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Get to know your board. Board President Kevin Bender. energy

Carroll White REMC’s

I N D I AN A

CONNECTION

Tomato talk page 19 4

FEBRUARY 2019

Keep your eyes on the heirloom prize

MARCH 2019


from the editor

Connecting with you

VOLUME 68 • NUMBER 9 ISSN 0745-4651 • USPS 262-340 Published monthly by:

As any new parent will tell you, selecting the perfect name is not easy. Of course, naming a child and naming a magazine are not quite the same thing. But both scenarios usually involve hours of debate, input (both solicited and sometimes unsolicited) from numerous sources, and a long and often ongoing list of pros and cons for each suggestion. There’s a reason for this arduous process. A name is something you can’t just change on a whim. You live up to it. Make it your own. Make it proud. It stands to reason that it takes time to settle on one that “fits.” Back in November, we asked you to help us rename this magazine. We needed a name that better suited the publication’s evolution as a general interest magazine as well as the ever-expanding role your co-op plays in your community. We received nearly 270 responses. Magazine staff as well as an advisory committee of electric cooperative directors, CEOs and communicators carefully considered possible names before selecting a name we feel is a winner: Indiana Connection. Indiana Connection first and foremost addresses our relationship with you, our readers. We strive to connect with you. We hope you find the magazine interesting, entertaining and informative. We hope it is a link, or connection, to your electric cooperative and all the programs and services it provides you. And we hope it draws you closer to a community of other readers throughout the Hoosier state who enjoy similar rural and suburban lifestyles to yours. Welcome to Indiana Connection! The name’s new, but our focus on you hasn’t changed.

EMILY SCHILLING Editor eschilling@indianaec.org

On the menu: June issue: Avocado, deadline April 1. July issue: Mint, deadline April 1. If we publish your recipe on our food page, we’ll send you a $10 gift card.

Three ways to contact us: To send us recipes, photos, event

listings, letters and entries for gift drawings, please use the forms on our website indianaconnection.org; email info@indianaconnection.org; or send to Indiana Connection, 8888 Keystone Crossing, Suite 1600, Indianapolis, IN 46240-4606.

Indiana Connection is for and about members of Indiana’s locally-owned, not-for-profit electric cooperatives. It helps consumers use electricity safely and efficiently; understand energy issues; connect with their co-op; and celebrate life in Indiana. Over 292,000 residents and businesses receive the magazine as part of their electric co-op membership. CONTACT US: 8888 Keystone Crossing, Suite 1600 Indianapolis, IN 46240-4606 317-487-2220 info@indianaconnection.org IndianaConnection.org INDIANA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVES OFFICERS: Gary Gerlach President Walter Hunter Vice President Randy Kleaving Secretary/Treasurer Elmer Stocker Interim CEO EDITORIAL STAFF: Emily Schilling Editor Richard George Biever Senior Editor Holly Huffman Member Relations/ Advertising Manager Ellie Schuler Senior Communication Specialist ADVERTISING: American MainStreet Publications, 512-441-5200; amp.coop Crosshair Media, 502-216-8537; crosshairmedia.net Paid advertisements are not endorsements by any electric cooperative or this publication. UNSOLICITED MATERIAL: Indiana Connection does not use unsolicited freelance manuscripts or photographs and assumes no responsibility for the safe‑keeping or return of unsolicited material. SUBSCRIPTIONS: $12 for individuals not subscribing through participating REMCs/RECs. CHANGE OF ADDRESS: Readers who receive Indiana Connection through their electric co-op membership should report address changes to their local co-op. POSTAGE: Periodicals postage paid at Indianapolis, Ind., and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send change of address to: Indiana Connection, 8888 Keystone Crossing, Suite 1600, Indianapolis, IN 46240-4606. Include key number. No portion of Indiana Connection may be reproduced without permission of the editor.

MARCH 2019

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contents

MARCH

10

19

energy

03 FROM THE EDITOR 05 CO-OP NEWS What’s happening at your local electric cooperative. 10 ENERGY Tips on picking the right contractor. 12 INSIGHTS 14 COUNTY OF THE MONTH Spotlighting St. Joseph County.

cover story 16 INDIANA EATS The Square in Columbia City. 17 FOOD Chips Ahoy: Taking potato chips to the next level. 19 COVER STORY Tomato Talk. Keep your eyes on the heirloom prize. 26 EVENTS CALENDAR

FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA

Indiana Connection 4

MARCH 2019

29

33

safety

travel

28 DIY Get growing your own produce.

31 H  OOSIER ENERGY/ WABASH VALLEY NEWS

29 SAFETY

Dig deep into Hoosier Hysteria roots.

Don’t neglect safety when spring cleaning. 30 BACKYARD Pretty ground cover? Probably a weed.

33 TRAVEL

34 PROFILE Best foot forward. Klinker’s “approachable” personality shines in shoes and Statehouse.

On the cover When we say tomato, we don’t mean the bland variety that may have graced a countless number of your BLTs. Thanks to our tomatogrowing expert Brian D. Smith (aka Mr. Tomato Head), we share proven tips for producing a crop of the juiciest heirloom tomatoes you’ll ever sink your teeth into — or set your eyes upon!


co-op news “This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer.” CARROLL WHITE REMC P.O. Box 599; Monticello, IN 47960 800-844-7161 (Toll Free) www.cwremc.coop MONTICELLO OFFICE 7:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m., Monday – Friday DELPHI OFFICE 7:30 a.m. – 1 p.m., 2 p.m. – 4:30 p.m., Monday – Friday EMAIL info@cwremc.coop CEO Randy W. Price BOARD OF DIRECTORS Kevin M. Bender, 574-686-2670 4280 W, 700 N, Delphi

Margaret E. Foutch, 219-279-2677 7535 W, 500 S, Chalmers

Gary E. Gerlach, 574-595-7820 9833 S. Base Road, Star City

Kent P. Zimpfer, 765-479-3006 4672 E. Arrow Point Court, Battle Ground

Tina L. Davis, 219-204-2195 7249 W, 600 S, Winamac

Milton D. Rodgers, 765-566-3731 3755 S, 575 E, Bringhurst

Ralph H. Zarse, 219-863-6342 1535 S, 100 E, Reynolds

MISSION STATEMENT The mission of Carroll White REMC is to provide members with superior energy and related services, meaningful contributions to their communities and a safe, productive environment for employees. “No job is complete until the member is satisfied.”

IMPORTANT DATES Cycle 1 February bills are due March 5 and are subject to disconnect March 26 if unpaid. Cycle 2 February bills are due March 20 and are subject to disconnect April 9 if unpaid. Meters are read using the Automated Meter Reading system. Cycle 1 meters will be read on March 1. Cycle 2 meters will be read March 15.

SPRING IS NEARLY HERE! Test your A/C, and ensure it’s ready for summer. Remember to check the evaporator coil, which should be cleaned annually for optimal efficiency. — U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK www.facebook.com/ carrollwhite.remc FOLLOW US ON TWITTER www.twitter.com/cwremc

MEET YOUR CW REMC DIRECTOR:

Kevin Bender,

DISTRICT TWO

In this ongoing seven article series, we’ll introduce you to each of Carroll White REMC’s board members. This issue, we feature Kevin Bender, CW REMC board president.

Family is at the forefront for Bender Growing up on a family farm in northeast Indiana’s DeKalb County not only instilled in Kevin Bender the passion to serve the REMC as a board member and its board president — but also to serve as president of a locally-owned and managed community bank. As a board member and banker, Bender considers his work teams his family. And, he counts his strong personal family ties as being the forefront of his life. “I am so fortunate to have been married to my wife, Denise, for the past 33 years,” Bender said. “We are very proud of our three sons, Kyle, Kris and Karson, and the awesome men they’ve become. Each is a college graduate, and they are all immersed in their own careers.” Several years ago, Bender began investing and expanding the family farm in northeast Indiana. “It takes a lot of help from others but I really enjoy doing that,” Bender said. “In the past three years, I started working with my son, Kris, and his fiancée, Alanna, building a cattle operation in Carroll County. The most enjoyable part of this new business venture is the fact that I get to work with one of my sons.” The Bender family enjoys traveling, especially when all of the family can go together. “Each summer, one of our fun trips is a long family weekend in St.

Louis to watch Cardinal baseball games,” Bender said. “I really enjoy high school and college sports. I have certainly attended many Delphi and Purdue games since moving to Carroll County in 1981!” In 1997, Bender and his wife became owners of Ready Set Go Children’s Center near Delphi. This business includes a Nursery Class for four year olds, a Pre-School class for five year olds, and child care for up to 12 children. “Denise’s passion is working with the children,” Bender said. “I am more of the bookkeeper and

CONTINUED ON PAGE 6 MARCH 2019

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co-op news CONTINUED FROM PAGE 5 maintenance man. We love working with kids, trying to help get them off to a good start in life.” Bender is a fully engaged member of the St. Joseph Catholic Church in Delphi and serves in a number of roles there.

