, feta cheese and mozzarella cheese. Bake until cheese melts, 15-20 min. Makes 2 servings.

second side is golden brown. Serve with pizza sauce.

Cook’s note: If using barbecue

Makes 14 pancakes.

grill, use indirect heat. This recipe is very versatile. Use ingredients to your liking.


WHAT’S YOUR

broadband story? Tell us why expanding high-speed internet to all of Indiana is important. How frustrated have you been waiting for

previously only available to their urban

an important file to upload from home?

peers. Adult learners will have access to

How many hours have you spent driving

distance education options right from

to a place that offers a more reliable and

their home.

quicker internet connection? If you’re like most of rural Indiana, you’ve felt the pain.

• Economic development. Small businesses in rural areas can enter the global marketplace. And, young

I believe I now know how it felt when electricity first came to rural America! For

Last month, Gov. Eric Holcomb

families seeking a rural lifestyle

years we paid far too much

announced the Next Level Connections

can enjoy that small town sense of

for a service that was barely

infrastructure plan, which dedicated

community along with the modern

$100 million in state funding for the

conveniences of an urban area.

useable. Now I feel like the

development of rural broadband. This will help close the rural digital divide, providing underserved or unserved Hoosiers the same opportunities that exist in internet-connected communities. Affordable and reliable quality internet access would mean life-altering improvements for rural Hoosiers in: • Modern health care, including prompt access to specialists and expanded monitoring and treatment options. • Modern education options so rural students can use technology

20

OCTOBER 2018

Electric cooperative representatives have heard your stories about how a lack of affordable and reliable high-speed internet service has negatively impacted your lives. We at Indiana Electric Cooperatives want to hear from you, too.

lights have finally been turned on for us!

Tell us how having access to affordable

Visit IndianaEC.org/

and reliable high-speed internet could

YourBroadbandStory and

improve your family’s quality of life.

share why you think expanding

Your stories will continue to inspire our

high-speed internet to all of

state’s leaders to do all they can to bring

Indiana is important.

broadband to all of Indiana.


Ready to vote? OCT. 9: VOTER REGISTRATION DEADLINE OCT. 29: ABSENTEE BALLOT REQUEST DEADLINE NOV. 5: ABSENTEE BALLOT SUBMISSION DEADLINE NOV. 6: ELECTION DAY

VISIT ACTION.INDIANAEC.ORG TO LEARN MORE

OCTOBER 2018

21


ZE R U N A M Just a sampling of the state’s autumn attractions

22

OCTOBER 2018

G N NI


There’s no doubt that Indiana’s autumns can be among the most beautiful in the country, with vibrant fall foliage sometimes visible for miles. Each of us has our own autumn traditions, from making s’mores over backyard firepits to carving pumpkins to hitting the road in search of prime spots to enjoy nature’s explosion of color. A must-do activity this season is a visit to one of our state’s numerous pumpkin patches or corn mazes. These agritourism attractions, which feature family-friendly activities for all ages,

Here ar e just a few cor n maze s and pumpkin patches to check o ut this m o n t h. Be sure to

visit the farms’ website s for hou rs of operatio n, phone numbers and adm ission fe es.

allow guests to enjoy the great outdoors, take part in some fun and games, and grab some seasonal décor to spruce up their homes for Halloween and Thanksgiving.

Twelve acres of corn are carved into an

The Trowbridge family of Kendallville owns

amazing maze at AMAZING FALL FUN

and operates THE AMAZING MAZE

ARMAND’S HARPER VALLEY FARMS features a unique maze experience

in Waterloo. The pumpkin patch offers more

AND PUMPKIN PATCH which includes

than 40 different varieties of pumpkins,

a four-acre family maze, a haunted maze

corn stalk version. The pumpkin patch

gourds and Indian corn. These autumn

(which begins at dark), wagon rides through

encompasses eight acres, and garden mums,

staples can be handpicked or, for those

the woods, a straw mountain, tube slides,

gourds and fall décor items are for sale at the

who like to grab and go, there is a selection

yard games, a fire pit, concession area, farm

Westport working farm along with produce and

of pre-picked items. Besides hayrides, the

animals, bounce house and more. Fresh cut

fresh meat. Visitors can choose to spend the

straw mountain, duck races, and the corn

Christmas trees and vegetable and bedding

night at Harper Valley Farms and experience

box, this northeast Indiana attraction features

plants are also available on the farm. The

the joys of being out in the country. Grandma

interactive attractions like the Barrel Roll, in

146-acre farm on which The Amazing Maze

Pearcy’s Hilltop Rental Home has enough

which participants race in cylinders (à la a

is located has been in the Trowbridge family

room to sleep up to seven people. The fixin’s

hamster wheel), Farmer Foosball (life size

for over 100 years. The farm started out

for an egg and sausage breakfast — all ready

foosball — you’re actually part of the game!)

as a dairy farm and now Tom and Cindy

and waiting in the home’s refrigerator — are

or Pumpkin Checkers or Tic Tac Toe (a giant

Trowbridge, their three daughters, their

included with the stay.

board game with pumpkins as the game

husbands and their children are running a

pieces).

thriving agribusiness.

