Page 1

UDWI REMC

YOUR INDIANA COOPERATIVE COMPANION

T he Best

of Indiana

Readers rave about their faves

J UN E 2018

Readers’ Choice for Indiana’s ‘Claim to Fame’ … The Indianapolis 500

Poles for a purpose UDWI supports 7th Cooperative Principle


from the editor

Garfield hits 40 It’s fitting that in this issue — which celebrates the Best of Indiana — I acknowledge the 40th birthday of a true Hoosier icon: Garfield the Cat. The original “grumpy cat,” who loves lasagna and lounging around as much as he loves terrorizing Odie the dog, was created by Indiana’s own Jim Davis, a native of Marion and alumnus of Ball State University. I actually met Jim Davis when the Garfield comic strip was barely past its “kitten” years and I was attending college. Davis was living and drawing near the Ball State campus. I met with him about speaking at a meeting I was organizing. The event, held at the Teacher’s College building, was well-attended and featured Davis, with flip chart paper and Sharpie in hand, deftly sketching the finicky feline and talking about his cartooning career. Little did those of us in attendance know that just a few years later, Garfield would have his own TV special, be featured in a series of books, and even have his own iconic plush toy that millions of fans suction-cupped to car windows in the 1980s. Garfield’s premiere appearance in a comic strip was June 19, 1978. Though a 40-year-old cat would be pushing 200 years old in human years, in his fourth decade, Garfield is as spry and relevant as the day he was first drawn. And he still has a huge fan base — and not just in Indiana or the U.S. In Australia, “Garfield: A Musical with Cattitude” recently completed a 10-day run to celebrate its star’s birthday. And Singapore of all places will host a 40th Anniversary Carnival to honor Garfield June 8-10, complete with games, meet-andgreets, photo booths and limited edition merchandise. Happy Birthday, Garfield! And to think I knew you when!

VOLUME 67 • NUMBER 12 ISSN 0745-4651 • USPS 262-340 Published monthly by:

ELECTRIC CONSUMER is for and about members of Indiana’s locally-owned, not-for-profit electric cooperatives. It helps consumers: use electricity safely and efficiently; understand energy issues; connect with their co-op; and celebrate life in Indiana. Over 272,000 residents and businesses receive the magazine as part of their electric co-op membership. CONTACT US: 8888 Keystone Crossing, Suite 1600 Indianapolis, IN 46240-4606 317-487-2220 ec@ElectricConsumer.org ElectricConsumer.org INDIANA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVES OFFICERS Gary Gerlach President Walter Hunter Vice President Randy Kleaving Secretary/Treasurer Tom VanParis Chief Executive Officer EDITORIAL STAFF Emily Schilling Editor Richard George Biever Senior Editor Holly Huffman Member Relations/ Advertising Manager Ellie Schuler Senior Communications Specialist ADVERTISING Crosshair Media, 502-216-8537; crosshairmedia.net

EMILY SCHILLING Editor eschilling@electricconsumer.org

On the menu: September issue — “Heirloom” recipes (that have been in the family for ages): deadline June 11. October — Pizza recipes: July 16. If we publish your recipe on our food page, we’ll send you a $10 gift card.

Reader Submissions page: September — “Heirloom” photos

(Your personal photos from “the good old days”): deadline June 11. October issue — Photos of your favorite carved pumpkins: deadline July 16.

Giveaway: We’re giving away to a randomly selected entrant an overnight stay from French Lick Resorts, our Best of Indiana Girls’ Weekend Getaway winner. See page 20 for details about French Lick. To enter, send us your contact information along with the name of your co-op. Put “June Giveaway” in the title. The deadline to submit your entry is June 15.

Three ways to contact us: To send us recipes, photos, event listings, letters and

entries for gift drawings, please use the forms on our website ElectricConsumer.org; email ec@ElectricConsumer.org; or send to Electric Consumer, PO Box 24517, Indianapolis, IN 46224.

GLM Communications, Inc., 212-929-1300; glmcommunications.com Paid advertisements are not endorsements by any electric cooperative or this publication. UNSOLICITED MATERIAL: Electric Consumer does not use unsolicited freelance manuscripts or photographs and assumes no responsibility for the safe‑keeping or return of unsolicited material. SUBSCRIPTIONS: $12 for individuals not subscribing through participating REMCs/RECs. CHANGE OF ADDRESS: Readers who receive Electric Consumer through their electric co-op membership should report address changes to their local co-op. POSTAGE: Periodicals postage paid at Indianapolis, Ind., and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send change of address to: Electric Consumer, 8888 Keystone Crossing, Suite 1600, Indianapolis, IN 46240-4606. Include key number. No portion of Electric Consumer may be reproduced without permission of the editor.

JUNE 2018

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contents

JUNE

16

17

indiana eats 03 FROM THE EDITOR 05 CO-OP NEWS Energy news and information from your electric co-op. 10 ENERGY 12 INSIGHTS 14 PRODUCT PICKS Summer is a go-go-go time. Here are ways to take your electronics with you.

food

16 INDIANA EATS Corndance Tavern in Mishawaka is a farm-totable twist on fine dining.

means to rural Hoosiers. 26 EVENTS CALENDAR

19 COVER STORY Readers share more of their favorite things in our annual “Best of Indiana” survey.

Follow us on Twitter www.twitter.com/Electriconsumer

28 OUTDOORS 29 SAFETY Share electric rules with kids (not in all editions).

feature

30 BACKYARD (not in all editions) 32 H  OOSIER ENERGY/ WABASH VALLEY NEWS 33 PROFILE Though he’s not made a bucket since 1992, legendary basketball star Larry Bird remains close to Hoosier hoops … and the hearts of our readers.

On the Cover The roar of 350,000 fans can’t compete with the roar of 33 race cars burning down

Find us on Pinterest www.pinterest.com/Electriconsumer

the front straightaway at 230 mph.

Follow us on Instagram www.instagram.com/ElectricConsumer

Spectacle in Racing” — the Indianapolis 500

Electric Consumer readers said the “Greatest — is still our state’s best claim to fame. PHOTO COURTESY OF THE INDIANAPOLIS MOTOR SPEEDWAY

4

22

cover story 22 FEATURE Sen. Todd Young and an FCC commissioner see firsthand what broadband

17 FOOD Strawberry recipes — a sweet taste of June.

Find us on Facebook www.facebook.com/ElectricConsumer

19

JUNE 2018


co-op news CONTACT US Office: 812-384-4446 / 800-489-7362 WEBSITE www.udwiremc.com OFFICE HOURS 7:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Monday-Friday STREET ADDRESS 1666 W. State Road 54 Bloomfield, IN 47424 MAILING ADDRESS P.O. Box 427, Bloomfield, IN 47424 SERVICE INTERRUPTIONS To report service interruptions, call 812384-4446 or 800-489-7362 (day or night). Please have your location number ready when reporting outages. Routine questions are answered during business hours.

UDWI REMC linemen drill a hole for a pole at one of the E5 Foundation’s ballfields.

BOARD OF DIRECTORS Mike Williams, President Todd Carpenter, Vice President Sophie Haywood, Secretary Dax Collins, Treasurer David Burger James Jackson John Royal Ronald Thompson STAFF Doug Childs CEO Kim Todd Director of Member Services Shane Smith Manager of Operations and Engineering Michael Sullivan Acting Manager of Accounting and Finance Jared Pyne Line Superintendent

Like us on Facebook www.facebook.com/ udwiremc Follow us on Twitter www.twitter.com/udwiremc

Concern for community HOW UDWI IS SUPPORTING THIS COOPERATIVE PRINCIPLE As an electric cooperative, UDWI REMC practices the seven cooperative principles. These principles are designed to put the needs of members first. I would like to share how UDWI is working on the seventh principle — concern for community. In an effort to reduce excess costs within the company, UDWI has had to make the difficult choice to dramatically cut our charitable contributions. But, we haven’t stopped looking for ways to help you, the member, and the communities you live in. Instead, we are giving our time and expertise in more meaningful and financially responsible ways. Recently, UDWI teamed up with the E5 Foundation created by former Major League Baseball player Scott Rolen. This nonprofit organization, located in Smithville, helps children who are dealing with an illness, hardship, or other special needs and their families. The foundation provides outdoor recreational

opportunities through Camp Emma Lou, Family Retreat Weekends, T.E.A.M. Field Trips, and the Hot Corner Kids Program. (See story on page 6). Our co-op helped install four donated poles at one of E5’s ballfields, two for lighting and two for netting, which will extend playing time on the field and increase safety for families. A team of our linemen set the poles in place between service calls so as not to interfere with member needs. This is the type of giving back in the community that UDWI will continue to support: dedicating our people and available resources to organizations and programs that improve the lives of our members. When we can help our communities, we will.

DOUG CHILDS CEO

JUNE 2018

5


co-op news A pole at one of the E5 Foundation’s ballfields is installed.

A baseball field makes a nice backdrop as two UDWI linemen dig a hole for a pole.

Poles for a purpose UDWI REMC recently installed new

T.E.A.M. Field Trips, and the Hot Corner

poles at the ballfields of the E5

Kids Program.

Foundation, a local organization working to bring smiles to children and their families as they deal with an illness, hardship, or other special needs.

“It was great to be able to contribute something to this organization that is trying to make life better for children,” said Jeremy Feltner, UDWI’s lead

UDWI teamed up with the foundation,

foreman on the project. “I’m looking

created by retired Major League Baseball

forward to seeing how else UDWI is

player Scott Rolen, to install four donated

going to get involved in helping members

poles at one of E5’s ballfields, two for

in our community.”

lighting and two for netting, which will extend playing time on the field and increase safety for spectators.

“UDWI REMC was pleased to support this worthwhile project. A big thank you to Rob Firestone, UDWI line serviceman,

This nonprofit organization, located in

for coordinating this endeavor. Also,

Smithville, provides families outdoor

thanks to the linemen who volunteered

recreational opportunities through Camp

their time for such a good cause,” said

Emma Lou, Family Retreat Weekends,

Doug Childs, UDWI REMC CEO.

6

JUNE 2018

It was great to contribute something to this organization that is trying to make life better for children.

JEREMY FELTNER, UDWI REMC lineman


co-op news

News briefs Credit card change UDWI REMC no longer accepts American Express or Discover credit cards for payments.

Meter testing UDWI meter technicians will be performing routine meter tests in our entire service territory over the next few years. Each employee will be driving white utility vans with our logo placard. Be sure to identify these items before approaching any vehicle that may be in your area. Report any suspicious behavior to your local law enforcement office. Please visit our website at www.udwiremc.com or “Like� us on Facebook to stay up to date on current testing locations.

OFFICE CLOSING

Spring planting? Make sure to dial 811 before starting any underground digging or planting project.

UDWI REMC will be closed on Wednesday, July 4, to observe the Independence Day holiday. Have a safe and happy Fourth of July! JUNE 2018

7


co-op news

Unclaimed Capital Credits If you see your name or know someone on the list, please call UDWI REMC at 812-384-4446 or 800-489-7362. PARSLEY, HERMAN D. PARSLEY, JAMES PARSLEY, JOHN C. PARSLEY, JOHNNIE H. PARSLEY, ORVILLE PARSONS, GEORGE PARSONS, WILLIAM PATE, CALVIN E. PATE, FRANCIS M. PATE, GERRY L. PATE, ORBA PATE, SIMEON JR. PATON, WILLIAM J. PATTERSON, CECIL PATTERSON, JOEL C. PATTERSON, JOHN R. PATTERSON, LOIS PATTON, ABE L. PATTON, ALBERT K. PATTON, CHARLES W. PATTON, DONALD E. PATTON, EVERETT PATTON, HAZEL I. PATTON, JOHN F. PATTON, LONUEL PATTON, LOWELL PATTON, OLLEN PATTON, ORAL M. PATTON, ROY PATTON, RUSSELL PAUL, HERBERT PAUL THOMPSON FARMS PAULK, AURETTA F. PAULK, CLAUDE D. PAULSON, EARL PAYNE, DANNY RAY PAYNE, HARVEY PAYNE, HARVEY A. PAYNE, HENRY PAYNE, JOHN PAYNE, JOHN D. PAYNE, WILLIAM PAYTON, RICHARD PEARSON, ALFRED E. PEARSON, ALTA L. PEARSON, ARGLE R. PEARSON, CHARLES D. PEARSON, CLYDE PEARSON, GALE PEARSON, GEORGE PEARSON, HARVEY PEARSON, HERSCHELL PEARSON, JOHN PEARSON, ORDA GRAVES PEARSON, RUSSELL W. PEARSON, SAM PEARSON, VERLIN REED PEARSON, VIRGIL PEAVEY, RUTH S. PECK, NESBIT F. PEDRAZA, JUAN PEDRO, CLEO PEDRO, JAMES PEEBLES, FRANK PEEBLES, W. F. PEGG, HARLEY PEINE, THOMAS E.

8 JUNE 2018

PELLENS, HAROLD W. PELSTON, JAMES PELTIER, CHARLES PEMBERTON, DAISY PEMBERTON, ERICA R. PENNA, PAUL R. PENNINGER, BILLY R. PENNSYLVANIA CENTRAL CO. PENROD, FRANK PENT CH OF GOD OF AMERICA PENTACOST CHURCH BLOOMFIELD PENZ, CHARLES F. PERCELL, ROBERT PERGAL, DON PERIGO, CLAUDE A. PERKINS, ARTHUR PERKINS, CHARLES R. PERKINS, DALE J. PERKINS, HAROLD PERKINS, MARVIN PERKINS, MARY PERKINS, RALPH PERNITZA, HOWARD H. PERRY, C. C. PERRY, IVETTA PERRY, J. S. PERRY, JACK PERRY, JOHN S. PERRY, PAUL PERRY, RICHARD PERRY, STELLA PERSHING, CLARENCE PERSHING, ELZA PERSHING, EMMETT PERSHING, HELEN PERSHING, OPHA PERSHING, RAYMOND G. PERSHING, ROY PERSINGER, CHESTER PERSINGER, TOMMY PETERMAN, FRANK PETERS, CARL PETERSON, C. V. PETERSON, HAROLD PETERSON, HAROLD E. PETERSON, HARRY L. PETERSON, ROGER PETERSON, ROY C. PETIT, LOUIS J. PETRO, JAMES D. PETROFF, JACK L. PETRY, RAYMOND E. PETTY, NELSON PETTY, VERNON PFAFF, DELMAR GLENN PFAFF, ERVIN L. PFISTER, MARK PHARES, OLIVER PHEGLEY, CLARENCE PHEGLEY, EARNEST E. PHEGLEY, FRED H. PHILIPPI, ANNIE PHILLIPS, A. L. PHILLIPS, BEN PHILLIPS, BRIAN PHILLIPS, C. M.