INTRIGUED BY MEMBEROWNED CONCEPT “When I first moved to Carroll County, I was intrigued about the REMC memberowned concept,” Bender said. “In the early 1980s, I remember attending a Carroll County REMC Annual Meeting at Carroll High School. At that time, many of the REMC directors were people I was acquainted with, and I remember thinking that I may be interested in serving in that director role someday.” That someday began with a position on the Operation Round Up® board. “In 2005, Operation Round Up was initiated at Carroll County REMC, and my local director, Don Willy, asked me to represent the district on that board,” Bender said. “I enjoyed that experience, and I had the opportunity to learn more about how REMC worked. “In 2008, when my district director retired, I ran for the open position, along with a number of other individuals,” noted Bender. “Fortunately, I was chosen at the local district meeting to represent the district, and I was elected to serve at the 2008 Annual Meeting.” This was the beginning of Bender’s commitment to his role as an REMC board member. “Each month at the REMC board meetings, I am so impressed with the engagement of each director,” Bender said. “Over my professional career, I’ve had the opportunity to serve on a number of different boards. At REMC, the board truly cares and wishes to serve each member in a fair and equitable fashion.”

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MARCH 2019

The Carroll White REMC junior board of directors attended and learned from the REMC board of directors during a recent meeting. Carroll White REMC board president Kevin Bender (right) shares some thoughts with the junior board president, Andrew Schoen.

FROM BANKING TO THE BOARDROOM

ways to constantly improve on what we do to become more efficient.”

A Purdue University graduate, Bender was initially employed at Camden State Bank before moving to Bank of Wolcott where he has worked for 26 years. “Obviously, my background and training is in lending and finance,” he said. “I feel I bring a strong financial and business management skillset to the REMC boardroom.

Bender has no doubt the REMC will accomplish that mission. “The team at CW REMC is fully committed to serving each and every member fairly, equitably and efficiently,” he said.

“As a banker for the past 38 years, my career had been fully ingrained in the for-profit model,” Bender said. “I need to wear a different hat in the REMC boardroom since it is a non-profit entity. We work to sell LESS of our product by educating our members.”

serving the needs of others.

The cooperative principles are the boardroom guidelines. “One cooperative principle, ‘Cooperation among cooperatives’ is so impressive and dramatically different from the competitive banking field that I live in daily,” Bender said.

communities. Likewise

“CW REMC board members need to continue to focus on decisions which allow the co-op to deliver dependable power to our members in the most cost effective and safest fashion,” said Bender. “We’re charged with effective management of that portion of the members’ dollars beyond the raw cost of power. We need to continue to find

I enjoy working with teams I’ve got a great team at Bank of Wolcott, and we daily strive to best serve the financial needs of our at Carroll White REMC, CEO Randy W. Price has assembled a team second to none. I enjoy working sideby-side with each of them and my fellow directors in serving our members.

KEVIN BENDER, CW REMC Board President


Guatemala Bassett headed to

On March 24, Carroll White REMC Journeyman Lineman Matt Bassett will travel to Guatemala to help bring electricity to a developing area of the impoverished Central American country.

MATT BASSETT

“REMCs have a rich history of bringing electricity to areas that are not served,” Bassett said. “In our country, people look at having electricity as a right. It is really a privilege.” Bassett is volunteering through Project Indiana, an initiative spearheaded through Indiana Electric Cooperatives (IEC) “to empower global communities one village at a time for a better tomorrow.” The crew of 14 lineworkers will spend approximately two weeks electrifying the village of San Jacinto in east central Guatemala. When the project is complete, approximately 110 homes, a school and clinic will have electricity for the first time. The power for the village will be generated from a hydroelectric facility in the region.

2013. He recently graduated from the Indiana Electric Cooperatives’ Rural Electric Apprenticeship Program (REAP). With 21 other lineworkers, Bassett earned an associate of applied science degree and a Journeyman Lineman Certificate. REAP is a four-year program that professionally trains apprentice lineworkers from across Indiana. Graduates complete 576 hours of classroom-related study and 8,000 hours of on-the-job training at their electric cooperative. They also complete four additional classes through Ivy Tech Community College. CW REMC CEO Randy W. Price is proud not only of Bassett’s achievement in REAP but also his involvement in Project Indiana. “We are proud that he embraces the cooperative spirit in wanting to help others. As a young husband and dad, Matt is to be commended for his willingness to be part of Project Indiana,” Price said. “Like the CW REMC lineworkers who have had this experience, Matt will return from Guatemala with renewed dedication and insight.”

“I wanted to be part of this project to help people,” Bassett said. “It is a little intimidating to be out of Indiana, but it is exciting to think about bringing electricity to a third world country.”

Bassett is the son of Ron and Kathy Bassett. His dad worked for NIPSCO. Bassett said he appreciated his father’s hard work and his dedication to his job and family.

RECENT APPRENTICESHIP PROGRAM GRADUATE

He and his wife, Alena, live in Carroll County and have two sons, Caston, age 7, and Jettson, 2 ½.

Bassett has worked at the REMC since

Matt Kent, a CW REMC lineman, works during a storm on a previous Project Indiana trip.

Co-ops’ fourth trip to Guatemala In 2012, 28 Hoosier lineworkers from 17 REMCs spent four weeks working across mountainous terrain to bring electricity to 184 homes, a church and school in three villages. In 2015, 14 lineworkers battled extreme heat and rugged landscapes to give electricity to 164 homes, a school and church. In 2017, 14 Hoosiers endured extreme temperatures to power 68 homes, a school, a church and health clinic.

Bassett recently completed his apprenticeship and became a journeyman lineman. Shown at his graduation are, from left, Line Superintendent Tim Bowley, Director of Operations Mark Jargstorf, Bassett, Line Superintendent Travis Curts and CEO Randy W. Price.

MARCH 2019

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co-op news

Sign up for new program and receive bill credits! You can save up to $40 by participating in the new Power Shift demand response unit programs offered by Carroll White REMC.

Together our small change makes a difference!

SUPPORT OPERATION ROUND UP Operation Round Up participants put their nickels and dimes to work each month for the good of our community. Customers who volunteer for the program will have their electric bills rounded up to the next dollar each month. For example, rather than paying $61.75, you would pay an even $62, with the extra 25 cents going into the Operation Round Up fund.

During 2019, you can receive a $30 annual credit by allowing a switch to be installed either on your central air conditioner or your pool pump. Have switches installed on both and earn $60. There will be a $10 bill credit in June, July and August. You will also receive a $10 bill credit when the demand response unit is successfully installed. That’s $40 in bill credits! We will also be offering switches for irrigation systems we well.

If you are able to participate in Operation Round Up®, please complete and return this card to Carroll White REMC. You can send it with your payment, drop it by either the Delphi or Monticello office, call in to join program or sign up on SmartHub at www.cwremc.coop. Quarterly updates will appear in this monthly magazine to inform you about the latest distributions Operation Round Up has made in our communities. Please enter information below exactly as it appears on your statement.

This switch helps members minimize long-term ener-

NAME: ____________________________________________

gy costs by adjusting their energy consumption during

ADDRESS: _________________________________________

specific times. Together, with switches already installed, more than 53 megawatts of energy can be saved. That’s

CITY: ________________ STATE: _____ ZIP: _____________

electricity we don’t have to buy and power plants we don’t

REMC ACCOUNT NUMBER(S): ________________________

have to build. This helps keep everyone’s long-term energy costs lower.

SIGNATURE: _______________________________________

For more details, call Carroll White REMC at 800-844-7161.

DATE: _____________________________________________

These Power Shift additions will only be offered through the end of March! Sign up now for bill credits this summer!

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MARCH 2019

We thank you for your contribution.


insurance and you could save.

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Some discounts, coverages, payment plans and features are not available in all states, in all GEICO companies, or in all situations. Boat and PWC coverages are underwritten by GEICO Marine Insurance Company. Homeowners, renters and condo coverages are written through non-affiliated insurance companies and are secured through the GEICO Insurance Agency, Inc. Motorcycle and ATV coverages are underwritten by GEICO Indemnity Company. GEICO is a registered service mark of Government Employees Insurance Company, Washington, DC 20076; a Berkshire Hathaway Inc. subsidiary. Š 2018 GEICO


energy

MEASURING UP THE COMPETITION

What should you look for in a quality contractor? Disclaimer: The Energy column provides general information to help you manage your energy costs. Some electric cooperatives may not offer all the programs mentioned in this column. With spring comes a natural desire to remodel our homes or perhaps even build a new abode. Often during this time of year, the energy experts at electric cooperatives receive desperate phone calls from members asking “Could you recommend a contractor?” Unfortunately, I’m not aware of any electric cooperative that conducts certifications, evaluations or testing that would result in that objective response. So any advice you would get from a co-op employee is going to be subjective. At my electric cooperative, for many years the standard response about contractors has been: “We do not conduct evaluations for maintaining a list of preferred contractors.” Unfortunately, this answer does not help members search for a reliable, topnotch contractor. So, I’ve developed the following method for selecting the best person for the job. Seek out people you know who have hired a contractor in the past. Ask them the following questions. If

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MARCH 2019

you’re satisfied with their answers, they can refer you to a contractor who can get the job done for you.

1

When you chose a contractor to perform your work and set the date, did the contractor show up on the agreed upon date? If you have to take off from work or rearrange your day to be there, the “no show” contractor is not only inconsiderate of your time, but he/she can cost you additional money. Good contractors keep their appointments.

2

When your contractor’s employees showed up at your home, were they professional in appearance, demeanor, appropriate uniform, etc.? Were you relieved when they left? Good contractors address these issues effectively with their employees before they allow them to work in your home for you.

