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Clark county REMC

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YOUR INDIANA COOPERATIVE COMPANION

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31 on 31 Indiana road trip member survey Your insight helps us provide better service


from the editor

Be a clown

Looking back, I’ve done some pretty interesting things so far in my life. I’ve judged a cooking competition and a scholarship pageant. Not only have I flown the friendly transcontinental skies in a 747, I’ve been sky high in a hot air balloon. I’ve buzzed around the Charlotte Motor Speedway in a car navigated by a NASCAR driver and driven my own car (much slower) around the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. And, for several years, I built quite a reputation as a face painter. Back in the 1990s, you might have seen me at some electric co-op annual meetings, stationed at a small table equipped with palettes of clown make-up and brushes. I adorned children’s faces with flowers and rainbows and whatever else they desired. Unlike many face painters, I wasn’t a clown. However, when I was “booked” for one of my REMC annual meeting painting gigs, a coworker was asked to dress up like a clown and help entertain the kids. I was in charge of transforming her into her new persona: “Coney.” I’ll never forget the bemused reaction she got from other travelers as she drove us along Interstate 74 in full clown make-up and wig. I learned then never to underestimate the power of a makeover. When you’re dressed like a clown, you will definitely not be ignored. The first week of August is National Clown Week. Although Stephen King’s “It” may have given some a “clown complex,” when I think about clowns, I remember “Coney” and how some greasepaint, a red wig and a goofy personality can brighten someone’s day!

EMILY SCHILLING Editor eschilling@electricconsumer.org

VOLUME 68 • NUMBER 2 ISSN 0745-4651 • USPS 262-340 Published monthly by:

ELECTRIC CONSUMER is for and about members of Indiana’s locally-owned, not-for-profit electric cooperatives. It helps consumers: use electricity safely and efficiently; understand energy issues; connect with their co-op; and celebrate life in Indiana. Over 272,000 residents and businesses receive the magazine as part of their electric co-op membership. CONTACT US: 8888 Keystone Crossing, Suite 1600 Indianapolis, IN 46240-4606 317-487-2220 ec@ElectricConsumer.org ElectricConsumer.org INDIANA ELECTRIC COOPERATIVES OFFICERS Gary Gerlach President Walter Hunter Vice President Randy Kleaving Secretary/Treasurer Tom VanParis Chief Executive Officer EDITORIAL STAFF Emily Schilling Editor Richard George Biever Senior Editor Holly Huffman Member Relations/ Advertising Manager Ellie Schuler Senior Communication Specialist ADVERTISING Crosshair Media, 502-216-8537; crosshairmedia.net GLM Communications, Inc., 212-929-1300; glmcommunications.com Paid advertisements are not endorsements by any electric cooperative or this publication. UNSOLICITED MATERIAL: Electric Consumer does not use unsolicited freelance manuscripts or photographs and assumes no responsibility for the safe‑keeping or return of unsolicited material.

On the menu: November — Quintessential Hoosier foods (like

persimmon pudding, pork tenderloin, and sugar cream pie): deadline Aug. 13. December issue — Christmas candy: deadline Sept. 14. If we publish your recipe on our food page, we’ll send you a $10 gift card.

Reader Submissions page: November — Photos of you and politicians/candidates for government offices: deadline Aug. 13. December — Christmas light displays: deadline Sept. 14.

Giveaway: Winner of the $25 Starbucks gift card was Kathy Trinkle of West Lafayette. Her favorite “song of summer” is “Jump” by Van Halen.

Three ways to contact us: To send us recipes, photos, event listings, letters and

entries for gift drawings, please use the forms on our website ElectricConsumer.org; email ec@ElectricConsumer.org; or send to Electric Consumer, 8888 Keystone Crossing, Suite 1600, Indianapolis, IN 46240-4606.

SUBSCRIPTIONS: $12 for individuals not subscribing through participating REMCs/RECs. CHANGE OF ADDRESS: Readers who receive Electric Consumer through their electric co-op membership should report address changes to their local co-op. POSTAGE: Periodicals postage paid at Indianapolis, Ind., and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send change of address to: Electric Consumer, 8888 Keystone Crossing, Suite 1600, Indianapolis, IN 46240-4606. Include key number. No portion of Electric Consumer may be reproduced without permission of the editor.

AUGUST 2018

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contents

AUGUST

10

17

recalls

03 FROM THE EDITOR 05 CO-OP NEWS Energy news and information from your electric co-op. 10 ENERGY Time to update your appliances? Do some research first. 11 PRODUCT RECALLS Lamps and video monitors make this month’s list.

19

food

12 INSIGHTS Boone County corn maze to honor slain deputy. 16 INDIANA EATS Zaharakos in Columbus hearkens back to ice cream parlors of yore. 17 FOOD Kid-approved sweet treats.

Find us on Facebook www.facebook.com/ElectricConsumer

cover story 19 COVER STORY 31 reasons why you should pull over when cruising on U.S. 31. 26 OUTDOOR Angler reels in state’s biggest whitefish. 27 SAFETY How to incorporate electrical safety devices in your home.

profile

28 EVENTS CALENDAR 30 PRODUCT PICKS Keeping it cool. 31 BACKYARD (not in all editions) 32 H  OOSIER ENERGY/ WABASH VALLEY NEWS 34 PROFILE State Fair Queen Audrey Campbell on a grand tour to promote fair, 4-H.

On the Cover

Follow us on Twitter www.twitter.com/Electriconsumer

Lauren Gandy delivers a tray of cold sweet treats to

Find us on Pinterest www.pinterest.com/Electriconsumer

in downtown Columbus. It’s just one of the many

Follow us on Instagram www.instagram.com/ElectricConsumer

which runs the length of the state from north of the

patrons at Zaharako’s Ice Cream Parlor and Restaurant unique places to visit along Indiana’s stretch of U.S. 31 Ohio River in the south to South Bend in the north. PHOTO BY RICHARD G. BIEVER

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co-op news

CONTACT US Office: 812-246-3316 / 800-462-6988 Outages: 866-480-REMC Fax: 812-246-3947 To pay your bill by phone or inquire about your account: 877-484-4042 EMAIL ccremc@theremc.net WEBSITE www.theremc.com OFFICE HOURS 7 a.m.-4 p.m., Monday-Friday

Your insight helps us provide better service Since Clark County

Rest assured all of the information is

REMC is a member-

confidential.

owned cooperative, the better we understand your needs, the better we can serve you. That’s why we occasionally survey our members to identify patterns in how

The research professionals performing the survey adhere to strict confidentiality criteria. You will never be asked for your name, address, account number, banking or credit card information for payment of any type.

you use power. Learning about our

Outstanding service to our members

members’ heating and cooling systems,

is our number one priority. We respect

MAILING ADDRESS P.O. Box 411, Sellersburg, IN 47172

electronic devices, and appliances helps

your privacy and encourage you to

us develop plans to provide reliable and

report any problems or questions

BOARD OF DIRECTORS Steve Dieterlen, President

efficient electric service throughout our

you may have by calling 812-246-3316.

communities. It also helps us develop

We thank all of our members who

programs that are of value to you.

participate in this survey and those

STREET ADDRESS 7810 State Road 60, Sellersburg, IN 47172

Paul Graf, Vice President Candy Meyer, Secretary/Treasurer Joe Basham

This September and October, an

John Biesel

independent research firm will survey a

Robert Kleehamer Derrick Vogt UPCOMING BOARD MEETINGS Aug. 7 Sept. 11

limited number of cooperative members through the internet or by phone to identify trends in energy use. If you are contacted, we hope you will participate.

who have participated in the past. Your participation and feedback are essential to helping us give you the best possible service.

DAVID A. VINCE General Manager

Oct. 2 POWER COST ADJUSTMENT

AUG. 12: VS. LEHIGH VALLEY SEPT. 2: VS. INDIANAPOLIS

The power cost adjustment for August billing cycles is $.004259/kWh or $4.26 per 1,000 kWh.

REGISTER TO WIN AT THEREMC.COM/BATS

Like us on Facebook www.facebook.com/ ClarkCountyREMC Follow us on Twitter www.twitter.com/ ClarkCountyREMC Follow us on Instagram www.instagram.com/ ClarkCoREMC Follow us on Pinterest www.pinterest.com/ ClarkCountyREMC

REMC SUNDAY SUMMER BASEBALL SWEEPSTAKES Clark County REMC once again offers our members the chance to win four tickets to each of the Louisville Bats Sunday home games at beautiful Louisville Slugger Field. At right is the remaining schedule of games.

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co-op news

Fair fun! REMC sponsors booth at Clark County 4-H Fair Thank you for visiting our booth at the Clark County 4-H Fair last month. We enjoyed getting to spend time with all of our members, even our youngest members! Bucket truck rides were a big hit again this year. Children ages 5-15 were invited to soar as high as 60 feet in the air and were given free plastic hard hats to take home. Linemen gear was also on hand so children and adults could get a feel for the equipment that linemen wear every day. Our commitment to the community and those we serve makes us differClark County REMC was proud to sponsor a booth at the Clark County 4-H Fair.

ent from other utilities. We offer a variety of programs for the youth in our communities, such as sending soon-to-be seventh graders to an electrifying camp experience, high school seniors-to-be to Washington, D.C., and offering $1,000 scholarships to students attending Indiana University Southeast, Ivy Tech Community College and Purdue Polytechnic of New Albany. This fall, we will be tailgating at some of the local high school football games. Come visit us to interact with your board of directors and grab some giveaways. Community events like this are a great way for us spend time with members and have some fun at the same time. We look forward to seeing you all this fall!

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This young man tries on protective gloves that linemen wear everyday.

Bucket truck rides were a highlight of the REMC booth.


Plastic hard hats were a hit with the younger crowd at the fair.

Clark County REMC Director Candy Meyer poses with linemen John Beckman and Jerry Applegate.

Mark Guernsey, REMC power mechanic, and John Biesel, director, work the booth at the fair.

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co-op news

Commitment to youth CLARK COUNTY REMC SENDS STUDENTS TO SUMMER PROGRAMS The 2018 Youth Tour delegation from Clark County REMC pose in front of the White House during the weeklong trip.

Youth Tour Brandon Collier, Jessica James, Gregory Jekel, Kenzie Knight and Tyler Upton represented Clark County REMC on the 2018 Electric Cooperative Youth Tour to Washington, D.C., this June. The Indiana delegation of 100 students representing 34 Indiana electric cooperatives joined more than 1,800 other students from 46 other states on the Youth Tour. Clark County REMC is pleased to be able to provide this opportunity for our local youth. Amber Bowman, digital communications specialist at the REMC, served as a chaperone. Students visited several museums and monuments during the weeklong trip. Delegates also spent a day on Capitol Hill where they met with members of Indiana’s congressional delegation. If your student will be a junior for the 2018-19 school year, apply for this educational trip of a lifetime. This winter, look for more information to apply in our publications and on our website, theremc.com/youthtour.

Touchstone Energy Camp For 16 years, Clark County REMC has sponsored soon-to-be seventh grade students to attend Indiana’s Touchstone Energy Camp. This camp offers the traditional outdoor camp activities, alongside electrical safety and cooperative business education. Students representing the cooperative this year were Colin Kruer, Isaac Lewis, Dimitar Slavov, Jacie Whitmer and Daniel Yoo. Jamie Carver, credit and collections specialist at the REMC, served as a chaperone. If your student will be a sixth grader for the 2018-19 school year, don’t miss out on this high-energy camp experience. This winter, look for more information to apply in our publications and on our website, theremc. com/camp.

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Clark County REMC was proud to send five students to Touchstone Energy Camp.


energy

Understanding Appliance BY PAT KEEGAN & BRAD THIESSEN

Dear Pat and Brad: Several of my appliances are getting old and will need to be replaced soon. Will the appliance choices I make have much impact on my energy bill? – Chelsea

Dear Chelsea: Your energy use varies month to month, so it can be difficult to see how much difference an appliance purchase makes. It’s best to view the purchase over the lifetime of the equipment. Think about the up-front cost and the lifetime energy cost. In a Consumer Reports test, the most efficient refrigerator used $68 per year less electricity than the least efficient model. Multiply that difference over a decade or two, and the lifetime energy savings could be greater than the up-front cost. All it takes to get the best appliance for your needs is some initial research. Appliance energy use is usually less, on average, than home heating and cooling bills, but can be several hundred dollars each year. Your appliance use depends on

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Energy Use

factors like the model, how often you use it, the settings you use for its particular function and even the time of day it is most used. Over the last few decades, new appliances became more energy efficient, driven partly by minimum government standards. These standards, created by the U.S. Department of Energy, save consumers over $60 billion each year. Appliances are required to include an Energy Guide label that shows estimated energy use and operating cost per year. These labels help you compare different models and calculate the initial cost against the long-term savings. Some appliances will also have an ENERGY STAR label. This indicates the appliance is substantially more efficient than the minimum standard. Your greatest energy savings opportunities can come from replacing an old appliance with an ENERGY STAR-rated appliance. Removing a refrigerator that’s 20 years old and replacing it with a new ENERGY STAR model can lower the monthly electricity cost by 75 percent, from $16.50 to less than $4. In some cases, the configuration of the appliance can also make a substantial difference. For example, a side-by-side refrigerator/freezer uses about 70 percent more energy than other configurations, with all the most efficient models having the refrigerator stacked on top of the freezer. All 36 of the most efficient clothes washers of 2018 were frontloading models. Consider how much you use the appliance. The more you use the appliance the greater your savings will be from choosing a more efficient model. If you use the appliance less or have a small household, you may get by with a smaller refrigerator or freezer, which will save you money.

How you operate appliances can also make a difference. Here are some easy ways to save:

REFRIGERATOR/FREEZER • Set your refrigerator at 35 to 38 F and your freezer at 0 F. • Make sure there is adequate air flow between the wall and the back of the unit. • Keep the refrigerator relatively full when possible. • Replace the seals around the doors if they appear to be leaking air. • Defrost the refrigerator and freezer regularly.

STOVE/OVEN • Use the correct size of burner to fit the pan. • Use smaller appliances like a microwave or slow cooker instead of the oven when possible.

DISHWASHER • Use the most energy-efficient and shortest setting that gets your dishes clean. • Air dry rather than using the heated dry function. • Wait to run a load until the dishwasher is full. Make the most out of your appliance energy use with a little research before buying a new model and a few easy adjustments to the way you use them.

This column was co-written by Pat Keegan and Brad Thiessen of Collaborative Efficiency. For more information on saving energy on your appliances, please visit: www.collaborativeefficiency.com/ energytips.