PHILLIPS, CARL L. PHILLIPS, CARLIS PHILLIPS, CECIL PHILLIPS, ELMER C. PHILLIPS, HOBERT PHILLIPS, JACK PHILLIPS, JEAN PHILLIPS, JOSEPH JR. PHILLIPS, MILTON B. PHILLIPS, R. C. PHILLIPS, RALPH PHILLIPS, RAY PHILLIPS, RAYMOND W. PHILLIPS, ROBERT PHILLIPS, S. K. PHILLIPS, STANLEY PHILLIPS, STANLEY F. PHILLIPS, THOMAS PHILLIPS, WENDELL J. PHILLIPS, WILSON M. PHILPOTT, LEONARD PHILPOTT, OTTIS PHIPPS, EDGAR PHIPPS, GOLDIA PHIPPS, JOHN H. PHIPPS, TREAT PICALEK, EDWARD PICKARD, CHARLEY PICKARD, LESSALEE PICKARD, RAYMOND PICKERING, HAROLD E. PICKETT, JOE PICKETT, PAUL PICKETT, RAY PICKETT, RICHARD D. PICKRELL, JAMES PIERCE, DONALD PIERCE, JESSE N. PIERCE, LEWIS E. PIERCE, MARVIN PIERCE, R. J. PIERCE, RICHARD M. PIERCE, ROY PIERCE, VAUGHN PIERSALL, CHARLES PIGG, J, RAYMOND PIGG, MARION O. PIGG, SHIRLEY PILGRIM HOLINESS CHURCH PINEAU, GERALD PINNELL, BERT PIRTLE, WILLIAM C. PITCHER, JOHN JR. PITMAN, B. V. PITMECKY, GEORGE ROBERT PITTMAN, ANITA PITTMAN, DWIGHT PITTMAN, ELRA JR. PITTMAN, WALTER L. PITTMAN, WARD PLANO, VICTOR PLATT, JAMES E. PLEASANT BETHEL CEMETERY PLESS, HERBERT PLESS, JOHN PLETLNER, RICHARD

PLEW, FRANCIS E. PLEW, GEO. C. PLEW, WAYNE PLUMMER, IVA PLUMMER, JOHN R. PLUMMER, RUTH E. PLUMMER, WILLIAM G. PLUNKETT, CLEO PLUNKETT, LAWRENCE PLUNKETT, ROY F. POE, GARRETT M. POE, LLOYD POE, RAY POE, ROBERT E. POGUE, JOHN POLK TOWNSHIP SCHOOLS POLLARD, PAUL POLLOM, SHIRLEY POOL, JOHN W. POOL, LUTHER POOLE, DONALD R. POORE, LIVA RAY POORMAN, CAROL POORMAN, PAUL POPE, EARL POPE, FERRIS POPE, RUSSELL D. POPE, WARREN J. POPE, WAYNE J. PORTER, ALBERT PORTER, CHARLES E. PORTER, CHARLES O. PORTER, CHESTER O. PORTER, CLIFFORD EARL PORTER, DORIS PORTER, EARL C. PORTER, EMERY E. PORTER, ETHEL PORTER, FRANCIS H. PORTER, GEORGE PORTER, GOLDIA PORTER, HARTSEL PORTER, HOMER PORTER, JAMES F. PORTER, JOSEPH H. PORTER, KATIE PORTER, KENNETH PORTER, LEOTA PORTER, LORAN PORTER, ROBERT H. PORTER, TED PORTER, THEODORE PORTER, THOMAS POTTER, HOWARD POTTER, LAURENS B. POTTER, RUSSELL POTTERSVILLE FARM POTZLER, WILLIAM R. POUND, VERNON POWDER COMPANY HERCULES POWELL, ALICE POWELL, ED POWELL, ELMO POWELL, G. W. POWELL, GARRY L. POWELL, HAROLD D.

POWELL, HAZEL POWELL, JAKE POWELL, LESTER POWELL, LEVI W. POWELL, RICHARD CLAUDE POWERS, JOHN POWNALL, HERSCHEL POWNELL, HALLET POWNELL, MINNIE POWNELL, THEODORE PRAIRIE CITY GARAGE PRATHER, EMILY PRATHER, FERD PRATT, DONALD PRESSER, LLOYD PRESTON, JESSE PRESTON, WILLIAM PRIBBLE, DALLAS PRIBBLE, HARRY R. PRIBBLE, JAMES S. PRICE, ALBERT PRICE, ARLIE E. PRICE, CALVIN PRICE, EMMA F. PRICE, FRANK PRICE, GIDEON W. PRICE, HERMAN PRICE, IRENE M. PRICE, JESSE PRICE, LAURA A. PRICE, LEE JR. PRICE, ROBERT J. PRICE, WENDELL PRIDEMORE, PAUL E. PRINCE, DELBERT PRINCE, EMERY PRINCE, FLOYD H. PRINCE, HANFORD PRINCE, JAMES W. PRINCE, ROBERT PRINCE, ROBERT D. PRINCE, VACEL PRINCE, VIRGIL PRINCE, WINIFRED PRITCHETT, MABLE PRITCHETT, RICHARD D. PROFFITT, MARTHA J. PROW, IRENE PRUESS, R. J. PRUETT, CLARA M. PRUETT, ELLSWORTH PRUETT, EMORY A. PRUETT, HERBERT PRUETT, HERBERT G. PRUETT, MERYL PRUETT, PAUL PRUETT, REX PRUETT, ROBERT W. PRUETT, THOMAS PRUETT, WILLIAM A. PRUITT, FRANCES PRYOR, ROBERT G. PUCKETT, BRAWN D. PUCKETT, FRANK H. PUCKETT, HANLEY

PUCKETT, KENNETH ROBERT PUCKETT, NELLIE PUCKETT, RAY PUCKETT, WALTER E. PUETT, MATTIE M. PUGH, A. B. PUGH, ELMO A. PUGH, GERALD R. PURCELL, BEN W. JR. PURCELL BROTHERS PURCELL, WILLIAM JR. PURDIE, DOROTHY PURSELL, CHARLES PURSELL, JAMES PURSELL, JOE F. PUSCHEL, CHARLES QUACKENBUSH, EVERETT QUATTLEBAUM, EDKER QUEAR, IRVEN S. QUEARRY, KENNETH QUERTERNOUS, ELMER QUILLEN, MARY ETTA QUILLEN, MAX T. QUILLIAM, WILLIAM P. QUINLAN, RUTH QUINN, VIRGIL H. RAAB, FRANK RAAB, JOHN M. RAAB, MARY RAAB, RALPH RAAB, THOEDORE RAAB, WAYNE RADER, ALFRED RADER, ARTHUR RADER, FRANK RADER, OLIVER RADER, ORA RAGAN, BRYAN RAINES, LAURIN O. RAINES, REBA RAINES, ROBERT B. RAINES, ROY RAINES, VERNON RAINEY, EARL E. RAINEY, JENNIE RAINWATER, CLAUDE RALSTON, JAMES A. RAMBEAUT, ROBERT L. RAMPLEY, PAUL R. RAMSEY, ERWIN RAMSEY, G. H. RAMSEY, L. E. RAMSEY, LOYE RAMSEY, MELVIN RAMSEY, OLIVER E. RAMSEY, VERLIN RANARD, ED RANARD, WILLIAM RANDLE, LUSSIE RANDOLPH, ALICE HASLER RANEY, CLAUDE C. RANEY, ELISABETH RANEY, ROBERT D. RANKIN, JOHN T.

PLEASE TURN TO PAGE 18A FOR MORE UNCLAIMED CAPITAL CREDITS


g n i h t u e l s y g Ener energy

WHAT A HOME ENERGY AUDIT CAN REVEAL

Spending a few hundred dollars on

and high-tech tools to provide a thorough

but there are usually larger and less

an energy audit now could save you

report of your home’s challenges and

obvious sources. A blower door test

thousands of dollars over time.

opportunities. A professional audit

measures how airtight your home is

can range from a quick, visual walk-

and identifies where the air leaks are.

A home energy audit is a detailed assessment of your home that can give you a roadmap for future energy-related investments: •  What efficiency investments will be

through to a more comprehensive, more informative — but more expensive —

• Duct blaster: Ducts move the warm and cool air around your home; duct

assessment.

testing can measure whether your

Energy audits require an examination of

ducts are leaking.

most effective in reducing your energy

the building envelope (attic, floor, and

• Thermographic imaging: This is one

bills?

exterior walls) and the energy systems

way to identify where more insulation

in the home, such as the water heater,

is needed. Infrared images show “cold”

air conditioner and furnace. Follow the

or “hot” spots in a home’s envelope.

auditor during the inspection, and ask

Identifying where more insulation is

questions so you can understand where

needed is a key component in energy

the problems are, what you can address

audits — too little insulation will make

yourself and where you may need further

you use more energy than needed.

professional help.

Adding more can provide a quick

• Why might some areas of your home be too hot or too cold at times? • Would a new furnace, air conditioner and/or rooftop solar system be appropriate? If so, what size? And what complementary measures will help these large investments work most efficiently?

The auditor may analyze your recent

Online audit tools can give you a basic understanding of how your home compares to similar ones. However, a qualified and professional home energy auditor can use his or her experience

return on investment.

energy bills to determine what your

Following the assessment of your home,

energy is used for and if use has

the auditor will analyze the information

recently changed. Finally, the auditor will

and make recommendations on what

ask about the energy use behaviors of

systems could be upgraded or what

those who live in the home.

behavior changes you can make

For example, is someone home all day, or does everyone leave for work and school? A resident’s habits can make a big impact on the energy bill. If you go

to reduce energy use and improve comfort. If you follow your auditor’s recommendations, you could lower your energy bill 5 to 30 percent, or more!

from being a household with two working

Your electric co-op can help you get

adults to one with a new baby and an

started with your audit. Most co-ops offer

adult home most of the day, your energy

audits or will provide a list of qualified

use is going to go up.

energy auditors in the area. Being home

An auditor may do some or all of the following tests: • Blower door test: Windows are often the suspected cause for air leaks,

during the audit is a great opportunity to learn what makes your home tick and how you can make it even better. For more information, please visit: www.collaborativeefficiency.com/energytips.

On a warm day, an infrared sensor shows heat gain up to 98 F around poorly-insulated canned ceiling lights above (the red blobs on the sensor’s display). The temperature at the red laser point reads 82.2 F. FILE P H OTO ILLU STRATI O N BY RI CHARD G . BI EVER

10

JUNE 2018


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insights

Electric Consumer

RE LO CATES OFFIC ES

Effective June 4, Electric Consumer has a new home base. The electric cooperative magazine, along with its publisher, Indiana Electric Cooperatives, is now located on Indianapolis’ northeast side near the Keystone at the Crossing shopping complex.

Search on for historic farm buildings AWARD TO BE PRESENTED AT STATE FAIR Does your farm property include a

The award winner will receive an

historic farmhouse, barn, agricultural

outdoor marker, a vehicle pass to

outbuilding or landscape element? If

the Indiana State Fair, and overnight

so, consider applying for the 2018 John

accommodations in Indianapolis for the

Arnold Award for Rural Preservation. The

formal presentation.

award, to be presented at the Indiana State Fair by Indiana Landmarks and the Indiana Farm Bureau, recognizes the

The magazine, which will begin its

preservation and continued agricultural

68th year of publication next month,

use of historic farm buildings in Indiana.

was headquartered on the westside of Indianapolis since 1974. Prior to that, its offices were in downtown Indianapolis. Electric Consumer is mailed out to consumers of 28 electric cooperatives. Over 275,000 copies of the magazine are distributed each month. Indiana Electric Cooperatives is the service association for 38 member-owned electric cooperatives throughout the state. The new address is 8888 Keystone Ave., Suite 1600, Indianapolis, IN 46240. You

Indiana Landmarks named the award in memory of John Arnold (1955-1991), a Rush County farmer who successfully combined progressive architectural practices with a deep respect for the

Anyone, including farm owners, can

natural and historic features of the rural

submit a nomination for the award. The

landscape. The John Arnold Award

nomination asks for:

honors those who share a similar

• A brief history of the farm and a description of its significant historic structures and features. • A description of how the farm’s

commitment to preserving the landmarks and landscape of rural Indiana. The award’s nomination form is available at bit.ly/ArnoldAward18 or by contacting

historic agricultural structures

Tommy Kleckner at Indiana Landmarks

are used in day-to-day farming

at 812-232-4534 or tkleckner@

operations, and how they have been

indianalandmarks.org. Deadline for

preserved or adapted.

nominations is June 15 at 5 p.m.

• High-res digital photographs of

can continue to email Electric Consumer

the farm and its preserved historic

staff at ec@electricconsumer.org.

features.

New Indiana school focuses on agricultural training Online students in Indiana are about to get their hands dirty. Indiana Agriculture & Technology School (IATS) is a new tuition-free charter school that couples online learning with labs and project-based activities down on the farm. Enrollment is now open to Indiana residents, grades 7-12. Online coursework is offered for Core 40, Core 40 Honors, and Core 40 Technical Honors diploma programs. AP opportunities are also provided. Enrollment is capped at 160 students per grade level. In addition to coursework, on-campus lab work will be offered at the school’s 600+ acre farm in Morgan County. The school is also working to establish a network of corporate and farming partners throughout the state to provide student internships and jobs.

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JUNE 2018

To learn more about Indiana Agriculture & Technology School, visit www.indiana.ag. Classes start July 30.


product picks

Takin’ it with you For most people, summer is go-go-go time. And when you’re on the move, you need electronics that will move with

4

5

you. Here are a few that may

1 2

2

POWER TO GO When stormy weather is on the horizon or hits, grab the Best Emergency Radio/ Charger. Get NOAA alerts, listen to the radio and charge your devices as you weather the storm. It’s a powerful flashlight, too. $100. 800-321-1484; hammacher.com

JUNE 2018

BY JAYNE CANNON

6

3

1

14

make your days a bit sunnier.

3

4

5

6

TALKING DIRTY

PARLEZ-VOUS?

You take your phone everywhere ... which means it picks up grime and germs. Clean it up with the PhoneSoap Smartphone Sanitizer. Insert phone, close the lid and in about 10 minutes, your device is germ-free and ready for duty. $60. 888-365-0056; uncommongoods.com

No matter where you roam, you’ll speak the local language with the Live Conversation Speaking Translator. The handheld device translates your words into any of 12 languages or will translate what’s said to you into English. $350. 800-321-1484; hammacher.com

ROLL WITH MUSIC

LIGHT READING

THINLY SLICED

It’s not a day at the beach without your playlists, but why risk turning your smartphone into a sandy, soggy mess? Enter the Drifter Action Speaker. Download your favorites and jam for eight hours on a single charge. $200. 888-365-0056; uncommongoods.com

You love to read at the beach, beside the pool or in the tub, but books get heavy — especially when waterlogged! Take your library with you on the Kindle Oasis that will let you listen to books as well as read them. And it’s waterproof. From $250. 888-280-4331; amazon.com

Apple’s mini 4 is the slimmest iPad yet, but it has a girth of features: a crisp, 7.9-inch Retina Display; 8MP camera; 1080p HD video recording; and a speedy A8 processor. It’s your perfectly portable digital media center. From $399. 800-692–7753; apple.com


TAVERN TAKES FINE DINING UP A NOTCH Looking for a creative twist to a fine dining experience? Corndance Tavern in Mishawaka, a farm-to-table favorite of foodies in northern Indiana, is renowned not only for specialities like bison and elote corn (fire roasted with lime juice, mayo, ancho chile, cilantro and cotija cheese) but for its even more unusual fare. Take the restaurant’s signature dish: the aptly named “Sword of John Adams.” An ample selection of steak, chicken, sausages or prawns (choice of meats varies) is impressively skewered on, yes, a sword, and presented to the, hopefully, hungry diner with steakhouse sides. Unusual culinary presentations are the norm at Corndance. Lobster and Shrimp Rigatoni is served in a collectible mason jar and the popular Birramisu dessert, a unique take on tiramisu, is prepared and served in a beer can. Corndance Tavern is just one of owner George Pesek’s forays into food — and drink. Corndance — named for the region’s native Potawatomi Indians’ rituals to thank their gods for bountiful harvests — is the dinnertime dining option featuring an extensive menu of dry-aged meats, some seafood, sausages and even frankfurters. Bourbon and Butcher, a combo butcher shop/informal eatery is open from 11 am-3 pm. Pesek’s Evil Czech Brewery serves up innovative craft beers along with upscale bar food from

Corndance Tavern

mid-day to late evening. (With names like “Vladimir Poutine” and the “Fungus Amongus” burger noted on the menu,

4725 Grape Road

Mishawaka, Indiana

who wouldn’t be intrigued with the Evil

574-217-7584

Czech’s offerings?) For those wanting to take Corndance brats, burgers, dogs

Hours

or sausages with them during tailgating

Mon.-Sat.: 5-10 pm Sun.: 5-9 pm

season, they can order online at www.

Website

corndance.com/tailgate-packages/

corndance.com

PHO TO CO URTESY O F CO RNDANCE TAVERN


food Grab some some fresh or frozen strawberries to prepare these readers’ recipes.

Strawberry SWEETS

Easy Strawberry Soup by Eileen Fisse, Greensburg 2 cups vanilla yogurt ½ cup orange juice 8 cups fresh, sliced strawberries ½ cup sugar In a blender, combine yogurt, juice, strawberries and sugar in batches. Cover and process until smooth. Refrigerate at least 2 hours. To serve, you can garnish with fresh strawberry slices and a spoonful of yogurt. (We garnished with mint leaves.) Cook’s notes: It’s an easy, quick soup in the hot summertime! I won first place in the soup class at our county fair last year.