3

When your contractor finished his/her work, did everything work correctly or look good upon leaving? Or were one or more callbacks necessary to finally have the equipment operating (or fixed) properly? These answers

implicate contractors’ skill levels. Good contractors continually invest in training to be effective and pull additional resources as necessary.

4

When they finished the work, did they inadvertently damage another feature in your home? Did they clean up any debris from the work effort and remove it from your home? Answers to these concerns indicate work habits and a respect for your home. Good contractors leave no indication of having been in your home when they are finished other than the results of their good work.

5

When you received a proposal from your contractor, was a copy of his certificate of insurance willingly provided? Homeowners would be wise to predetermine the working arrangement they are going to have in getting their desired work done. Many homeowners may possibly and inadvertently enter into an employer (homeowner) / employee (worker) relationship when they have someone work for them on the “side.” This relationship has legal

implications regarding liability and workmen’s compensation insurance that can be complicated and result in unpleasant long term outcomes. Contractors who provide you with a certificate of insurance are putting you at ease in demonstrating they have the business insurance in force to protect you from risks in these areas. Uninsured contractors, while putting homeowners at risk for issues they may want no part of, will many times have lower proposal amounts for performing the work. Business insurance is not cheap, and homeowners would be prudent to determine if the contractor they want working in their home has it.

6

Finally, was your project completed on time and according to budget? If not, why so? Be sure to always ask the tough questions to ensure you are getting the best quality customer service. If you receive what you consider appropriate answers to these questions, you should have the name of the “preferred” contractor you originally called your electric cooperative for and the one you want to do business with.

by

Bob Geswein

Retired Employee of Harrison REMC Corydon, Indiana GUEST COLUMNIST


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insights

letter

T O THE E DITOR HANDY MOM In regard to the “Cheap Tricks” article about household hacks in the January issue: My mother was way ahead of her time in utilizing space and recycling... When Mom and Dad were adding on to our small home, Mom utilized the space between the 2x4s. Instead of plasterboard on both sides of a dividing wall, she put plaster board on one side and left the other side for paneling or plywood. The paneling side would become cabinet doors. Upon opening the doors in the hallway, you would find small wooden shelves just the size to hold processed cheese (Velveeta) boxes. After painting the boxes, she labeled them “Birthday,” “Get Well,” “Stationary,” etc. Band Aid boxes were painted and labeled “Stamps,” “Rubber Bands,” “Paper Clips,” etc. Another had the stud removed in the lower half (and boxed in) so the card table fit securely. My bedroom wall was the “masterpiece.” She lined the space between the studs with pink satin. It was tacked around the edges with small nails running through pearls. These pearls also supported the glass shelves. There were hanging gold cup hooks, too. She loved reading Erma Bombeck and Heloise, but, personally, I think she ranked right up there with them. My dad would tell this story: As he sat reading the paper or watching TV, company came. They walked through the utility room with the washer and dryer, freezer, etc. As they joined him in the other room, one asked, “So what is your wife doing with the circular saw in the utility room?” He just laughed. She was actually cutting between two more studs to add another cabinet. She knew where the electric lines were because they had built the wall. This time the space was just the right depth to hold a box of powdered laundry detergent and cleaning supplies. Those cabinets became the home to hair clippers, sponges, shoestrings, etc.

from Kay Miller, Tipmont REMC

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FEBRUARY 2019

Hope, opportunity and progress possible through Project Indiana Indiana Electric Cooperatives’ Project Indiana initiative, which is changing lives in rural Guatemala, proves that by working together, amazing things are possible. Residents of El Zapotillo, the village which Indiana linemen electrified in March 2017, will always remember the last time Project Indiana volunteers came to Guatemala. One villager noted, “It doesn’t look like El Zapotillo, It looks like another village. And, it’s all because the cooperatives with a good heart gave us a hand.” Learn more about what happened in El Zapotillo and hear direct from the linemen what that trip meant to them through this video: bit.ly/2WG9TFz. Learn how you can help at ProjectIndiana.org.

Bill would extend historic trail In mid-January, Sen. Todd Young reintroduced the Eastern Legacy Extension Act, a bill that would extend the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail from St. Louis, Missouri, to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. This extension includes all of Indiana’s southern border along the Ohio River and would travel through seven states: Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky, Missouri, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia. “The Eastern Legacy Extension Act honors the important legacy of the Lewis and Clark trail in Indiana,” Young said. “The extension of the trail will help educate Americans on the historic Lewis and Clark partnership, and will boost tourism in the areas of Indiana that the trail crosses through.”

On Oct. 15, 1803, Merriweather Lewis joined William Clark in Clarksville, Indiana, near the Falls of the Ohio. They were captains of the Corps of Discovery, a specially established unit of the United States Army whose mission was to explore the West. Eleven days later the Corps departed Indiana via the Ohio River for St. Louis. In February 2018, the National Park Service (NPS) released a Lewis & Clark Extension study that noted the historical and cultural importance of the Ohio River to their journey, and the importance of Indiana, where Lewis and Clark’s expedition “began in earnest.” The Eastern Legacy Extension Act reflects the NPS study and honors the importance of states like Indiana to this famous partnership.


insights

Deadline for entries March 22 Student artists have until March 22 to

A first place artist will be selected for

enter the Cooperative Calendar of Student

each grade and will receive $200. The

Art Contest. Winning entries and nine

artwork of each grade level winner will

honorable mention-winning artworks

illustrate either the cover or one month

will appear in the 2020 student art

of the calendar. Honorable mention

calendar sponsored by Indiana’s electric

award winners and will receive $75. Their

cooperatives.

artwork will appear in a special section of

Artwork should be sent to: Cooperative Calendar of Student Art, 8888 Keystone Crossing, Suite 1600, Indianapolis, IN 46240. A complete set of rules and required entry forms are available at

www.indianaconnection.org/ for-youth/2020-contest.

the calendar. An “Artist of the Year� will be selected from among the first place winners and will receive an additional $100. Judges will also select merit winners who will receive certificates. Contact either Emily Schilling (317-4872241) or Richard G. Biever (317-4872242) at Indiana Connection if you have questions about the art contest.

FEBRUARY 2019

13


county feature

St. Joseph County Two feast days this month make St. Joseph County a divine choice to feature. The first is March 17 — St. Patrick’s Day. The county on the Michigan border, of course, is home to the renowned University of Notre Dame, whose athletic teams are known as “The Fighting Irish.” The pugilistic leprechaun with raised dukes as well as shamrocks abound around the school’s famed dome of gold. Two days later, March 19, is celebrated as the principal feast day of St. Joseph, the earthly father of Jesus Christ. The St. Joseph River flows through the county (before making its famous “south bend” back to the north) and the county.

y t n u o C acts F FOUNDED: 1830

NAMED FOR: St. Joseph River POPULATION: 270,434 (2017) COUNTY SEAT: South Bend NOTED FOR: University of Notre Dame Studebaker National Museum South Bend Chocolate Company Potato Creek State Park

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MARCH 2019

The St. Joseph River was the area’s life blood long before Indiana statehood and the arrival of Europeans on the continent. The river was used as a major trade and migration route for the indigenous tribes that lived in the area for thousands of years. Then, it was used by French fur traders and explorers in the late 1600s. The river, which flows into Lake Michigan north of the Indiana state line, was called “Sakiwäsipi” (outlet river) by the Native Americans in the area. Its meaning is also translated as “Coming-out River” — and is where the Miami tribe says it emerged as a distinct people. While the father of Christ is prominent for the county and river, the famed university was named for the Blessed Virgin Mary, the mother of Jesus. In 1842, Father Edward Sorin, a French priest, founded the University of Notre Dame, located north of South Bend. Notre Dame became an intrinsic part of the area and continues to have a great effect on South Bend’s culture

and economy. Saint Mary’s College and Holy Cross College are also located in the unincorporated area of Notre Dame. Notre Dame remains a private, non-profit, Catholic-based college with about 8,600 undergraduate students and is consistently recognized among the best universities in the nation. Aided by the success of Notre Dame’s football team in the early 1900s, Notre Dame achieved international fame and is ingrained in college football folklore. Notre Dame officially adopted the nickname “Fighting Irish” for its athletic teams in 1927. Multiple stories exist for how it received the moniker, but it’s generally believed the press coined the nickname for the never-say-die fighting spirit of the Notre Dame athletic teams. While Irish culture surrounds the campus, St. Joseph County is home to a large population of Polish Catholic descent. Dyngus Day, a Polish feast of fun and frivolity the day after Easter, is also celebrated by the South Bend/ Mishawaka communities. The St. Joseph River continued shaping South Bend’s economy through the mid-20th century. River access assisted heavy industrial development such as the Studebaker Corporation, the Oliver Chilled Plow Company, and other large corporations. Though the Studebaker auto plant closed in the late 1950s, a national museum in South Bend pays tribute to its workers and legacy. South Bend is also home to The Potawatomi Zoo, which opened in 1902 and is the oldest zoo in the state. In southwestern St. Joseph County, Potato Creek State Park provides abundant outdoor activities and is noted for its bicycling trails.