PRODUCT As a service to our readers and to promote electrical safety, here are some recent recall notices provided by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. Visit www.cpsc.gov/en/recalls for full details of these recalls and for notices of many more.

GE Lighting pulls LED tube lamps GE Lighting has recalled LED Cool White Universal T8/T12 LED tube lamps. The pins on one end of the lamp can be energized during installation/removal, posing electric shock and electrocution hazards. The recall involves GE Lighting’s 31243 LED13T8U840 LED two-pack tube lamps. These units are most often used in garages, basements, workshops and utility rooms. They were sold at Lowe’s stores nationwide and online from approximately November 2017 through April 2018 for about $15. Call 800-338-4999 from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. ET, Monday through Friday, or go to www.gelighting. com and click on “Product Safety Information” for more information.

Ashley Furniture recalls mislabeled floor lamps Incorrect labeling has led to a recall of Signature Design by Ashley Amnon floor lamps with a floor switch and 12 lightbulb sockets. The incorrect label on the lamp states that consumers can use 40 watt lightbulbs in the product. However, the socket is only designed to support 25 watt lightbulbs. Use of incorrect wattage lightbulbs can melt the power switch, posing a burn hazard. The portable, electric floor lamps are metal with a bronze finish and measure about 64 inches tall. Model number L207971 is printed on a label on the underside of the lamp’s base. The lamps were sold at Ashley Furniture Home stores, independently owned and operated furniture stores nationwide and online retailers from February 2017 through April 2018 for between $160 and $300. Ashley Furniture has received seven incident reports, including six reports in the United States of the floor lamp’s power switch melting with four of those reports resulting in minor property damage. No injuries have been reported. Call 800-477-2222, ext. 129155, or go to www.ashleyfurniture.com and click on the “Consumer Notifications” link at the bottom of the page for more information.

Video monitors pose burn hazard Lorex has recalled three of video monitors — models LW2751, LW2752 and LW2962H — used with surveillance video systems. Batteries in the monitors can overheat, swell and expand and cause the battery cover to open or come off and expose hot batteries, posing a burn hazard to consumers. The video monitors are black and were sold in two sizes; 7-inches wide by 5-inches tall, and 9-inches wide by 6-inches tall. Lorex has received 328 reports of the monitor battery overheating and/or expanding. No injuries have been reported. The monitors were sold at Best Buy stores nationwide and online from April 2014 through March 2017. The video monitors were sold in bundles for between $150 and $330. Call 844-265-7388 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. ET, Monday through Friday.

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insights NEW USS INDIANA SUBMARINE TO HIT THE SEAS IN SEPTEMBER A next-generation attack submarine named for the Hoosier state joined the U.S. Navy’s fleet on June 25. The USS Indiana began construction in 2012 and is scheduled to commission next month. This is the fourth time a ship has been named after the 19th state, and it will be the first USS Indiana to be in active service since the end of World War II. The first USS Indiana (BB 1), a battleship, saw action during the Spanish-American War and participated in both the blockade and battle of Santiago de Cuba. The second (BB50) was canceled before it was fully constructed in the 1920s. The third USS Indiana (BB 58) was completed in April 1942, saw extensive combat in the Pacific theater of World War II, and earned nine battle stars. Virginia-class submarines such as the USS Indiana are built to operate in littoral and deep waters while conducting anti-submarine warfare; anti-surface ship warfare; strike warfare; special operations forces support; intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance; irregular warfare and mine warfare missions. Their inherent stealth, endurance, mobility and firepower enable them to support five of the six maritime strategy core capabilities — sea control, power projection, forward presence, maritime security and deterrence. P HO TO C OU RT E SY OF S U B M AR IN E FOR C E ATLA N TIC

Corn maze to honor slain deputy The Boone County community was

feature a design which will read “Dulls

shaken when Sheriff’s Deputy Jacob

Honor Our Everyday Heroes” and will

Pickett was fatally shot during a police

include Pickett’s badge number in the

chase in March. This fall, Dull’s Tree

center of a large sheriff’s star.

Farm in Thorntown will dedicate one of its most popular fall traditions to fallen Pickett. Harvest” will honor Pickett and support

get into the farm for free with proof of

all members of law enforcement and first

identification.

responders. The eight-acre attraction will

They’ve got the power Concern for community is not limited

be formally recognized at the Indiana

by age. Past winners of the Youth

Electric Cooperatives annual meeting

Power and Hope Awards, including

in Indianapolis on Dec. 4. They will also

those who’ve spearheaded anti-bullying

be featured in an Electric Consumer

campaigns, toy drives, and logged in

article.

Indiana’s electric cooperatives invite

Indiana Eats article about Limestone Cafe listed incorrect hours of operation. The restaurant is open from 5-9 p.m. on Thursdays and 6-10 p.m. on Fridays.

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AUGUST 2018

will open on Sept. 29. Through the end of October, all first responders will

proven that. Electric Consumer and

CORRECTION: Last month’s

by Boone REMC. Its Pumpkin Harvest

The corn maze at the farm’s “Pumpkin

hundreds of volunteer hours, have

Sailors assigned to Pre-Commissioning Unit Indiana (SSN 789) stand watch and pilot the vessel while underway.

Dull’s Tree Farm is served electrically

community-minded students who will be in grades 5-8 this school year to apply

Applicants do not have to live within an REMC/REC territory. However, they must reside in Indiana. Deadline to apply is Oct. 5.

for this year’s Youth Power and Hope

For more information and application

Awards.

forms, please visit our website: www.

Up to five winners will be named. Each winner will receive $500. Winners will

ElectricConsumer.org.


Always call 811 before starting fencing & landscaping projects. Landowners completing these projects were more than three times more likely to hit a buried utility because they did not call 811 before breaking ground.


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Indiana eats

youth FOUNTAIN OF

ZAHARAKOS HEARKENS BACK TO ICE CREAM PARLORS OF YORE

ZAHARAKOS Ice Cream Parlor and Museum 329 W. Washington St. Columbus, Indiana 812-378-1900

Long gone are the days when you could savor an ice cream soda or sundae at an honest-togoodness ice cream parlor/soda fountain — that is, unless you visit Zaharakos in Columbus, Indiana. This national historic landmark is known not only for its creamy homemade ice cream, but for its unparalleled atmosphere.

Britney Pagels pours strawberries and syrup onto an ice cream dish as 7-year-old Reese Yoder of Brownsburg oohs in anticipation. Along with usual ice cream shop fare, the iconic parlor still serves up the ice cream sodas and phosphates from behind its marble counter just as it did a century ago.

onsite player piano, designed to sound like a full orchestra, entertains with ragtime tunes.

cream with three toppings.

Originally, it was a candy store when the four Zaharako brothers, Greek immigrants, opened it in 1900. But by 1911, Zaharakos had transitioned into an parlor and fountain purveying some of the treats it still serves today.

An adjoining museum houses mechanical musical instruments and soda fountain relics. And the banquet rooms — which can accommodate small and large groups alike — are like a special treat with a cherry on top. For instance, the Whitman Room, which can seat 24 guests, is a private ice cream parlor with special seating for the kids.

Visitors wanting something a bit more substantial before diving into the sweets, will find a generous menu of sandwiches, sides, salads, chili and macaroni and cheese. Zaharakos is famous for its version of Sloppy Joes, the Gom Sandwich, and its giant handcut, hand-breaded tenderloin.

In 2007, it was restored to its turn-of-lastcentury glory. Stained glass windows, a tin ceiling, marble pillars and counter, and refurbished woodwork add architectural charm. Two Mexican onyx soda fountains, which were originally used at the 1904 World’s Fair, are still dispensing favorites like Green River phosphates and flavored colas. The

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But ambiance aside, Zaharakos — or “Greek’s” as it’s sometimes still called — is known for its old-timey fountain favorites like sundaes, floats, milk shakes and ice cream sodas. Those wanting to try for a massive brain freeze can order The Big “Z:” five scoops of ice

Hours: 11 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Before devouring that whole tenderloin when at Zaharakos, though, it’s wise to remember the old adage: “save room for dessert.” You’ll be glad you did!

SEE MORE IDEAS FOR YOUR NEXT U.S. 31 ROAD TRIP ON PAGES 19–24.


food

KID

approved

Popsicles by Marilles Mauer, Greensburg 1 (3-oz.) package gelatin 1 cup sugar 3 cups water 1 (0.15-oz.) package powdered drink mix 2 cups boiling water Use any flavor of gelatin and drink mix. Mix gelatin and boiling water. Add the rest of the ingredients. Blend together well and freeze in popsicle molds until frozen firm. Makes about 10 popsicles. JULY 2018

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food FO O D PREPARED BY ELECTR I C CO NS UME R S TA FF PHO TO S BY RI CHA RD G . B I E V E R

Mini Pumpkin Whoopie Pies by Riley Carothers, Elizabethtown COOKIES ½ cup butter, softened 1¼ cups sugar 2 large eggs

Toll House Marble Squares

at room temperature, lightly beaten

1 cup pumpkin (from can) 1 t. vanilla 2 T. molasses 2 cups all-purpose flour 1 t. baking powder 1 t. baking soda 1 t. ground cinnamon ½ t. ground ginger ½ t. ground cloves ¼ t. ground cardamom ¼ t. salt

(only if using unsalted butter; otherwise omit)

Cream butter and sugar in a large bowl. Add eggs and beat well. Add

Toll House Marble Squares

Edible Fun Dough

and spices. Add to pumpkin mixture

by Kathi Tooley, Berne

by Christine Franke, LaGrange

and stir well. Using a teaspoon-size

1 cup butter ¾ cup brown sugar ¾ cup white sugar 1 t. vanilla 2 eggs 1 t. baking soda 1 t. salt 2 cups flour

pumpkin, vanilla, and molasses; beat until smooth. In a separate bowl, whisk flour, baking powder, baking soda,

cookie scoop, drop onto greased or parchment-lined cookie sheet. Bake for about 12 minutes in 350 F oven. Cookie should spring back to the touch. FILLING 4 oz. cream cheese, at room temperature 6 T. butter, softened ½ t. vanilla 1½ cups powdered sugar Beat cream cheese, butter, and vanilla

12 oz. chocolate chips Mix together butter, sugars and vanilla. Then add eggs and stir well. Blend in baking soda, salt,

until fluffy. Gradually mix in powdered

and flour. Spread evenly into

sugar and beat until light and fluffy.

greased cookie sheet or jelly roll

Generously frost the flat side of one

pan. Sprinkle chocolate chips over

cookie with filling, then top it with the

dough and bake 1-2 minutes at 375

flat side of another one to make a

F until chips are slightly melted.

“sandwich.” Repeat with remaining

Remove from oven and swirl with

cookies and filling.

knife until marbleized. Return to oven and bake 12-15 minutes.

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1 cup peanut butter 2 cups powdered milk ½-1 cup honey Mix all ingredients in a bowl. Add more/less powdered milk or more/less honey to make stiffer or softer as needed.


Capital Credits Do we owe you money?

The following listing represents account balance and capital credit refund checks issued to current or former members of the REMC which remain unclaimed at the current time. This listing includes the name, last known city and state of residence, and amount due the member. If you are entitled to claim any of the following amounts, please stop by our office located at 7810 State Road 60, Sellersburg, Indiana, or call us at 812-246-3316. You must provide proper identification and a current mailing address so that we can issue a replacement check. Any amounts not claimed by the rightful recipients within 60 days of first being published will be reallocated among the current membership of the REMC. Please contact our office at 812-246-3316 if you have any questions. ROBERTSON ROLLIE MILTON KY 75.26 ROBERTSON RONALD JEFFERSONVILLE IN 15.94 ROBERTSON TODD HENRYVILLE IN 30.10 ROBERTSON WILLIAM EDDYVILLE KY 41.78 ROBEY ELLEN CHARLESTOWN IN 4.49 ROBINSON FLORENCE NEW ALBANY IN 44.42 ROBINSON J NEW ALBANY IN 13.86 ROBINSON JAMES CROTHERSVILLE IN 24.70 ROBINSON MARY HENRYVILLE IN 106.87 ROBINSON PAUL SCOTTSBURG IN 93.72 ROBINSON SANDRA SHELBYVILLE KY 39.05 ROBISON JOHN NEW WASHINGTON IN 186.08 ROBISON ROY FLOYDS KNOBS IN 24.19 ROBISON WILLIAM CHARLESTOWN IN 1.57 ROBY RICK LOUISVILLE KY 36.86 ROCHNER SUSAN INDIANAPOLIS IN 113.32 RODEWIG RICHARD BORDEN IN 64.76 RODEWIG RICHARD JEFFERSONVILLE IN 89.41 RODGERS GEORGE FLOYDS KNOBS IN 90.54 RODGERS SUZANNE INDIANAPOLIS IN 37.29 RODRIGUEZ MARIN SELLERSBURG IN 11.11 ROEDERER PAUL JEFFERSONVILLE IN 19.98 ROGERS CHRISTOPHER HENRYVILLE IN 83.63 ROGERS KATHYRN FLOYDS KNOBS IN 19.69 ROGERS LESTER CHARLESTOWN IN 24.74 ROGERS PHIL SELLERSBURG IN 6.22 ROGERS ROBERT HENRYVILLE IN 6.46 ROGERS VIVIAN CUMBERLAND KY 11.33 ROGGE JUDY CHARLESTOWN IN 30.74 ROLAND STEVEN RADCLIFF KY 14.78 ROLL GERALD NAPA CA 11.05 ROLLING HILLS COMM CHARLESTOWN IN 3.12 ROLLINS HARRY HENRYVILLE IN 89.20 ROLLO DAVID SAN JOSE CA 213.18 ROMANS DANNY CHARLESTOWN IN 22.47 ROMERO RENE SELLERSBURG IN 58.92 ROOKS RICK UNDERWOOD IN 168.71 ROQUE CESAR CLARKSVILLE IN 51.23 ROSE EUGENE AURORA IL 22.48 ROSE FLORENE SHERIDAN IN 59.90 ROSE JERRY SCOTTSBURG IN 76.34 ROSEBERRY DAVID APPLE VALLEY MN 46.82 ROSENBLUM JERE COLUMBUS MS 41.91 ROSS ANDREW NEW ALBANY IN 22.69 ROSS CARL CLARKSVILLE IN 38.09 ROSS JANICE JEFFERSONVILLE IN 129.13 ROSS JESSE NEW ALBANY IN 7.16 ROSS ROY LOUISVILLE KY 42.09 ROSSLER WM MURRAY,KY 0.54 ROTH KELLY LEXINGTON IN 2.03 ROTH MONTE SCOTTSBURG IN 6.27 ROTHBAUER DELPHINE CLARKSVILLE IN 77.80 ROTHGERBER MARK TELL CITY IN 31.49 ROUCK KENNETH SELLERSBURG IN 19.88 ROUNTREE STEVE LOUISVILLE KY 9.97 ROUTT LEOTA CAMPBELLSBURG IN 51.72 ROWAN JEFF BORDEN IN 39.23 ROWE RONDAL SELLERSBURG IN 45.92 ROWLAND MELISSA PEKIN IN 34.65 ROWLETT MIKE HANOVER IN 10.90 ROY DAVID JEFFERSONVILLE IN 3.10 ROY THOMAS HENRYVILLE IN 27.90 ROYALTY TROY LOUISVILLE KY 12.36 ROYSE DAVID PHEONIX AZ 23.93 ROYSE DOUGLAS DENVER CO 74.52 RUDOLPH CHARLES JEFFERSONVILLE IN 26.72 RUDOLPH STEVEN JEFFERSONVILLE IN 27.45 RUMBLEY JULIA SAINT CLAIR MO 70.02 RUMPEL ALAN NEW ALBANY IN 8.52 RUPERT ALBERT GARDEN GROVE CA 12.39 RUPP DEAN CLARKSVILLE IN 11.35 RUPPEL GREG MEMPHIS IN 98.63 RUSCOE GORDON NEW SMYRNA BEACH FL 5.10 RUSH C NEW ALBANY IN 39.22