Amazing Fall Fun is open Fridays, Saturdays

The Amazing Maze is open Fridays through

and Sundays until Oct. 28.

Sundays until Nov. 2.

www.amazingfallfun.com

www.theamazingmaze.com

— a sunflower maze as opposed to the

Harper Valley Farms will be selling pumpkins until Oct. 31. www.harpervalleyfarms.com

OCTOBER 2018

23


MAZE RUNNING

CORNUCOPIA FARM in Scottsburg is

DULL’S FARM in Thorntown pays tribute

EXPLORATION ACRES in Lafayette,

celebrating its 20th anniversary with a “Golden

to everyday heroes in its cornmaze this year.

voted the Best Corn Maze by Electric

Pumpkin” scavenger hunt. Each weekend, a

The Boone County attraction honors first

Consumer readers in the 2017 Readers’

golden pumpkin will be hidden somewhere in

responders, law enforcement personnel and

Choice Awards, is home to the largest corn

the farm’s corn maze. If you find the pumpkin

firefighters in its eight-acre maze that also

maze in northwest Indiana. The attraction

you’ll receive a gift certificate to be used in

specifically pays tribute to Jacob Pickett, a

encompasses 20 acres with 10 miles of

the farm’s Cornucopia Farm Market. Among

Boone County Sheriff’s deputy fatally shot

paths. The theme of this year’s maze is the

the unique attractions at Cornucopia Farm

in a police chase in March. Dull’s Farm also

Indiana-based sci-fi hit series, “Stranger

is an observation bee hive. City slickers

honors first responders by inviting them to

Things” with a design featuring key

who’ve never milked a cow before can do

visit its Pumpkin Harvest for free this year.

characters from the Netflix show. Rewards

so at Cornucopia. Little ones who may be

Dull’s has a pumpkin patch and an array of fall

from 28 advertisers are hidden in the maze.

frightened by the tall stalks in a corn maze

activities including a straw maze, left turn and

As you find each reward, punch your maze

can visit the farm’s soybean maze — all

right turn only mazes, slingshots, stilts, hillbilly

map to claim the rewards. The farm’s 11-

the fun without feeling dazed by the maize.

treadmill, wagon rides and pony rides. The

acre pumpkin patch includes 38 varieties

Among other things to see and do: a pumpkin

historic Stone Cabin Inn Bed and Breakfast,

of pumpkins and gourds weighing from 1

patch, tunnel slide, hay ride, petting zoo,

featuring a unique waterfall-like shower, is

to 200 pounds. Exploration Acres’ array of

duck races and the super straw house. The

right on the property for those wanting to

family-friendly activities includes laser tag

onsite Cornucopia Café serves sandwiches,

extend their autumn getaway at this 50-acre

and corn cannons. There’s a country store

nachos and seasonal sweets including

farm. Dull’s also sells a half-dozen popular

onsite as well as food truck and food booth

pumpkin bread, pumpkin rolls and apple

varieties of choose-and-cut Christmas trees.

dining options.

cinnamon doughnuts. Dull’s Farm is open Saturdays and Sundays

Exploration Acres is open Thursdays through

The farm is open until Nov. 3.

through Oct. 28.

Sundays until Oct. 28.

www.cornucopiafarm.com

www.dullstreefarm.com/FallFestival

www.explorationacres.com

? W O U KN DID YO

Corn maze crops should be planted from mid to late May. This is two-three weeks later than crops being planted for grain. Corn mazes are typically cut down in early November. The first corn maze was in Annville, Pennsylvania. Corn mazes in the United Kingdom are called “maize mazes.” Maize mazes are particularly popular in the eastern portion of England. As of 2014, the Guinness World Record for largest corn maze was 60 acres, created by Cool Patch Pumpkins in Dixon, California.