Grandma Lewis’ Baked Strawberry Pie by Lois Lewis, Henryville 1½ lbs. (24-oz. frozen) strawberries ½ to ¾ cup sugar 2-4 T. cornstarch (heaping scoops) 2 unbaked pie crusts (1 for top) Place 1 pie crust in pie plate. Cook strawberries, sugar and cornstarch until it thickens like syrup. Pour into unbaked pie shell. Cover with top crust. Pinch sides and slit top. Bake at 360 F for approximately 50–60 minutes. Cook’s notes: This recipe was passed down to me from my mother-in-law several years ago. All the family requests it at gatherings. I didn’t get one made this year for Christmas, and I was informed it was missing.

JUNE 2018

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food FO O D PREPARED BY ELECTRI C CO NS UME R S TA FF PHO TO S BY RI CHA RD G . B I E V E R

Baskin-Robbins Cake by Shirley Bickel, Freedom CRUST: 1½ cups flour ¼ cup powdered sugar Dash of salt ¾ cup butter or margarine, softened ½ cup finely chopped pecans Combine flour, ¼ cup powdered sugar and a dash of salt. Cut in butter or margarine until crumbly. Stir in pecans. Pat mixture into the bottom of a 9x13 pan. Bake at 375 F for 1012 minutes or until light brown. Cool completely. FILLING: 2 (10-oz.) bags frozen strawberries, thawed ½ cup strawberry juice 1 envelope unflavored gelatin 2 (8-oz.) packages cream cheese, softened 1 cup powdered sugar 1 (8-oz.) tub frozen whipped topping, thawed Thaw strawberries. Remove ½ cup juice; place in a small saucepan.

Marshmallow Strawberry Cake

Sprinkle gelatin over juice. Heat over

by Kerri Ladeburg, Romney

low heat to melt gelatin. Pour over strawberries. Stir and set aside.

2 cups mini marshmallows

In a small bowl, mix thawed

Beat softened cream cheese and

2 (10-oz.) packages

strawberries and gelatin together;

frozen strawberries

set aside.

powdered sugar until fluffy. By hand, stir in strawberry mixture and thawed whipped topping, combining well. Pour into cooled crust and freeze. Remove from freezer and let rest 20-30 minutes before serving. Cut in squares. Top with additional whipped topping and fresh strawberries, if desired.

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JUNE 2018

1 (3-oz.) box strawberry gelatin 1 box yellow cake mix, plus required ingredients Grease a 9x13 inch pan. Spread 2

Mix cake as directed. Then, pour over marshmallows. Add strawberries and gelatin mixture over cake batter.

cups mini marshmallows in bottom

Bake at 350 F for 45–50 minutes.

of pan.

Marshmallows will come to the top to form a crust. Serve warm or cold.


CONTINUED FROM PAGE 8 RANKIN, THOS. B. RANKIN, WILLIAM B. RANSOM, LEWIS H. RAPER, HENRY RAPER, OLIVE RASNER, DONALD RATCLIFF, ETTA E. RATCLIFFE, LUCILLE RATKOVICH, BETTY J. RATLIFF, EUGENE EDWARD RATLIFF, LEE RATTS, LOWELL G. RAUER, PAUL RAWLEY, CLIFFORD RAWLEY, FOSTER RAY, ALBERT RAY, BERT RAY, DEWEY RAY, DOROTHY RAY, ELMO RAY, ETHEL RAY, HOMER RAY, JAMES FRANCIS RAY, JAMES FRANKLIN RAY, KENNETH W. RAY, ZELMAR R. RAYBURN, ROBERT E. RAYNARD, LEWIS C. RAYS ENTERPRISES INC. REA, HERSCHEL E. REA, LEONARD REA, MARY E. REA, THOMAS REAGAN, HOWARD REAGAN, RALPH REAGIN, ARTHUR LEE REAGIN, HAROLD E. REAGIN, JAMES E. REAGIN, JOHN P. REAGIN, THOMAS A. REAGON, WALTER REAM, EARL RECHSTATTER, JOSEPH E. RECKEL, ROBERT RECONSTRUCTION FINANCE RECORD, FRANCES C. RECORD, JAMES RECORD, ROSS RECORD, VAUGHN B RECORDS, CHARLES PHILIP RECORDS, ORCHARD RECTOR, BOB D. RECTOR, FLORA RECTOR, JAMES RECTOR, JAMES R. RECTOR, JOHN O. RECTOR, LOLA RECTOR, ROYCE RECTOR, WARREN O. RECTOR, WILLIAM REDENBARGER, GEORGE REDENBARGER, HAROLD REDENBARGER, HENRY REDENBARGER, JOHN REDENBARGER, PHILIP REDENBARGER, RALPH REDFAIRN, EARL REDIFER, LELA REDNOUR, PAUL REDNOUR, REX REECE, GLENN W. REECE, JAMES O. REECE, SARGENT R. REED, ALBERT REED, ALBERTA REED, BERT REED, CLARENCE K. REED, DELLA

REED, DORIS L. REED, EARL REED, EDWARD D. REED, EVA M. REED, EZRA REED, FERN REED, GEORGE REED, GEORGE A. REED, GERALD L. REED, JOHN DAVID REED, KAY REED, LAWRENCE REED, LEBERT J. REED, LOREN REED, MARIE REED, NINA REED, NOAH REED, OTTO REED, ROBERT C. REED, ROY REED, S. L. REED, WAYNE REED, WILL REED, WM. D. REED, WM. E. REEDY, CLARENCE REEDY, GEORGE REESE, GLENN W. REESE, JOHN REESE, JOSEPH H. REEVE, LAVERNE REEVES, CHARLES REEVES, ELBERT REEVES, LOUIS REFFETT, JAMES O. REHMEL, HERSCHEL REHMEL, RAYMOND REHNER, HERBERT REICHERT, MELVIN REIK, HERMAN E. REIN, ANN REINTJES, JAMES REITZ, PHILIP REMISON, ROY A. REMKUS, THOMAS RENTSCHLER, CHARLES RENTSCHLER, MARTHA RENTSCHLER, W. C. REPASS, DONALD RESLER, ALBERT RESLER, H. LOWELL RESLER, HAROLD H. RESLER, MILDRED REUTER, CLAUDE REUTER, JUANITA REUTER, RAYMOND C. REUTER, ROMAR REUTER, W. N. REYES, CIPRIANA REYNOLDS, BEUFORD REYNOLDS, DONALD REYNOLDS, FRANK REYNOLDS, FRED REYNOLDS, HARLEY REYNOLDS, HAROLD E. REYNOLDS, HAZEL REYNOLDS, HERMAN REYNOLDS, JAMES E. REYNOLDS, JAMES W. REYNOLDS, LAYNE REYNOLDS, LEO REYNOLDS, RAYMOND REYNOLDS, ROGER L. RHODES, JAMES W. RHODES, NORMAN RHODES, RALPH RICE, CLARA RICE, DANIEL P. RICE, DONALD D. RICE, J. M. RICE, JOHN H. RICE, JOHN W. RICE, MAY

RICE, PAUL RICE, WILLIAM A. RICH MOORE ACRES RICHARDS, OTHA RICHARDS, WILBUR L. RICHARDSON, ARLIE F. RICHARDSON, ARTHUR RICHARDSON, CHARLES E. RICHARDSON, CHAS RICHARDSON, FLORIS RICHARDSON, FRANK RICHARDSON, GERALD KEITH RICHARDSON, HERMAN RICHARDSON, JOHN MCKINLEY RICHARDSON, JOHN R. RICHARDSON, JOHN W. RICHARDSON, MELVILLE L. RICHARDSON, PAUL R. RICHARDSON, R. E. RICHARDSON, RALPH C. RICHARDSON, ROBERT E. RICHARDSON, ROBERT M. RICHARDSON, ROGER RICHARDSON, ROY RAYMOND RICHARDSON, W. E. RICHARDSON, WILLIAM A. RICHARDSON, WILLIAM H. RICHLAND CHURCH RICHLAND TWP SCHOOL FURNACE RICHLAND TWP SCHOOL PARK RICHLAND TWP SCHOOL WILDCAT RICHLAND VALLEY MISSION RICKETTS, FRED M. RIDDELL, GEORGE RIDDLE, J. W. RIDENBARK, BILL RIDGE, ANDERSON RIDGEPORT APOSTOLIC FAITH RIDINGS, TELLA RIESE, PAUL E. RIESTER, LEONARD RIFE, CECIL A. RIGGINS, DENNIS C. RIGGINS, LESTER RIGGINS, ORAL LEE RIGGINS, VIRGIL T. RIGGLE, JAMES O. RIGGLE, JOHN L. RIGGLE, MINNIE C. RIGGLE, WILBUR RIGGS, ARTHUR RIGGS, MELVIN I. RIGSBY, OWEN C. RIGSBY, RUSSELL RILEY, LOYD H. RILEY, NELLIE RILEY, RAY RILEY, WILLAM P. RILEY, WM. JR. RING, ALEXANDER RING, CECIL RING, HARLEY W. RING, WALTER RINGER, GEORGE RINGER, JAMES RINGO, EDITH RINGO, JOE RINGO, LEONARD O. RIPLEY, WILLIAM RIPPY, BILLY JOE RISLEY, DICK RISLEY, ROBERT RITCHEY, ANNA LAURA RITCHEY, OBEDIAH RITCHIE, C. M. RITTER, WILLIAM R. RITTERSKAMP COMPANY

ROACH, GOLDIA M. ROACH, JOHN N. ROACH, LESLIE ROACH, LLOYD E. ROACH, MARY ROACH, MARY M. ROACH, NORMAN D. ROACH, WILLIAM ROADMAN SCHOOL JACKSON ROARK, DONALD ROARK, EARL ROBBINS, BRUCE ROBBINS, HUGH C. ROBBINS, VERNER ROBBINS, VICTOR L. ROBBINS, WILLIAM K. ROBERSON, CHARLES E. ROBERT, DAVID G. ROBERTS, A. V. ROBERTS, ALVIN W. ROBERTS, CARL D. ROBERTS, CARRY A. ROBERTS, CHARLES E. ROBERTS, CLARENCE ROBERTS, DALE ROBERTS, DELPHIA ROBERTS, DORA ROBERTS, ELZA ROBERTS, ERNEST T. JR. ROBERTS, ERNEST T. SR. ROBERTS, ERNIE ROBERTS, HOMER D. ROBERTS, ILENE ROBERTS, JENNIE ROBERTS, JOHN O. ROBERTS, JUNIOR F. ROBERTS, KENNETH ROBERTS, NOAH W. ROBERTS, ODENA ROBERTS, OLIVE G. ROBERTS, PAUL ROBERTS, PERRY ROBERTS, SUSAN C. ROBERTS, VAN R. ROBERTS, WM. R. ROBERTSON, E. R. ROBERTSON, ELISHA ROBERTSON, ERVIN ROBERTSON, GLENN C. ROBERTSON, LIONEL ROBERTSON, LLOYD G. ROBERTSON, MARGARET A. ROBERTSON, MARY ANN ROBERTSON, MILDRED ROBERTSON, OLLIE ROBERTSON, RAYMOND ROBERTSON, RAYMOND E. ROBERTSON, WILLIAM ROBINSON, BENCE ROBINSON, CLARENCE ROBINSON, CLAUDE ROBINSON, EDWARD R. ROBINSON, GEORGE ROBINSON, ISA ROBINSON, VICTOR I. ROBISON, ELIZA J. ROBISON, JACOB F. ROBISON, LAWRENCE E. ROBISON, PANSY ROBY, HERSHEL ROBY, ROBERT RODGER, GEORGE RODGERS, CLIFFORD L. RODGERS, ELMER L. RODMAN, MARY ANN RODOCKER, CHARLES W. RODOCKER, MAX ROEDER, WILBUR N. ROESCHLEIN, CORA A. ROESCHLEIN, EARNEST P. ROESCHLEIN, ELMER

ROESCHLEIN, EMERY ROESCHLEIN, ERNEST L. ROESCHLEIN, J. FRED ROESCHLEIN, LESTER ROESCHLEIN, ROSEMARY ROESCHLEIN, WM. E. ROGAN, JOHN F. ROGERS, CLAUDE A. ROGERS, EDITH ROGERS, ELMER A. ROGERS, ELMER K. ROGERS, GEORGE E. ROGERS, H. E. ROGERS, LUCILLE ROGERS, WAITIS L. JR. ROGERS, WAYNE ROHDE, LYNN O. ROHR C. L. AND SON COAL CO. ROLISON, MARY E. ROLLER, MASON B. ROLLINGS, JOHN ROLLINGS, KENNETH ROLLINS, BETTY ROLLINS, BOB D. ROLLINS, CLARENCE ROLLINS, CLYDE ROLLINS, DEBBY ROLLINS, EARL J. ROLLINS, GENE ROLLINS, JAMES R. ROLLINS, MODENA ROLLINS, NORMAN F. ROLLINS, ONA ROLLINS, W. ROBERT ROLLINS, WILLIE ROLLINS, WOODROW M. ROLLISON, DOVIE ROLLISON, FRANK ROLLISON, HENRY ROLLISON, MAY ROLLISON, REE ROLLISONS LOCKER ROMAS, BENNIE ROMAS, CHARLES RONAN, LAWRENCE ROOF, W. D. ROOS, WILLIAM ROOT, ORVILLE ROSE, ARCHIE ROSE, BERNARD ROSE, CECIL ROSE, DWIGHT ROSE, HERMAN ROSE, WAYNE ROSE, WESLEY ROSEHILL GUN & CONSERVATION ROSENBURY, WIRTSEL ROSS, CECIL A. ROSS, WARNER D. ROSS, WILLIAM V. ROTH, RUPERT M. ROTHROCK, CARL ROTHWELL, WILLIAM ROUDEBUSH, HAROLD ROUSH, JACOB R. ROW, ELHENNON ROWAN, MARY ROWE, ALVA ROWE, BASIL ROWE, CURTIS H. ROWE, DAVID D. ROWE, DORIS ROWE, EDGAR ROWE, LUCY A. ROWE, MILBURN ROWE, WILLIAM G. ROWLAND, DAVID E. ROWLAND, G. W. ROWLAND, GEORGE W. ROWLAND GRAIN & FEED CO. INC. ROWLAND, LEO ROYAL, TERRY C. ROYER, EARL

ROYER, FERRIS R. ROYER, JOHN ROYER, RICHARD ROYER, ROBERT G. RUMBLE, DONALD RUMINER, WILLIAM A. RUMPLE, OSCAR RUMPLE, REX RUMPLE, ROBERT RUNYON, CARL RUNYON, EDWARD O. RUSH, ARMINTA RUSH, BERT RUSH, CARL G. RUSH, CHARLES RUSH, EVERETT RUSH, FLORENCE RUSH, FRANK RUSH, SHARON D. RUSH, THEODORE RUSH, WANDA RUSH, WAYNE RUSH, ZEBEDEE RUSHER, JAMES H. RUSHER, LEROY RUSHER, MARION W. RUSHER, RALPH RUSHER, SHANNON RUSHTON, WILLIAM T. RUSS, JOHN E. RUSSELL, ALBERT R. RUSSELL, EARL RUSSELL, ESTEL L. RUSSELL, H. R. RUSSELL, J. E. RUSSELL, J. M. RUSSELL, MARTIN L. RUSSELL, OSCAR H. RUSSELL, PHILLIP R. RUSSELL, WILLIAM N. RYAN, BESSIE RYAN, EDWARD RYAN, MARSH RYAN, MARY COVEY RYAN, WILLIAM J. SAALMAN, O. EDWARD SAGARSEE, HENRY M. SALADEE, DENNY SALADIN, NORMA SALB, JOSEPH V. SALDA, ARTHUR SALESMAN, HOWARD W. SALESMAN, JOY H. SALINE CITY PARSONAGE SALINE CITY STREET LIGHTING SALLEE, FRED SALO, KARL O. SALTER, KENNETH H. SALYERS, CARL SALYERS, CHESTER M. SALYERS, LOGUSTA B. SALYERS, THOMAS L. SAMS, BERTHA SANBURN, DARRELL SANBURN, HARRY SANBURN, OSCAR SANDERS, CLAUDE SANDERS, EDWIN E. SANDERS, FRANCIS C. SANDERS, GEORGE R. SANDERS, HERSCHEL SANDERS, JAMES SANDERS, LEON SANDERS, WILLIAM SANDERSON, FRANCIS SANDS, JOHN R. SANDS, KERMIT SANKEY, DAVID SANTURE, CLAYTON SANTY, RICHARD SAPP, WILLIAM SARGENT, EMMA SARGENT, FRANK SARGENT, HOMER