RUSH L NEW WASHINGTON IN RUSH RAYMOND BORDEN IN RUSS LEONARD RICHLAND OR RUSSELBURG DAVID CLARKSVILLE IN RUSSELL DAVID NEW ALBANY IN RUSSELL HARRY SALEM IN RUSSELL PATRICIA JEFFERSONVILLE IN RUSSELL ROY SELLERSBURG IN RUTHERFORD BOB DEPUTY IN RUTHERFORD DELBERT MARYSVILLE IN RUTHERFORD ELMER NEW ALBANY IN RUTHERFORD JIM SCOTTSBURG IN RYAN ROBERT CLARKSVILLE IN RYBICKI CARL DAYTONA BEACH FL RYDBERG BRYAN WESTLAKE OH RYKER CHARLES MOORESVILLE IN RYKER MARY CHARLESTOWN IN RYND CHARLES SCOTTSBURG IN SABALONES TAMERA CHARLESTOWN IN SACHAR RUTH LOUISVILLE KY SADLER ROBERT WESTLAKE OH SAGE KERRY JEFFERSONVILLE IN SAGE ROGER JEFFERSONVILLE IN SAHO VICTOR LOUISVILLE KY SALEM CHURCH CHARLESTOWN IN SALESMAN LORETTA LEXINGTON KY SAME GRAHAM CHARLESTOWN IN SAMMONS OF INDIANA NEW ALBANY IN SAMPLES TONIA JEFFERSONVILLE IN SAMPSON AMOS LEXINGTON IN SANBORN GEORGE NEW ALBANY IN SANDBACH ELMER MEMPHIS IN SANDEFUR KENNETH BORDEN IN SANDERS ALICIA NABB IN SANDERS CAROLYN CHARLESTOWN IN SANDERS EDIE CHARLOTTE NC SANDERS EVERETT CHARLESTOWN IN SANDERS JERRY ROSSVILLE GA SANDERS KENNETH HENRYVILLE IN SANDERS NORMAN CHARLESTOWN IN SANDERS NORMAN NEW ALBANY IN SANDERS PEARL MARYSVILLE IN SANDERS ROBERT SCOTTSBURG IN SANDERSON FORREST CLARKSVILLE IN SANDERSON NICK BORDEN IN SANDOVAL GARY HENRYVILLE IN SANFORD JAMES JEFFERSONVILLE IN SANS RICHARD CLARKSVILLE IN SAPP DONALD BOWLING GREEN KY SARGENT RANDALL SELLERSBURG IN SARLES PAUL NEW ALBANY IN SARLES SHELBY NEW ALBANY IN SATTERFIELD DARLENE NABB IN SAUER JOSEPH FLOYDS KNOBS IN SAUER KENNETH CLARKSVILLE IN SAUERHEBER HAROLD CLARKSVILLE IN SAYLOR FRANK HARDINSBURG IN SAYLOR RAY JEFFERSONVILLE IN SCAMAHORNE ALLEN BARDSTOWN KY SCARBERRY KENNETH CHARLESTOWN IN SCARBOROUGH BRET SELLERSBURG IN SCEIFERS WILLIAM SELLERSBURG IN SCHAEFER LOUIS CINCINNATI OH SCHAFER JOSEPHINE COLUMBUS IN SCHAFER ROBERT SELLERSBURG IN SCHEICH ROBERT NEW ALBANY IN SCHICKER NORMAN HUNTINGBURG IN SCHIDLER KYLIE HENRYVILLE IN SCHILL WILLIAM CROTHERSVILLE IN SCHILLER DORIS CLARKSVILLE IN SCHILLING J PEWEE VALLEY KY SCHINDLER BERTRAND FLOYDS KNOBS IN SCHINDLER JOHN SELLERSBURG IN SCHINDLER LAWRENCE CHARLESTOWN IN

116.11 116.79 78.60 18.75 86.66 57.64 12.05 20.00 55.52 176.46 12.55 18.33 21.65 56.86 26.54 29.10 83.53 13.48 20.62 12.01 19.71 41.48 37.54 32.02 47.09 6.09 37.71 217.13 40.96 15.59 18.63 6.95 35.79 6.16 6.48 53.14 93.57 66.87 18.54 13.21 51.07 83.68 12.47 66.89 29.68 6.59 37.67 6.16 118.90 81.97 82.86 95.47 19.23 63.15 34.05 93.67 12.54 13.19 10.99 23.26 19.70 114.95 30.68 77.84 123.85 30.57 10.85 21.81 40.26 25.68 24.79 114.88 76.61 1.81

SCHLEICHER LUCILLE BORDEN IN SCHLEICHER MARCIA FLOYDS KNOBS IN SCHMELZER DEBRA PEKIN IN SCHMIDT DAVID JEFFERSONVILLE IN SCHMIDT GREG UNDERWOOD IN SCHMIDT JAMES NEW ALBANY IN SCHMIDT PATRICK FLOYDS KNOBS IN SCHMIDT THELMA NEW ALBANY IN SCHMITT EUGENE SELLERSBURG IN SCHMITTLER DONNA NEW ALBANY IN SCHNEBLE JOHN LOUISVILLE KY SCHNEIDER CHLORA FLOYDS KNOBS IN SCHNEIDER JOHN NEW ALBANY IN SCHNEIDER MARK HENRYVILLE IN SCHNEIDER MARK HENRYVILLE IN SCHNOLL MARVIN JEFFERSONVILLE IN SCHNOOR MICHAEL SELLERSBURG IN SCHOEN JOAN LOUISVILLE KY SCHOLES JAMES NEW WASHINGTON IN SCHRICHTEN EDWARD MADISON IN SCHRODER JIM LOUISVILLE KY SCHROEDER JACQUELINE CHARLESTOWN IN SCHROEDER KATHLEEN OCALA FL SCHUESSLER MARY TRUSSVILLE AL SCHULER DAVID J JR HENRYVILLE IN SCHULER M NEW ALBANY IN SCHULER RESTAURANT HENRYVILLE IN SCHULTZ PATRICIA LOUISVILLE KY SCHULZ ANGIE JEFFERSONVILLE IN SCHULZ JOSEPH LOUISVILLE KY SCOFIELD DENNIS NEW WASHINGTON IN SCOTT DAVID NEW ALBANY IN SCOTT DAVID PEKIN IN SCOTT DAVID PEKIN IN SCOTT DEAN AKRON OH SCOTT JOSEPH JEFFERSONVILLE IN SCOTT KEITH OTISCO IN SCOTT PAULA LEXINGTON IN SCOTT RICHARD JEFFERSONVILLE IN SCOTT TERESA CHARLESTOWN IN SCOTT TIM FT MYERS FL SCOTT WAYNER CLARKSVILLE IN SCOTT WILLIAM HENRYVILLE IN SCROGGINS JAMES CHARLESTOWN IN SCROGGINS PAM NABB IN SEABORNE COAKLEY MEMPHIS IN SEACK JAMES SELLERSBURG IN SEARS PAULINE CLARKSVILLE IN SEAY G NEW ALBANY IN SEBASTIAN DWAYNE SCOTTSBURG IN SEEBOLD W MARYSVILLE IN SEGER RANDY GEORGETOWN IN SEIGEL KURT CHARLESTOWN IN SEITZ LAURA LAGRANGE KY SELIG HOLLY FRANKLIN NC SELLERS MARK METTER GA SELLS JEFFERY SELLERSBURG IN SELLS TIMOTHY SELLERSBURG IN SEMAR EDNA SCOTTSBURG IN SENN ALBERTA SEYMOUR IN SEPER BARBARA MEMPHIS IN SETSER MELISSA BORDEN IN SEWELL DORIS LOUISVILLE KY SEWELL THOMAS NEW ALBANY IN SEXTON JAMES JEFFERSONVILLE IN SHADBURN WILMA HENRYVILLE IN SHAFFER DONALD ALTOONA PA SHAIN FRANK SELLERSBURG IN SHAMPO TRACY CHARLESTOWN IN SHANKS MAJOR CHARLESTOWN IN SHARP BEULAH N MADISON TN SHARP JOANN ENGLISH IN SHARP LARRY GREENVILLE IN SHARP NATHAN CLARKSVILLE IN

AUGUST 20 18

61.45 28.95 47.54 90.48 34.41 35.09 24.99 63.75 5.64 31.38 38.71 36.58 32.87 49.10 1.62 146.77 7.28 42.16 58.13 29.42 30.54 12.34 53.96 63.51 293.31 65.25 10.26 22.32 13.24 17.14 12.13 38.95 69.11 2.63 262.06 14.89 65.85 13.60 98.32 175.07 148.48 28.32 9.76 8.95 8.39 73.80 86.77 13.92 146.24 35.72 2.85 21.47 14.49 21.75 21.39 33.06 36.53 18.60 30.24 86.91 122.90 7.93 13.82 6.47 3.51 63.64 162.50 42.08 10.22 50.47 5.10 35.09 25.60 6.78

18A


SHARTZER MICHAEL LOUISVILLE KY SHATYNSKI DORIS THOROFARE NJ SHAUGHNESSY MICHAEL NEW ALBANY IN SHAW DANIEL LOUISVILLE KY SHAW DAVID JEFFERSONVILLE IN SHAW DONNA CHARLESTOWN IN SHAW JAMES JAMESTOWN IN SHEA SHANON NEW ALBANY IN SHEEHAN RONALD CHARLESTOWN IN SHEEHAN VIRGINIA PEKIN IN SHEFFEL EMILY CHARLESTOWN IN SHELLEY LANA LOUISVILLE KY SHELTON ELMER NEW ALBANY IN SHELTON JAMES GRAND JUNCTION CO SHELTON LEAANN SCOTTSBURG IN SHELTON R MCGAHEYSVILLE VA SHEPHERD ANDY GREENVILLE IN SHEPHERD CHARLES SCOTTSBURG IN SHEPHERD DEAN MARYSVILLE IN SHEPHERD DENISE HANOVER IN SHEPHERD DENNIS LEXINGTON IN SHEPHERD JACK NEW ALBANY IN SHEPHERD SUSAN MADISON IN SHEROAN RUBY CHARLESTOWN IN SHERRARD DONALD JEFFERSONVILLE IN SHERRELL LESLIE JEFFERSONVILLE IN SHERRI & SHONNA PIZZA PEKIN IN SHERRILL ROY KANSAS CITY MO SHIELDS ROGER ARCADIA FL SHILLITO LAURENCE LOUISVILLE KY SHINGLER GARY LEXINGTON KY SHIPLEY JAMY JEFFERSONVILLE IN SHIPMAN T JEFFERSONVILLE IN SHIVERS DAVID ACKERMAN MS SHOEMAKER WYNEMA JEFFERSONVILLE IN SHORT JACK OTISCO IN SHORT PAUL BROOKSVILLE FL SHOULTZ KEITH PETERSBURG IN SHRADER VIRGINIA SELLERSBURG IN SHREBTIENKO JUDY CLARKSVILLE IN SHREWSBERRY BYRON BELLA VISTA AR SHUCK AUDRA NEW ALBANY IN SHUFF BERNICE GEORGETOWN IN SHULER AMY SCOTTSBURG IN SHULTZ MICHAEL SELMA NC SHUMAN RON UNDERWOOD IN SHUMATE BRADLEY SELLERSBURG IN SIDDONS CINDY UNDERWOOD IN SIEG KAREN SEMINOLE FL SIEWERT MICHAEL LOUISVILLE KY SILGAS INC JEFFERSONVILLE IN SILVER EDWARD MUSKOGEE OK SILVERSTEIN SEAN CRESTWOOD KY SIMMONS MICHELLE SELLERSBURG IN SIMMONS TODD NEW ALBANY IN SIMMS ROBERT JACKSONVILLE AR SIMON CHRISTA CLARKSVILLE IN SIMONS CHARLES FLOYDS KNOBS IN SIMONTON HARRY JEFFERSONVILLE IN SIMPSON BILL CHARLESTOWN IN SIMPSON RUSSELL SCOTTSBURG IN SIMS LESTER HENRYVILLE IN SINGH KIRK JEFFERSONVILLE IN SINGLETON MAE SELLERSBURG IN SINK J JEFFERSONVILLE IN SINK JAMES JEFFERSONVILLE IN SIZEMORE DORIS CHARLESTOWN IN SIZEMORE FRANK OTISCO IN SIZEMORE ROBERT GEORGETOWN IN SKAGGS CHARLES CORYDON IN SKEENS WILLARD CHARLESTOWN IN SKILLMAN ELIZABETH SEYMOUR IN SLIDER STEVE HENRYVILLE IN SLINKER CHARLES NABB IN SLONE KAREN SELLERSBURG IN SLONE P E HENRYVILLE IN SLUCHER RALPH PALMYRA IN SLUSHER GENE SELLERSBURG IN SMALLEY RICK WEATHERFORD TX SMALLWOOD ARMILDA CLARKSVILLE IN SMEDLEY ROBERT PROSPECT KY SMITH ALONZO NEW ALBANY IN SMITH ALVIN JEFFERSONVILLE IN SMITH BRETT SCOTTSBURG IN SMITH BRIAN HENRYVILLE IN SMITH BROADUS L JEFFERSONVILLE IN SMITH CLIFFORD SELLERSBURG IN SMITH CORA LEXINGTON IN SMITH DENNIS CLARKSVILLE IN SMITH DEWEY SELLERSBURG IN SMITH DORIS NEW ALBANY IN SMITH DORIS NEW ALBANY IN SMITH DORIS INC BORDEN IN