24

OCTOBER 2018


HO E? WI S A MAZE MAD

FARMLIFE (Lanesville Indiana Family

LARK RANCH provides double the

Prior to modern technology, corn mazes began as sketches or

Entertainment) is Southern Indiana’s largest

autumn fun! There are two locations of this

were plotted on graph paper and

corn maze and pumpkin patch attraction.

popular family attraction — Loogootee and Greenfield. Activities are similar whichever

measured into the field manually.

Guests can explore 20 acres of pumpkin patches and 13 acres of corn mazes along

site you visit. Besides the pumpkin patch

four miles of paths. There are horse and

and corn maze, you can enjoy the train ride,

pony rides, pig races, a giant tire mountain, a

slide mountain, various rides, a rock wall, a

bungee trampoline, a tug of war, animal farm

mechanical bull, life size birdhouses and go

tours, and gem and fossil mining, among other

karts. There are farm animals and hayrides,

attractions. FARMLIFE is famous for its apple

and, for those who want to report on their

cider slushies, pumpkin caramel cheesecake

down-on-the-farm experience on Instagram,

and 12 oz. smoked butterflied pork chops.

there’s a selfie booth and giant rocking

Fall décor is for sale as well as pumpkin

chairs, the perfect place for a photo op. Both

decorating and carving kits.

locations also offer gem mining and pony rides.

Visit FARMLIFE on weekends until Oct. 28. Friday Flash Light Mazes are by appointment only.

Lark Ranch is open Fridays through Sundays

www.farmlife.fun

until Oct. 28. www.larkranch.com

Now, GPS technology is often used to create mazes. The first step in creating a corn maze is coming up with a grid plot. Next, a vehicle fitted with a GPS tracking device is driven around the property on which the maze will be located. GPS coordinates are obtained. An electronic version of the maze design is placed over a map of the field. A program plots the maze and lets a mower follow the GPS-guided path for cutting the maze at the right locations. In most cases, the maze design process begins while the corn is

STEELE FARMS in Decatur offers a fun farm experience

growing. Corn in mazes is planted in

for all ages. There’s the pumpkin patch (which has been

rows going two directions. Thus the

featured on “The Blog for Lifestyle and Travel” in a list of 30

crop is denser than normal, making

perfect Indiana pumpkin patches) and corn maze for sure

the “walls” of the maze difficult to

but there’s also a Play Zone for the little ones. The Play

see through.

Zone features a corn crib, straw mountain, spider web, play set, duck races and more. Tour the property via a barrel train

When the corn stalks are a foot

or wagon and see farm animals up close. Shop for fall décor

tall, a tractor cuts through the field

like multi-colored mums, Indian corn, decorative pumpkins and gourds and corn shocks. Fresh, homegrown pork and beef is available for purchase. Visitors who work up an appetite exploring Steele Farms’ attractions can enjoy hot dogs and Coney dogs as well as snacks like pretzels, fresh baked cookies, nachos and apples with caramel dip. Steele Farms is open weekends from Sept. 29 – Oct. 28. www.visitsteelefarms.com

according to GPS tracking specs. The maze is ready for business once the remaining corn stalks reach 10 feet high. That takes about two months. When fall is over, the corn maze is flattened. The corn is usually used for animal feed.

OCTOBER 2018

25


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calendar NORTHWEST

4

620

STATE OF THE ART: ART OF THE STATE, Rensselaer (Jasper), Lillian Fendig Gallery, Carnegie Center. As part of its 25th anniversary celebration, the Prairie Arts Council is sponsoring and hosting the creative talent of Indiana artists. Gallery times: Tuesday and Thursday, Noon-4 pm. Opening reception, Oct. 12, 6-7:30 pm (Central time). Free. 219-866-5278. pacrensselaer@gmail.com. prairieartscouncil.net. Event runs through Nov. 4. PUMPKIN TRAINS ON SATURDAYS, North Judson (Starke), Hoosier Valley Railroad Museum. Fall foliage excursion through the countryside with a stop at a pumpkin patch where pumpkins can be purchased for a nominal fee. The 12-mile, round-trip excursion lasts approximately 75 minutes. 10 am, 12:30 pm, & 2:30 pm (Central time). Cost: $6 and up, plus pumpkin fee (optional). 574-896-3950. marketing@ hoosiervalley.org. hoosiervalley.org

18

MARSHALL COUNTY SENIOR EXPO, Plymouth (Marshall), Plymouth High School. Live entertainment, educational presentations, health screenings, free food, lifestyle opportunities and information for the senior population and their caregivers. Free. 8 am-3 pm. 574-9369904. tmorales.mcoas@hotmail.com. marshallcountycouncilonaging.org