JUNE 20 18

18A


SARVER, JOSEPHINE SATTERLY, JAMES S. SAUCERMAN, GOLDIA SAUNDERS, CHARLES H. SAUNDERS, DAVID SAUNDERS, EDWARD SAUNDERS, EDWARD R. SAUNDERS, EDWARD V. SAUNDERS, GEORGE R. SAVAGE, RALPH SAWYER, GEORGE L. SAYLE, HAROLD SAYLOR, DAN SAYLOR, MACK DONALD SCAGGS, LEONARD SCALF, CHARLES E. SCALF, S. M. SCARBOROUGH, OSCAR D. SCARBROUGH, JAMES SCHAFER, ADOLPH SCHAFER, CLEON SCHAFER, LEMOYNE SCHAFER, WALTER SCHAFER, WILLIAM E. SCHAFFER, JIMMY L. SCHARF, WILLIAM SCHATZLEY, BYRON SCHAUBER, OPAL SCHAUWECKER, EFFIE SCHAUWECKER, GORDON SCHAUWECKER, LARRY SCHELLING, FRANK SCHERSCHEL, RITA A. SCHIELE, EVA SCHIELE, WILLIAM D. SCHLAG, ROBERT C. SCHLATTER, JOHN SCHLEGEL, ARTHUR SCHLEGEL, GENE R. SCHLEGEL, JACOB SCHLEGEL, ORVAL SCHLEH, WITTMER I. SCHLOOT, HAZEL E. SCHLOOT, JAN F. SCHLOSSER, RUSSELL J. SCHLOTE, WILLIAM SCHMAUS, FRANCES SCHMIDT, CHAS SCHMIDT, FRED SCHMIDT, FREDERICK M. SCHMITT, JERRY SCHMITT, LILLIAN SCHNUCK, RUTH SCHOBER, MERLE SCHOENTRUP, JAMES M. SCHOFIELD, NOCUS SCHOFIELD, WILLIAM SCHOLL, WALTER H. SCHOPMEYER, CLARENCE SCHOPMEYER, CLAYBURN SCHOPMEYER, NORVAL SCHOPMEYER, RALPH SCHOPMEYER, ROBERT SCHOPMEYER, ROSALIND SCHOPMEYER, ROSALIND J. SCHOPMEYER, ROY L. SCHOPMEYER, VERNICE C. SCHOPMEYER, WAYNE SCHROCK, IRA JESSE SCHRODT, JOHN F. JR. SCHROEDER, CHARLES SCHROER, DENNIS SCHROER, HUBERT SCHROER, JOHN C. SCHROER, LAWRENCE SCHROER, LOIS SCHROPE, JOHN R. SCHUELER, PAUL A. SCHULTES, WILLIAM A. SCHULTZ, ALVIN SCHULTZ, VIRGIL W.

18B

JUNE 2018

SCHULZ, ROY L. SCHWAD, JAMES F. SCOFIELD, EMMA F. SCOTT, DALE SCOTT, EDGAR N. SCOTT, ELMER B. SCOTT, HARLEY SCOTT, HARRY SCOTT, HARRY G. SCOTT, HARRY L. SCOTT, JERRELL J. SCOTT, JERRY SCOTT, MARY RUTH SCOTT, MAX M. SCOTT, MAXINE SCOTT, MINNIE B. SCOTT, PANSY SCOTT, PAUL E. SCOTT, RENOS SCOTT, ROBERT S. SCOTT, ROGER SCOTT, WARREN L. SCOVILLE, CECIL L. SCROGGINS, TROY D. SCURLOCK, OSCAR A. SCUTCHFIELD, BERNETT SEANEY, OWEN SEARCY, CHESTER C. SEARS, CALVIN C. SEARS, CLIFFORD E. SEARS, DELBERT SEARS, EARL SEARS, EMMA F. SEARS, FORREST H. SEARS, LEO SEARS, LOWELL SEARS, ROY SEARS, THOMAS SECREST, ALFRED SECREST, FRANK SECREST, HENRY SECREST, JOHN SECREST, K. J. SECREST, ROSCOE SECREST, ROY SEDWICK, JOSEPHINE SEELEY, CHARLES W. SEIBOLD, RAY SEIGEL, RALPH SELBY, CLIFFORD SENDMEYER, U. E. SENSNY HASLER SERVICE STATION SENTIR, HARRIS SESTRIC, MICHAEL S. SETZER, ED SEXSON, MARCUS M. SEXSON, OTT SEXSON, PAUL SEXTON, BILLY SEXTON, FRED L. SEXTON, KENNETH SEXTON, ROBERT SEXTON, WM. FLOYD SEYMOUR, GEORGE E. SEYMOUR, HAROLD SEYMOUR, JERRY SEYMOUR, RAY SEYMOUR, ROY SHAFER, GERRIE J. SHAFFER, WARREN E. SHAIN, LEONARD SHAKE, DOYLE SHAKE, EMERSON A. SHAKE, HUBERT SHAKE, JERRY SHAKE, THOMAS C. SHANAFELT, PAUL D. SHANAHAN, EUGENE SHANKLIN, MAURICE SHANKLIN, ROY E. SHANKS, MAURICE L. SHANKS, WILLIAM SHAPPELL, JONATHAN R. SHARP, JEANETTE SHARP, JERRY F. SHARP, VERA B.

SHARR, AUSTIN M. SHARR, J. T. SHARR, RUSSELL SHARR, SHIRLEY SHARUM, NORMAN A. SHATTUCK, J. C. SHAW, C. ALLEN SHAW, CHARLES E. SHAW, CLYDE SHAW, DONALD SHAW, JAMES SHAW, JESSE M. SHAW, MARJORIE A. SHAW, MARVIN SHAW, NESBIT SHAW, OTHO SHAW, WILLIAM SHEAR, LLOYD SHEEHY, LEO SHEEN, JAMES H. SHEESE, FLETCHER SHEESE, FLOYD SHEESE, GROVER SHEESE, PAUL SHEETS, FRANK SHEETS, NELLIE SHEETS, NELLIE M. SHEETZ, LORENE SHEETZ, RALPH W. SHEFFIELD, EDWARD SHELL, V. B. SHELLHARDT, RICHARD SHELTON, A. SHERMAN SHELTON, COMADORE SHELTON, GERALD SHELTON, JAMES ANDY SHELTON, THEODORE S. SHEPHERD, CHARLES R SHEPHERD, CLARENCE SHEPHERD, CLETES SHEPHERD, ESSIE L. SHEPHERD, HOWARD JR. SHEPHERD, JUANITA M. SHEPHERD, KENNETH SHEPHERD, NEWTON E. SHERFIELD, CHARLIE SHERFIELD, HERSCHEL SHERFIELD, HOBART SHERFIELD, JOHN A. SHERFIELD, MARTHA J. SHERMAN, WILLARD SHERRARD, ARMILDA SHERRARD, CLARENCE JR. SHERRARD, ROBERT W. SHERROW, GLENN SHERTZER, DAISY SHERTZER, EDWIN SHERTZER, PAUL SHEW, FRANKLIN J. SHICKLES, ARVIL SHIDLER, CLIFTON J. SHIDLER, MERLE SHIELDS, CLYDE SHIELDS, DAVID SHIELDS, ELMO SHIELDS, EVERETT SHIELDS, HENRY SHIELDS, HERSHEL SHIELDS, HOMER SHIELDS, JAMES L. SHIELDS, LEVI SHIELDS, MARJORIE SHIELDS, ROY SHIELDS, WM. ROY SHIELE, WM. J. SHIKLETT, FRANK SHILKETT, GALLEN SHILOH BAPTIST CHURCH SHINNOCK, SAMUEL SHIPLEY, JAMES R. SHISHCOFF, JULIA SHONK, CHARLES L. SHONK, DANIEL SHONK, DELBERT SHONK, EMMA

SHONK, FOSTER SHONK, LEON SHOOK, D. E. SHOOK, NORMAN SHOPMEYER, VERNICE SHOPTAW, LEO SHORES, EMMA J. SHORES, LESLIE SHORT, ESTLE I. SHORT, JERRY SHORT, LAUREN A. SHORT, O. C. SHORT, ROY N. SHORTER, WM. R. SHOULTZ, MARGARET SHOUSE, DORA SHOUSE, HAROLD E. SHOUSE, OTTO SHOUSE, WARREN SHOWECKER, CHESTER SHULTZ, GEORGIE SHUTE, EDWARD SHY, RICHARD C. SIEDL, ROGER SIEGEL, RALPH SIEGELIN, ROY SIEVERT, EARL E. SIGMAN, LLOYD JR. SILVERS, COVERT SILVERS, FRANK O. SIMES, MARY M. SIMMERMAN, EMIL SIMMERMAN, JUDAH SIMMERMAN, LINDA SIMMERMAN, LLOYD SIMMERMAN, ROBERT SIMMERT, ROBERT SIMMONS, FERN I. SIMMONS, JAMES M. SIMMONS, JAMES R. SIMMONS, ROSE MARY SIMMONS, WILLIAM SIMMONS, WILLIAM JR. SIMMS, JAMES G. SIMON, FERNAND SIMON, HEINZ SIMONS, MABLE SIMPSON, CHARLES SIMPSON, CHRISTINA SIMPSON, EUNICE SIMPSON, EVA M. SIMPSON, GERALD A. SIMPSON, JOHN SIMPSON, JOHN W. SIMPSON, RE. WM. L. SIMS, ABE SIMS, BERTHA L. SIMS, DORA SIMS, ERNEST W. SIMS, FRANK E. SIMS, HERMAN JR. SIMS, IVAN O. SIMS, JAMES G. SIMS, JESSE SIMS, LIZA C. SIMS, NELLIE C. SIMS, NOAH SIMS, RALPH SIMS, RAY SIMS, RAYMOND SIMS, RUSSELL SIMS, TRUMAN SINCLAIR, ALVA D. SINCLAIR, ROGER SINDERS, CHARLIE SINDERS, CHESTER SINDERS, HERSCHEL SINDERS, J. R. SINDERS, LEVI SINDERS, RAY SINGERS, JACK M. SINGLETON, BILLY SINK, BEN SINK, JAMES SIPES, BASIL SIPES, BURL EUGENE SIPES, DWIGHT R.

SIPES, JACK SIPES, JASPER SIPES, JASPER E. SIPES, JOHN R. SIPES, KENNETH C. SIPES, MAUDE M. SISCOE, CLOVIS SISCOE, ROGER SISCOE, WILLIAM H. SISIL, COLUMBUS SIVERTSON, HAROLD SIZEMORE, JOHN SIZEMORE, REED SIZEMORE, WILLIAM P. SKAGGS, ANNA M. SKAGGS, FOSTER SKEEN, JAMES H. SKELTON, CHARLES SKELTON, FLOYD W. SKETO, EVERETT SKINNER, ACE SKINNER, GERALD L. SKINNER, H. D. SKINNER, HARVEY SKINNER, RICHARD LEE SKINNER, VERNON SKINNER, VERNON P. SKINNER, WILLIAM SKIRKA, GEORGE SKIRVIN, FRED SKIRVIN, ILENE SKOMP, DARRELL SKOMP, HILAND SKOMP, JOHN E. SKOMP, ROBERT R. SKOMP, WILLIAM K. SLACK, GRANVILLE R. SLACK, RAYMOND T. SLACK, WM. PETE SLANAC, JOSEPH SLANKARD, ROYAL SLATE, WILLIAM O. SLATER, J. C. SLATER, JACK SLAVENS, STANFORD SLIFER, DALE E. SLONE, ROBERT SLOUGH, ALBERT SLOUGH, E. D. SLOUGH, FRANK V. SLUDER, IRA W. SLUDER, NELLE W. SLUDER, ROY G. SLUSHER, OWEN SMALL, ALVA SMALL, ANNA E. SMALL, HAROLD SMALL, THOMAS G. SMEDLEY, JOHN D. SMELSER, LEE SMITH SMITH, ALFRED LEE SMITH, ALVA T. SMITH, ANCEL SMITH, ARTHUR L. SMITH, BEVERLY SMITH, BILLIE SMITH, CARL E. SMITH, CARL EDWIN SMITH, CHARLES SMITH, CHARLES B. SMITH, CHARLES E. SMITH, CHARLES R. SMITH, CHLOE SMITH, CLARA B. SMITH, CLARENCE SMITH, CLEMEN M. SMITH, CLEVE SMITH, CLONA D. SMITH, CLOVIS F. SMITH, CURTIS SMITH, DANIEL H. SMITH, DELBERT SMITH, DONALD B. SMITH, DONALD R. SMITH, EARL H. SMITH, EDWARD C.

SMITH, ELMER C. SMITH, ELMER N. SMITH, ELMER WM. SMITH, ERNEST SMITH, ETHEL M. SMITH, EUGENE SMITH, EZRA SMITH, F. HAROLD SMITH, FELBERT SMITH, FOREST SMITH, FRANK SMITH, FRANK C. SMITH, FRED SMITH, FREDERICK B. SMITH, GENE SMITH, GEORGE B. SMITH, GEORGE O. SMITH, GERALD E. SMITH, GERRELD SMITH, GILBERT SMITH, GLADSTONE SMITH, HARLAN V. SMITH, HARRY SMITH, HENRY SMITH, HILL SMITH, HOLLIS L. SMITH, HOWARD H. SMITH, INA M. SMITH, IRA K. SMITH, JACK SMITH, JACOB S. SMITH, JAMES B. SMITH, JAMES D. SMITH, JAMES E. SMITH, JAMES EDWARD SMITH, JAMES T. SMITH, JOE F. SMITH, JOHN SMITH, JOHN L. SMITH, JOHN R. SMITH, JUNIOR RAY SMITH, KENNETH SMITH, LARRY SMITH, LAWRENCE SMITH, LAWRENCE S. SMITH, LEWIS SMITH, LEX E. SMITH, LOWELL A. SMITH, LYMAN SMITH, MAX SMITH, MELVIN SMITH, MELVY O. SMITH, MILLARD W. SMITH, MINNIE SMITH, MINNIE M. SMITH, NORA SMITH, ODIS SMITH, PAUL SMITH, PAUL E. SMITH, RALPH SMITH, RALPH W. SMITH, RICHARD P. SMITH, ROBERT D. SMITH, ROBERT E. SMITH, ROBERT W. SMITH, ROY T. SMITH, RUBEN E. SMITH, SAMUEL P. SMITH, SARAH C. SMITH, TOM SMITH, VERNON R. SMITH, VIRGIL SMITH, WILLIAM FRANK SMITH, WILLIE O. SMOCK, EMILY SMOCK, MARY E. SMOOT, HENRY SMOOT, LLOYD D. SMOOT, RUSSELL SMYTH, CHARLIE G. SMYTH, ETHEL L. SMYTH, ETHEL M. SNAPP, WILLIAM B. JR. SNAPP, WILLIAM H. SNAPP, WM. SNELLENBERGER, NELSON


SNODDY, JAMES E. SNODDY, MARVIN SNOW, ELMER I. SNOW, JOHN W. SNOW, ROGER LEE SNOW, VIOLA PAGE SNOW, WILLIAM SNYDER, ARTHUR F. SNYDER, GEORGE E. SNYDER, JAMES A. SNYDER, MONA F. SNYDER, RALPH SNYDER, WARD SOLSBERRY SADDLE CLUB SOMMERS, EDNA SONNEFIFELD, WILLIAM R. SORTWELL, FRANK W. SOSBE, CHARLES E. SOUDER, THOMAS SOUDERS, EDWARD L. SOUDERS, HENRY L. SOUDERS, HENRY S. SOUDERS, KENNETH SOUDERS, LEONARD E. SOUDERS, LORIS SOUDERS, THOMAS W. SOULES, CHARLES A. JR. SOUTER, AUDREY SOUTHERN, ALICE SOUTHERN, EUGENE SOUTHERN, HARLEY SOUTHERN, HERSCHEL SOUTHERN, LENA SOUTHERN, LOUISE SOUTHERN, NORMAN E. SOUTHERN, ORMAUL SOUTHERN, RODNEY DEAN SOUTHWORTH, WILFORD T. SOWDER, BEULAH SOWDER, DALE C. SOWDER, JOHN C. JR. SOWDER, NOBLE SOWDER, PAUL SOWDER, PEARL SOWDERS, BONNIE SOWDERS, HAROLD W. SOWDERS, VERNON SOWERS, HERMAN SOWERS, STANLEY SOWERS, WILLIAM SOWERS, WM. SOWKA, IGNATIUS N. SPAINHOWER, MEARL L. SPANGLER, DON SPANN, R. F. SPARKS, ALLIE SPARKS, BRIAN L. SPARKS, CARL H. SPARKS, CHARLES H. SPARKS, CHAS JR. SPARKS, CLIFFORD D. SPARKS, DELPHIA A. SPARKS, DEWEY SPARKS, EMMA SPARKS, EVA SPARKS, GEORGE SPARKS, HARLEY A. SPARKS, HARVEY SPARKS, HOWARD C. SPARKS, J. LLOYD SPARKS, JAMES F. SPARKS, KENNETH SPARKS, LONNIE SPARKS, MERLE SPARKS, OSCAR SPARKS, PAUL R. SPARKS, ROBERT C. SPARKS, ROBERT L. SPARKS, RUTH E. SPARKS, VONDA SPARKS, W. ROY SPARKS, WENDELL RAY