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Indiana eats

Square meals

Delicious food with a hometown feel

I

The square 111 S. Main St. Columbia City 46725 260-244-4011

n small cities and towns

great customer service to its

covered with an array of

all around America, the

patrons.

options including prime rib

MONDAY–WEDNESDAY:

and an 8-ounce filet. New to

11 a.m. to 9 p.m.

the menu are a tuna tataki

THURSDAY–SATURDAY:

appetizer and a tuna steak

11 a.m. to 10 p.m.

town square is the heart of

the community. It’s a gathering place for area residents and offers an opportunity for locally owned stores and restaurants to conveniently serve customers and thrive. Columbia City’s town square features the aptly named eatery, The Square. Located in a historic building right across from the Whitley County courthouse, the restaurant has been in business since 2013. In March of last year, Carmin and Trent Hammons purchased the restaurant and have continued to provide delicious meals and

Chicken Breast Sandwich with Bacon, Swiss and Honey Mustard

16

MARCH 2019

“We take pride in our food and in our customer service. We want everyone to feel like they’re at home when they walk in,” Carmin said. The Square gained a following soon after its opening and has since become a bona fide favorite for locals and area residents. Diners can feast on appetizers (such as hot pepper cheese curds

entree.

SUNDAY:

State Rep. Christopher Judy

11 a.m. to 8 p.m.

(District 83) counts the

www.facebook.com/ the-square411766649281175

restaurant as a favorite and touts its lunch and dinner menus. “It’s a great gathering place for business meals or dinner with family,” Judy said.

ABOUT STATE REP. JUDY: Rep. Christopher Judy (R) serves

and wings), soups, salads,

Judy’s positive review is

sandwiches, and burgers.

echoed by TripAdvisor. The

Entrees include a variety of

travel and restaurant website

of Whitley and Allen counties.

tasty chicken, seafood, pasta

ranked The Square as the

He serves as vice chair of the

and “south of the border”

number one restaurant in

dishes. In the mood for a

Columbia City.

steak? The Square has diners

Flat Iron Steak

District 83 which includes portions

Veterans Affairs and Public Safety committee. He also serves on the Elections and Apportionment and Insurance committees.

Grilled Chicken Salad

Tuna Tataki


food

y o ah

S P I CH

Potato Chips ON ANOTHER LEVEL

Sweet and Salty Cookies

Potato Chip Fried Fish

by Doris Voelkel, Dubois, Indiana

by Patricia Piekarski, Harvey, Illinois

1 cup white sugar

1 lb. fresh or frozen fish fillets

1 cup brown sugar

1 egg, beaten

1 cup shortening

2 T. water

1 t. vanilla

⅔ cup crushed potato chips

2 eggs

¼ cup shortening or cooking oil

2 cups flour ½ cup chopped nuts

Thaw fish if frozen. Pat dry.

1 t. baking soda

Combine egg and water. Put chips

¼ t. salt (optional)

in another dish. Dip fish in egg

2 cups crushed potato chips

mixture, then coat with potato

Mix ingredients in the order listed.

shortening or oil. Add fish. Fry 3-4

Drop by teaspoonfuls on cookie sheet.

minutes, then turn and fry other side

Bake at 350 F for 8-10 minutes.

the same way.

chips. In a large pan, heat ¼ cup

MARCH 2019

17


food FO O D PREPARED BY I NDI ANA CO NNECT I O N S TA FF PHO TO S BY RI CHARD G . B I E V E R

Potato Chip Pork Chops by Marilles Mauer, Greensburg, Indiana 1 t. onion powder 1 t. garlic powder ¼ t. kosher salt ½ t. pepper 4 pork chops ¼ cup flour ¼ cup buttermilk 1 egg 1⅓ cups coarsely chopped potato chips Preheat oven to 375 F. Combine the onion powder, garlic powder, kosher salt and pepper in a small bowl. Liberally season both sides of each pork chop with the seasoning mixture. Dredge the seasoned pork chops in flour. In a medium bowl, whisk the egg into the buttermilk, Dip floured pork chops in the buttermilk and egg mixture. Place the potato chips into a shallow pan and dredge the pork chops to coat completely. Place the pork chops on a greased baking sheet and bake for 25-30 minutes, flipping halfway through. Broil until

Pulled Pork Potato Chip Nachos by Charlotte Rymph, Monterey, Indiana

browned if desired. 4 cups (approximately) kettle cooked potato chips

Place potato chips in a cast iron

1 cup barbecue pulled pork (purchased or homemade), heated

Equally divide pulled pork over the

1 cup grated cheddar cheese

Place under broiler on high until

½ cup chopped and seeded tomatoes ¼ cup chopped scallions Your favorite nacho toppings such as sour cream, jalapeños, chopped onion and black olives

18

MARCH 2019

skillet or rimmed baking sheet. chips and then cover with cheese. cheese is bubbly. Remove and top with your favorite nacho toppings. Serve immediately. Makes about 2 servings Cook’s note: The kettle cooked chips seem to be more sturdy or you can try the “wavy” style.


Tomato Talk Keep your eyes on the heirloom prize

MARCH 2019

19


BY BRIAN D. SMITH Call me Mr. Tomato Head. That’s the nickname I earned in a previous job after gathering ripe tomatoes from my backyard garden at the crack of dawn, hauling them to my downtown Indianapolis office, and tempting my co-workers with the offer, “Free to good homes!” And these were no run-of-the-mill ’maters, mind you. For more than two decades I’ve almost exclusively grown sweet, juicy, old-fashioned varieties with funny names, shapes and colors – otherwise known as heirlooms. Technically speaking, they’re also open-pollinated, which means that unlike hybrids, they produce seeds that grow true to the original. If you’ve never heard of tomatoes such as Mortgage Lifter, Arkansas Traveler, Cherokee Purple and Hillbilly Potato Leaf, then it’s time to grab a No. 2 pencil and notepad, pull up a tomato crate and find out what Mr. Tomato Head can do for you. Let’s get one thing settled: I claim no formal expertise in the ways of the tomato. If you aced a Master Gardener class at your local extension office and want to challenge me to a test of horticultural knowledge, you’ll probably win. But look me up in August and we’ll see how your tomatoes compare to mine in a taste test. Fair warning: I’ve had chefs from prestigious Central Indiana restaurants offer to buy my heirlooms if I could grow them in greater quantities (which, unfortunately, I can’t without digging up most of my backyard). Heck, my tomatoes even won top prize at the Conner Prairie Country Fair.

20

MARCH 2019


You’re undoubtedly wondering how

Wow – so this was the way tomatoes

I transformed from a mild-mannered

really tasted? I felt like Dorothy in

consumer of store-bought tomatoes

“The Wizard of Oz” when she stepped

into Mr. Tomato Head. Well, it didn’t

through the door of her sepia sur-

happen overnight.

roundings into a world transformed

if you want it done right My passion for tomatoes took root

by Technicolor. Every home garden I grew from then on included tomato plants.

with the first tomato plants I ever grew,

But my graduation from college led

as a boy of maybe 13. Until then my

to nearly two decades of apartment

concept of tomatoes came from the red

living, during which I never planted

tennis balls my family purchased at the

another garden. It took a disappoint-

local grocery and the soggy slices that

ing stop at a roadside stand to send

slithered between the buns of my fast-

me back to the soil.

food burgers.

October 1995, shortly after I bought

ban backyard of my Franklin home, I

a house (my first) in New Whiteland.

spaded a strip of our concrete soil into

A tempting display of ripe, farm-grown

a small garden and dropped a couple

tomatoes coaxed me off a nearby

of tomato seedlings into the space.

rural road, and I was soon opening my

Two months later I proudly harvested

wallet and carting home my anticipat-

my first tomato. But as I lifted that

ed delights. Instead, I bit into the same

first slice to my lips, I was wholly

blandness that usually seeped out of

unprepared for the explosion of sweet

their store-bought cousins.

buds.

HEIRLOOM TOMATOES Pink Brandywine Cherokee Purple Mortgage Lifter Great White Pineapple

The fateful incident occurred in

But that summer, in the modest subur-

juiciness that would tantalize my taste

Brian’s five favorite

Exasperated, I realized the veracity of the classic expression: “If you want something done right, do it yourself.” The following May again found me in shovel-wielding stance, attacking the backyard dirt with a renewed sense of purpose as I cleared space for hybrid seedlings such as Jet Star and Celebrity. I was pleased with the initial results, but not overjoyed.

MARCH 2019

21


Truth be told, despite the improved

I was an instant convert: The following

Don’t fall for the hype of hybrids, and

flavor of my homegrown bounty, I

year, I left most of the hybrids on

don’t even approach the ripe, uniform-

couldn’t shake the nagging feeling

the garden center shelf (except for

looking imposters that beckon from

that my latter-day versions still hadn’t

hybrids Better Boy and Big Boy, which

the produce section of your local

matched the scrumptiousness of the

are worth including for their taste,

grocery. Make this the summer you go

ones I’d grown in my youth. Or was it

hardiness and prolific qualities). And

old school and discover the tabletop

just the fog of nostalgia?

I’ve never reconsidered.

treat that was once known as the love

from hybrids to heirlooms My interest in heirloom tomatoes began a year later, thanks to an article in a sister magazine I once edited as part of my Senior Editor duties at Indianapolis Monthly magazine.

If you’re ready to get in the game, March is the month to begin growing

When you pluck that first ripe heirloom

tomato plants indoors. Purdue Uni-

from the vine and discover what

versity Cooperative Extensive Service

tomatoes really taste like, you’ll roll

recommends planting seeds 7 weeks

your eyes, smack your lips, raise your

before the last frost date in your area.

glass and say, “Thanks, Mr. Tomato

In Central Indiana, that’s generally ear-

Head!”

ly to mid-May; your mileage may vary.