CENTRAL

46

DUGGER COAL FESTIVAL, Duggar (Greene), Community Center Park.Celebrating the town’s coal mining heritage and Dugger Union High School homecoming since 1979. Food, parade, arts and crafts, car and motorcycle show, and more. Free. 812699-0446. facebook.com/DuggerCoalFest/

67

PIONEER DAYS, Terre Haute (Vigo), Fowler Park. Wagon rides, music, demonstrations, authentic food, vendors, and much more. 9 am-5 pm. Parking, $5. 812462-3392. laura.maloney@ vigocounty.in.gov

1114

MORGAN COUNTY FALL FOLIAGE FESTIVAL, Martinsville (Morgan), Courthouse Square. Car show, kids’ events, arts and crafts vendors, parade and much more. Free. 765-342-0332. morgancountyfallfoliagefestival. com/wordpress

SOUTHWEST

67

BICENTENNIAL CELEBRATION, Rome (Perry), Courthouse square. Music all day, free children’s activities, food vendors, history tours and demonstrations, market vendors, reunion and stories of anyone who lived, worked, or went to school in Rome. Saturday, 9 am-6 pm. Sunday, 11-am-4 pm. Free. 812-7198418. peke@psci.net. romeindianacourthouse.com

7

ANTIQUE FARM SHOW, Saint Meinrad (Spencer), Saint Meinrad Community Center and Park. Antique farm equipment, food, entertainment, cash raffle drawing, judging and more! Featuring John Deere tractors and equipment. 9:30 am-3 pm (Central time). Free. 812-5498093. smvfd@psci.net

2728

FALL HERITAGE DAYS, Rockport (Spencer), Rockport Lincoln Pioneer Village and Museum. Costumed interpreters, demonstrators, kids’ activities, music, food and more. Cost: $5, adults (50 and under); $3, children (12 and under) and seniors. 9 am-4 pm. 812-649-9147. lpvdirector@gmail.com. lincolnpioneervillage. com

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OCTOBER 2018


OCTOBER NORTHEAST

6

WALK ’N’ ROLL TO CURE ATAXIA, Fort Wayne (Allen), Foster Park (Pavilion 1). Two-mile loop through Foster Park. Social hour before the walk with coffee and snacks. Door prize drawing after the walk. Ataxia is a neurological degenerative disease of the cerebellum. 10 am. jclebrato711@gmail.com

67

APPLE FESTIVAL OF KENDALLVILLE, Kendallville (Noble), Noble County Fairgrounds. Unique entertainment, over 35 food vendors, handmade crafts, a traders’ village, antique vendors, children’s games and activities and two demonstration buildings. Saturday, 9 am–6 pm. Sunday, 9 am–5 pm. Free. Parking, $5. 260-350-1119. applefest@ kendallvilleapplefestival.com. www. kendallvilleapplefestival.com.

27

HOWL O’ WEEN, Albion (Noble), Black Pine Animal Sanctuary. A family friendly “safe” celebration. Park at the 4-H park adjacent to Black Pine and enjoy a free wagon ride to the sanctuary! Trick-or-Treat stations throughout the grounds. Costumes optional. Cost: Free for ages 0-2; $7, ages 3-9; $10, ages 10-54; $8, ages 55 plus. Free for Park Pal members. 260-636-7383. info@blackpine.org. bpsanctuary.org/howl-o-ween

SOUTHEAST

614

HARVEST HOMECOMING FESTIVAL, New Albany (Floyd), Downtown. Parade, rides, entertainment, kids’ events, craft/food booths and more! Admission charge at some events. Fees for select activities. 812-944-8572. harvesthomecoming.com

1920

ZIMMERMAN GLASSTOBERFEST, Corydon (Harrison), Downtown. Celebrate a family tradition of glass making. Demonstrations, live music, beer garden, artists’ booths, entertainment and German food. Begins Friday at 5 pm and Saturday at 10 am. Free. 888-738-2137. thisisindiana.org

27

UPPER CLUB 26TH 19- PEPPER ANNUAL HAUNTED WOODS, (Clark), 10801 Hwy. 60. 20 Sellersburg Concession opens at 6:30 pm. Event: 7:30 pm-Midnight. Cost: $15, adult; $10, children (12 and under). Express: $2 more. suescholl1@gmail.com

OKTOBERFEST/CORNMEAL BAKE OFF, Salem (Washington), Historic Beck’s Mill. Adult art show, campfire beans and Beck’s Mill cornbread. Craft vendors, demonstrations, music and kids’ crafts. 9 am-4 pm. Cornmeal bake off — entry must contain at least 1/2 cup of Beck’s Mill cornmeal and be in non-returnable pan with recipe. Drop off between 11 am-Noon. Cost: $5, adult; children (16 and under) free with a paid adult admission. becksmill1864@outlook.com. www.becksmill.org