SPARKS, WILL L. SPEARS, DELOS SPEARS, ED SPEARS, MAX E. SPEARS, ROY SPEAS, CLAUDE SPEAS, JAMES F. SPEAS, LOYD SPEAS, NELLIE L. SPEAS, WAYNE W. SPEEDWAY OIL COMPANY INC. SPEER, ESTHER SPEER, LLOYD C. SPELBRING, IRVIN L. SPELBRING, JAMES E. SPELTS, ALVA C. SPELTS, ELMER L. SPELTS, LESTER SPELTS, MILDRED SPELTS, WILLIS SPENCE, WILLIAM M. SPENCER, CARL O. SPENCER, RUBY SPICE, GAIL SPICE, JACK L. SPICER, HARLEY SPINKS, ELMER SPINKS, GEORGIA SPINKS, MURLEY SPINKS, SAM SPOONMORE, CARL L. SPOONMORE, WILLIAM SPRADLIN, WILLIAM W. SPRIGGS, CHARLIE SPRING HILL STONE CO. SPRINGER, BESSIE SPRINKLE, RALPH SPURLOCK, JOHN W. SPURR, EUDORA SQUIRE, DAVID SQUIRE, HENRY P. SQUIRE, NATHEN E. SQUIRE, WM. M. SQUIRES, HENRY S. SQUIRES, RALPH L. SQUIRES, STOCKLIN SQUIRES, SUSIE SRYGLEY, EDNA ST. JOHN, CARL ST. JOHN, RALPH L. ST. PAUL LUTHERAN CHURCH STACKMAN, CHARLES STADER, LOUIS J. STADLER, ORLANDO M. STADLER, RALPH STAFFORD CHAPEL CHURCH STAFFORD, FLOYD STAFFORD, JAMES L. STAFFORD, JAMES R. STAFFORD, MARJORIE STAFFORD, PAULINE STAGGS, S. E. STAHL, CHARLES A. STAHL, DANIEL W. STAHL, FLOYD STAHL JOHN AND SON STAHL, RAY STAHL, WILSON STAISCH, EVA STAKER, WESLEY STALCUP, CHARLES L. STALCUP, FRANK A. STALCUP, MILDRED STALCUP, REX STALCUP, WILBUR STALDER, ROBERT L. STALDER, ROBERT LEE STALEY, CHARLES STALEY, D. R. STALEY, EDWARD STALEY, LLOYD H. STALEY, RENOS STALEY, SOLON

STAMM, A. J. STAMM, DAVID H. STANCOMBE, JOHNNY STANFIELD, DORIS STANFIELD, LEO STANFIELD, WM. J. STANGER, SANDRA J. STANLEY, JOHN STANLEY, WILLIAM H. STANSIFER, ROY STANTON, RUBE STANTZ, CLYDE D. STANTZ, GILBERT STANTZ, KERY JR. STANTZ, KERY SR. STANTZ, ROBERT STANTZ, VIOLA B. STARK, EMMA STARK, JULIA M. STARK, RAYMOND JACK STARKS, CHARLES F. STARNES, EMMA STARNES, LEON STARR, MAY STARR, PAUL E. STARR, RALPH STARRETT, ALBERT J. STEARLEY, CHARLES STEARLEY, DON STEARLEY, EDWARD STEARLEY, JOHN STEARLEY, MYRTLE STEARLY, GUST STEDMAN, EVERETT STEELE, L. B. STEELE, LORA STEELE, RAYMOND STEELE, ROBERT J. STEELE, WILLIAM R. STEELE, WM. STEEN, ALBERT C. STEFFEN, D. T. STEGEMOLLER, CHARLES E. STEGEMOLLER, CHARLES W. STEIN, PAUL E. STEIN, ROBERT J. STEPHEN, WANDA J. STEPHENS, ARTHUR STEPHENS, CLAUDE L. STEPHENS, FLORA B. STEPHENS, JAMES STEPHENS, JERRY STEPHENS, JOHN STEPHENS, JOHN H. STEPHENS, JOHN T. STEPHENS, LAWRENCE STEPHENS, MARY E. STEPHENS, SHERMAN STEPHENSON, CHARLES STEPHENSON, JAMES H. STEPLER, SIMON STERCHI, SAMUEL F. STERLING DRILLING CORP. STERLING, HAROLD E. STERLING, JOSEPH A. STEUERWALD, CHESTER STEUERWALD, ERNEST P. STEUERWALD, HARVEY STEUERWALD, JACK C. STEUERWALD, WAYNE STEURWALD, ELMER STEVENS, GENE STEVENS, JACK STEVENS, KENNETH STEVENS, LEE STEVENS, PEARL STEVENS, ROBERT STEVENSON, ERNEST LLOYD STEVENSON, ROBERT STEVENSON, WALTER STEVENSON, WILLIAM

STEVENSON, WILLIAM JR. STEVENSON, WM. B. JR. STEVES, WINFRED E. STEWARD, CURTIS STEWARD, JOSEPHINE STEWARD, RAYMOND O. STEWARD, WAYNE STEWART, ALBERT STEWART, BILL STEWART, BUENA STEWART, CARROLL STEWART, CLARENCE STEWART, CLIFFORD STEWART, CURT STEWART, DONALD F. STEWART, DUNCAN STEWART, EDITH STEWART, EMERY M. STEWART, FANNIE C. STEWART, GAYLORD H. STEWART, GEORGE R. STEWART, HAROLD B. STEWART, HERBERT L. STEWART, JAMES E. STEWART, JOHN E. STEWART, L. E. STEWART, LARRY W. STEWART, LEE F. STEWART, MILDRED STEWART, REX L. STEWART, RICHARD STEWART, ROY STEWART, ZELPHA STICKLES, A. M. STICKLES, EMMA E. STICKLES, ROSS M. STIERWALT, CEDRICK STILGER, WILLIAM STILLIONS, JOHN P. STINER, WILLIAM T. STINGER, RAYMOND STINNETT, SAM STINOGEL, ORVIL STINSON, FREDRICK STINSON, R. M. STINSON, WARREN STIRNEMAN, KEN STITZLE, MARION STOCKLEY, JAMES STOCKTON TWP SCHOOL STOELTING, LAWRENCE STOGODILL, C. M. STOGSDILL, CECIL M. STOGSDILL, CLYDE STOGSDILL, JOE STOGSDILL, PANSY STOGSDILL, PAUL E. STOGSDILL, ROLLA STOLTZ, RONALD L. STONE, GERALD STONE, HELEN STONE, PERRY STONE, RAYMOND STONE, ROSS H. STONE, THOMAS R. STONEBURNER, ELMER STORM, ONA STORMS, RAYMOND STORY, MARK STORY, WINONA STOUGH, CURT STOUGH, WAYNE STOUT, BERT M. STOUT, CURRIE M. STOUT, DENNIS STOUT, LOLA D. STOUT, TOM STOVALL, R. J. STRAHLA, CARL STRAHLE, THEODORE STRANGE, N. W. STRANGE, WILLIAM A. STRAUSER, ALVA E. STRAUSER, CLYDE STRAUSER, GEORGE

STRAUSER, HARLEY STRAUSER, RALEIGH STRAUSER, RAYMOND D. STRAUSER, VERNON D. STREACKER, RICHARD STREET, ROBERT L. STREMMING, VIVIAN E. STRICKLAND, BERNARD STRICKLAND, HARLEY STRICKLAND, JULIUS E. STRICKLAND, ROBERT STRIETELMEIER, CARL F. STRIETELMEIER, ELMER STRINGER, FRED A. STRINGHAM, E. G. STRONG, FLOYD STRONG, LYLE STRONG, W. C. STROSNIDER, WM. STROTHER, LAWRENCE STROUD, DALE STROUD, FLOYD STROUD, FLOYD W. STROUSE, EMMA STROUSE, MOSE STROUSE, O. R. STRUNK, CECIL STRUNK, LOYD STRUNK, ROBERT T. STUCK, DOLLIE N. STUCKEY, ROBERT D. STULTZ, ADDIE STULTZ, FRITZ STULTZ, WILLIAM STULTZ, WILLIAM E. STUNKARD, CLARA S. STUNKARD, FLO STURGEON, BERNICE STURGEON, EDWARD STURGEON, JAMES STURGIS, CHARLES STURGIS, FRANK STURGIS, V. H. STUVER, WILLIAM A. STWALLEY, CHARLES E. STWALLEY, HAROLD SUBLETT, JAMES L. SUDBRINK, WILLIAM SUGAR CREEK CREAMERY SULLIVAN, ARTHUR SULLIVAN, CARL W. SULLIVAN, D. V. SULLIVAN, DELMA E. SULLIVAN, DENVER A. SULLIVAN, EARL SULLIVAN, ELZA SULLIVAN, FRANK SULLIVAN, GEORGE W. SULLIVAN, HAROLD SULLIVAN, JACK E. SULLIVAN, JACK JR. SULLIVAN, JACK SR. SULLIVAN, JAMES P. SULLIVAN, JESSE SULLIVAN, JOHN SULLIVAN, JOHN F. SULLIVAN, KENNETH SULLIVAN, LETHA SULLIVAN, MINNIE SULLIVAN, ORA SULLIVAN, ORVAL SULLIVAN, OSCAR SULLIVAN, ROBERT JR. SULLIVAN, ROY SULLIVAN, RUSSELL E. SULLIVAN, RUTH SULLIVAN, VERNON F. SULLIVAN, WALLACE SULT, DONALD SUMMERLOT, J. W. SUMMERS, ORLIE R. SUMMERVILLE, ANNA SUMMERVILLE, ARTHUR SUMMERVILLE, CLETHO SUMMERVILLE, O. W.

SUMMERVILLE, WILLIAM E. SUMMITT, DAVID SUMMITT, JOAN SUMMITT, TED SUMNER, ELMA SUMNER, P. D. JR. SUN OIL COMPANY SUNFLOWER SALVAGE CO. SUNSET INN SUPER, TOM SUPER, TOMMY W. SUTHERLAND, JANE SUTHERLAND, RALPH SUTHERLIN, FRED E. SR. SUTHERLIN, RONALD J. SUTPHIN, W. M. SUTTLES, SUE SUTTON, CLIFFORD P. SUTTON, EMERSON SUTTON, GEORGE SUTTON, GERVIS W. SUTTON, GREVIS W. JR. SUTTON, HOWARD SUTTON, LEROY SUTTON, NORMAN O. SWABY, CHESTER A. SWABY, EVERETT R. SWABY, FRANCIS SWABY, JANET P. SWABY, LESTER SWABY, WINFORD L. SWAIM, WILLIAM SWALLEY, LOWELL SWAN, DAVID SWAN, EDITH SWAN, JAMES SWAN, NORVAL A. SWANAGAN, C. A. SWANGO, DARRELL Q. SWANGO, DICK SWANGO, EMERY SWANGO, GREENBERRY SWANGO, HERBERT SWANGO, JACKY SWANGO, JAMES R. SWANGO, RUPERT SWANK, PAUL SWANK, ROY R. SWARBRICK, BERTHA M. SWAYZE, ALVA SWEENEY, CLAUDE E. SWEETANA, ANDREW S. SWITZ CITY CHRISTIAN CH. PARS SYCHOWSKI, F. B. SYKES, CHARLES E. SYLVANIA WESLEYAN CHURCH SYLVESTER, EDWARD SYLVESTER, FANNIE SYLVESTER, MAX TABOR, DARIUS TABOR, HANFORD TABOR, RICHARD A. TAGUE, JACOB TALBOT, THOMAS TALBOTT, JOHN E. TALLEY, CLYDE E. TALLEY, EARL N. TALLY, CHARLES M. TALLY, ROBERT M. TALLY, RUSSELL TALLY, WAYNE TALPAS, MIKE TAME, BUTHEL TANKERSLEY, BARBARA TANKERSLEY, CLARENCE TANKSLEY, DONALD TANKSLEY, MURIEL TANNEHILL, ARLIE TAPY, LOLA TARGETT, ALFRED JR. TARGETT, ALFRED WM. TARTER, WALTER JR. TATASCIORE, J. W.

JUNE 2018

18C


TATTON, JOHN M JR. TAYLOR, A. B. TAYLOR, ALBERT R. TAYLOR, ANGELA TAYLOR, ARNOLD TAYLOR, CHESTER S. TAYLOR, CLAUDE B. TAYLOR, CLEO TAYLOR, EDWARD TAYLOR, ELBERT E. TAYLOR, EMMITT A. TAYLOR, EVERETT TAYLOR, GEORGE W. TAYLOR, HAROLD J. TAYLOR, J. EDWARD TAYLOR, J. H. TAYLOR, JAMES TAYLOR, LEWIS A. TAYLOR, LLOYD TAYLOR, LLOYD O. TAYLOR, ONEITA KAY TAYLOR, RAYMOND E. TAYLOR, WILBER TEAGUE, EDGAR TEAGUE, ELMER TEAGUE, GLENN M. TEAGUE, HELEN TEDDER, ROMEY H. TELLAS, DONALD L. TEMPLETON, E. FAYE TEMPLETON, HARRY TENER, HAROLD TENNANT, MALCOLM L. TERHUNE, BILL TERHUNE, DEAN TERHUNE, HARLEY W. TERHUNE, LEO TERHUNE, MALCOLM C. TERHUNE, MURRAY TERPIN, ROBERT JR. TERRELL, ALBERT TERRELL, ARTHUR TERRELL, CLIFFORD J. TERRELL, EVERETT TERRELL, FLOYD TERRELL, FRANK TERRELL, IVAN TERRELL, JANETTE TERRELL, LAWRENCE M. TERRELL, LEO J. TERRELL, PERCY TERRELL, ROBERT TERRELL, THURMAN E. TERRELL, WALTER TERRELL, WAYNE L. TERRY, EARL TERRY, JOHN TERRY, ROBERT TETRICK, ELVIRA TEVAULT, RICHARD THACKER, ANNA O. THACKER, HARVEY THACKER, WILLIS A. THATCHER, EVERETT THATCHER, RICHARD THAYER, ORVILLE THOMAS, CHARLES M. THOMAS, CLAUDE E. THOMAS, CLAUDE JR. THOMAS, CLYDE THOMAS, EMMITT THOMAS, FRANKLIN THOMAS, FRED THOMAS, GLENN THOMAS, HAROLD THOMAS, HOBART THOMAS, HOMER S. THOMAS, IRA L. THOMAS, J. E. THOMAS, JAMES THOMAS, JAMES W. THOMAS, LAWRENCE THOMAS, LYLE THOMAS, MARION F. THOMAS, MELVIN H. THOMAS, O. R. THOMAS, ORVILLE R.