Brian D. Smith is a freelance journalist from Greenwood.

I’d never heard the term “heirloom”

But why bother with indoor planting?

associated with garden produce, but I

Unless your

was instantly fascinated with the story

garden has

of Seed Savers Exchange, an Iowa

room for dozens of

nonprofit with a mission of preserving

plants, or you

the seeds of historic plants.

happen to enjoy the

That spring, my new-found interest of heirlooms prompted me to take home a quirky-looking tomato plant with potato-leaf foliage and a compelling story. The tag on the Pink Brandywine identified it as an 1886 Amish heirloom, which convinced me that it deserved garden space alongside the common hybrids I’d already purchased. (I’ve since learned that Brandywine’s Amish connection is dubious, but the “heirloom” description alone was enough to win me over.) Like a taste test arranged by Mother Nature, my first ripe tomatoes of the season appeared simultaneously on two plants – the Beefmaster and the Brandywine. Sampling the Beefmaster brought a satisfied smile. But the Brandywine was magic in my mouth, a staggering sensory overload of sweet goodness.

22

MARCH 2019

apple.

DIY side of growing, I recommend letting someone else do the dirty work – literally. Come May, you can browse farmers’ markets, garden centers and even tomato grower websites for potted tomato plants that trip your trigger (yes, some out-of-state merchants ship live plants). My five favorites are Pink Brandywine, Cherokee Purple, Mortgage Lifter, Great White and Pineapple (as in tomato). You can also use these next two months to plan and prepare your garden and obtain necessary supplies – and to study my Ten Tomato Tips available online at IndianaConnection.org. It often is more economical and convenient to grow tomatoes from plants. Buying the biggest plant you can find will pay for itself by delivering an extra week or two of fresh tomatoes.


FIELD OF FLOWERS Pollinators are abuzz for the ‘Perennial of the Year’ A growing concern for years, especially for those in the world of agriculture, has been the marked decline of bee populations necessary for pollination of plants and crops. That concern was dialed upward last year with the addition of the rusty patch bumblebee to the list of endangered species. It is the first bee to be so designated and protected by the federal Endangered Species Act. By selecting Stachys officinalis “Hummelo” as its “2019 Perennial Plant of the Year,” the Perennial Plant Association continues its focus on pollinator-friendly plants. Hummelo is a compact, clumpforming perennial, reaching 1.5 to 2 feet tall and wide. Over time, the plants will form a dense mat,

spreading slowly from creeping underground stems. Showy magenta flower spikes rise well above the foliage in midsummer and are quite attractive to butterflies, bees and other pollinators. Plants are hardy in USDA Hardiness zones 4-8 and appear to be trouble-free. Plants perform best in full sun and well-drained soil. Hummelo was the highest rated Stachys in the Chicago Botanic Garden Evaluation Trials for its strong

‘Hummelo’ means ‘bee’ friendly • Hardiness: USDA Zones 4 to 8 (Indiana is in Zones 5 and 6), foliage may remain evergreen in warmer climates. • Light: Full sun to part shade. • Soil: Well drained soil; water as necessary. • Uses: This colorful and compact winner makes an excellent addition to the full sun perennial border. Terrific in combination with ornamental grasses, Echinacea purpurea, and Asclepias tuberosa (2018 Perennial Plant of the Year®). Wiry stems make for a great cut flower as well. • Unique Qualities: Pollinators can’t resist the striking midsummer spikes of magenta flowers rising above bright green, trouble-free foliage. Hummelo was the highest rated Stachys in the Chicago Botanic Garden Evaluation Trials for its strong flower production, vigor, habit, quality and winter hardiness. • Maintenance: Spreads slowly by creeping rhizomes. May benefit from division every few years. Strong stems and seed heads add to winter interest. Considered deer-resistant!

flower production, vigor, habit, quality and winter hardiness. SOURCE: B. Rosie Lerner, Purdue Extension consumer horticulturist For more, please stroll through our website for an enhanced garden of stories at IndianaConnection.org.

ABOUT THE PPA The Perennial Plant Association selects a different perennial plant each year to promote throughout the nursery and gardening industry. PPA is a trade association composed of international growers, retailers, landscape designers and contractors, educators, and others who are professionally involved in the herbaceous perennial industry. Members nominate plants based on several criteria, including low maintenance needs, adaptability to a wide range of climates, pest and disease resistance, wide availability, multiple seasons of interest, and ease of propagation. For more information about the Perennial of the Year program, see www.perennialplant.org. MARCH 2019

23


government

Legislature tackles issues important to electric co-ops

2019 legislative session

By Scott Bowers Indiana’s 2019 legislative session kicked off three days into the new year. The first order of business: the seating of 21 new members of the Indiana General Assembly who joined 129 returning members. Since this is a legislative budget year, state legislators are primarily focused on

22 new members of the Indiana General Assembly (joining 128 returning members)

setting the state’s financial priorities for the next two years. Earlier this session, Gov. Eric Holcomb and legislative leaders identified several areas which will likely receive increased state funding when the new fiscal year starts on July 1. Those areas are: the Indiana Department of Child Services, teacher pay, and school safety programs Progress is being made on several key issues important to Indiana’s electric cooperatives. Rural broadband continues to garner the greatest amount of interest. Several

Areas likely to receive increased funding this year Teacher Pay

broadband-related bills were filed at the beginning of session and a few currently remain under consideration. Last fall, the governor announced the state’s $100 million investment to help deploy broadband in rural Indiana. State Sen. Mark Messmer (District 48) has authored a bill which would establish a rural broadband fund. This fund would award grants to support the broadband

School Safety Programs

initiative. Ensuring the safety of cooperative employees remains a priority for Indiana Electric Cooperatives and local electric cooperatives like yours. That’s why Indiana’s electric cooperatives support legislation authored by State Sen. Eric

Indiana Department of Child Services

Koch (District 44). Koch’s bill would enhance the classification and penalties for people convicted of intimidation against utility workers. Electric cooperatives also continue to support legislation that would enhance rural Indiana’s overall economic development environment. A bill authored by State Rep. Ed Soliday (District 4) would ensure state and local incentives are in place to make Indiana a more attractive site for data centers. These centers are remote storage facilities for large amounts of data.

issues indiana’s electric cooperatives are watching Broadband Development

Scott Bowers is vice president of government relations at Indiana Electric Cooperatives.

24

MARCH 2019

Increased Penalties for Intimidation Against Utility Workers


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Leading Acid Reflux Pill Becomes an AntiAging Phenomenon Clinical studies show breakthrough acid reflux treatment also helps maintain vital health and helps protect users from the serious conditions that accompany aging such as fatigue and poor cardiovascular health

by David Waxman Seattle Washington: A clinical study on a leading acid reflux pill shows that its key ingredient relieves digestive symptoms while suppressing the inflammation that contributes to premature aging in men and women. And, if consumer sales are any indication of a product’s effectiveness, this ‘acid reflux pill turned anti-aging phenomenon’ is nothing short of a miracle. Sold under the brand name AloeCure, it was already backed by clinical data documenting its ability to provide all day and night relief from heartburn, acid reflux, constipation, irritable bowel, gas, bloating, and more. But soon doctors started reporting some incredible results… “With AloeCure, my patients started reporting less joint pain, more energy, better sleep, stronger immune systems… even less stress and better skin, hair, and nails” explains Dr. Liza Leal; a leading integrative health specialist and company spokesperson. AloeCure contains an active ingredient that helps improve digestion by acting as a natural acid-buffer that improves the pH balance of your stomach. Scientists now believe that this acid imbalance is what contributes to painful inflammation throughout the rest of the body. The daily allowance of AloeCure has shown to calm this inflammation which is why AloeCure is so effective. Relieving other stressful symptoms related to GI health like pain, bloating, fatigue, cramping, constipation, diarrhea, heartburn, and nausea. Now, backed with new clinical studies, AloeCure is being recommended by doctors everywhere to help improve digestion, calm painful inflammation, soothe joint pain, and even reduce the appearance of wrinkles – helping patients to look and feel decades younger.

FIX YOUR GUT & FIGHT INFLAMMATION

Since hitting the market, sales for AloeCure have taken off and there are some very good reasons why. To start, the clinical studies have been impressive. Participants taking the active ingredient in AloeCure saw a stunning 100% improvement in digestive symptoms, which includes fast and lasting relief from reflux. Users also experienced higher energy levels and endurance, relief from chronic discomfort and better sleep. Some even reported healthier looking skin, hair, and nails. A healthy gut is the key to a reducing swell-

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which results in inflammation in the rest of the body. The recommended daily allowance of acemannan in AloeCure has been proven to support digestive health, and calm painful inflammation without side effects or drugs. This would explain why so many users are experiencing impressive results so quickly.