This calendar is published as a service to readers and the communities electric cooperatives serve. Electric Consumer publishes events free of charge as space allows, giving preference to free community festival and events in and around areas served by subscribing REMCs/RECs. While Electric Consumer strives for accuracy, please note that events, dates and time may change without notice. Electric Consumer advises using contact phone numbers or internet sites to check times and dates of events before making plans. To add events to Calendar, please use the “Submit and Event” form under the “Talk to Us” or “Calendar” buttons at electricconsumer.org; or mail your info to: Calendar, Electric Consumer, P.O. Box 24517, Indianapolis, IN 46224. Please submit info two months before the date of the event.

OCTOBER 2018

29


Bourbon Trail

KY Horse Park

Frankfort

Elkhorn Creek

The Centerpiece of Your Kentucky Experience Adventure. Art. Bluegrass. Bourbon. History. Horses.

Frankfort is close to home, and close to the fun. Stay in Frankfort, Play in Kentucky! Castle & Key Distillery

Learn more at visitfrankfort.com or call us at 800-976-7200

Jeptha Creed Distillery

Downtown Frankfort

Keeneland

Berea Artisan Center


Always call 811 before starting fencing & landscaping projects. Landowners completing these projects were more than three times more likely to hit a buried utility because they did not call 811 before breaking ground.


outdoors

Purple paint means

‘no trespassing’ B Y J ACK SPAULDI NG When I first heard about the new “Purple

I also question the selection of the color

Paint No Trespass” law, I thought it was

purple. In shadows or dim light, purple

a joke. But believe it or not, in our label-

paint can be hard to detect. Why wasn’t the

loving, litigious society, an easy-to-read

law written around using “blaze orange”

“No Trespassing” sign is being upstaged

paint or “high visibility green?” Should

by a simple swatch of purple paint

the paint also be luminous so it will glow

strategically placed on a post or tree. This

in the dark to notify nighttime woodland

can now legally define areas of denied

walkers, raccoon hunters and the like?

entry as well. One place where purple paint on trees and

IC 35-43-2-2 says the “purple mark” on a tree must be:

I couldn’t help in my twisted humor

posts designates something forbidden is

but wonder if the sign manufacturers

in Haiti. When traveling the roads and you

had been out-lobbied by the paint

see purple painted trees and posts and

manufacturers. I even checked the local

utility poles, it signifies it is where the local

farm supply store, and it had a good supply

voodoo witch doctor lives. For me, this

of “No Trespassing” signs. Some locations

application is a “big time” no trespassing

length with the bottom of the mark

even sell the signs in Spanish.

indicator.

at least 3 feet and not more than 5

We are a nation that demands we be told

The official media release for our Hoosier

of eminent danger or of situations of

residents reads:

unintentional rule breaking. Everywhere we see signs saying: “Don’t Feed The

“Hunters, anglers, trappers and anyone

Animals,” “Don’t Walk On The Grass,”

else who enjoys time in the woods will

“Coffee is Hot,” etc.

need to be aware of a new law that took effect July 1. Per Indiana Code (IC 35-43-

I can see where the new legislation

2-2), landowners may mark no-trespassing

may create havoc for Hoosier woodland

areas of their property with purple paint

wanderers and our Indiana conservation

instead of no-trespassing signs.

officers. The legislation brings up more than a few questions!

“The purple-paint perimeter serves the

• a vertical line at least 8 inches in

feet from the ground; • not more than 100 feet from the nearest other marked tree.

On a post, the mark must: • cover at least the top 2 inches of the post; • be at least 3 feet and not more

same legal purpose as a “No Trespassing”

than 5 feet, 6 inches from the

First, how is the general public supposed

sign. Painting can be done around the

to learn of the new ruling? I know there

perimeter of the area where entry is denied

ground

are a few people who read this column but

on either trees or posts.

come on, where is the media blitz to notify the masses? Do we need to post signs

“The purple marks must be readily visible

telling misguided woodland wanderers the

to any person approaching the property.”

purple swatches replaced the signs telling people to stay out?

My good friend Paul Coffey from Shelby County heard about the new law and

And secondly, how can an enforcement

wanted to paint trespass boundaries on his

officer be sure the swatch of paint was

new property. Sure enough, he found the

simply not seen by an unaware trespassing

local farm supply stores completely sold

offender?

out of “no trespassing” exterior purple. For more information, see IC 35-43-2-2 at iga.IN.gov.