18D

JUNE 2018

THOMAS, QUINCE THOMAS, QUINCY E. THOMAS, R. J. THOMAS, ROBERT K. THOMAS, ROY THOMAS, ROY A. THOMAS, SETH E. SR. THOMAS, WARREN THOMAS, WARREN H. THOMAS, WAYNE THOMAS, WAYNE L. THOMAS, WILLIS L. THOMAS, WM. A. JR. THOMAS, WM. R. THOMASSON, LUCILE THOMASSON, SAMMY THOMPSON, ARTER V. THOMPSON BROS THOMPSON, C. M. THOMPSON, CHARLES THOMPSON, CLARENCE W. THOMPSON, CLYDE THOMPSON, COY THOMPSON, DALLAS W. THOMPSON, DELMAR L. THOMPSON, ED THOMPSON, EDWIN THOMPSON, EZRA THOMPSON, FRANK D. THOMPSON, GLENN M. THOMPSON, H. B. THOMPSON, HELMAN THOMPSON, HENRY A. THOMPSON, IRA THOMPSON, JEANETTE THOMPSON, JOHN O. THOMPSON, LARRY THOMPSON, LARRY G. THOMPSON, LLOYD THOMPSON, MABEL THOMPSON, MARVIN THOMPSON, MARY HELEN THOMPSON, MYERS THOMPSON, PAUL THOMPSON, RALPH M. THOMPSON, RALPH R. THOMPSON, ROBERT P. THOMPSON, ROY THOMPSON, RUSSELL W. THOMPSON, T. R. THOMPSON, WILLIAM THOMPSON, WILLIAM C. THOMPSON, WILLIAM H. THOMSON, LEE THOMSON, WILLIAM THORNTON, LYNDA L. THRASH, RUFUS J. THURMAN, RUFUS THURSTON, JOHN TICKEL, JOHN TICKEL, JOHN L. TIDD, EARL H. TIEFEL, JAMES TIEFEL, JOHN TIEMAN, CLARA J. TILFORD, WILLARD L. TILLER, LUTHER J. TIME OIL COMPANY TIMMONS, CHARLES W. TIMMONS, ORVAL C. TINCHER, CHARLES W. TINCHER, JIM TINCHER, JOE TINCHER, ROBERT TINCHER, WM. R. TIPPETT, GEORGE TIPPY, GLENN F. TIPTON, CHARLES W. TITZER, JOE TODD, ALFRED LEON TODD, CURTIS TODD, FRANK TODD, HAROLD TODD, HERMAN TODD, IVAN

TODD, JOHN TODD, KENNETH H. TODD, LLOYD V. TODD, OLIN M. TODD, RAYMOND R. TODD, WILLIAM M. TOLBERT, CECIL V. TOLEMY, PETER TOLEN, LEROY TOLEN, ROBERT TOLLE, RAY TOLLIVER, WAYNE F. TOMCZAK, MICKAEL T. TOMEY, D. J. TOOLEY, CHARLES J. TOON, JOSEPH H. TORBERT, MARY TORSON, EUGENE L. TOTTON, JOHN M. JR. TOTTON, MILTON TOWER SERVICE GRILL TOWNSEND, HALDON L. TOWNSEND, MARVEL TOWNSEND, R. O. TOWNSEND, RODNEY FRED TOWNSEND, WM. G. TRACY, FLOYD TRACY, THOMAS E. TRACY, VIRGIL A. TRADER, PERRY W. TRAMMELL, CHARLES TREADWAY, EARL TREASH, ELZIA E. TRENDELMAN, DONALD L. TRENDELMAN, GLENN E. TRENT, C. G. TRENT, MELVIN TRENTA, TONY TRESSEL, MAYME F. TRESTER, ROY TRIBBETT, SALLY TRIBBY, EUGENE TRIMBLE, NELSON TRIMBLE, RONALD KENT TRIMBLE, STERLING TRIMMER, FRANCIS TRIPLETT, JOHN W. TRIPLETT, TRENTON TRISLER, LYMAN L. TROSPER, CHESTER G. TROTTER, KERMIT E. TROTTER, RALPH J. TROUT, FRANK TROUT, JACK W. TROUT, MARY N. TROXEL, JAMES TROXELL, JAMES TRUEBLOOD, ROBERT W. TRUEBLOOD, WILSON TRUESDELL, WILLIAM I. TRUITT, ALICE TRUMP, STELLA TRUSLER, JAMES JOSEPH TRUSTY, EARL J. TRYON, HARRY TRYON, MARTHA TUCKER, GRACE TUCKER, JOHN TUCKER, ROSE MARIE TUCKER, WALTER L. TUGGLE, DONALD TUNGATE, JAMES TUNGATE, ROBERT TUNGATE, ROBERT E. TURK, FRED TURLEY, ROBERT TURNER, ARCHIE V. TURNER, BEN TURNER, BERNARD TURNER, BERNICE TURNER, DAVID LYNN TURNER, EZRA TURNER, HAROLD TURNER, HULCEE TURNER, JAMES H.

TURNER, JANIE TURNER, KENNETH TURNER, NOBLE B. TURNER, ROBERT E. TURNER, WILLIAM H. TURPEN, BURNELL TURPEN, DALLAS TURPEN, HOWARD DEWEY TURPEN, LEVI TURPEN, R. JOE TURPIN, ANNA E. TURPIN, BRUCE TURPIN, ELMER TURPIN, GEORGE TURPIN, GEORGE L. TURPIN, HOBART TURPIN, IVAN TURPIN, JENNIE TURPIN, LOGAN TURPIN, RAYMOND TURPIN, RICHARD TURPIN, ROBERT JR. TYLER, ANNIE UHRLAUB, JOHN C. ULAND, IVAN ULAND, J. L. ULAND, ORVAL ULAND, ROBERT E. ULRICH, JOE ULRICH, NELLIE UNDERHILL, ALBERT UNDERWOOD, ANNA E. UNDERWOOD, JOHN R. UNGER, FRANK UNGER, LEWIS UNION PRIM. BAPTIST CHURCH UNION VALLEY CHURCH UPSHAW, CECILE H. URBAIN, ROY JR. URSEY, ROSA USERY, ROSA USREY, WILLIAM R. UTTERBACK, D. L. UTTERBACK, JOHN H. VAIR, ROSE VALLANCE, WH. H. VAN BUREN TWP. SCHOOL KIRBY VANCE, WALKER VANDEVENTER, DIXIE VANDEVENTER, EZRA VANDEVENTER, I. T. VANDEVENTER, ROZELLA VANDEVENTER, SCOTT VANDEVENTER, SHELDON VANDEVENTER, SIMON VANHENNICK, NEIL VANHOOK, E. H. VANHOOK, ESTHER VANHORN, CHARLES RAY VANHORN, FRED F. VANHORN, HAROLD W. VANHORN, JOHN B. VANHORN, PAUL R. VANMETER, ROBERT E. VANNESS, CHARLES W. VANNESS, CLIFFORD VANNESS, FORREST VANSLYKE, GEORGE VANSLYKE, ROY VANTUYLE, HERBERT OTTO VANWORMER, R. C. VARVELL, STANLEY VASS, D. H. VAUGHN, BEULAH VAUGHN, BUDDIE VAUGHN, NORMAN VAUGHN, SAMUEL VAUGHN, WILLIAM VEACH, FRANK VEATCH, BERNARD R.

VEHSLAGE, BETTY VEIRS, ERWIN VELA, ABEL VERMEER, W. H. VERSEMAN, GERHART VEST, ANDREW J. VEST, EUGENE VEST, FERN VEST, FRANK R. VEST, GEORGIA R. VEST, JAFUS VEST, ORVAL E. VEST, PARSIE R. VICCELLIO, CLARENCE H. VICKERS, ASHER VICKERS, DONALD VICKERS, STATION VICKERS, VICTOR VIEIRA, LEONARD JR. VIETOR, WILLIAM H. VILLAIN, PHYLLIS VILLAIN, RICHARD VILLIERS, ROLAND VINCENT, GEORGE VINCENT, LENARD VINCENT, LEONARD VINCENT, OTIS VIRGINIA CAROLINA CHEMICAL VISE, VERLIA VOLIVA, RUTH E. VONTHADEN, JAMES E. VOORHIES, ARNOLD VOWELL, DELBERT R. VOYLES, CECIL M. VOYLES, GLENN E. WADE, BEN WADE, CHARLES C. WADE, FRANCIS M. WADE, FRANK WADE, GEORGE WADE, HARRY WADE, JAMES F. WADE, JOHN WADE, LELAND WADE, NOAH WADE, OLIVE F. WADE, ORVAL H. WADE, PAUL WADE, WILLIAM W. WADSWORTH, JAMES C. WAGAMAN, LINCOLN WAGGONER, ELBERT W. WAGGONER, JAMES N. WAGGONER, LEONARD WAGGONER, LEWIS E. WAGGONER, ODIS WAGGONER, PARIS G. WAGGONER, PAUL WAGGONER, RALPH WAGGONER, WILLIAM A. WAGNER, ALVA WAGNER, EARL WAGNER, ELZA WAGNER, JACOB WAGNER, NOVELLA WAGNER, OLA WAGNER, ORAN WAGNER, ORVILLE I. WAGNER, RUSSELL WAGNER, WALTER WAGONER, GEORGE L. WAGONER, JAMES E. WAGONER, M. G. WAGONER, M. WOODROW WAGONER, MERLIN F. WAGONER, THELMA K. WAGONER, WM. C. WAINWRIGHT, J. R. WAKEFIELD, FRANK WAKEFIELD, KENNETH C. WAKEFIELD, MYRTLE WAKEFIELD, W. J. WALCOTT, REX WALDBIESER, MALCOLM WALDEN, ROSS

WALDON, HARRY WALDON, JIM WALDON, LEONARD WALDRIDGE, DICK W. WALDRIDGE, JOSEPH C. WALDRIDGE, OLIVE WALDRIP, RAYMOND WALDRIP, STOKELY D. WALDRON, OLIVE WALDRON, WORTH WALKER, BERTHA WALKER, CLYDE R. WALKER, DONNA A. WALKER, ED WALKER, GERALD C. WALKER, GLENN E. WALKER, HARRY WALKER, JAMES WALKER, KIMBLE WALKER, LEE WALKER, LESTER WALKER, OSCAR WALKER, OWEN H. WALKER, RANDALL WALKER, THOMAS WALKER, VIRGIL WALKERS CHAPEL CHURCH WALL, JESSE WALL, KENNETH E. WALL, PAMELA S. WALLACE, GEORGE O. WALLACE, JOHN WALLACE, LEONARD A. WALLACE, LEWIS WALLACE, RALPH WALLACE, RAYMOND H. WALLACE, WM. EARL WALLISA, WAYNE H. WALLS, CHARLES W. WALLS, CLIFFORD R. WALLS, EDGAR WALLS, ELMER WALLS, HAZEL WALLS, KENNETH WALLS, LESSIE WALRAVEN, O. P. WALTER, WILBER G. WALTERS, DAVID A. WALTERS, JOEL WALTERS, LESTER WALTERS, MABLE WALTERS, RAY WALTON, STANLEY WALTZ, ALLEN D. WALTZ, JAMES G. WALTZ, LEE C. WAMPLER, CLAUDE WAMPLER, HAROLD WAMPLER, IRA I. WAMPLER, WM. P. WANTLAND, EDDIE WANTLAND, HELEN WARD, ALVIN WARD, ELLA MARIE WARD, FRANK M. WARD, FRED WARD, H. G. WARD, HAROLD E. WARD, MILFORD WARD, NANNIE M. WARD, RALPH WARD, RICHARD L. WARD, ROSCOE W. WARD, WM. E. WARFLE, RICHARD B. WARINNER, JAMES R. WARINNER, JOHN O. WARKEN, HARLAN WARKEN-ANDRES, HELEN WARNICK, CATHERINE WARNICK, JOHN W. WARNICK, ROBERT LOOK FOR MORE NAMES IN NEXT MONTH’S ISSUE.


T he Best

of Indiana Readers rave about their faves BY EMI LY SC H ILLING

W

ith summer just a few weeks away, now’s the perfect time to add new places to your Hoosier bucket lists.

Electric Consumer readers have been providing their picks of places to check out since we announced in March that our “Readers’ Choice Awards” would be back. After sharing their favorites in four categories — Best Fried Chicken, Best Antique Store, Best Girls’ Getaway and Best Guys’ Getaway — they cast their votes in the most competitive categories: Famous Hoosier and Claim to Fame (which could literally be anything: what defines being a Hoosier, what makes our state unique, a renowned place or event, etc.). Did your favorites match up to other readers’ picks? Turn the page to see what ... or who ... has been chosen as this year’s Best of Indiana.

JUNE 2018

19


BEST ANTIQUE STORE BEST FRIED CHICKEN

The Chicken House 7180 Highway 111 Sellersburg, Indiana 47172 812-246-9485 thechickenhouseonline.com The Chicken House’s no-nonsense, no-frills name pretty much sums up why folks flock to this old white building off St. Joe’s Road in Sellersburg: its fried chicken. Oh, there’s other stuff on the menu — pork chops, steak, ham, oysters, fish and shrimp — but chicken

Red Barn Antique Mall

add to your collection: furniture, quilts,

215 Highway 62 W. Corydon, IN 47112 812-738-6000 www.redbarnantiquemall.com

embroidered linens, glassware, books,

The painted signage on the Red Barn

and Kentucky Derby glasses will want to

Antique Mall mimics those Mail Pouch

check out the selection at the Red Barn.

Tobacco barns of yesteryear— right down

Paintings and handcrafted items from

to the tag line: “Treat Yourself to the Best.”

local artisans are also available at the mall.

baskets, jewelry and so much more, all on three floors. Collectors of regional goodies like Corydon’s own Zimmerman Art Glass, M.A. Hadley pottery, Louisville Stoneware

Red Barn is open seven days a week.

The best is, in fact, what antique lovers will find in this huge browsers’

Keep an eye out for the store’s lovable

paradise on Highway 62 in Corydon.

kitty mascot who can usually be found

No matter what you’re searching for,

nestled on a quilt or blanket, waiting to

there will surely be something you can

be petted.

is the star attraction (although the homemade yeast rolls are fan favorites in their supporting roles). Restaurant regulars liken this home-cooking haven to the “Cheers” bar from the TV show “where everybody knows your name.” As that family-friendly vibe suggests, there’s no need to get fancied-up before heading to dinner at The Chicken House. Just bring an “A game” appetite. The generous dinners include salad, potato, two veggies and a roll.

   Win a night at French Lick Electric Consumer is giving away an overnight stay at the French Lick Springs Hotel. Deadline to enter is June 15. Please see page 5 for details.

Giveaway GETAWAY

Since everything is cooked to

patrons, enjoy an ice cold beer, and

French Lick Resorts

get psyched up for some crispy, tender

www.visitFrenchLickWestBaden.com

chicken, just like Electric Consumer readers like it. And, if you like a deal,

Last year’s Readers’ Choice for Best

bring a hungry friend with you to

Weekend Getaway is this year’s pick for

dinner. The Chicken House has a

Best Getaway for gal pals.

“Buy one, get one half off” special on

The historic and luxurious French

chicken dinners, Monday-Thursday

Lick Resorts offer everything a girl could

from 4-7:30 pm and Friday-Saturday,

want: beautiful, comfortable rooms; fine

4-9 pm.

food; activities like golf and gambling; and two full-service spas at its two hotels:

20

JUNE 2018

PHO TO CO URTESY O F FRENCH LI CK RE S O RTS

BEST GIRLS’ GETAWAY

order, expect a bit of a wait. You’ll have plenty of time to chat with other

The Relaxation Room at the French Lick Springs Hotel.

the West Baden Springs Hotel and the French Lick Springs Hotel. Those in need of intensive pampering can choose from an extensive menu of spa services like facials, manicures, pedicures, scrubs, wraps, massages and French Lick’s famous mineral baths. Once you’re sufficiently destressed, travel by trolley between hotels or just wander the grounds and take in the scenery. Or, visit the area’s quaint shops, antique stores and wineries.


FAMOUS HOOSIER

Larry Bird “Larry Legend” was the overwhelming choice for favorite Famous Hoosier, surpassing Vice President Mike Pence, John Mellencamp and James Whitcomb Riley. To learn more about Larry Bird, please turn to our Profile page — PHO TO S BY I STO CK/ G ETTY I M AG ES PLUS

BEST GUYS’ GETAWAY

Indiana lakes

bluegill and crappie fishing; and Cecil

https://www.in.gov/dnr/fishwild/3077.htm You can lead a guy to water ... and when you do, according to Electric Consumer readers, he’ll be sure to cast his fishing pole. Our readers’ top pick for a guys’ trip was to one of Indiana’s many lakes to go fishing. Patoka Lake, spread across Dubois, Crawford and Orange counties in southern Indiana, was the favorite fishing spot. Indiana’s second largest lake at 8,800 acres is a prime spot to catch bass, stripers, sunfish, catfish and crappie. Lake Monroe, the state’s largest lake, is home to carp, catfish, bass, crappie and walleye; West Boggs Lake, good for largemouth bass, bream,

M. Harden Lake (Raccoon Lake), home to largemouth, smallmouth and striped bass, bluegill, catfish, crappie, walleye and white bass, also received votes. For those who have yet to catch the fishing bug, take advantage of two “Free Fishing Days” this month (June 2-3) when you don’t need a fishing license or trout/salmon stamp to fish the state’s public waters. For information on purchasing a fishing license, visit https://www.in.gov/dnr/fishwild/52330.htm or call 317-232-4200. By the way, quite a few readers cast votes for French Lick Resorts, which was named Best Girls’ Getaway. It just goes to prove, what’s good for the goose is good for the gander!