18B

AUGUST 2018

5.97 12.03 30.88 31.32 90.42 11.88 52.14 57.61 95.57 74.26 29.87 59.37 37.41 141.88 70.31 2.03 13.32 26.49 16.26 8.21 21.23 39.91 1.84 7.63 153.72 90.98 45.09 33.88 14.15 53.39 6.96 26.85 77.73 48.56 7.53 82.98 89.56 2.45 24.07 32.15 33.34 34.84 100.24 9.98 7.67 41.39 6.68 36.80 27.55 7.62 53.79 0.60 26.53 38.55 11.78 8.39 10.67 103.65 14.86 93.21 3.65 26.35 30.23 63.55 111.23 20.09 83.62 60.03 13.49 106.58 173.15 45.52 21.29 9.59 74.74 61.40 2.37 90.86 72.82 19.44 15.23 22.83 14.85 34.82 51.05 100.80 8.99 4.24 27.42 13.72 19.15 42.03 5.30

SMITH DORIS INC BORDEN IN SMITH ERIC JEFFERSONVILLE IN SMITH FRANK OCALA FL SMITH GARY CHARLESTOWN IN SMITH GARY CHARLESTOWN IN SMITH GENE JEFFERSONVILLE IN SMITH GERALD SIOUX FALLS SD SMITH GREGORY BORDEN IN SMITH JAMES LOUISVILLE KY SMITH JASON HENRYVILLE IN SMITH JOHN BROWNSTOWN IN SMITH JOHN GREENFIELD IN SMITH JOHN JEFFERSONVILLE IN SMITH JOHN SCOTTSBURG IN SMITH JOSEPH SELLERSBURG IN SMITH JOYCE FAY BORDEN IN SMITH JULIA SELLERSBURG IN SMITH KARL MARTINSVILLE IN SMITH KENNETH SELLERSBURG IN SMITH LANNY SCOTTSBURG IN SMITH LARRY CLARKSVILLE IN SMITH LAYNE LOUISVILLE KY SMITH MARGIE CLARKSVILLE IN SMITH MICHAEL DEPAUW IN SMITH MICHAEL JEFFERSONVILLE IN SMITH MICHAEL LOUISVILLE KY SMITH NELSON CHARLESTOWN IN SMITH NORMA CHARLESTOWN IN SMITH OREDA HENRYVILLE IN SMITH PAUL MARYSVILLE IN SMITH PEGGY HENRYVILLE IN SMITH RANDY PADUCAH KY SMITH RICHARD BORDEN IN SMITH ROBERT HANOVER IN SMITH ROBERT STRAWBERRY PLAINS TN SMITH RONALD LOUISVILLE KY SMITH SANDRA SCOTTSBURG IN SMITH SUSAN LEXINGTON IN SMITH TERRI PEKIN IN SMITH TERRY BORDEN IN SMITH WENDELL NEW SALISBURY IN SMITH WILLIAM CHARLESTOWN IN SMITH WILLIAM JEFFERSONVILLE IN SMITH WILLIAM LOUISVILLE KY SMITLEY CURTIS CLARKSVILLE IN SMITLEY DONALD SELLERSBURG IN SMITLEY DONALD SELLERSBURG IN SMOTHERS TERRY JEFFERSONVILLE IN SNEDEGAR OLETA LOUISVILLE KY SNEED JESSE BORDEN IN SNELLING GARY JEFFERSONVILLE IN SNELLING JANE JEFFERSONVILLE IN SNELLING JIM PAOLI IN SNELLING MICHELLE FLOYDS KNOBS IN SNELLING R CINCINNATI OH SNELLING RICHARD SELLERSBURG IN SNELLING RUTH HENRYVILLE IN SNELLING RYAN CLARKSVILLE IN SNIDER DOUGLAS SELLERSBURG IN SNIDER JAMES SELLERSBURG IN SNIDER R BORDEN IN SNIDER RANDY SELLERSBURG IN SNOW DALE NAPERVILLE IL SNOW TONYA SCOTTSBURG IN SNYDER EDWARD MEMPHIS IN SO HILLS HOMEOWNERS ASSN BORDEN IN SOLANKI MUKESH SIOUX CENTER IA SOLOMON DAVID HENRYVILLE IN SOMMERVILLE JEFFREY CHARLESTOWN IN SOMMERVILLE JOAN HENRYVILLE IN SONNE JILL NEW ALBANY IN SOPER LAURA NEW ALBANY IN SOTHMANN TERRY OTISCO IN SOUTH IND LUMBER CO HENRYVILLE IN SOUTH MARIE & JOHN J INDEPENDENCE KY SOWDER ELIZABETH JEFFERSONVILLE IN SOWLE JOHN HENRYVILLE IN SPAINHOUR LADONNA SELLERSBURG IN SPALDING GREGORY SCOTTSBURG IN SPALDING TERRY ELIZABETHTOWN KY SPALL CHRIS AUSTIN IN SPANGER LOY WEST FRANKFORT IL SPANO DEANO SCOTTSBURG IN SPARKMAN ROBERT SALEM IN SPARKMAN RONALD NORTH VERNON IN SPARKMAN RONALD NORTH VERNON IN SPARKS FRANK HENRYVILLE IN SPARKS GEORGE FLORENCE KY SPARKS STEPHEN MILFORD OH SPARROW MARY CHARLESTOWN IN SPARROW THERESA CHARLESTOWN IN SPAULDING DIANE SELLERSBURG IN

5.09 5.78 80.42 10.00 100.99 123.96 40.51 6.06 4.39 7.51 13.41 22.91 10.95 3.45 37.47 2.13 12.32 20.22 15.38 17.85 64.59 29.16 15.45 42.33 58.24 10.53 74.81 30.46 16.19 41.48 26.44 10.28 19.96 12.87 33.04 12.64 1.30 6.37 15.95 14.25 12.97 35.39 30.15 9.69 79.12 10.46 8.97 129.42 73.82 56.78 4.29 2.05 15.99 15.63 97.92 7.85 15.00 17.27 61.65 6.35 44.59 87.69 89.87 166.61 20.65 14.06 7.91 125.93 17.29 16.83 12.96 3.45 13.96 1.26 10.47 44.28 20.97 50.78 8.92 187.51 9.09 16.27 75.25 64.65 51.21 63.07 122.29 19.98 120.36 6.55 64.19 36.31

SPAULDING MICHAEL GILBERTSVILLE KY SPEED PEPPER UPPER CLUB SPEED IN SPEIGELHALDER RAY FLOYDS KNOBS IN SPENCE WALDO NABB IN SPENCER BJ SCOTTSBURG IN SPENCER DONALD SELLERSBURG IN SPENCER FRANCES MEMPHIS IN SPENCER FRANKLIN CLARKSVILLE IN SPENCER JOSEPH JEFFERSONVILLE IN SPENCER LENA OTISCO IN SPENCER MARY SELLERSBURG IN SPENCER SCOTTY SELLERSBURG IN SPENCER THERESA BEDFORD KY SPETH RANDY CHARLESTOWN IN SPHIRE MICHAEL GEORGETOWN IN SPIVEY TERISA SCOTTSBURG IN SPRATT KEVIN HANNIBAL MO SPRINGLEAF FARM OTISCO IN SPURGEON HOWARD MEMPHIS IN SPURRIER BROTHERS CHARLESTOWN IN ST JOHN JULIE SALEM IN ST JOHN KERY SELLERSBURG IN ST JOSEPH HILL SELLERSBURG IN STACKHOUSE GARY HENRYVILLE IN STACKHOUSE HERSHELL HOT SPRINGS AR STACY EVA SCOTTSBURG IN STAFFORD JAMES BROKENARROW OK STAGGS MARGARET HENRYVILLE IN STAGGS MICHAEL HENRYVILLE IN STAIDLE SCOTT LOUISVILLE KY STALEY CRAIG HENRYVILLE IN STAMPER MIKE NEW ALBANY IN STANDEFER JERRY OTISCO IN STANDIFORD DOUGLAS FLOYDS KNOBS IN STANLEY ROBERT NEW ALBANY IN STANSBURY CHARLES MEMPHIS IN STAR GAS PROPANE LP HERNANDO FL STARCH GARY JEFFERSONVILLE IN STARGEL CARRY JEFFERSONVILLE IN STARK CORY JEFFERSONVILLE IN STARK L SCOTTSBURG IN STARNES JOHN BORDEN IN STARR RONNIE MEMPHIS IN STASER GENE SELLERSBURG IN STASER JAMES FLOYDS KNOBS IN STATON BETTY SUN CITY CA STATON SAM HENRYVILLE IN STEELE ALICE CLARKSVILLE IN STEELE JIM JEFFERSONVILLE IN STEELE SANDY NABB IN STEELE SANDY SCOTTSBURG IN STEGE MARTHA BORDEN IN STEIER ROBERT RAMSEY IN STEIN JENNY SELLERSBURG IN STEMLER MARY GOOSE CREEK SC STEPHENS DON FLOYDS KNOBS IN STEPP DAVID CLARKSVILLE IN STEPP MARY NEW ALBANY IN STEPP MICHAEL NEW ALBANY IN STERRETT ROBERT PENDLETON IN STERRTT CLARENCE LEXINGTON IN STEVENS EDGAR CLARKSVILLE IN STEVENS MAURCIE CHARLESTOWN IN STEWART CONST SCOTTSBURG IN STEWART DONALD FAIRDALE KY STEWART DONALD LOUISVILLE KY STEWART FUNERAL HOME HENRYVILLE IN STEWART GARY BEL AIR MD STEWART JAMES NABB IN STEWART ROSEMARY OTISCO IN STEWART THOMAS SCOTTSBURG IN STIFFEY PAUL R - RES SELLERSBURG IN STILLER STEPHEN FLOYDS KNOBS IN STINER WILLIAM NEW ALBANY IN STINES JOYCE OTISCO IN STINES WILLIAM MADISON IN STITH VIRGINIA SELLERSBURG IN STIVERS K FLOYDS KNOBS IN STOCKDELL VINCENT SELLERSBURG IN STOCKFORD SHAWN SPEED IN STODGHILL CAROLYN SALEM IN STOLL CHARLES SCOTTSBURG IN STOLWORTHY JEFFREY SMITHFIELD KY STONE DAVID L CHARLESTOWN IN STONE JANICE AUSTIN IN STONE ROBERT LOUISVILLE KY STONER CHARLES SELLERSBURG IN STONER FRANCIS JEFFERSONVILLE IN STONER TAMMY MILTON KY STORIE MICKY FLOYDS KNOBS IN STOVER LINDA CHARLESTOWN IN

143.58 32.19 91.84 206.74 5.73 8.56 94.64 8.62 15.98 47.34 17.72 37.53 20.11 26.19 10.49 9.24 14.41 18.42 7.29 0.69 11.47 35.34 34.30 25.47 71.61 13.63 32.37 65.39 11.74 16.56 41.91 10.23 22.27 15.35 19.79 43.90 55.80 74.62 57.68 14.80 70.87 21.42 7.07 16.67 49.59 45.92 5.23 12.79 7.96 22.22 32.33 59.38 3.76 31.04 67.59 104.08 29.99 49.94 18.89 18.24 13.67 9.95 47.59 7.05 96.40 65.45 160.08 23.46 38.26 38.12 135.62 127.34 65.30 41.39 99.58 62.46 116.60 214.08 6.73 28.98 8.59 25.98 22.53 2.86 102.49 42.43 49.19 27.52 42.10 57.25 4.92


STOVER ROBERT NEW ALBANY IN STRAIGHT DEBBIE NEW ALBANY IN STRAUB DAVID & ASSOCIATES NEW ALBANY IN STREET EDWARD SELLERSBURG IN STRICKER HARRY MARYSVILLE IN STRIEGEL DANIEL HENRYVILLE IN STROUSE GARRY ANTIOCH TN STUCKY WILMA NEW ALBANY IN STULL JAMES PEKIN IN STULTS DONALD NEW ALBANY IN STUMLER ADAM GEORGETOWN IN STUMLER BYRAN FLOYDS KNOBS IN STUMLER TILLIE FLOYDS KNOBS IN STUTESMAN ROBERT CHARLESTOWN IN STYERS CYNTHIA JEFFERSONVILLE IN STYGAR TANEE MEMPHIS IN SUBWAY OF SELLERSBURG NEW ALBANY IN SUDDETH MARY SELLERSBURG IN SULLIVAN DWAYNE SCOTTSBURG IN SULLIVAN JAMES REEDS SPRING MO SULLIVAN JIM JEFFERSONVILLE IN SULLIVAN LEWIS MEMPHIS IN SULLIVAN RON PANAMA CITY BEACH FL SUMMERS ROBERT LEBANON KY SUMMERS SUSAN NEW ALBANY IN SUMNER JEAN SELLERSBURG IN SUMNER MELISSA CHARLESTOWN IN SUNDMAN RONALD OOLTEWAH TN SURBER RODNEY AUSTIN IN SURMA JAY UNDERWOOD IN SUTTLES LARRY JEFFERSONVILLE IN SUTTON J SCOTTSBURG IN SWALLOWS EDWARD UNDERWOOD IN SWARTZ ROBIN GEORGETOWN IN SWEETEN MICHAEL CLARKSVILLE IN SWISHER WILLIAM SCOTTSBURG IN T J ATKINS/RENTAL CHARLESTOWN IN TABLER NORMAN FLOYDS KNOBS IN TABOR THOMAS MARYSVILLE IN TABOR THOMAS OTISCO IN TACKETT STEVEN LA GRANGE KY TACKETT THOMAS SELLERSBURG IN TADLOCK DEON OTISCO IN TAGGART WILLIAM COLUMBUS IN TALBOTT FOREST FLOYDS KNOBS IN TALBOTT ROBT F SALEM IN TANKISLEY CASEY R SELLERSBURG IN TANKSLEY JAMES NEW ALBANY IN TANNER CALON HENRYVILLE IN TARBELL SCOTT ATHOL MA TATE DONALD LOUISVILLE KY TATUM EDDIE NAPLES FL TAUL DENNIE CHARLESTOWN IN TAYLOR DIANE SCOTTSBURG IN TAYLOR EDWARD CLARKSVILLE IN TAYLOR HARLAN NEW ALBANY IN TAYLOR JAMES MARYSVILLE IN TAYLOR JEFFREY NEW ALBANY IN TAYLOR JOSEPH STRUTHERS OH TAYLOR JOYCE UNDERWOOD IN TAYLOR KENNETH SELLERSBURG IN TAYLOR LARRY NEW ALBANY IN TAYLOR MARVIN GENOA IL TAYLOR MICHAEL HENRYVILLE IN TAYLOR MISSY LEXINGTON IN TAYLOR PAM HENRYVILLE IN TAYLOR ROBERT O DEPAUW IN TAYLOR TERRY SELLERSBURG IN TAYLOR THOMAS LEXINGTON IN TAYLOR THOMAS LOUISVILLE KY TAYLOR TRACY SCOTTSBURG IN TAYLOR VENCER LOUISVILLE KY TEDESCO DOMINIC JEFFERSONVILLE IN TEIMOURY MASOUD TAMUNING GUAM TELEVISION SERVICES INC SELLERSBURG IN TEMPLE DON PLEASURVILLE KY TEMPLE SAM SALEM IN TERRELL DIKE LEXINGTON IN TERRELL JAMES SCOTTSBURG IN TERRELL RONALD SELLERSBURG IN TERRELL TERESA SCOTTSBURG IN TERRY ALICIA AUSTIN IN TESTANI DOROTHY SCOTTSBURG IN THACKER MORRIS LOUISVILLE KY THACKER PHYLLIS NEW ALBANY IN THARP ARTHUR LOUISVILLE KY THARP KEITH BORDEN IN THARP SHAUNTY WEST LAFAYETTE IN THEOHARATOS GREGORY HENRYVILLE IN THIENEMAN MATHEW T LOUISVILLE KY THOMAS ARTHUR LEXINGTON IN