32

OCTOBER 2018

• be not more than 36 feet from the nearest other marked post.

JACK SPAULDING is a state outdoors writer and a consumer of RushShelby Energy living along the Flatrock River in Moscow. Readers with questions or comments can write to him in care of Electric Consumer or email jackspaulding@ hughes.net.


safety

Electrical overloads HOW TO PREVENT THEM, SPOT THEM AND FIX THEM No matter what time of year, whether

Relying too heavily on extension

it’s the holidays, full of bright

cords may mean that your home

decorations covering every inch of

doesn’t have enough outlets. Instead

your home, or summertime, when you

of grabbing an extension cord for a

just can’t seem to plug in enough fans

temporary solution, you should call a

to keep cool, it’s never the wrong time

qualified electrician who can install

to talk about electrical overloads — and

more outlets.

how to prevent them, spot them, and fix them.

Major appliances, like your refrigerator, should always be plugged directly

PREVENT

into a wall outlet. Never use extension

Prevention is simple — don’t overuse extension cords when powering your home. It’s easy to grab one when you’ve run out of outlets; we are all

cords or multi-outlet converters for these larger appliances. Extension cords should be used as a short-term option, not a long-time fix.

guilty of plugging in too many lamps,

So why is this a big deal? An overload

chargers and other electronics into

occurs when the home draws more

those convenient extension cords.

electricity than a circuit can safely handle. Electrical circuits are designed to handle a limited amount of electricity. When it receives too much, it causes the circuit breaker to trip, shutting off the power to the entire circuit. If there were no breaker in the circuit, an overload would cause the wires to overheat and start a fire.

SPOT Here are some easy ways to spot an overloaded circuit: • Flickering, blinking or dimming lights. • Outlet switch covers that are warm to the touch. • Burning odors from outlets or switches. • Frequently tripped circuit breakers. • Crackling, sizzling or buzzing receptacles. • Mild shock or tingle from appliances, receptacles or switches. • Power tools, appliances, or electronics that seem to lack adequate power.

FIX Once you know how to spot an overload, it’s a quick fix consumers can manage themselves. Simply locate your circuit panel, usually found in the basement or a garage in most homes, and check to see if any of the switches

“It’s way too easy to plug

in the panel have been tripped or

in too many devices onto

partially tripped. Then turn them off

the same circuit,” said Tom

and back on again.

VanParis, CEO of Indiana Electric Cooperatives. “Everyone has a role — whether it’s the cooperative keeping consumers informed, or homeowners doing their research — to best keep their home safe.”

Can’t find enough plug-ins? Call an electrician to install more outlets in your home.

Indiana’s electric cooperatives recommend all consumers map their home’s circuits. It’s as simple as grabbing a notepad and a pencil. This will ensure you are not loading too much on one circuit. Knowing what is on each circuit could help you navigate an overload in the future.

OCT OB E R 2018

33


Ask Rosie backyard

Dying Blue Spruce and Potato Bugs soil as well as from extreme heat and drought. They are also susceptible to a number of fungal diseases. If caught early, there are some fungicides that can be applied to protect the healthy foliage, but they must be applied early in the season as the new needles are still elongating and then repeated for one or two more applications depending on the season.

Above: Blue spruce are susceptible to a number of fungal diseases. This one began dying off from the bottom up.

Q: We have 5.5 acres with several hundred white pines, seven blue spruce and two red pines. Several of the blue spruce are dying. Several years ago, we had two start dying from the bottom up. We put evergreen spikes around them, and after a year or so, they came back to normal. Presently some of the large ones are now dying from the bottom to the top. We have put spikes around two large and one small, but they continue to deteriorate. The picture above shows one in the front yard which is a beautiful tree, but we are losing it. The problem begins on the bottom branches. How can we save them? Three large and one small are dying. They were planted in the mid 1990s. — Danny Teague, Anderson A: Unfortunately, blue spruce are not particularly well adapted to Indiana. They suffer in heavy, poorly drained

34

OCTOBER 2018

Unfortunately, there’s not much that can be done to save them once the injury has progressed to the point seen in your photos. So, when it’s time to replace them, you might consider other species of spruce that are a bit better adapted to our area, such as white spruce and Norway spruce. You can read more about this blue spruce dilemma at www. purduelandscapereport.org/article/ blue-spruce-update/.

Rosie’s Tip

When planning your landscape, consider species of spruce better adapted to Indiana, such as white spruce and Norway spruce.