CLAIM TO FAME

Indianapolis 500 Indianapolis Motor Speedway 4790 W. 16th St. Indianapolis, IN 46222 317-492-8500 www.indianapolismotorspeedway.com Electric Consumer readers love the Hoosier state for so many reasons. Some liked the friendly people. Others enjoyed the State Fair or high school basketball. Farmers markets, community festivals, and the beautiful scenery were all cited for making our state special. But most folks noted that the quintessential Hoosier experience

happens each year on the day before Memorial Day on a 2.5 mile racetrack in Speedway, Indiana. The Indianapolis 500, an internationally known tradition of fast cars, famed drivers, pit stops and ladies and gentlemen starting their engines was the readers’ choice for Indiana’s claim to fame. The 500, which just celebrated its 102nd running on May 27, draws approximately 300,000 race fans each year to the track. Billed and (trademarked) as “The Greatest Spectacle in Racing,” it is the largest single-day sporting event in the world. Not only that, the Indianapolis Motor Speedway is the world’s largest

coincidentally but appropriately — page number 33.

‘Best of INDIANA’ at a GLANCE 1 BEST FRIED CHICKEN:  The Chicken House, Sellersburg  Close second: Stone’s Family Restaurant, Milhousen

4

5

4 2 BEST ANTIQUE 4 3 STORE: 1 4 2  Red Barn Antique Mall, Corydon  Close second: Picker’s Paradise, Columbus 3 BEST GIRLS’ GETAWAY:  French Lick Resorts (includes both the historic French Lick Springs and West Baden Springs hotels) 4 BEST GUYS’ GETAWAY:  Indiana lakes — Monroe, Patoka, West Boggs and Harden (Raccoon) 5 BEST INDIANA CLAIM TO FAME:   Indianapolis 500 6 BEST FAMOUS HOOSIER:  Larry Bird

$50 WINNERS Electric Consumer thanks all who took time to offer opinions by filling out and mailing in the published ballot or by going online. The three ballots randomly drawn for $50 participation prizes belonged to: • Brandi Summers, Attica, member of Tipmont REMC; • Amy Simpson, Tell City, member of Southern Indiana Power; • Ross Carothers, Elizabethtown, member of Bartholomew County REMC.

sporting facility in terms of capacity.

JUNE 2018

21


legislative

d e t c e n n Co Hometown Living in a

Rural Hoosiers say access to broadband is a vital thread to survival and growth S T ORY A ND P HO T O S BY RIC H A RD G . B IE V E R

W

hen Chris Muegge went off to college in 2007, he thought his days working with his dad

on the family farm were done. Leveraging his education in animal/

feedlot nutrition from Oklahoma State University and then Purdue to come back to his parents’ 1,200-acre grain and livestock farm in southeast Hancock County seemed economically improbable. “I still wanted to be able to work on the farm,” he said. “But just like any kids my age coming out of college, it’s really hard to go back to the farm. You’ve got to have another source of income.” Fortunately, their electric and

22

JUNE 2018

telecommunications cooperative,

about herds, weight gain and nutrition

NineStar Connect, had run high-speed

and assess videos sent to him digitally.

broadband fiber optic lines into the

“We can be out in the shop working

rural countryside and past their farm a

on a piece of equipment,” Chris said. “If

few years earlier. The Greenfield-based

I get an email from someone that says,

cooperative, which was created in 2011

‘Hey, these cattle aren’t performing very

by the unique consolidation of the area’s

well.’ I may say, ‘Send me a picture of

REMC and telephone co-op, serves their

them. Send me a video.’

farm and home. Today, Chris, who turns 30 this month, still assists his dad on the farm, while pursuing his own career via high-

“I can start my computer while I’m changing a tire or swapping out disk blades.” Chris can diagnose problems or

speed internet as a nutritionist for Great

recommend adjustments in the feed to

Plains Livestock Consulting, based in

help the client ... “and I’m still able to be

tiny Eagle, Nebraska.

involved on the farm,” he said.

The speedy broadband is crucial; he

“We were just tickled to death out

connects daily with clients at farms and

here when NineStar brought broadband

mills from New Mexico to Minnesota. He

fiber optics. It made a difference,” said

even has a client in Costa Rica. He needs

Linda Muegge, Chris’ mother. “All of our

to be able to quickly access spreadsheets

kids have had opportunities to do other


Chris Muegge, right, talks about his experiences coming home to work on his family’s rural southeast Hancock County farm while maintaining his consulting job in animal nutrition that has clients as far away at Costa Rica. Sitting with him for the discussion on how fiber optic connectivity has made his dual roles possible are, from left, Brendan Carr, a member of the Federal Communications Commission; Indiana Sen. Todd Young; Michael Burrow, CEO of NineStar Connect, Muegge’s local electric and telecom cooperative that installed the fiber; and his mother, Linda, who also spoke about the benefits high-speed broadband has brought to their farm and to the Hancock County community at large.

Broadband in Indiana

BY THE NUMBERS

there that we can access,” Chris Muegge told Young and Carr when it comes to improving most any aspect of agriculture and agribusiness. “It’s just having the ability to access it.” Young and Carr began the day at the Hancock Wellness Center in things — live out of state and this or that

McCordsville with a demonstration of

— and they’ve all chosen to be here.”

how high-speed fiber is essential in

Sitting across the kitchen table as

another field of rural health and wellness.

the Muegges talked about what high-

This one had nothing to do with

speed fiber has meant to the family

livestock; rather, it has everything to do

and their farm on this particular day in

with the lives of rural residents.

May were Indiana Sen. Todd Young and

Dr. Michael Fletcher, chief medical

Brendan Carr, a member of the Federal

officer at Hancock Regional Hospital,

Communications Commission. Joining

demonstrated how he and a neurologist

them was Michael Burrow, CEO of

at the Greenfield-based hospital, could

NineStar Connect.

link up in real time using GoToMeeting

The Muegge farm was a stop for Young and Carr as they toured Indiana early last month to see firsthand how

available. From McCordsville, Fletcher was able to discuss CT scan results and

and how Washington, D.C., can ensure

treatment options. Though they were

rural Hoosiers receive a fair share when

less than 20 miles from one another in

it comes to the investment in broadband

this case, telemedicine via high-speed

infrastructure and connectivity.

internet allows the same virtual faceto-face discussions between a family

day, the senator and the commissioner

physician and a medical specialist

were told that the advances in

looking at the same test results at the

technology in agriculture, medicine

same time even when they may be

and workforce development do no good

hundreds or thousands of miles apart.

unless everyday Hoosiers — including

That’s critical in the medically under-

rural Hoosiers — are able to access that

served rural areas that have only become

technology via the internet. The day-

more isolated from quality health care

long trip also included stops at Ivy Tech

even as their population ages.

in Indianapolis and Purdue University in

electric cooperatives in Indiana now offer or are about to offer high-speed internet services to their consumers.

software and the fiber NineStar made

technology is changing the landscape —

All along the “connectivity tour” that

5

Further, Fletcher said the virtual

59

out of Indiana’s 92 counties are expecting to see population losses over the next 35 years.

West Lafayette. “There’s a lot of technology out

PLEASE TURN TO THE NEXT PAGE JUNE 2018

23


George Plisinski, manager of telecom operations at NineStar, right, shows Sen. Todd Young, left, and Brendan Carr, an FCC member, a fiber optic strand. Plisinski demonstrated how the line is spliced together in the back of a van along a highway where crews were installing it underground.

CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE two-way highway allows better communication between him and patients, especially those with transportation or physical mobility challenges. “We want to make sure all Hoosiers, all Americans, regardless of their circumstances, including their geographic circumstances, have a fair shot at success,” Young said in opening remarks during the visit. “Though I am a conservative

sure all Hoosiers …

on their core business, they need to figure

regardless of their

services in rural areas,” he added.

circumstances, including their geographic

characterize myself as a Whig,” Young

fair shot at success.

internal improvements. And one of the essential roles of our federal government is to bind together different geographies by making critical investments so that our economy can grow and people can thrive.” NineStar’s Burrow emphasized that

“If rural co-ops are going to be around and relevant and be able to deliver

circumstances, have a

that believed in the American system of

Burrow told Young and Carr.

We want to make

Republican, I also from time-to-time added. “A Whig is that now-defunct party

point, you almost get into a death spiral,”

SEN. TODD YOUNG

out a way to provide these much-needed A recent report by IU’s Kelley School of Business noted that between the aging population and outward migration, 59 of Indiana’s 92 counties are expected to see population losses over the next 35 years. It’s a somber and sobering toll. NineStar had a head start with broadband, given its unique pedigree as both an electric and telecom co-op. But three other Indiana REMCs — Jackson County, South Central Indiana, and Tipmont — have started or announced projects to bring high-speed internet to their consumers. A fourth is to announce its broadband plan early this month.

access to high-speed internet will be

As Young and Carr’s visit began

broadband infrastructure investment

crucial, too: for smart meters, smart

faces the same hurdles in rural areas

wrapping up, Linda Muegge, speaking

consumer appliances, real-time pricing

that electrification did 80 years ago.

for all rural communities, left the two

and other innovations. But rural areas

“We know that fiber optic connects

with a plea for high-speed access to take

often lack the density — the people

rural communities and their residents

back to Washington. “You need to say,

— to spread the cost of infrastructure

and businesses to the greater world —

‘they need it,’” she told them. “There are

investment around. And areas without

allowing them to be able to compete

so many things it touches that it’s really

these engines and amenities of economic

and be a part of that larger global

important. There are so many good

growth, lose even more people. That

community,” he said.

things that it brings.”

forces businesses and industry to leave,

With the changing technology on the consumer end of the electric lines,

24

JUNE 2018

driving up the costs even more for all the services for those who remain. “At some

RICHARD G. BIEVER is senior editor of Electric Consumer.


calendar NORTHWEST

9

NATIONAL GET OUTDOORS DAY OPEN HOUSE, Chesterton (Porter), Dunes Learning Center. Join naturalists and National Park Service rangers for a day of guided activities and adventures. Free. Online registration requested. 11 am-3 pm. 219-395-9555. duneslearningcenter.org

9

LIBRARY CONCERT SERIES, Monticello (White), MonticelloUnion Township Library. An evening with the Moon Cats band at Constitution Plaza. 6 pm. Free. 574-583-2665, ext. 3307. adult@monticello.lib. in.us. monticello.lib.in.us

23

ART IN THE STREET, Plymouth (Marshall), Downtown. Enjoy art, entertainment, kids’ activities, food and more. Free. 10 am-3 pm. 574-274-4376. shelleyheiden@heidencreative. com. heartlandartgallery.com

CENTRAL

1-2

BANKS OF THE WABASH FESTIVAL, Terre Haute (Vigo). Fairbanks Park. Live music, food, crafters, midway rides and games nightly. Free. 812-232-2727. terrehaute.in.gov/parks

1316

KNIGHTSTOWN JUBILEE DAYS, Knightstown (Henry), Town Square. Carnival rides, games, queen contest, parade, chamber fish wagon, and more. Rain or shine. Free. 800-668-1895. knightstownchamber.org

23

TENDERLOIN THROWDOWN, Greensburg (Decatur), Downtown Square. This food competition names the best pork tenderloin sandwich in the state. Four categories, craft beer, wine, kids’ fun, shopping. Free. 812-222-0037. mainstreetgreensburg.com.

SOUTHWEST

15

BRUTALLY HANDSOME, Mitchell (Lawrence), Mitchell Opera House. Brutally Handsome is a group that celebrates the music of the Eagles. 7 pm. Tickets: $15, adults; $6, kids 12 and under. 812-849-4447. aprince@hoosieruplands.org. mitchelloperahouse.com

1516

FERDINAND HEIMATFEST, Ferdinand (Dubois), 18th Street Park. Live entertainment, kids area, food, games. 5K Walk/ Run. Admission charge. Fri: 5 pm-1 am, Sat: 8 am-1 am. $4 for beer garden. 812-6612711. nweyer1490@gmail.com. ferdinandheimatfest.com

26

JUNE 2018

2930

LIMESTONE HERITAGE FESTIVAL, Bedford (Lawrence), Downtown Square. Music, food, limestone carving exhibit, bike show, parade, fireworks and more. Free. 812-329-4221. downtown bedford.org


June NORTHEAST

1

CHAMBER CLASSIC GOLF OUTING, Portland (Jay), Portland Golf Club. Outing will feature scramble format and golf clinic. Registration, 9 am. Shotgun start, 10 am. 260-726-4481. membership@ jaycountychamber.com. www.jaycountychamber.com

1922

44TH ANNUAL QUILT SHOW & SALE, Topeka (LaGrange), Eden Worship Center. One of the premier quilt shows in northeastern Indiana. 9 am-4 pm. Cost: $5. 260-4990149. edenwc@hotmail.com. edenworshipcenter.com/ quiltshow

20

WINE IN THE PINES & ANIMAL ART AUCTION, Albion (Noble), Black Pine Animal Sanctuary. Adults-only evening with the animals. Explore, view animal artists, sample wines and appetizers. 5:30-9 pm. Cost: $40-$50. 260-636-7383. lori@ blackpine.org. blackpine.org

SOUTHEAST

13 PHOTO CREDIT: HAMILTON COUNTY CONVENTION AND VISITORS BUREAU

910

CAMPBELLSBURG COUNTRY FESTIVAL, Campbellsburg (Washington), Campbellsburg Park. Music, vendors, contests, truck and tractor pulls, parade, kids’ games and activities. Free. 812-896-7979. campbellsburgcountryfestival.com. ART ON THE PARISH GREEN, New Albany (Floyd), Downtown. Festival showcasing over 90 artists. Music, children’s art activities, food and more. Sat: 10 am-6 pm, Sun: 11:30-5 pm. Free. 812-944-0413. info@ artontheparishgreen.com. artontheparishgreen.org.

2223

BLUEGRASS ON THE SQUARE, Corydon (Harrison), Downtown Square. Enjoy bluegrass music as Corydon comes alive this summer! Bring your lawn chairs or blanket. 4-8 pm. Free. 888-738-2137. thisisindiana. org

This calendar is published as a service to readers and the communities electric cooperatives serve. Electric Consumer publishes events free of charge as space allows, giving preference to free community festival and events in and around areas served by subscribing REMCs/RECs. While Electric Consumer strives for accuracy, please note that events, dates and time may change without notice. Electric Consumer advises using contact phone numbers or internet sites to check times and dates of events before making plans. To add events to Calendar, please use the “Submit and Event” form under the “Talk to Us” or “Calendar” buttons at electricconsumer.org; or mail your info to: Calendar, Electric Consumer, P.O. Box 24517, Indianapolis, IN 46224. Please submit info two months before the date of the event.

JUNE 2018

27


Where asparagus once grew wild

outdoors

B Y JACK S PAU L D IN G

When one of us spied our prized quarry,

kle them with sea salt. About 15 minutes

O

we would holler … Mom would stop the

or so in the oven at 350 F produces an

old Ford, and we would scramble out of

amazing side dish for any meal.

ne of my fond experiences as a child came with the first warming days of spring. Prior

to cultivated side ditches, mowed fence rows and the liberal use of herbicides, wild asparagus proliferated in the side

the car and into the side ditch to gather the stalks. As the warm spring weather continued, the stalks of asparagus became more mature and taller.

ditches along the county roads. And it

At this point, we stopped using the par-

was free for the picking!

ing knife and opted to simply bend the

The sporadic patches took root from stray seeds dropped by birds feeding on the seeds from nearby gardens. Once sprouted, the hearty plant would mature

stalk to snap the top off. When the tops are snapped off like this, it guarantees a soft, chewable spear when the asparagus hits the plate.

and seed and produce more plants in a

On a good run, we might fill two large

growing cluster.

paper grocery bags with the succulent

I remember loading up with Mom and

stalks. What a haul!

my sister Mary in the old family station

Usually the spears were boiled in salted

wagon armed with paper grocery bags

water, drained and liberally coated

and paring knives.

with butter when prepared for the ta-

Once we were out of town, the hunt would begin. Mom would slowly idle the old Ford down the county roads at a

ble. Truth be known: As a boy, I appreciated the hunt a whole lot more than actually eating the asparagus.

snail’s pace while my sister and I stuck

A few years ago, I spotted a lone

our heads out of the car windows and

patch of the velvety looking ma-

scanned the ditches for the dark green

ture plants along a county road

spears of asparagus.

near home. I hadn’t seen any wild

On a good run, we might fill two large paper grocery bags with the succulent stalks. What a haul!