17.14 24.64 18.99 26.82 101.58 14.13 9.95 22.77 26.17 8.97 44.21 41.82 7.09 101.08 16.71 109.75 102.07 72.46 27.12 16.71 9.57 48.26 20.74 11.19 21.05 81.32 51.56 50.61 10.43 70.20 38.42 136.40 79.45 80.76 10.69 72.96 5.21 242.33 7.11 21.50 13.69 69.02 85.10 32.92 143.08 37.88 29.53 16.99 58.65 12.01 24.21 31.10 92.70 26.79 94.58 46.16 155.03 88.08 6.18 49.43 104.39 52.13 41.04 39.50 20.46 7.34 28.49 10.49 8.37 36.29 11.31 13.33 12.77 50.33 52.56 7.35 14.88 107.47 223.28 81.75 125.41 5.32 61.10 68.42 150.41 66.99 11.97 16.26 25.93 85.12 96.17

THOMAS CHARLES MEMPHIS IN THOMAS GRANT NABB IN THOMAS HERSCHEL NEW ALBANY IN THOMAS JEFFREY NEW ALBANY IN THOMAS JONATHAN CLARKSVILLE IN THOMAS LARRY CLARKSVILLE IN THOMAS MARK SELLERSBURG IN THOMAS MELISSA BORDEN IN THOMAS MERVIN CHARLESTOWN IN THOMAS STEPHEN JEFFERSONVILLE IN THOMPSON ANNA CHARLESTOWN IN THOMPSON B & E IN C FLOYDS KNOBS IN THOMPSON BILLY PHILLIPSBURG KS THOMPSON CHARLES JEFFERSONVILLE IN THOMPSON DON NEW ALBANY IN THOMPSON EDWARD SCOTTSBURG IN THOMPSON ELMER CLARKSVILLE IN THOMPSON JOSEPH HENRYVILLE IN THOMPSON MALCOLM JEFFERSONVILLE IN THOMPSON MARIA SELLERSBURG IN THOMPSON ROBERT PORT CHARLOTTE FL THOMPSON SYLVIA CHARLESTOWN IN THORN WILLARD NEW ALBANY IN THORNEYCROFT DONALD SEYMOUR IN THORNTON PAUL JEFFERSONVILLE IN THORPE WILLIAM JEFFERSONVILLE IN THRELKEL MARILYN HENRYVILLE IN TICHENOR KERRY SELLERSBURG IN TILFORD SHIRLEY CHARLESTOWN IN TILTON GARY CLARKSVILLE IN TIMBERLAKE KIM SELLERSBURG IN TIM’S PIZZA HENRYVILLE IN TIPTON DENNIS JEFFERSONVILLE IN TITUS JAMES MEMPHIS IN TOAN JOHN SELLERSBURG IN TOBY ANTHONY FLOYDS KNOBS IN TODARO GAELYN TORONTO ON TODD CYNTHIA JEFFERSONVILLE IN TOMES JAMES CHARLESTOWN IN TOOLEY DONALD FLOYDS KNOBS IN TOPGUN TRANSPORT SELLERSBURG IN TORRENCE DIANA LOUISVILLE KY TORSCH JAMES LOUISVILLE KY TOTTEN MICHELE SELLERSBURG IN TOUPIN DAVID LOUISVILLE KY TOWLES DORIS JEFFERSONVILLE IN TOWNS CONSTANCE RICHMOND VA TOWNSEND JAMES JEFFERSONVILLE IN TOWNSEND OLIVER BORDEN IN TOWNSLEY DONALD NEW ALBANY IN TRADING POST MOBILE HOMES LOUISVILLE KY TRANSIT OIL CO #3 4 LOUISVILLE KY TRAVER SCOTT CHARLESTOWN IN TREECE DOYLE MARYSVILLE IN TRENT ERNEST JEFFERSONVILLE IN TRENT TIMOTHY SCOTTSBURG IN TRIPLE CREEK LEXINGTON IN TROWBRIDGE EVAN NEW ALBANY IN TROXEL FORREST BORDEN IN TRUMAN DANA JEFFERSONVILLE IN TUCKER JOHN SCOTTSBURG IN TUDDER THOMAS NEW ALBANY IN TUNGATE KENNETH MEMPHIS IN TUNGATE WILLIAM CHARLESTOWN IN TURLEY DAVID B CHARLESTOWN IN TURLEY MC HAINES CITY FL TURNAGE DOUGLAS HENRYVILLE IN TURNER BRENDA GREENVILLE IN TURNER DAVID JEFFERSONVILLE IN TURNER DOUGLAS NEW ALBANY IN TURNER DOUGLAS SCOTTSBURG IN TURNER ERNEST LEROSE KY TURNER FALACE OTISCO IN TURNER KEVIN SELLERSBURG IN TURNER MARK INDIANAPOLIS IN TURNER PAMELA OTISCO IN TURNER RICK INDIANAPOLIS IN TURNER ROGER MAUCKPORT IN TURNER WILMA SMITHFIELD VA TURNS DANIELLE LOUISVILLE KY TUTTLE RICHARD TUCSON AZ TWIGG RONALD CLARKSVILLE IN TWO STEP FARM LOUISVILLE KY TWO WAY COMMUNICATIONS SELLERSBURG IN UNDERWOOD ERNEST LOUISVILLE KY UNDERWOOD JOHN NABB IN UNDERWOOD SALVAGE HENRYVILLE IN UNDERWOOD SALVAGE YARD HENRYVILLE IN UNITED CHRISTIAN OUTREACH HENRYVILLE IN

34.26 135.68 105.77 15.26 43.25 53.89 32.57 9.65 89.59 33.06 54.59 15.84 8.32 24.91 124.43 61.55 12.93 234.10 12.51 21.24 12.30 79.33 37.50 8.27 8.86 91.32 36.90 6.00 50.67 11.03 39.07 102.73 99.79 160.11 40.41 9.14 11.68 84.24 66.68 28.84 28.18 17.76 130.61 12.45 173.10 127.44 49.32 87.25 9.15 13.33 237.69 396.40 8.73 77.51 5.98 7.44 14.68 6.13 66.19 10.18 33.30 74.81 45.71 31.68 14.35 42.70 83.35 28.53 80.28 97.66 0.63 5.99 12.93 49.52 7.34 5.16 16.40 49.95 19.19 32.37 10.09 12.68 221.11 12.77 113.14 43.41 20.17 10.02 15.87

UNITED DYNAMICS INC SELLERSBURG IN UNIVERSITY OF LOUISVILLE LOUISVILLE KY UTLEY CONNIE OTISCO IN VAAL DANIEL INDIANAPOLIS IN VAIL W LEXINGTON KY VALENTINE TAMMY SELLERSBURG IN VALENTOUR DEBORAH ENGLISH IN VALLEY EXCAVATING MEMPHIS IN VALLEY FENCE CO INC LOUISVILLE KY VAN NOTE PETER BORDEN IN VANCADER WILLIAM LIVINGSTON TX VANCE HAROLD LOUISVILLE KY VANDYKE SUSAN SELLERSBURG IN VANHOOK JOHN NEW ALBANY IN VANHOOK TERRI CLARKSVILLE IN VANHOOK TERRI CLARKSVILLE IN VANMETER NORMA PEKIN IN VANNIS MICHELLE BRONSON FL VARBLE MORRIS NEW ALBANY IN VARNANAY DANIEL MORRISTOWN NJ VAUGHN BARBARA LOUISVILLE KY VAUGHN GEORGE CORYDON IN VAUGHT KIMBERLY NEW ALBANY IN VERY CHARLES CHARLESTOWN IN VEST BRADLEY NEW ALBANY IN VEST CARL HENRYVILLE IN VEST LEONARD JEFFERSONVILLE IN VEST MATHEW CHARLESTOWN IN VEST ROBIN CLARKSVILLE IN VEST RUEBIN NABB IN VEST SANDRA SELLERSBURG IN VEST WILLIAM SHARON SPRINGS NY VETTER CHARLES MADISON IN VIERLING WILLIAM RENTON WA VINCENCT LEONARD JEFFERSONVILLE IN VINCENT JAMES ALEXANDRIA VA VINCENT LORETTA HOOPESTON IL VOGT JAMES JEFFERSONVILLE IN VOIGNIER JAMES NEW ALBANY IN VOILS BOB LOUISVILLE KY VON SAXEL MORGAN LOUISVILLE KY WACKER GEORGE LOUISVILLE KY WADE LISA OTISCO IN WAGERS EDWARD JEFFERSONVILLE IN WAGGONER JAN GREENVILLE IN WAGGONER KENNETH DALBY GA WAGONER DUANE SELLERSBURG IN WAGONER MILDRED SELLERSBURG IN WALDMAN WM CHATTANOOGA TN WALKER FLETCHER LEXINGTON IN WALKER JAMES SHERIDAN IN WALKER LEWIS JEFFERSONVILLE IN WALKER MARGARET JEFFERSONVILLE IN WALKER MARY SELLERSBURG IN WALKER RICK HENRYVILLE IN WALKER RICK VAN BUREN AR WALKER TERESA NABB IN WALKER WINFORD CLARKSVILLE IN WALL CHARLES LOS ALTOS CA WALLACE JAMES NEW ALBANY IN WALLACE JOEL CLARKSVILLE IN WALLACE WARNER DUBUQUE IA WALLS NORINE OTISCO IN WALSH BRYAN JEFFERSONVILLE IN WALTER KAYETTA SELLERSBURG IN WALTER TODD NORTH BEND OH WALTERS MARVIN CHARLESTOWN IN WALTON BRENDA JEFFERSONVILLE IN WALTS DAVID CLARKSVILLE IN WALTS RICHARD CLARKSVILLE IN WARD EDGAR BORDEN IN WARD JOSEPH SELLERSBURG IN WARD JOYCE SCOTTSBURG IN WARD NADIENE NEW CASTLE PA WARD PATRICIA GARRETT IN WARD PAUL JEFFERSONVILLE IN WARD WINIFRED LOUISVILLE KY WARE WILLIAM LOUISVILLE KY WARREN BRENDA SCOTTSBURG IN WARREN DANNY NEW ALBANY IN WARREN DONALD CAMPBELLSVILLE KY WARREN EDWARD AUSTIN IN WARREN JEROME CHARLESTOWN IN WARREN LAWRENCE SELLERSBURG IN WARREN MARTHA CHARLESTOWN IN WARREN PETER NEW ALBANY IN WASH GARRY CHARLESTOWN IN WASSON LORA HENRYVILLE IN WATE DONALD NEW ALBANY IN WATERBURY TOM OTISCO IN WATERFILL GLENN HENRYVILLE IN WATERS CHARLES MARYSVILLE IN

AUGUST 2018

27.94 540.01 64.93 75.97 59.66 38.09 51.38 62.85 7.11 90.27 22.60 51.19 42.73 54.08 5.27 5.27 14.20 33.44 90.46 20.18 35.04 8.69 66.33 130.38 81.27 11.96 19.56 10.35 8.62 108.16 15.32 18.89 40.34 110.87 16.08 51.74 113.41 46.99 6.32 5.81 18.57 0.22 11.46 8.01 9.70 8.67 15.19 1.19 13.46 106.74 121.94 31.78 66.23 14.21 74.28 89.06 45.67 10.01 14.83 40.16 31.85 65.58 48.80 25.68 67.17 50.35 25.80 46.17 25.91 113.92 145.43 7.97 16.75 113.51 23.57 6.63 15.68 16.49 66.36 57.32 15.10 19.06 98.49 23.87 7.69 7.04 105.73 10.68 9.47 106.69 42.00 56.34