Q: I had potato bugs really bad this year. I picked them off every few days, but they just came back. I tried Sevin, but the rain just washed it off. What can I do about potato bugs? — S. Newland, Columbus, IN A: There are a number of insecticides labeled for control of Colorado potato beetle on potatoes. Unfortunately, this pest is developing resistance to insecticides when the same product is used repeatedly. So, if you find that one product is not being effective, try switching to a different unrelated product such as Bacillus thuringiensis (sold as BT, Dipel and others), bifenthrin or spinosad. Be sure to read all label instructions and follow the days to harvest restrictions. Additional strategies include rotating your crop plans out of potato for a year or two. But Colorado potato beetle will also feed on related plants in the nightshade family including tomato, pepper, eggplant, and weedy species such as buffalo bur and black nightshade so you’ll have to avoid those as well.

B. ROSIE LERNER is the Purdue Extension consumer horticulturist and is a consumer of Tipmont REMC. Questions about gardening issues may be sent directly to Rosie at homehort@ purdue.edu; mailed to “Ask Rosie,” Electric Consumer, 8888 Keystone Crossing, Suite 1600, Indianapolis, IN 46240-4606; or through our “Talk to Us” form online at ElectricConsumer.org.


product recalls

1

1. Harbor Freight Tools recalls unsafe handgun safe Harbor Freight has recalled two models of its electronic handgun safe. The handgun safes can open without the use of a key or combination upon impact and allow unintended access to the contents of the safe, posing a risk of serious injury to children and others. Sold under two different brand names, Union Safe Company and Bunker Hill Security, the recalled safes have 0.17 cubic foot capacity and are dark gray. The safes were sold exclusively at Harbor Freight Tools stores nationwide and online from November 2014 through February 2018 for about $65. Call 800-444-3353, or go online to www.harborfreight.com and click on “Recall Safety Information” on the bottom of the homepage for more information.

2. Hirsch Gift recalls wireless charging pads due to burn hazard

2

CloudCharge Wireless Charging Pad and accessories have been recalled because the wireless phone chargers can overheat while in use, posing a burn hazard to consumers. The charging pads were a promotional giveaway to employees and customers of various companies from February 2018 to May 2018. The product name and model number T4706 are printed on the bottom of the product and select company promotional logos and artwork are printed on the top. The recalled chargers are circular and have a white plastic bottom. They measure about 4 inches in diameter and 0.5 inch tall. A white USB power cable is included along with a wireless receiver adapter. Each charging pad and accessories are packed in a white plastic box with a clear lid, measuring approximately 5 inches x 5 inches x 1.25 inches. This recall involves only one production lot (version 2) of the charging pad. Call 877-220-4438, ext. 117, or go online at hg-promo.com and click on the recall link at the bottom of the page for more information.

3

3. Hair dryer models pose fire, burn and electrical shock hazards Two models of hand-held hair dryers and their power cords have been recalled because they can overheat posing fire, burn and electrical shock hazards. This recall involves the Allure and Allure Pro 2200W ionic ceramic hair dryers. The hand-held hair dryers are black or white and include a concentrator nozzle. The hair dryers were sold separately or as part of various hair care kits that included hair treatment products, a flat iron or a diffuser online at Amazon.com, eBay.com, Walmart. com, Xtava.com, Groupon.com and other websites from October 2014 through August 2018 for between $15 and $60 when sold separately, and for between $20 and $80 when sold as part of a hair care kit. The firm has received 193 reports of the hair dryers or power cords overheating, melting, exploding or catching fire, including 18 reports of burns and two reports of a minor electrical shock. Call 877-643-8440, or go online atxtava.com and click on “Product Recalls” or recall-xtava-allure.expertinquiry.com for more information.

4. Koehler-Bright Star recalls WorkSafe flashlights due to explosion hazard

4

Koehler-Bright Star has recalled WorkSafe Model 2224 LED 3-D cell flashlights. The flashlights are missing a circuit board component which protects the flashlight from igniting an explosive environment, posing an injury hazard to the user or bystander. The flashlight is safety orange with a black reflector assembly and black end cap and measures about 10.25 inches long by 2 inches in diameter. Only 3-D cell flashlights that do not contain a date code stamped on the body of the units are included in the recall. The flashlights were sold at Koehler-Bright Star Industrial distributors, Grainger and online January 2017 through May 2018 for about $21. No incidents or injuries have been reported. Call 800-788-1696, or go online at www.koehlerlighting.com and click on the “Contact Us” tab for more information. As a service to our readers and to promote electrical safety, here are some recent recall notices provided by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. Visit www.cpsc.gov/ en/recalls for full details of these recalls and for notices of many more. OCTOBER 2018

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Wabash Valley Power news

Don’t Fall Behind: Prep your HVAC system now to stay warm in winter The cooling temperatures and kids once again climbing the school bus steps to head to school mean that fall is quickly approaching! The changing season also can serve as an alarm clock to prepare for what is to come – winter. Early fall is the perfect time to prepare your heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system for winter. Many HVAC contractors are not as busy in the early fall as they will be during the winter months, when they receive more emergency service calls. As a result, you’re more likely to get a timely response, and perhaps even get a special rate on service. Some steps you may want to take include:

Replace your furnace filter.