REVITALIZE YOUR ENTIRE BODY

With daily use, AloeCure helps users look and feel decades younger and defend against some of the painful inflammation that accompanies aging and can make life hard. By buffering stomach acid and restoring gut health, AloeCure calms painful inflammation EXCITING RESULTS FROM PATIENTS and will help improve digestion… soothe aching To date over 5 million bottles of AloeCure have joints… reduce the appearance of wrinkles and been sold, and the community seeking non-phar- help restore hair and nails … manage cholesterma therapy for their GI health continues to grow. ol and oxidative stress… and improve sleep and According to Dr. Leal, her patients are ab- brain function… without side effects or expense. solutely thrilled with their results and are often Readers can now reclaim their energy, vitalishocked by how fast it works. ty, and youth regardless of age or current level of “For the first time in years, they are free from health. concerns about their digestion and almost every other aspect of their health,” says Dr. Leal, “and I One AloeCure Capsule Daily recommend it to everyone who wants to improve GI health without resorting to drugs, surgery, or • Helps End Digestion Nightmares OTC medications.” • Helps Calm Painful Inflammation “I was always in ‘indigestion hell.’ Doctors • Soothes Stiff & Aching Joints put me on all sorts of antacid remedies. Nothing • Reduces appearance of Wrinkles worked. Dr. Leal recommended I try AloeCure. & Increases Elasticity And something remarkable happened… Not only were all the issues I had with my stomach gone • Manages Cholesterol & Oxidative completely gone – but I felt less joint pain and I Stress was able to actually sleep through the night.” • Supports Healthy Immune System With so much positive feedback, it’s easy to see • Improves Sleep & Brain Function why the community of believers is growing and sales for the new pill are soaring.

THE SCIENCE BEHIND ALOECURE

HOW TO GET ALOECURE

Due to the enormous interest consumers have AloeCure is a pill that’s taken just once daily. shown in AloeCure, the company has decided to The pill is small. Easy to swallow. There are no extend their nationwide savings event for a little harmful side effects and it does not require a pre- while longer. Here’s how it works... scription. Call the AloeCure number and speak to a live The active ingredient is a rare Aloe Vera com- person in the US. Callers will be greeted by a ponent known as acemannan. knowledgeable and friendly person approved to Made from of 100% organic Aloe Vera, Aloe- offer up to 3 FREE bottles of AloeCure with your Cure uses a proprietary process that results in the order. AloeCure’s Toll-Free number is 1-800-591highest quality, most bio-available levels of ace- 2946. Only a limited discounted supply of Aloemannan known to exist. Cure is currently available. According to Dr. Leal and several of her colConsumers who miss out on the current prodleagues, improving the pH balance of your stomach uct inventory will have to wait until more becomes and restoring gut health is the key to revitalizing your available and that could take weeks. They will entire body. also not be guaranteed any additional savings. The When your digestive system isn’t healthy, it company advises not to wait. Call 1-800-591-2946 causes unwanted stress on your immune system, today.

THESE STATEMENTS HAVE NOT BEEN EVALUATED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION. THIS PRODUCT IS NOT INTENDED TO DIAGNOSE, TREAT, CURE, OR PREVENT ANY DISEASE. ALL DOCTORS MENTIONED ARE REMUNERATED FOR THEIR SERVICES. ALL CLINICAL STUDIES ON ALOECURE’S ACTIVE INGREDIENT WERE INDEPENDENTLY CONDUCTED AND WERE NOT SPONSORED BY THE AMERICAN GLOBAL HEALTH GROUP.


calendar NORTHWEST

9

THE CHEESE WEASLES, Delphi (Carroll), Delphi Opera House. Rock ‘n‘ roll, soul, blues and R&B songs from the ’50s, ’60s, ’70s, and ’80s. 7:30 pm. Tickets, $10-$25. 765-564-4300. info@delphioperahouse.org. delphioperahouse.org

1617

SUGAR CAMP DAYS, New Carlisle (St. Joseph), Bendix Woods County Park Sugar House.. Pancake breakfast, sugarbush tours, music, horse-drawn wagon rides, ice carving, kids’ activities, artisan demonstrations, and Native American lifeways. 8:30 am-3 pm. $8 per vehicle. 574-6543155. sjcparks.org

15

APRIL VERCH BAND, Delphi (Carroll), Delphi Opera House. As a fiddler, singer, and stepdancer, Verch knows how to entertain a crowd. Tickets, $23-$40. 765-564-4300. info@delphioperahouse.org. delphioperahouse.org

CENTRAL

3

PEG + CAT LIVE!: THE BIG DOG PROBLEM, West Lafayette (Tippecanoe), Loeb Playhouse. A kid-friendly musical with comedy, fun songs, and an appearance from the coolest pals ever. 3 pm. Tickets: $10-$15. 765-494-9712. convos@purdue.edu. purdue.edu/convocations/event/peg-cat

HERITAGE QUILT 7-9 INDIANA SHOW, Bloomington (Monroe), Downtown Convention Center. Over 200 quilts on display, workshops taught by nationally known instructors, and vendors. Free shuttle to other community quilt exhibits. Visit website for show hours. Admission: $10 daily; $20 full show. 812-334-8900. ihqs.org

1416

ST. PATRICK’S DAY CELEBRATION, Indianapolis (Marion), Downtown. Greening of the Downtown Canal (Thurs.), St. Patrick’s Day Parade and Block Party presented by the Hoosier Lottery (Fri.),. Shamrock Run and Walk (entry fee) (Sat.). Free. 317-498-5299. indystpats.com

SOUTHWEST

1

INDIANA UNIVERSITY’S “ANOTHER ROUND,” Mitchell (Lawrence), Mitchell Opera House. Indiana University’s Another Round is the university’s premier all-male a cappella group. 7 pm. Tickets: $18, adults; $10, 12 and under. 812849-4447. mitchelloperahouse.com

2

MIDWEST STATION, Mitchell (Lawrence), Mitchell Opera House.Midwest Station is an Indiana-based bluegrass. 7 p.m. Tickets: $13, adults; $6 for kids 12 and under. 812-683-2221. mitchelloperahouse.com

26

MARCH 2019

1517

QUILT SHOW, Tell City (Perry), Tell City Depot. Quilt show, vendors, food vendors, classes, workshops, awards given for entries, people’s choice awards, auction of quilts. 9 am-5 pm. Admission charge. 812-547-7933. pickperry.com/ event/quilt-guildshow-2/2019-03-16


MARCH NORTHEAST

8-9

JAY COUNTY FIBER ARTS FESTIVAL, Portland (Jay), Jay Community Center. Kate Larson classes and lecture, demonstrations, vendors, sheep shearing, kids’ area, old spinning wheel demonstration and more. $1 admission charge. 260-726-3366. fiberarts.visitjaycounty.com

16

ST. CATTY’S DAY, Albion (Noble), Black Pine Animal Sanctuary. Enjoy a visit with the wildcats, wild canines, and reptiles. 1-4 pm. Admission charge for non Park Pal members. 260-636-7383. bpsanctuary.org/st-catty-s-day

1617

MAPLE SYRUP DAYS, LaGrange (LaGrange), Maple Wood Nature Center. All-you-can-eat pancake and sausage meal served with maple syrup. Free tours of the sugar house and horse drawn wagon tours of the maple woods. Demonstrations, puppet shows and games. Maple syrup and maple candy available for sale. Meal: 7 am-2 pm. Tours: 8 am-3 pm. Charge for meal. 260854-2225. lagrangecountyparks@yahoo.com. lagrangecountyparks.org

16

KITE FESTIVAL, Angola (Steuben), Pokagon State Park, Potawatomi Inn Lawn. See professional kite flyers in action. You can also bring your own kite and join in on the fun! All day. 260-833-2012. niball@dnr.in.gov. in.gov/dnr/parklake/2973.htm

SOUTHEAST

1011

YE OLDE CENTRAL HOUSE PHOTOGRAPHY SHOW, Napoleon (Ripley), Central House.Enjoy the works of local photographers at this historic Federalstyle home. Free (donations appreciated). Visit its website or its Facebook page for show hours. 812-621-7826. ripleycountytourism.com/event/ye-oldecentral-house-photography-show/ or facebook.com/yeoldecentralhouse

18

VIENNA BOYS CHOIR, New Albany (Clark), Ogle Center at Indiana University Southeast. The choir, established in the 14th century, is beloved the world over for its lively singing style and beautiful tones. 7:30 pm. Tickets: $35; $10, students. oglecenter.com/events/ocp/ vienna-boys-choir.php

25

METAMORA MANDOLIN GATHERING, Metamora (Franklin), MPA Opry Barn. Full day of workshops, jams and networking for mandolin enthusiasts. Evening show open to the public. Admission charge. 866-647-6555. metamorampa.org

This calendar is published as a service to readers and the communities electric cooperatives serve. Indiana Connection publishes events free of charge as space allows, giving preference to free community festival and events in and around areas served by subscribing REMCs/RECs. While Indiana Connection strives for accuracy, please note that events, dates and time may change without notice. Indiana Connection advises using contact phone numbers or internet sites to check times and dates of events before making plans. To add events to Calendar, please use the “Submit and Event” form under the “Talk to Us” or “Calendar” buttons at indianaconnection.org; or mail your info to: Calendar, Indiana Connection, 8888 Keystone Crossing, Suite 1600, Indianapolis, IN 46240. Please submit info two months before the date of the event.

MARCH 2019

27


fresh

do-it-yourself career profile

START PLANNING: Now take all this knowledge and enthusiasm to your local hardware store or home center. You’ll find all the necessary materials to begin building raised beds or prepping the ground for an open plot. Many stores hold workshops in the spring that highlight local master gardeners and landscaping pros who know how to plan an efficient growing schedule and build a garden that fits your yard and lifestyle.