18C


WATERS LINDA NEW WASHINGTON IN WATERS MARY CHARLESTOWN IN WATERS MICHAEL BORDEN IN WATERS NORVIN CHARLESTOWN IN WATERS ROBERT LEXINGTON IN WATERS THOMAS OTISCO IN WATHEN GUY SELLERSBURG IN WATHEN NORMA CHARLESTOWN IN WATHEN PATTY LOUISVILLE KY WATKINS JAMES LOUISVILLE KY WATSON HELEN JEFFERSONVILLE IN WATSON MARY SELLERSBURG IN WATSON WILLIAM CLARKSVILLE IN WATTS CHAS CHARLESTOWN IN WATTS JAMES SELLERSBURG IN WAYMAN JAMES JEFFERSONVILLE IN WEATHERFORD MAX BORDEN IN WEATHERS JOSEPH CLARKSVILLE IN WEAVER CLIFF JR SELLERSBURG IN WEAVIL RONALD JEFFERSONVILLE IN WEBB ANTHONY CHARLESTOWN IN WEBB DAVID BORDEN IN WEBB HOBERT BORDEN IN WEBB WILLIAM CLARKSVILLE IN WEBER HERMAN FRUITLAND PARK FL WEBER LURA SELLERSBURG IN WEBER MILDRED JEFFERSONVILLE IN WEBER SAMUEL AUSTIN IN WEBSTER JEFFERY CHARLESTOWN IN WEBSTER MARY LOUISVILLE KY WEBSTER ROBERT BANGOR ME WEDDINGTON KENNETH SCOTTSBURG IN WEDDLE TERESA NABB IN WEIDNER GEORGE CLARKSVILLE IN WEIR JAMES SCOTTSBURG IN WEIR TERESA SCOTTSBURG IN WEIS WILLIAM LOUISVILLE KY WEISENBACH RAY MEMPHIS IN WELCH JENNIFER CLARKSVILLE IN WELDON BOBBY SELLERSBURG IN WELDON MORRIS DANVILLE KY WELLER HERMAN MEMPHIS IN WELLER WALTER MEMPHIS IN WELLS BRUCE SELLERSBURG IN WELLS GLEN LEXINGTON IN WELLS JIM SELLERSBURG IN WELLS JOHN BARBOURSVILLE WV WELLS PATRICK MEMPHIS IN WELSH JUDE CLARKSVILLE IN WELSH RICHARD JEFFERSONVILLE IN WELSH TIMOTHY CLARKSVILLE IN WELSHANS LEOLA MEMPHIS IN WELTY WILLIAM SELLERSBURG IN WELZ CECILE CLARKSVILLE IN WENNING BLOSSOM FLOYDS KNOBS IN WENNING GARY JEFFERSONVILLE IN WENTWORTH CARLOS NEW ALBANY IN WERMUTH ALVIN SELLERSBURG IN WERMUTH PHILIP SCOTTSBURG IN WERNER HAZEL BORDEN IN WESNER RAY PEKIN IN WESSELMAN RICHARD MEMPHIS IN WEST DONALD SELLERSBURG IN WEST JULIAN MADISON IN WESTON ROBERT SALEM IN WESTON ROGER UNDERWOOD IN WETZELBERGER CHARLES NEW ALBANY IN WETZELBERGER CRAIG LOUISVILLE KY WEYL LARRY PRINCETON IN WHALEY WAYNE KNOXVILLE TN WHEATLEY DAVID CLARKSVILLE IN WHEATLEY S NEW ALBANY IN WHEELER DON BORDEN IN WHEELER EVA CLARKSVILLE IN WHEELER JOHN NABB IN WHEELER TABATHA CHARLESTOWN IN WHEELER TONY NEW WASHINGTON IN WHEELER WANDA BORDEN IN WHITAKER CHARLES B JR MEMPHIS IN WHITE ADV CO SIGN 204 LEXINGTON IN WHITE BRUCE MARYSVILLE IN WHITE DENISE CHARLESTOWN IN WHITE EDWARD LOUISVILLE KY WHITE GAYLE CHARLESTOWN IN WHITE HARVEY CHARLESTOWN IN WHITE JOHN CLARKSVILLE IN WHITE JONATHAN SCOTTSBURG IN WHITE JOSEPH CHARLESTOWN IN WHITE JUDY CHARLESTOWN IN WHITE JULIA NEW ALBANY IN WHITE LAWRENCE GRANVILLE IL WHITE LISA COLUMBIA TN WHITE MATT UNDERWOOD IN WHITE RICKY NEW ALBANY IN

18D

AUGUST 2018

24.60 59.45 7.61 46.15 115.52 125.62 51.86 14.31 57.59 65.98 57.42 4.02 16.02 23.33 242.32 64.29 116.75 51.97 16.88 88.02 26.10 5.13 47.48 74.20 2.35 52.07 23.62 54.93 11.52 24.65 49.99 86.03 11.60 93.38 132.95 11.38 4.50 9.94 5.40 138.62 60.91 52.84 41.11 20.73 17.08 29.41 8.97 9.83 50.02 20.45 38.18 61.53 5.66 69.80 27.44 53.17 47.39 10.04 41.17 39.21 7.75 15.28 8.59 86.57 53.75 5.80 91.03 4.86 69.73 67.45 49.53 22.32 15.06 119.72 99.10 44.57 51.10 131.60 8.56 44.92 18.48 24.44 16.27 20.82 51.88 5.77 94.76 35.55 38.79 57.94 35.30 7.47 17.63 26.50

WHITE ROSA WHITEFIELD ROGER WHITEMAN MARY WHITLOCK MICHAEL WHITMER CECIL WHITMER KENNETH WHITTEMORE BRUCE WHITTINGHILL JACK WHITWORTH STEPHEN WICHMAN SUSAN WICKER DEANNA WIDNER DANIEL WILCOX A WILCOX SUE WILCOXSON JODIE WILDER CHARLES WILDT MICHAEL WILEY CHARLOTTE WILEY CURTIS WILKE DAVID WILKINS BILL WILKINS DEBRA WILKINSON BLDG IN C WILLEFORD ELIZABETH WILLEFORD HUGH WILLIAMS ANTHONY WILLIAMS BOBBY WILLIAMS CARROLL WILLIAMS DALLAS WILLIAMS DAVID WILLIAMS DAVID WILLIAMS DONALD WILLIAMS DOROTHY WILLIAMS GARY WILLIAMS HOMER WILLIAMS JEFFREY WILLIAMS LISA WILLIAMS LOUIS WILLIAMS MARK WILLIAMS MARY WILLIAMS MICHAEL WILLIAMS MILDRED WILLIAMS RACHEL WILLIAMS ROCKY WILLIAMS ZELBY WILLIAMSON DANIEL WILLIAMSON RODNEY WILLIAR KEVIN WILLIE FRANKLIN WILLIS DELBERT WILLIS DONNIE WILLIS HELEN WILLIS WILLIAM WILLITS RAYMOND WILLS CHARLES WILMOTH SARAH WILSON BARBARA WILSON BECKY WILSON BETTY WILSON BRAD WILSON CURTIS WILSON DONALD WILSON DONNY WILSON ERICA WILSON EUGENE WILSON GARY WILSON JANIE WILSON JOSEPH WILSON LESTER WILSON MARGARET WILSON MARK WILSON MARTHA WILSON OLIVER WILSON RAYMOND WILSON RICK WILSON RICK WILSON SCOTT WILSON TOM WINBUN KATHERINE WINBURN CHELSEA WINDELL GILBERT WINDHORST SIGN CO WINEBARGER JEAN WINGLER MELVIN WINGLER TERRY WINN JUNIOR WISE LOTTIE WISE RUTH WISEMAN STANLEY WOLF LEA WOLF NELSON WOLF TROY WOLFE ALBERT WOLFE IRVIN

SELLERSBURG IN SELLERSBURG IN JEFFERSONVILLE IN SCOTTSBURG IN TAYLORSVILLE KY LOUISVILLE KY ABILENE TX JEFFERSONVILLE IN RICHARDSON TN NEW ALBANY IN AUSTIN IN JEFFERSONVILLE IN FLOYDS KNOBS IN RADCLIFF KY LOUISVILLE KY OTISCO IN CHARLESTOWN IN SCOTTSBURG IN AUSTIN IN OTISCO IN NEW ALBANY IN SELLERSBURG IN ANCHORAGE KY JEFFERSONVILLE IN PEKIN IN BORDEN IN CLARKSVILLE IN LOUISVILLE KY MARYSVILLE IN CHARLESTOWN IN CHARLESTOWN IN CHARLESTOWN IN NEW ALBANY IN HINESVILLE GA OTISCO IN PALMYRA IN GEORGETOWN IN NABB IN MARYSVILLE IN HENRYVILLE IN CHARLESTOWN IN LEXINGTON IN SCOTTSBURG IN CHARLESTOWN IN JEFFERSONVILLE IN BORDEN IN CLARKSVILLE IN NEW ALBANY IN JEFFERSONVILLE IN HARNED KY LEITCHFIELD KY LOUISVILLE KY HENRYVILLE IN AUSTIN IN SELLERSBURG IN LOUISVILLE KY SELLERSBURG IN JEFFERSONVILLE IN SEYMOUR IN CLARKSVILLE IN BORDEN IN SOUTH FLORIDA FL HENRYVILLE IN HENRYVILLE IN OTISCO IN EVANSVILLE IN CLARKSVILLE IN FLOYDS KNOBS IN MARION AR LOUISVILLE KY HENRYVILLE IN CHARLESTOWN IN NEW ALBANY IN PEKIN IN SELLERSBURG IN SELLERSBURG IN NEW ALBANY IN ST LOUIS MO SELLERSBURG IN JEFFERSONVILLE IN NEW ALBANY IN LOUISVILLE KY LOUISVILLE KY JEFFERSONVILLE IN SELLERSBURG IN TERRE HAUTE IN CHARLESTOWN IN SCOTTSBURG IN CLARKSVILLE IN CHARLESTOWN IN CHARLESTOWN IN NEW ALBANY IN NEW ALBANY IN NEW ALBANY IN

26.44 9.33 152.64 102.93 49.80 104.89 42.33 14.49 26.72 76.28 34.85 89.76 134.15 58.48 72.05 6.73 37.56 2.36 37.05 110.77 3.24 63.85 10.59 27.50 45.46 28.08 64.24 5.04 21.49 48.97 10.10 17.30 84.97 69.63 5.82 9.25 45.18 75.13 90.25 46.44 73.58 43.00 60.69 24.82 90.29 117.87 8.25 24.20 80.05 38.67 12.28 85.70 51.95 49.07 102.76 65.06 29.94 32.63 16.05 72.71 13.34 119.20 118.16 44.63 31.35 81.87 67.90 62.97 37.17 114.48 84.62 149.78 24.32 237.58 19.52 10.74 7.88 3.57 108.35 85.33 42.76 55.48 22.34 11.95 32.46 34.13 82.81 66.50 31.56 27.55 29.46 43.40 33.33 90.38

WOLFORD CHARLES CHARLESTOWN IN WOLIUNG NORMA CHARLESTOWN IN WOOD HARLAN TERRE HAUTE IN WOOD MARK LOUISVILLE KY WOOD MICHAEL NEW ALBANY IN WOODRUFF CHARLES FLOYDS KNOBS IN WOODS JACKIE CLARKSVILLE IN WOODS JACKIE PEKIN IN WOODS RICHARD BORDEN IN WOODWARD JASON RICHMAN KY WOOLF CRAIG UNIONTOWN OH WOOTEN BOBBY LEXINGTON IN WOOTEN ELAINE JEFFERSONVILLE IN WORDEN LORI NEW ALBANY IN WORLEY JANICE SCOTTSBURG IN WORLEY PHILLIP JEFFERSONVILLE IN WORLEY TOSHIKO NEW ALBANY IN WORMAN DENISE BORDEN IN WORRALL BARBARA JEFFERSONVILLE IN WORSHAM TAMMY SELLERSBURG IN WRAY BUFORD SELLERSBURG IN WRAY JAMES BORDEN IN WRIGHT DAVID LOUISVILLE KY WRIGHT F LOUISVILLE KY WRIGHT JOHN LEXINGTON IN WRIGHT KENNETH MAUCKPORT IN WRIGHT LORNA JEFFERSONVILLE IN WRIGHT MARK JEFFERSONVILLE IN WRIGHT PHYLLIS CLERMONT FL WRIGHT STEVEN FAIRVIEW HTS IL WRIGHTHOUSE DAVID JEFFERSONVILLE IN WRIGHTHOUSE RICK CLARKSVILLE IN WUEST ROGER FT SHERIDAN IL WUNDRAK ERIC SELLERSBURG IN WYATT DEBBIE JUPITER FL WYATT RICHARD LOUISVILLE KY WYCKCLIFF FARMS JEFFERSONVILLE IN WYCOFF DONALD OTISCO IN WYCOFF TOM - SHOP UNDERWOOD IN WYNN WILLIAM NEW SALISBURY IN WYSSBROD GINA SELLERSBURG IN Y.L.C.ENTERPRISES INC INDIANAPOLIS IN YARBER CATHARINE MEMPHIS IN YARBERRY MICHAEL LEXINGTON KY YARBROUGH JAMES JEFFERSONVILLE IN YARNELL BARBARA LOUISVILLE KY YATES JESSE BORDEN IN YEAGER MARY MARYSVILLE IN YENAWINE J JEFFERSONVILLE IN YODER JAMES CLARKSVILLE IN YORK MARK SCOTTSBURG IN YORK WILLIAM JEFFERSONVILLE IN YOST DALE NEW ALBANY IN YOUNG BLANTON CHARLESTOWN IN YOUNG C BORDEN IN YOUNG INA CHARLESTOWN IN YOUNG ROBERT OCALA FL YOUNG WILLIAM JEFFERSONVILLE IN YOUNGS MICHAEL HURRICANE WV YUNKER BRIGITTE SELLERSBURG IN YUNKER JAMES SELLERSBURG IN Z & M FARMS CHARLESTOWN IN ZAHN BARBARA S TRUELOVE HENRYVILLE IN ZAHND ERNEST SELLERSBURG IN ZAMAN SYED CLARKSVILLE IN ZANGMASTER JOHN SELLERSBURG IN ZEHNDER MARK SALEM IN ZEHNDER SHERRY LOUISVILLE KY ZEHR ROGER FLANAGAN IL ZELLER THOMAS BORDEN IN ZIEGLER KENNETH COLUMBUS IN ZIELKE JUDY - BAR N LOUISVILLE KY ZIELSDORF HENRY SELLERSBURG IN ZIEMBA DALE SCOTTSBURG IN ZIGLAR JASON NAPLES FL ZIMBRO CLARENCE CHARLESTOWN IN ZIMMERMAN H SELLERSBURG IN ZIMMERMAN H P HENRYVILLE IN ZIMMERMAN HOWARD LEXINGTON IN ZIMMERMAN WAREHOUSE CHARLESTOWN IN ZIRNHELD RON TRENTON FL ZOLLMAN BLANCHE SCOTTSBURG IN ZOLLMAN CHAD MARYSVILLE IN ZOLLMAN DAVID SCOTTSBURG IN ZOLLMAN GEORGE OTISCO IN ZOLLMAN LAWRENCE HENRYVILLE IN ZOLLMAN REVA HENRYVILLE IN ZORNES DENNIS SCOTTSBURG IN ZURSCHMIEDE RUBY NEW ALBANY IN ZWILLING SHELTON FLOYDS KNOBS IN

16.20 19.87 30.29 2.40 30.75 80.88 14.39 47.69 22.03 34.62 12.80 13.39 63.82 12.71 62.11 5.72 96.71 97.73 42.94 34.63 10.37 14.80 107.50 116.81 8.33 81.28 87.71 12.14 30.40 4.47 32.21 41.86 36.08 22.02 113.26 16.77 8.20 54.86 5.85 5.59 5.73 0.49 11.09 43.42 88.88 1.58 25.89 42.81 142.16 58.48 18.12 21.65 14.56 132.83 135.53 51.20 24.62 6.01 20.89 40.31 10.27 4.89 57.14 2.27 93.47 52.60 33.51 3.92 16.07 86.23 28.53 91.57 22.19 24.03 18.65 47.67 30.15 40.17 42.84 25.11 71.60 1.41 36.38 24.61 40.78 57.04 18.44 63.04 3.60 24.13


Fulton County Historical Society From the outside, the round barn at the Fulton County Historical Society grounds north of Rochester looks quite simple. But the skeletal framework of the roof seen from the inside looking up reveals amazing geometric shapes and intricate woodwork.