Get a system inspection.

The changing seasons can serve as a

Early fall is a perfect time to schedule

Consider an upgrade if one is needed.

reminder that it’s time to change your

an inspection of your HVAC system. This

If you have an older or underperforming

furnace filter. This is a fairly easy step,

could include a tune-up to ensure that

system, you may want to think about a

and can help keep your furnace clean.

your system is optimized to perform as

replacement. While not cheap, it may

A dirty furnace filter can plug up the

best as it can. Preventative maintenance

ultimately be a better option than having

airflow of your system, making your

frequently can be more affordable than

to keep making needed repairs on an

home uncomfortable and shortening the

having to pay for an emergency house call

inefficient system. If you choose to upgrade

furnace’s lifespan at the same time.

when your system goes out! During an

your system in the fall, HVAC contractors

excellent “clean and tune,” a technician

may be running seasonal discounts. Of

will pull the blower from your system and

course, your local electric cooperative offers

use water or a cleaner to remove the dirt

POWER MOVES® rebates for qualifying

that made it past the furnace filter.

efficiency upgrades that will help you save more on energy costs. Contact your local electric cooperative for details.

Taking the time in the fall to prepare your heating system can lead to a warm, more comfortable winter! It also can help your HVAC system run more efficiently and last longer. You always can contact your local electric cooperative to inquire about a home energy assessment, which would provide details on your whole home’s energy use and give suggestions on steps you can take to improve your home’s energy usage and efficiency. You also can visit www.PowerMoves.com for more information.

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OCTOBER 2018


reader submissions

Pumpkin personalities

ABOVE: Reader Elaine Glova dug into her photo file to share this seasonal snapshot from 1999. “Great memory!” she noted.

LEFT: Making a Jack-o’-Lantern takes time! Jane E. Pirtle from Lanesville shared a vintage photo of her young daughter patiently removing the “guts” from her just-carved pumpkin.

JACK-O’-LANTERNS ARE 3-D EMOJIS THAT YOU CREATE YOURSELF!

ABOVE: Jack and Rita Purcell’s annual pumpkin carving party in Bloomfield is a gathering of siblings, their spouses, children and, most importantly, grandchildren. Oh, and don’t forget all the pumpkins! “Our family loves spending time together,” Rita said.

OCTOBER 2018

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cooperative career profile

Here to help you! Top 3

responsibilities in a day 1. Greet the consumers — either on phone or in person. I’m the first one they’ll see or speak with. 2. Answer questions. Many are general, but it’s my job to help consumers problem solve. 3. Electric service requests. Starting, stopping or transfering service —

Vicki Hollis

I process them all.

Customer Service Representative Boone REMC

What type of background did you need for this position? It was important for me to have a background in customer service, and we have opportunities for additional training at the cooperative.

What part of your job is most fulfilling? My favorite part of the job is talking with the consumers and helping them find the answers they are seeking. Every person has a story, and it is fun to get to know some of them.

How would you describe working for a cooperative? We take pride that we’re owned by the consumers we serve. It is important to us to look out for the consumers and really listen if they have a suggestion or concern.

Do you see opportunity for growth at the cooperative?

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OCTOBER 2018

Regardless of what position a person is in, there is always room for growth. As technology changes, so does the way we do our jobs. The opportunity always exists. We just need to be willing to take it.

Have you had to master new skills? Yes. Several of my responsibilities require industry-specific skills. It is a constant education process. I have had to learn to analyze a person’s electric use to see if something is out of the ordinary. I also need to remain aware of any changes in the industry that could affect the way I do my job.

What’s the best part of your job? The kind and caring consumers and the people I work with. I look forward to coming to work every day and not many get to say that.

Interested in an electric co-op career? Visit IndianaEC.org/Careers to learn about available careers or tell us about yourself.


Carroll White REMC — October 2018 Electric Consumer  
Carroll White REMC — October 2018 Electric Consumer