28

JUNE 2018

asparagus in years. I made a mental note to come back the following spring to see if I could pick just a few spears. The next year, I was disappointed to find even the last patch had disappeared under the onslaught of a tractor mounted mower. My wife and I have a favorite recipe for our garden asparagus. We wash and dry the stalks, lay them on a cookie sheet, drizzle the stalks with a little virgin olive oil and sprin-

I can’t help but wonder, though, how wild asparagus would taste if fixed this way. JACK SPAULDING is a state outdoors writer and a consumer of RushShelby Energy living along the Flatrock River in Moscow. Readers with questions or comments can write to him in care of Electric Consumer or email jackspaulding@hughes.net.


safety

Electrical rules TO SHARE WITH KIDS

IT’S NEVER TOO EARLY TO TEACH YOUR KIDS ABOUT DANGERS OF ELECTRICITY Born with a natural curiosity, children are always exploring, asking questions and trying new things to understand the world around them. Unfortunately, that curiosity can be dangerous – and even deadly – when it comes to electricity. “There are 400 deaths and 4,400 injuries from electrical hazards each year,” said Tom VanParis, CEO of Indiana Electric Cooperatives. “Education and adult supervision are the main ways to help reduce your child’s risk of an electrical accident.” With summer break just beginning, children of all ages will spend the next few months entertaining themselves. Whether they are keeping cool inside or soaking up some vitamin D outside, they are bound to run into trouble. Your cooperative, though, wants to be sure they are safe from electrical hazards. Keep your children safe by teaching them the rules of outdoor and indoor electrical safety.

OUTDOOR ELECTRICAL SAFETY RULES: • Do not climb trees near power lines or climb utility poles, transmission towers or fences around electrical substations. • Keep electrical cords away from water. • Never touch an electrical pole or wire that has fallen to the ground. • Watch out for thunderstorms! If you

It is also important for children to know how to avoid electrical dangers, but also how to respond to an electrical injury. The most important rule is to never touch a victim who is still connected to a power source. The same current could travel to their bodies and injure

can hear thunder, you can be struck by

them as well. If they can,

lightning.

either unplug or turn off

INDOOR ELECTRICAL SAFETY RULES: • Do not overload an extension cord with too many plugs. • Teach older kids how to safely plug in and unplug cords. • Remind children that water and electricity do not mix. • For younger children, install safety caps on outlets.

Do you have young children at home? Install safety caps on outlets.

the switch to the power supply. Inform children to never touch a live wire, even if it does not look dangerous. Lastly, be sure they know how to call 911 in an emergency if they ever need help. If you have questions about keeping your family safe from electrical hazards, contact your electric cooperative. Help keep your children safe, wherever they are, by applying a few safety rules to their summer routine. JU NE 2 018

29


Top crop

Tomatoes: the apples of most eyes by B. Rosie Lerner

M

ost gardeners would agree that tomatoes are the most popular crop for home growing. But

what gardeners can’t agree on is what tomato is considered “the best,” since taste is such a personal matter.

garden. Midseason is considered to be 66 to 80 days. Late types are those that need more than 80 days from transplanting. Third, you can group tomatoes by the plant’s growth habit: determinate or indeterminate. Determinate plants tend to grow their foliage first, then set flowers that mature into fruit if pollination is

The diversity of cultivars available makes

successful. All of the fruit tend to ripen

it easy for anyone to grow tomatoes —

on a plant at about the same time. Inde-

even if all you have is a pot on the patio.

terminate tomatoes start out by growing

The Burpee Seed Company introduced

some foliage, then continue to produce

the first F1 hybrid tomato “Big Boy” in

foliage and flowers throughout the

1949. Since then, plant breeders have in-

gardening season. These plants will tend

troduced thousands of hybrid tomatoes.

to have tomato fruit in different stages

Modern hybrids bring disease resistance,

of maturity at any given time once they

cold tolerance, nematode resistance, and

start to set fruit.

hybrid vigor as well as a dazzling range of colors, shapes, and sizes.

More recent developments in tomato breeding have led to a wider array of fruit

There are several ways to classify the

colors. In addition to the standard red ripe

wide array of tomatoes that are so pop-

color, tomatoes can be creamy white, lime

ular among gardeners today. First, you

green, purple or nearly black. Pink and

can group them by fruit size and shape.

yellowish types have mistakenly been re-

From small to large, there are: currant,

ferred to as low-acid tomatoes, but in fact,

cherry/grape, salad/cocktail, plum, pear,

these types are just higher in sugar, which

standard slicing, and beefsteak types.

makes them taste less acidic.

Second, you can group tomatoes by the

All tomatoes are warm-season crops that

amount of time it takes for the plants to

thrive when soil temperature is at least 60

mature fruit for harvest. Seed packets will

F which meant this spring required extra

list the expected length of time to ma-

patience with late, cooler than usual soil

turity in number of days, but in general,

temperatures. But the old saying about

cultivars are classified as: early, midsea-

good things coming to those who wait is

son, or late-maturing. Early cultivars take

true for tomatoes — whichever cultivars

55 to 65 days from transplanting to the

and colors you choose to grow.

30

JUNE 2018

Ask Rosie

P H OTO P R OV ID E D B Y R OSI E LERNER, PURDUE EXTENSI O N

Q:  I have a

maple tree that has a rather large sucker at the bottom. The diameter of the sucker is about 2 inches, and the tree trunk is 7 inches in diameter. I would like to know if it is OK to remove it? J.M., Crown Point, Indiana

A:  Some landscape plants produce

vigorous, upright stems that become troublesome, because they out-compete better-formed branches and shade out the rest of the plant. These remarkably fast-growing, upright stems are called “suckers” if they come from the root system. The best time to try removing these suckers is late winter and early spring before the new growth begins. You’ll want to be careful to avoid injuring the main trunk when you cut. First, remove the top of the root sucker (this can be done in stages) to get the heavy weight off that stem. Then, make closer cuts further down to just above where you see the “V.” We also recommend that you pull the rock mulch away from the base of the tree and, if needed, remove any soil that is covering the root collar (the flare of the trunk at the bottom.) (You can see an illustration of these recommendations on the annotated photo, courtesy of Purdue Urban Forestry Specialist Lindsey Purcell, with this column at ElectricConsumer.org. B. ROSIE LERNER is the Purdue Extension consumer horticulturist and is a consumer of Tipmont REMC. Questions about gardening issues may be sent to “Ask Rosie,” Electric Consumer, P.O. Box 24517, Indianapolis, IN 46224; or use our “Talk to Us” form online at ElectricConsumer.org.

PHO TO BY J. M

backyard


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Apeaz™ is an FDA drug with approved claims for the pain relief of the following conditions: • Arthritis pain • Simple back pain • Strains • Sprains • Athletic injuries • Muscle stiffness/ pain • Wrist, elbow, shoulder, hip, knee, ankle, foot, muscle or joint pain

Works In Minutes

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Apeaz contains the highest, non-prescription OTC dose of a medical compound that fights pain on contact. When applied to the skin it goes to work within minutes by penetrating right to the source of your pain, numbing the nerve endings. “This is why Apeaz™ is so effective for people with arthritis pain. It reduces pain while adding an additional potential layer of joint support,” explains Damaj.

A New Way to Treat Pain Although Dr. Damaj and his team say that their cream is the fastest and most effective way to relieve arthritis pain, they believe there is still a reason to take joint pills. The most effective are those which help to further lubricate, strengthen and support the joints. That’s why every container of Apeaz™ comes with ArthriVarx™, a breakthrough supplement that’s taking on joint support in an entirely new way.

Apeaz™: Quick Acting Pain and Arthritis Cream is Now Available Without a Prescription

ArthriVarx™ works on your joints, making it the perfect companion to Apeaz™. “ArthriVarx™ contains special compounds published to lubricate the joints and connective tissues that surrounds them. With daily use, they improve joint health and can give an extra cushion,” explains Dr. Damaj. “When combined with Apeaz™, it becomes the perfect system to tackle arthritis. While the anesthetic component of Apeaz™ is working on the outside, relieving pain on contact, ArthriVarx™ is working on the inside, adding cushioning to the joints”’

A Powerful Combination For Arthritis and Joint Pain With daily use, Apeaz™ plus ArthriVarx™ helps users live a more vital, pain free life without any of the negative side effects or interactions associated with oral drugs. By delivering fast, long-lasting, and targeted relief from joint pain and supporting longterm joint health, Apeaz™ and ArthriVarx™ is the newest, most effective way to tackle your arthritis pain. You can now enjoy an entirely new level of comfort that’s both safe and affordable. It is also extremely effective, especially if nothing else has worked well for you.

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APEAZ IS AN FDA OTC COMPLIANT DRUG NDC # 57483-001-04 APPROVED FOR THE RELIEF OF PAIN FROM MUSCLES AND JOINTS INCLUDING ARTHRITIS PAIN. ARTHRIVARX STATEMENTS HAVE NOT BEEN EVALUATED BY THE FDA. ARTHRIVARX IS NOT INTENDED TO DIAGNOSE, TREAT, CURE, OR PREVENT ANY DISEASE AND IS NOT A DRUG. RESULTS MAY VARY. OFFER NOT AVAILABLE TO RESIDENTS OF IOWA.


Hoosier Energy news Your energy producer is a co-op, too! Hoosier Energy is a generation and transmission (G&T) cooperative providing wholesale electric power and services to your electric cooperative. Founded in 1949 and based in Bloomington, the power producer generates power from coal, natural gas and renewable energy resources. The G&T delivers power through nearly 1,700 miles of transmission lines on the electric grid.

Generating power from the wind Hoosier Energy purchases energy generated from the wind at farms in Indiana, Iowa and Illinois. The turbine generators capture the kinetic energy of the wind and convert it into electricity.

Output from these wind farms is enough to power 21,000 homes. For more information about Hoosier Energy’s generation sources, log onto hoosierenergy.com/about/ energy-strategy.

How energy is transmitted to your home

Power generation Generating energy from a diverse set of fuel sources is an important part of the power supply portfolio, including wind power purchase agreements.

32

JUNE 2018

Switching substation After leaving a power plant, electricity feeds into a substation that raises or “steps up” the voltage – similar to increasing water pressure.

Transmission Electricity generated by Hoosier Energy and other utilities is placed on a regional grid and transmitted at highvoltage over long distances throughout central and southern Indiana and southeastern Illinois.

Distribution substation

Energy to your cooperative

These stations lower the voltage before being sent along to your local electric cooperative.

At this phase, your electric cooperative distributes and meters the energy you use at your home or business.


Bird’vsiew eye

profile

I

n Indiana, a land where annual obsessions called March Madness and Hoosier Hysteria thankfully bring us

nothing but net, it comes as no surprise that Electric Consumer readers’ pick for favorite Famous Hoosier would be a king of the basketball court. Larry Bird, the “Hick from French Lick,” who rose from humble beginnings to college and pro basketball superstardom, is not only a sports icon; he’s a true example of the Hoosier work ethic. “I’ve got a theory that if you give 100 percent all of the time, somehow things will work out in the end,” he once said. For Bird, now 61, that theory helped put him in NBA record books. He’s the only person in professional basketball history to be named Rookie of the Year (197980, Boston Celtics), Regular Season MVP (three times between 1983 and 1986), Finals MVP (1984 and 1986), Coach of the Year (1997-98, Indiana Pacers) and Executive of the Year (2011-12, Indiana Pacers). As a player, he led the Indiana State University Sycamores to the final game of the 1979 NCAA championship and then, as a professional, led the Boston Celtics to two NBA championships. He played on the celebrated 1992 Olympic gold-medal-winning “Dream Team.” As a coach, he steered the Indiana Pacers to a berth in the 2000 NBA Finals. He retired from the coaching position after the end of the 2000 season, returning as the Pacers’ president of basketball operations in 2003. In 2012, Bird left the Pacers, only to return a year later as president of basketball operations. He served in that capacity until May 2017, and now

P HO TO CO URTESY O F THE I NDI ANA PACERS

PLEASE TURN TO THE NEXT PAGE JUNE 2018

33


profile CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE maintains an advisory role within the Pacers organization. We asked Bird about his Electric Consumer honor, his roots, his career and the game that has been his life. See what “Larry Legend” had to say.

Q: Electric Consumer readers from

Are you surprised by the changes and growth in the area over the past 20 years?

A: I’m really surprised. It’s beautiful in Southern Indiana and the changes the state — have been for the good and, hopefully, will continue.

Q: What exactly is your role as advisor

favorite “Famous Hoosier.” Why do you

to the president of basketball operations

think your fellow Hoosiers so easily

for the Indiana Pacers?

identify with you and “root” for you?

A: I do scouting, discuss direction of

I grew up in a small town in South-

you do anything differently?

A: I would not have tried to play through so many injuries. I would have had them taken care of.

— helping one of the poorest parts of

across Indiana chose you as their

A:

Q: Looking back on your career, would

team of team and stay in touch with

Q: What’s left on your bucket list? A: Seeing the Pacers win a championship, whether I’m involved or not.

Q: What’s the best advice you were ever given?

A: As for basketball, no matter how much or how long you practice, no mat-

ern Indiana. After my background

(President of Basketball Operations)Kevin

ter how many shots you put up, someone

was written about during my career at

(Pritchard). He makes all the decisions.

is doing more.

we had there and the school not being a

Q: You’ve been a college and pro

basketball power, and the state’s love of

basketball standout, an Olympian, a

Q: What’s the best advice you ever

basketball, I think it all came together.

coach and a Pacers executive. What has

Indiana State, along with the success

Then when I came back to coach the Pacers and then to run the basketball side, it kind of stacked up on top of my early career.

Q: How does growing up in rural Indiana play a part in your daily life?

A: It keeps you humble. I loved growing up there and think about it often.

Q: Your hometown of French Lick and its neighbor West Baden have continually been recognized because of the resorts and the golf courses and nearby Patoka Lake for recreation.

FUN FACTS ABOUT LARRY BIRD • The bright blue Twitter logo is named “Larry” after Larry Bird. Turns out

been the highlight of your career? Why?

A: Winning championships, competing these things, to win.

Q: If you were 40 years younger, playing college or pro basketball now, do you think you’d be as successful — or more successful? Would you want to be playing ball now?

A: That’s hard to say, but I think I would

Q: The Pacers had a fabulous season this year, making it to the playoffs. What’s been your takeaway from this season?

A: It was very pleasing. I liked how the team stayed together, I liked the leadership from a number of our guys and I liked how they competed every night.

succeed.

on the Broadway stage in the play

talking; one of his early jobs was picking

“Magic/Bird.” The play failed to attract

up trash back home in French Lick.

acclaim or an audience. It ran for just

Back in 1974, after dropping out of

one month in the spring 2012.

Indiana University and West Baden’s

canceled, Bird was named NBA

led the Boston Celtics to two NBA

Executive of the Year. He was the first

championships.

person to win NBA’s Triple Crown: best

JUNE 2018

should be listening.

for the game and I put in the work to

Boston and he grew up when Bird

34

used it: Don’t always be talking when you

be successful because I did have talent

• Four days after “Magic/Bird” was

Bird and Magic Johnson was captured

A: I was told this when I was 10, but I’ve

for championships. That’s why you do

Twitter’s co-founder Biz Stone is from

• The rivalry and friendship between

gave?

player, coach and executive. • Not only is Bird known for his trash

Northwood Institute, Bird got a job with his hometown’s street department, driving a garbage truck and doing maintenance and road repair work. He did that for nine months before returning to college, this time Indiana State University. The rest is history.


UDWI REMC — June 2018 Electric Consumer  
UDWI REMC — June 2018 Electric Consumer