FROM THE GARDEN

GET GOING: There’s work ahead of you, so make sure you’re ready with the right materials and tools. If you’re building raised beds, take measurements and pick up some naturally rot-resistant wood like red cedar, black locust, or redwood. Avoid woods preserved with toxins, such as creosotesoaked railroad ties. Recycled plastic or composite wood planks are options as well. A drill, level, mallet, and screws are necessities. Raised beds or not, a sod cutter and hoe may be in order. Good soil,

Get growing your own produce

organic compost, and a balanced fertilizer create a good foundation. Pick up a trowel, pruners, a shovel, rake, hose, kneeling pads, and gloves. Cages, hoops, stakes, and

by

BRANDON JUERGENS

they would be tended to year-round for a continuous supply of just the right amount

Eating fresh fruits and vegetables is always

of healthy foods we could prepare and eat

a good idea, but it can be expensive. That’s

fresh. But many of us grow more than we

why so many people are now growing their

need, which means we must preserve the

own produce. It’s not only budget friendly,

extra produce or give it away. As a result, the

but we also feel good knowing where our

popularity of “use it now” kitchen gardens

food comes from, and how it was grown

waned. But as the self-sufficiency movement

— most notably (and hopefully) without

picks back up, these types of gardens are

pesticides. Kitchen gardens are one of the

becoming all the rage once again.

fastest growing trends for DIYers, especially for those short on space. With spring around

THOSE IN THE KNOW:

the corner, now’s a great time to get your

novice or haven’t done it lately, there are

hands dirty.

great resources to help you get started.

If you’re a gardening

Your local county extension office has lots

ties will keep your bounty orderly and safe. Hardscaping materials like brick pavers and natural stones create a lovely walking path to, or within, the garden. Lastly, choose from a wide array of seeds or seedlings to get your garden up and running. Just be sure to stagger the plantings each month to continue growing all summer long. Visit your local Do it Best store or doitbest.com for thousands of the best home improvement products, including all the gardening essentials for creating a successful kitchen garden.

BRANDON JUERGENS’

WHAT’S IN A NAME?: A traditional kitchen

of knowledgeable people (some are master

garden, also known as a “potager” (in

gardeners) who can offer advice on building

French, “jardin potager”) or in Scotland a

your own garden and advise on the best

“kailyaird,” is a space designated for growing

times to plant certain fruits and veggies in

things you’ll use every day in the kitchen.

your part of the state. Purdue Extension

It contains just the fruits, vegetables, and

offices are great places to seek help and

herbs we know we’ll eat most often, separate

advice. They’ll give detailed instructions

from the ornamental flowers, plants, and the

for building kitchen gardens from scratch

cooperative of thousands of hardware stores,

rest of the yard. A kitchen garden can stand

and field questions from newbies or more

home centers and lumberyards throughout

alone as a humble vegetable plot, or it can

experienced green thumbs. The Consumer

the U.S. and around the world.

serve as a structured, central feature of an

Horticulture Program at the Purdue

all-season landscape.

University website — www.purdue.edu/

(This article is for informational purposes only. Indiana

hla/sites/yardandgarden/about-purdue-

Connection and Do it Best Corp. assume no liability

consumer-horticulture — is loaded with

for the accuracy or completeness of the information

BRINGING FRESHNESS BACK:

The original

idea behind kitchen gardens was that

28

MARCH 2019

information and opportunities to learn more.

family owns Juergens Do it Best Center® in Huntington. The Juergenses are member-owners of Do it Best Corp., a Fort Wayne-based

contained herein, or for injuries, property damage, or the outcome of any project.)


safety

Spring cleaning? Don’t forget about electrical safety! INDOOR ELECTRICAL SAFETY

OUTDOOR ELECTRICAL SAFETY

During the winter months, it’s easy for

Always call before you dig. Make a plan

cords to get misplaced or collect some

before beginning any major project

dust. Take the time to move extension

in your yard. Start by calling 811. The

cords out of high traffic areas of the

professionals there will mark any

home to avoid a tripping hazard and

potential dangers on your property, like

decide whether they are still useful to

buried wires, piping or gas and water

you.

mains located where you plan to dig.

Inspect cords, plugs and outlets to

Whether you are trimming trees or

ensure everything is in good working

clearing out the gutters, if using a ladder

condition. Damaged or worn out cables

always be sure to look up and out. Ensure

can turn into a real fire or electrocution

your safety and the safety of those around

hazard.

you by staying at least 10 feet away from

To help prevent home fires, clean

power lines when working outside.

appliances you may have neglected that

When working outdoors, keep electrical

might have a buildup of things like food

cords and tools away from water,

debris, oil and dust. An example of this

even wet grass. Remember water and

buildup is in your stove’s exhaust hood.

electricity do not mix! Use caution when

To clean it: remove the hood, clean the

working with electricity in conditions

filter, use a degreaser on any exposed

such as wet grass.

surfaces and replace the hood.

CLEAN YOUR DIRTY LIGHT SWITCHES AND OUTLETS 1. To be safe, turn off the power at the electrical panel. 2. Start at the front of the house making your way around to each switch plate. 3. Use a antibacterial wipe or a microfiber cloth lightly dampened with all-purpose cleaner. Don’t spray directly onto the plate. It’s best to spray onto the cloth. 4. Wipe over the switch plate and surrounding wall, removing all dirt and grime. 5. If the switch is dirty, use a cotton swab to get into the cracks and crevices. 6. Use another microfiber cloth to wipe plate dry. 7. Turn the power back on.

Above all, continue to practice good electrical safety all year round! MARCH 2019

29


backyard

Pretty ground cover? Probably a weed

Asiatic dayflower can form dense colonies

There is a native, closely related species

But even these improved cultivars frequently

known as slender dayflower, Commelina

drop small- to medium-size branches in high

erecta, that has more narrow-shaped leaves,

winds.

is more upright, does not form dense colonies, and tends to be found in drier soils. Q. I have a Bradford pear tree in my front

Photo Credit: Rosie Lerner, Purdue Extension

For more information

yard that split in half with the recent high

about each of these species:

winds. This has occurred many times

Asiatic dayflower — www.illinoiswildflowers. info/weeds/plants/asia_dayflower.htm

Q: I’m having an argument with my wife

Slender dayflower — www.illinoiswildflowers.

about a plant in our yard, and we hope

info/prairie/plantx/sl_dayflower.htm

you can help arbitrate. I’ve sent a photo of

in my development over the years. Is it safe to let half the tree remain standing? If I remove the tree, what good, strong trees that are more wind resistant do you recommend?

a plant that we found growing near some

A. Bradford pears are notorious for breaking

shrubs. Neither of us remember planting

up in high winds, but the extreme winds

it. My wife thinks it’s pretty ground cover

experienced statewide damaged many

and that we should let it stay. I think it’s a

sturdier trees as well.

weed and that we should get it out of there before it takes over the whole bed. My

You would be wise to remove what is left of

wife said, “Ask Rosie!” — W & M, Lebanon,

the tree. Bradford and all other cultivars of the

Indiana

ornamental (callery) pear are now considered invasive in Indiana. This is a good opportunity

A: You could both be right, but if I have to choose, I’d say you win the argument! Your

Honey locust tree branch. Photo Credit K.M., Indianapolis

photo appears to be Commelina communis, more commonly known as Asiatic dayflower.

Q. Can you tell me what kind of tree this

I’ve included a photo that shows both

is? They were planted near our community

flowers and leaves. It does have pretty blue

lake 25 years ago. — K.M., Indianapolis

flowers, but this non-native plant is generally considered a weed. Because the plant tends

A. This is a honey locust tree, known

to sprawl along the ground, the stems root

botanically as Gleditsia triacanthos. The

when they stay in contact with moist soil.

species is native to the eastern United States.

This species can form a dense colony that

It has large seed pods and trunks that are

outcompetes other plants. Dig the plant

armed with wicked thorns. Fortunately, most

out, removing as much of the root system

plants sold for landscape specimens are

as possible.

cultivars that are both seedless and thornless.

Ask

ROSIE 30

MARCH 2019

to replace with a better choice. Here are links to additional information on the callery pear as well as a publication on alternatives to invasive ornamentals: www.purdue.edu/hla/sites/yardandgarden/ a-pearfect-nightmare www.extension.purdue.edu/extmedia/ID/ID464-W.pdf

B. Rosie Lerner is the Purdue Extension consumer horticulturist and is a consumer of Tipmont REMC. Questions about gardening issues may be sent to “Ask Rosie,” Indiana Connection, 8888 Keystone Crossing, Suite 1600, Indianapolis, IN 46240-4606, or use the form at IndianaConnection.org.


product recalls Choking hazard causes recall of children’s book

Thermostat poses fire hazard

“Find the Bear,” a soft fabric book by Manhattan Toy, has been recalled. A metal grommet used to attach one fabric flap can detach, posing a choking hazard to young children.

White-Rodgers has recalled the Emerson Branded Sensi WiFi Thermostat. Contact between the thermostat wires and household line voltage can damage the thermostat, posing a fire hazard.