31 on BY RICHARD G. BIEVER It’s designated “U.S.” Route 31. But perhaps more than any other single state or federal highway, Route 31 truly traces the heart of Indiana. It’s really about “Us.” AUGUST 2018

19


cover story Take a road trip on the highway that runs through the heart of Indiana

U.S. 31 literally wraps itself around Monument Circle in the very center of our state capital and splits Indiana down the middle. North of Indianapolis, it’s a major thoroughfare, a direct four-lane north-south spoke in between interstates 65 and 69. To the south of Indianapolis, U.S. 31 becomes a more leisurely two-lane retro road that parallels Interstate 65. The some 270 miles U.S. 31 spends in Indiana take motorists on a magical history tour

31

from when cars and paved two-lanes began replacing rivers, corduroy roads and steel rails as America’s favorite form of transportation. Take a ride with us this month as Electric Consumer highlights 31 unique and interesting places on or along Route 31.

1

FALLS OF THE OHIO RIVER STATE PARK, CLARKSVILLE.

Our first stop is on the banks of the Ohio Indiana from the Clark Memorial Bridge.

in 1939, provides service to over

the core of their “Corps of Discovery” set off to the Pacific Ocean and back. A statue depicting the two adventurers is on the bluff next to the park’s Interpretive Center.

Bunker Hill Kokomo Sharpsville Arcadia Indianapolis Franklin Amity Edinburgh Columbus Seymour Underwood Sellersburg Clarksville

20

AUGUST 2018

Headquartered not far off the 31 trail, Clark County REMC, incorporated

Meriwether Lewis, William Clark and

South Bend North Liberty Plymouth Rochester Denver Peru

SELLERSBURG.

River, just west of where U.S. 31 enters At the Falls, in the fall of 1803,

1

3

CLARK COUNTY REMC,

Below the center on the river’s edge,

20,810 members living in Clark, Floyd, Jefferson, Scott and Washington counties.

4

PIGEON ROOST MASSACRE MEMORIAL, UNDERWOOD.

The site off U.S. 31 memorializes the

386-million-year-old fossil beds are

Sept. 3, 1812 surprise attack on the

among the largest exposed (when the

small Pigeon Roost settlement by a band

river cooperates) Devonian fossil beds in

of Native Americans. Fifteen children

the world.

and nine adults were killed, marking the

2

first deaths of Indiana settlers in the War of 1812. COLGATE CLOCK, CLARKSVILLE.

Mere blocks from the Falls of the Ohio is the Colgate Clock. At 38 feet in diameter, it is reportedly the second largest

5

MUSCATATUCK NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE, SEYMOUR.

Muscatatuck National Wildlife Refuge is

timepiece in the world. It was originally

a 7,724-acre area of forest, wetland and

erected at the Colgate plant in New

grassland habitat just to the east of U.S.

Jersey in 1906 to mark the company’s

31 as it passes by Seymour. The site

centennial. In 1924, a larger clock was

provides resting and feeding areas for

erected at the New Jersey plant, and the original was brought to Indiana.

waterfowl during their annual migrations. More than 280 species of birds have been seen there.


Falls of the Ohio River State Park

6

BARTHOLOMEW COUNTY REMC, COLUMBUS.

Founded in 1937, the REMC provides electricity to some 10,100 members in Bartholomew and parts of Decatur, Jackson and Jennings counties.

7

COLUMBUS, INDIANA: ARCHITECTURAL MECCA.

For a city its size, Columbus claims an astounding collection of architecturally significant buildings and art created by some of the biggest names in modern art and architecture.

8

ZAHARAKOS ICE CREAM PARLOR AND MUSEUM, COLUMBUS.

Please turn back to page 16 for details on this amazing stop.

9

EDINBURGH PREMIUM OUTLETS, EDINBURGH

Located at the intersection of U.S. 31 and I-65 between Taylorsville and Edinburgh, Edinburgh Premium Outlets has every shopping need covered with 85 stores. There are a variety of restaurants and antique stores surrounding the complex.

10

PRISONER OF WAR CHAPEL, JOHNSON COUNTY.

After the U.S. entry into World War II, the newly-established Army training ground, Camp Atterbury, became the destination for about 15,000 Italian and German POWs. In 1943, some Italian POWs requested permission to build a Roman Catholic chapel in a quiet corner

Sarah Marksbury and son Tyler, 10, experience a cool spray of water as the Ohio River splashes up from its banks at the Falls of the Ohio River State Park in Clarksville. The two, along with husband and dad Danny Marksbury, from Williamtown, Kentucky, came to the river’s northern edge one hot, muggy Saturday last month to check out the famed exposed fossil beds below the falls but found the water too high.


Grave(s) in the middle of the road Nancy Kerlin Barnett rests in peace in the middle of Johnson County Road 400 South near Amity. According to local legend, when the county built the road in 1905, her grandson held vigil with a shotgun to protect her grave. So, the county diverted the east/ west lanes around her. When the road was improved a couple of years ago, several other remains were found with hers. They were all reinterred in the same spot.

12

JOHNSON COUNTY REMC, FRANKLIN.

Founded in 1935, the REMC serves over 21,000 members in Johnson and portions of Brown, Morgan and Shelby counties.

13

SOLDIERS' AND SAILORS' MONUMENT, INDIANAPOLIS.

Technically, U.S. 31 today detours east around Indianapolis, sharing the road with the I-465 beltway. But before 465 was built, U.S. 31 ran right into the heart of downtown Indianapolis. And that’s the route we’ll take for a number of don’tmiss sites in the capital city. One of the most iconic symbols of Indianapolis is the Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument on the circle in the very center of the city. Begun in 1888 and dedicated in 1902, the 284-foot-6-inch monument honors Hoosier veterans of the wars to that point and was the first in the United States dedicated to the common soldier.

of the camp. After the war, the “Chapel

right through her gravesite. Local lore

in the Meadow” fell into disrepair. While

maintains that when workers arrived to

Atterbury remains an active National

move Barnett’s remains, her grandson

Guard base, the land with the chapel

was standing vigil with a shotgun. That

was returned to the county. It later

led to a compromise: Her grave stayed,

became part of Johnson County Park,

and what became County Road 400

and, in 1988, the chapel was restored.

South split in the middle with the lanes of

11

the road diverting to either side around it. In 2016, the road was widened and the GRAVE(S) IN THE MIDDLE OF THE ROAD, AMITY.

grave lowered to make the road safer for motorists. When Barnett’s remains were temporarily removed during the work, the

When Nancy Kerlin Barnett died 1831,

remains of at least seven others were

she was buried as she requested: on a

discovered. The group was reinterred in

grassy hill near Sugar Creek.

what should now be called the “Graves

In 1905, county officials decided to build

in the Middle of the Road.”

a bridge over the creek and a road —

22

AUGUST 2018

14

WHITE RIVER STATE PARK, INDIANAPOLIS.

The park on Indy’s near west side covers 250 acres along the White River. Among the attractions located in or near the park are the Indiana State Museum, the Indianapolis Zoo, the Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art, the NCAA Hall of Champions, Victory Field (home of Indianapolis Indians Triple-A minor league baseball team), and an outdoor concert venue.

15

INDIANA WORLD WAR MEMORIAL PLAZA, INDIANAPOLIS.

North of Monument Circle, the five-cityblock plaza is home for national and state headquarters of the American


Legion. The plaza includes the Indiana World War Memorial Building; Obelisk Square; more recent semi-circular memorials to World War II, the Korean War and Vietnam War; and more.

16

what became U.S. 31 in Kokomo

produce from their neighbors’ fields

July 4, 1894. That was the Haynes

and offered it directly to customers.

Horseless Carriage inaugural test

The newly renovated store also offers fresh bakery goods, deli meats and cheeses; hand-dipped ice cream;

CHILDREN'S MUSEUM, INDIANAPOLIS.

The museum on Meridian Street is the world’s largest dedicated to children. Its five floors of exhibit halls receive more than 1 million visitors annually.

17

variety of fresh and vine-ripened

INDIANA STATE FAIRGROUNDS, INDIANAPOLIS.

old-fashioned candies; pies; jellies and jams, and much more!

19

THE KELLEY AGRICULTURAL HISTORICAL MUSEUM, SHARPSVILLE.

and current, for General Motors, GM Components Holding and Chrysler Transmission. Haynes was an inventor, scientist, industrialist, educator and philanthropist who is credited with being the first to produce cars preserved as a public museum.

is a collection of eclectic structures from the 1800s and early 1920 on 125 a round barn, farmhouse, red brick

fairgrounds and its biggest annual

school house, log cabin, a blacksmith

event, the State Fair. Some 900,000

shop and more.

ARCADIA.

the giant manufacturing facilities, past

diverts to the east around Kokomo,

need less introduction than the

18

the marker is on the same block as

commercially. His mansion is now

acres. The restored buildings include

WILSON FARM MARKET,

old Pumpkinville Pike. Appropriately,

Just south of where the “new” U.S. 31

Few locations and events in Indiana

visitors attend the fair each year.

drive over “a 6-mile course” on the

20

21

GRISSOM AIR MUSEUM (AND AIR RESERVE BASE), BUNKER HILL.

One of the nation’s fastest growing aviation museums, Grissom has 25

ELWOOD HAYNES MUSEUM/FIRST 'ROAD TRIP' BY HORSELESS CARRIAGE, KOKOMO.

For over 40 years, Bill and Judy

The first road trip by car, notes

Wilson have gathered up a wide

a historical marker, passed over

military aircraft on display, a fivestory Cold War Security Alert Tower, cockpits or trainers, and more. It sits on the fringes of the Grissom Air Reserve Base, home to the 434th Air Refueling Wing.

22

PERU AMATEUR CIRCUS, PERU.

Every year, approximately 200 young people present 10 circus performances during an eight day festival in mid-July. Other circus performers and a huge number of volunteers join together to support these talented performers.

Wilson Farm Market Jennifer Zech, an employee at Wilson Farm Market, stacks local sweet corn in a bin. The market is an oasis of farm and fresh-baked goods just north of metro Indianapolis congestion, and U.S. 31 literally is right out the front window.

Peru’s Circus City Festival, Inc., was formed in 1960 to reawaken the area’s rich circus heritage that dates back to the late 1800s. Along with the performances, the Circus City Center in downtown Peru also hosts a museum filled with photos, miniatures, displays, and costumes from circuses past. AUGUST 2018

23


25

VOHNE LICHE KENNELS, DENVER.

For being the world’s largest and most renown trainer of police, military and security service dogs, Vohne Liche Kennels keeps a low profile with the general public. Its 350-acre K-9 campus on the east side of U.S. 31 near the Miami/Fulton county line is served electrically by Miami-Cass REMC. But since 1993, Vohne Liche has trained dogs for over 5,000 law enforcement and government agencies in 49 states and 40 nations. Officers come to northern Indiana from around the world to learn how to handle their new highly-trained K-9 partners.

Vohne Liche Bobby Roettger, director of military training at Vohne Liche Kennels, pauses while training this Belgian Malinois. Based in Denver, Indiana, with satellite kennels worldwide, Vohne Loche is the world’s largest trainer of military and law enforcement service dogs.

23

MIAMI-CASS REMC, PERU.

Headquartered atop the hill on U.S. 31 (just north of U.S. 24), the REMC serves about 5,200 consumers in Miami, Cass, and parts of Wabash counties.

24

McCLURE'S ORCHARD/ WINERY, PERU.

Served electrically by Miami-Cass REMC, the family-run facility, located north of Peru on the west side of U.S. 31, is a flourishing orchard and farm open year-round. Along with apple treats and ciders, hard ciders and wines, McClure’s also offers a gift shop, petting zoo and a café.

26

FULTON COUNTY REMC, ROCHESTER.

29

POTATO CREEK STATE PARK, NORTH LIBERTY.

Located a few miles west of U.S. 31, the park offers a wide array of natural features including the 327-acre Worster Lake, old fields, woodlands, restored prairies, and diverse wetlands. The park is also noted for its 6.6 miles of wooded mountain bike trails.

30

POTOWATAMI ZOO, SOUTH BEND.

As in Indianapolis and Kokomo, U.S. 31 now diverts around the city of South Bend. But just off its older route through town is the Potawatomi Zoo. The zoo began in 1902 and bills itself as the oldest zoo in Indiana. It covers 23 acres with over 500 animals.

Founded in 1936, the REMC serves a little over 4,800 members in Fulton and parts of Cass, Kosciusko, Marshall, Miami, Pulaski, and Starke counties.

31

27

The Studebaker National Museum opened in 2005 to honor the legacy of the famed South Bend automaker.

FULTON COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM/ ROUND BARN/ VILLAGE, ROCHESTER.

Located on U.S. 31 four miles north of Rochester, the historical society grounds include a museum, a full-sized round barn and a village of restored historical buildings depicting the 19001925 time period.

28

MARSHALL COUNTY REMC, PLYMOUTH.

Incorporated in 1935, the REMC serves a little over 6,000 members, mostly in Marshall County but also in parts of Elkhart, Fulton, Kosciusko, St. Joseph and Starke counties.

STUDEBAKER NATIONAL MUSEUM, SOUTH BEND.

What better way to wrap up a road trip than a stop at a museum devoted to cars?

Studebaker began as a wagon manufacturer in South Bend in 1852. It entered the automotive business in 1902 with electric and then gasoline vehicles. Financial problems began taking a toll in the 1950s and by the end of 1963, the South Bend plant ceased production.

To read and learn more about the 31 points of interest we breezed through, please visit this story on our website at ElectricConsumer.org.

24

AUGUST 2018


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outdoors

Tipping the B Y J ACK SPAULDI NG

Angler reels in state’s biggest whitefish

scales

Ready to catch your own whitefish? Whitefish have long been targets of commercial fishing operations in northern

Friday the 13th proved lucky for a Crown

Lake Michigan because of the demand

Point angler who broke the record for the

for their flaky white flesh. Recently, sport

biggest lake whitefish caught in Indiana.

anglers began targeting them in southern

Dustin Meeter landed the record 6-pound,

Lake Michigan, which prompted Indiana

3-ounce lake whitefish on Lake Michigan

in 2011 to place a bag limit regulation of

near Burns Harbor in Portage on Friday,

12 fish.