The front cover features the sewn-on face of a panda bear and purple horizontal stripes. The Manhattan Toy logo is printed on a sewn-in label on the side of the book. Lot code “208150 AJ” is printed on another sewn-in label. Manhattan Toy has received one report of the metal grommet detaching from the

page. No injuries have been reported. The books were sold by independent specialty retailers nationwide and online at Amazon.com, Buybuybaby. com, Manhattantoy.com and other websites from March 2017 through July 2018 for about $18. Call 800-541-1345, or go online at www.manhattantoy. com and click on “Recalls” for more information.

As a service to our readers and to promote electrical safety, here are some recent recall notices provided by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. Visit www.cpsc.gov/en/recalls for full details of these recalls and for notices of many more.

This recall involves Emerson branded SensiWiFi thermostats with “Emerson” printed on the front and a date code from 1416 to 1536 on the back. The thermostats are white with an LCD screen. There are three buttons below the thermostat screen. Up and down arrow and Menu buttons are located to the right of the screen. Recalled thermostats have model numbers 1F86U-42WF or UP500W. A product label containing model number and date

code information is located on the back of the thermostat. The firm has received eight reports of burn damage to the thermostat, involving minor property damage. The units were sold Home Depot and other heating ventilation and air conditioning equipment distributors nationwide from April 2014 through December 2016 for between about $90 and $150. Call 888-847-8742, or go online at www.white-rodgers. com and click on “Emerson Branded Sensi Recall” at the lower left corner of the homepage for more information.

MARCH 2019

31


Wabash Valley Power news

Spring to

LEARN: No matter your age, you

Your Co-op’s Annual Meeting

should learn something new every day – and your co-op’s annual meeting will definitely help! You can learn about how electricity is generated and how your local co-op delivers it to your home. You also can learn more about programs and incentives – including Power Moves® energy efficiency rebates – that your coop offers to help save you money.

The melting snow means that spring is

can participate in during your co-op’s

arriving – and so is your local electric

annual meeting include:

BE ENTERTAINED: Annual meetings frequently include live entertainment,

cooperative’s annual meeting! Co-ops start hosting their annual meetings

EAT: Co-ops’ annual meetings

games, activities (such as a petting zoo),

in the spring, which is a great time

frequently have some of the best food

and more! It’s a family-friendly event

for you to get it on your calendar and

around. The meeting will typically

with something to appeal to everyone.

plan to attend! As a member of your

include breakfast, lunch, or dinner as

local electric cooperative, you are also

part of the festivities. Those who attend

WIN! Register when you arrive, stay

part owner. You have a direct say in

will leave full! Be sure to go hungry.

for the meeting, and you may be eligible to win door prizes or even a bill credit.

how things are run – which means the annual meeting directly impacts you.

MEET: The annual meeting is a

Each co-op does things differently, and

community event, which means everyone

they can get creative with prizes. You

Your co-op’s annual meeting doesn’t

is welcome! You can catch up with

don’t want to miss it!

feel like a boardroom gathering. It’s

family, friends, and neighbors you

almost the opposite; many annual

don’t regularly see. Your local co-op’s

VOTE: The annual meeting is your

meetings feel more like a family

employees also will attend the meeting.

chance to have a direct impact on how

carnival with food, games, activities,

You can meet your co-op’s CEO and

your local electric co-op is governed.

and entertainment with a brief

board of directors, which makes decisions

You will be able to vote for your board

meeting involved. Six activities you

on your behalf.

of directors, which creates policy that directly impacts you and the entire co-op’s membership. Democratic participation is part of the foundational bedrock of all cooperatives, and voting is one of the cooperative principles! As you make spring and summer plans, keep an eye out for your local cooperative’s annual meeting. You will meet new acquaintances, catch up with old friends, have a great time, and maybe even win prizes for letting your voice be heard. Contact your local co-op for details on how you can spring to the next annual meeting.

32

MARCH 2019


travel

DIG DEEP INTO

Hoosier Hysteria’s roots BY RICHARD G. BIEVER

Milan ’54 Museum

When the inventor of the game of basket-

Fame, a 14,000 square foot museum that

ball — James Naismith — visited Indiana’s

is full of memorabilia and interactive dis-

high school basketball state finals in 1925,

plays about basketball in the state.

201 E. Carr St. Milan, IN 47031

game in Massachusetts, but “basketball

The Hall of Fame features inductees

812-654-2772

really had its origin in Indiana.”

such as Oscar Robertson, Larry Bird, Bob

milan54.org

he quipped that he may have invented the

This time of year, those Hoosier roots of the game rise to the rafters of high school gyms across the state like the lofty banners boasting of school glory. Two

Knight, John Wooden and many more. Robertson, after losing to that Miracle Milan team in the 1954 semi-state finals as a sophomore, led his Crispus Attucks team

museums in eastern Indiana pay homage

to the 1955 state championship. Attucks,

to Hoosier Hysteria. Acting like bookends,

in Indianapolis, became the first all-black

the two display the true fairy tale story that

high school in the nation to win a state

is the essence of “Hoosier Hysteria,” and

championship. The team repeated in 1956

an encyclopedia that fills in all the details,

with a perfect 31-0 season.

names the legends and adds up the statistics. Here’s a glimpse of both:

MILAN ’54 — HOOSIERS MUSEUM

HOURS OF OPERATION: Wednesday – Saturday: 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Sunday: noon – 4 p.m. Monday & Tuesday: by appointment only

Indiana Basketball Hall of Fame

feet away from the world’s largest high

One Hall of Fame Court New Castle, IN 47362

A visit to the Hall of Fame, puts you mere school gymnasium, New Castle Field-

765-529-1891

For many people, the movie “Hoosiers” —

house . Holding up to 10,000 spectators,

hoopshall.com

the David vs. Goliath story of tiny mythical

you’ll want to check the schedule and plan

Hickory, Indiana, winning the state

to take in Indiana high school basketball

HOURS OF OPERATION:

championship — epitomizes basketball in

at this historic venue.

Indiana. The story is based on the real-life story of “The Milan Miracle.” In 1954, tiny Milan High School (enrollment of 161) shocked the state by winning the Indiana state championship. While

Hoosier Hysteria today may not have

a multi-class, multi-champion tourney

enthusiasm for the sport in the state is

Indiana’s high school state finals

spot on.

are still the most attended

Milan building. The museum’s goal is to

high school championship tourney in the nation. Check out the roots of

recapture the nostalgia and hysteria of that

this annual phenom-

era with memorabilia from the 1954 Milan

enon at these two

Indians team and the movie “Hoosiers.”

museums where so

The collection of props from the movie is

much of the story

the largest known in existence.

is told.

SOAK IN INDIANA BASKETBALL HISTORY About an hour and a half drive north of Milan is the Indiana Basketball Hall of

Closed on major holidays

back before the controversial change to after the 1997 championship. But

in June 2013 in the former State Bank of

Sunday: 1 – 5 p.m.

the same mystique or following it had

the movie added quite a bit of drama, the

The Milan ’54 — Hoosiers Museum opened

Monday – Saturday: 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. (ET)

RICHARD G. BIEVER is senior editor of Indiana Connection. MARCH 2019

33


profile

Best foot forward

Klinker’s ‘approachable’ personality shines in shoes and Statehouse By Nick Rogers

Sheila Klinker apologizes, but she has to reschedule. Something has come up on this rare day off from 2019’s session of the Indiana General Assembly, where Klinker has been a Democratic state representative for House District 27 since 1982. She’ll talk more later, but still makes time to preview that discussion — which will concern, among many other topics, proposed budget increases for Indiana’s Department of Child Services and incentives for Indiana teachers. Even in her downtime, Klinker finds ways to put her best foot forward for Indiana families — a foot frequently found in a fashionable shoe. Klinker’s locally legendary, vibrant fashion sense reflects not only her personality but her strategy in politics. “I’d describe my style as happy, outgoing and, hopefully, friendly,” she

Rep. Sheila Klinker

says. “If I want to be approachable, I want to feel that way.”

D-Lafayette PHO TO BY RI CHARD G . B I E V E R

For nearly four decades, Klinker has represented most of Lafayette, Ind.,

here. I’ve been in the minority and the

diana. Klinker also strongly supports

along with sections of West Lafayette

majority. You have to work together

First Steps, which provides in-home

and Tippecanoe County. From the

to make sure you’re doing the right

services for newborns and toddlers

middle of her 19th term, what advice

thing. If you see a bill you can work

who have developmental delays or

would she give to herself at the start if

on with Republican friends, join in.”

disabilities.

she could?

There’s not enough room to list every

“The reason I continue to do this is re-

“Be a good listener, don’t try to make

cause Klinker has championed. But

ally to help education and to help the

big decisions quickly and work in a

she cites Court-Appointed Special

people in my area,” Klinker says. “I still

bipartisan way,” says Klinker, who

Advocates, or CASA, as a bipartisan

enjoy serving the people very much.”

spent more than 34 years as a teacher.

capstone — bringing advocacy for

“That last one might be why I’m still

abused or neglected children to In-

34

MARCH 2019

Freelance writer Nick Rogers is a communications manager for Purdue Agricultural Communications.


Planning to shovel

more than snow

this winter? Visit 811now.com

before you decide

to go below! Contacting 811 before you dig gets utility lines in your yard marked for free to protect you from expenses and injuries.

www.811now.com


Electric Consumer is now

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Carroll White REMC — March 2019 Indiana Connection  

Carroll White REMC — March 2019 Indiana Connection