April 13. The fish measured 25.5 inches long.

Best fishing time and locations in Indiana

Meeter’s fish marks the sixth record lake

waters have been from shore along

whitefish since the state established a

marinas and breakwaters during March

category for the species in 2012. It bested

and April, and again during spawning in

the previous record, caught in 2017, by

November. Fishing is best when water

nearly a half-pound.

temperatures are below 50 F, according

Meeter caught the whitefish from a boat while fishing with two friends. Earlier in

to DNR Lake Michigan fisheries biologist Brian Breidert.

the day, the friends had trolled for Coho

“They can be caught using simple

salmon and caught their daily limit. They

techniques,” Breidert said.

then headed toward shore to jig for lake trout.

a small weight, a 12- to 24-inch leader, a small hook and single salmon egg or piece

Meeter said. “It was the best day of fishing

of night crawler. Jigging is productive for

I’ve ever had.”

boat anglers in the spring. Lake Whitefish feed on the bottom on zebra mussels, bugs and worms.

of his life in the same spot under similar circumstances. Unfamiliar with whitefish

Meeter said he isn’t sure how long his

and unaware of the state record, Meeter

record will last.

simply took the large fish home. He didn’t

“Will it be beat? I’m sure it will,” he said.

bother to look up the record until a friend suggested he do so. But, he had already fileted the fish. Meeter thinks the 2017 fish also may have been a record breaker. Nonetheless, “It was great eating,” Meeter said. Meeter submitted his most recent whitefish to Indiana Department of Natural Resources staff for official weighing the Monday after he caught it. He said he plans to have the fish mounted for display.

26

AUGUST 2018

Shoreline anglers often bottom-fish using

“Within a minute, I caught that whitefish,”

Last year, Meeter caught the first whitefish

It was the best day of fishing I’ve ever had.

“I’m just hoping it stands for a little while.” DUSTIN MEETER landed his 6-pound, 3-ounce lake whitefish on Lake Michigan near Burns Harbor in Portage on Friday, April 13. The fish measured 25.5 inches long. Photo courtesy of the Indiana Department of Natural Resources.

JACK SPAULDING is a state outdoors writer and a consumer of RushShelby Energy living along the Flatrock River in Moscow. Readers with questions or comments can write to him in care of Electric Consumer or email jackspaulding@ hughes.net.


safety IN CASE OF AN EMERGENCY...

WHAT’S YOUR ESCAPE PLAN? You’ve heard of preventive technology devices that can keep you and your home safe. But just because you have those devices

Update in progress... Your home electrical systems need an update. Learn how you can incorporate these electrical safety devices to keep you and your home safe. Electricity is a major cause of house fires each year. Since outdated electrical systems can’t handle the demands of today’s devices, malfunctions, electrical fires, injury and electrocution may result. We may forget that like our phones, which update with a simple press of a button, homes need an occasional update, too! You might be tempted to press that “not now” or “remind me later” button when it comes to updating your homes. But it’s easy to incorporate new technology in our homes to help reduce the risk of fires and electrocutions. There are five main devices that can help keep you and your home safe. First, there is the arc fault circuit interrupter (AFCI) receptacle that, as you may have guessed, stops arc faults. Arc faults can occur when older wires become frayed or cracked, when a nail or screw damages a wire behind a wall, or when outlets or circuits are compromised. AFCIs will protect appliances, cords plugged into receptacles, and you! Ground fault circuit interrupters (GFCIs) are outlets that prevent deadly shock by quickly shutting off power to the circuit if the electricity flowing into the circuit differs by even the slightest amount. These outlets should be used inside and outside where water may come into contact with electronic devices, such as in the kitchen and bathroom or by the pool.

Tamper-resistant receptacles (TRRs) may catch the eyes of customers with young children in the house. They are designed with spring-loaded receptacle cover plates that close off the openings, or slots, preventing someone from inserting an object. TRRs are now required in all newly constructed homes, but if your existing home does not have them, this is not your next DIY project. Tamper-resistant receptacles can only be installed by a licensed electrician. Our favorite dynamic duo is smoke and carbon monoxide alarms. Many homes are not equipped with the appropriate number of alarms. To ensure safety, install these devices on every level outside each sleeping area. Don’t forget to test your alarms once a month, replace the batteries once a year, and replace the alarms every 10 years. Don’t rely on past homeowners to follow these simple safety measures when you move into a new home. Many devices could be outdated or nonfunctional, and it’s your duty to check them to ensure your family’s safety! And remember, neither the carbon monoxide detector or smoke alarm is a substitute for the other; both are very important for your safety. Let this information be your guide in keeping your home up-to-date and safe. If you would like more information on home safety devices, contact your local electric cooperative.

doesn’t 100 percent guarantee your home will never have a fire. Follow these steps to create an escape plan for your family: Everyone in your family, including children, should be involved in creating your fire escape plan. Make sure everyone in your home knows what the fire alarm sounds like and what it means. Walk through your home and note any possible exits, including windows. Draw a floor plan of your house and mark two ways to escape from each room. Make sure that doors and windows leading to the outside can be opened easily by everyone in the family. Establish a meeting place a safe distance outside your home where your family will gather. The meeting place should be something permanent and easy to identify, such as a tree, light pole or mailbox, and should be a place where firefighters will easily see you. Teach everyone in the family to call 911 from a neighbor’s home or cellphone once they are outside. Practice your escape plan by having at least two fire drills every year. For optimum preparation, have a drill during the night when family members are sleeping. JU L Y 2 018

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calendar NORTHWEST CAMP, Chesterton (Porter), Dunes Learning Center. Budding naturalists 6-10 CRITTER (ages 6-8) spend their days exploring the park’s forests, streams, meadows, and trails with new friends. Activities range from camp crafts to themed hikes, to a day at the beach. Registration fee: $190. Monday through Friday, 9 am-2 pm. 219-395-9555. mkrueger@duneslearningcenter.org. www.duneslearningcenter.org

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TOUCH OF DUTCH FESTIVAL, Demotte (Jasper), Spencer Park. Parade Friday and Saturday. Arts and crafts, food and family entertainment! Free. 219-9875800. www.demottechamber. org/touch-of-dutch

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TUNES ON THE TARMAC, Rensselaer (Jasper), Jasper County Airport. A charity benefit concert series supporting local causes. Free-will donation. Proceeds will help fund Safe Halloween at the Jasper County Fairgrounds. 5-7pm. 219-866-2100. Info@ JasperCountyAirport.com

CENTRAL

2-4

STATELINE HERITAGE DAYS, Union City (Randolph). Community festival celebrating Union City, Indiana, and Union City, Ohio. Featuring live music, antique tractor displays, food vendors. Free. 765-584-3266. statelineheritagedays.com

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THE RACE FOR SOUTHEASTERN BAPTIST YOUTH CAMP, Greensburg (Decatur), Southern Baptist Youth Camp. Form a team, raise money, and compete against other teams! You can also volunteer or sponsor the event. Registration begins at 7:30 am. Cost: $500. 812-591-2515. sbycamp@gmail.com. www.theraceforsbycamp. wordpress.com

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BEAN BLOSSOM BLUES FESTIVAL, Morgantown (Johnson), Bill Monroe Music Park and Campground. Live music and jam sessions. Laid back atmosphere where friends gather to celebrate the blues. Admission charge. 812-325-8836. www.beanblossomblues.com

SOUTHWEST

2-5

JASPER STRASSENFEST, Jasper (Dubois), Downtown and Citywide. Family-oriented street festival with German music, food, dancing, rides and games. Beer garden, 5k run/walk, craft and wine show, events, entertainment and much more. Free. 812-482-6866. jasperstrassenfest.org

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SCHWEIZER FEST, Tell City (Perry), City Hall Park. Amusement rides, games, food, beer garden, wine tasting, exhibit market, live entertainment nightly, talent show, queen pageant, road run, baby contest, golf event. Free. 888-3436262. tcschweizerfest@gmail.com. www.tellcityschweizerfest.com

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AUGUST 2018

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WOODVILLE SUMMER FESTIVAL, Mitchell (Lawrence), 611 Woodville Road. Fourth annual fundraiser for church mission outreach. Organized by the Women of Woodville. Craft show, car show, live music and concessions. 10 am3 pm. Free. 812-849-4593. cheryl_lyon @hotmail.com


AUGUST NORTHEAST

2-5

AMISH ACRES ARTS AND CRAFTS FESTIVAL, Nappanee (Elkhart), Amish Acres. 300 plus vendors demonstrate their trade and sell their wares. Familystyle threshers dinner in the century old barn and guided tour of the historic house and farm. Admission charge. 800-800-4942. www.amishacres.com

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FUN FEST UNDER THE STARS, North Manchester (Wabash), Market Square Downtown. Area’s largest family festival! Free kids’ night, car show, live entertainment, amusement rides, motorcycle show, huge parade, food, crafts, basketball and much more! Free. 260-982-7644. www.northmanchesterchamber.com

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53RD ANNUAL ANTIQUE GAS ENGINE & TRACTOR SHOW, Portland (Jay), Jay County Fairgrounds. World’s largest show of its kind. Over 3,000 engines and tractors. Antique and craft dealers, entertainment. Admission charge. www.tristategasenginetractor.com

SOUTHEAST

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PIG ROAST IN THE PARK, Scottsburg (Scott), Beechwood Park. Music, food, craft booths, kids’ games, fireworks, sporting and various activities. Free. 812-752-9211. www.greatscottindiana.com

210TH BIRTHDAY OF BECK’S MILL, Salem (Washington), Historic Beck’s Gristmill. 210th birthday of Historic Beck’s Mill, featuring the Corydon Dulcimer Society playing at 11:30 am. Demonstrations: corn grinding, blacksmithing and mock moonshining. Craft show. 10 am-4 pm. Special adult admission, $2.10. Children age 16 and under are free with paid adult admission. 812-8835147. becksmill1864@outlook.com. www.becksmill.org

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BLUEGRASS ON THE SQUARE, Corydon (Harrison). Downtown Square. The Downtown Square of Historic Corydon comes alive with bluegrass music. Bring your lawn chairs or blanket. 4-8 pm. Free. 888-738-2137. www.thisisindiana.org

This calendar is published as a service to readers and the communities electric cooperatives serve. Electric Consumer publishes events free of charge as space allows, giving preference to free community festival and events in and around areas served by subscribing REMCs/RECs. While Electric Consumer strives for accuracy, please note that events, dates and time may change without notice. Electric Consumer advises using contact phone numbers or internet sites to check times and dates of events before making plans. To add events to Calendar, please use the “Submit and Event” form under the “Talk to Us” or “Calendar” buttons at electricconsumer.org; or mail your info to: Calendar, Electric Consumer, P.O. Box 24517, Indianapolis, IN 46224. Please submit info two months before the date of the event.

AUGUST 2018

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product picks

cool

Keep it

1

5

Ah, summertime! The living may be easy, but it’s just not cool to be so hot. Here are a few ways to keep it chill when

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temperatures are on the rise.

2

by JAY N E C A N N ON

4 3 1

2

3

4

5

WE ALL SCREAM

IT’S ALL ABOUT YOU

COOL AIR WHEREVER YOU GO

BREEZY AND BLADELESS

COMPUTER COOLER

JUST CHILLIN’

It sounds like a dream on a sweltering summer day: “Alexa, turn the air conditioner up.” The Frigidaire Gallery 12,000 BTU Smart Portable Air Conditioner with Dehumidifier and Wi-Fi Control cools the room you need it to cool, and it works with Alexa and Google Home apps to make your life easy and, yes, cool. $500. 800-430-3376; homedepot.com

The Dyson Cool desk fan is not your father’s fan. Without blades, it’s safe to put anywhere — no worries about the kids or the dog. The fan oscillates to cool a wider space, comes with its own remote, has a sleep timer and is so quiet you won’t have to yell over it. Larger models also available. $300. 866-693-9766; dyson.com

Just like you, your laptop doesn’t have as much get-up-and-go when it’s overheating. Be kind and use a Mind Reader Laptop Cooling Pad. Fans circulate air into your device to keep it from shutting down when the heat is on. Think of it as a cold drink for your computer. $23. 800-843-2446; overstock.com

Bottles of ketchup and pitchers of tea mixed among the wines you so carefully selected? Perish the thought. The Frigidaire 34-Bottle Wine Chiller has a seethrough door, adjustable temperature settings and LED interior lighting — all the better to grab the right bottle. $279. 800-445-6937; lowes.com

Is there anything more welcome on a scorching day than a dish of homemade ice cream? In just 20 minutes, you can create your favorite flavor of ice cream, frozen yogurt or sorbet in the Cuisinart Ice Cream and Sorbet Maker — and skip a trip to the ice cream shop. $60. 800-462-3966; bedbathandbeyond. com

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AUGUST 2018

It looks like a watch, but the Embr Wave Wristband is really a personal cooling device that creates a cold spot on the sensitive skin of your wrist. The idea is to trick your mind into thinking you’re comfortably cool. Will it work when the heat index hits triple digits? We don’t know, but it probably can’t hurt. From $299. embrlabs.com

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Ask Rosie Q:  I am wondering what you

might know about the small “red cedar trees” that seem to be invading fencerows and highways, especially U.S. 31 north of Kokomo. I think a column from you would be worthwhile, since I can’t seem to get my neighbors to control the “pretty little trees,” which are much like Canadian thistle and kudzu. E.W., Kokomo, Indiana

A:  The eastern red cedar is a

juniper, rather than a true cedar. Known botanically as Juniperus virginiana, it is actually native to the eastern two-thirds of the United States and Canada. But as you’ve observed, it wears out its welcome by volunteering along fencerows, roads and pastures. The eastern red cedar is also the alternate host for cedar apple rust, a fungal disease. On the plus side, it is a very adaptable species and can survive really tough conditions. It also provides food and shelter to a wide range of wildlife, which is how it has become so widespread — wildlife eat the fruit and distribute the seed. Despite its native status and value to wildlife, it is considered to be weedy and invasive in many situations.

P HO TO BY P UR DU E AR B OR E TU M

Cutting or mowing down to the ground so that no green foliage remains can be a very effective control. Of course, this is much easier to do when the seedlings are young.

Don’t Plant A Pest

backyard

by B. Rosie Lerner

P

eople often select plants first

The publication we link to below lists

for their beauty and second

some of these plants to avoid.

for their functionality in the

garden. Frequently, we don’t know or don’t consider a plant’s behavior when we’re selecting them.

As you consider what to plant, it may seem that more and more plants are classified as invasive — and you would be correct. There are more

Almost by definition, a species that is

invasive plants for several reasons,

an effective ground cover will have a

including an increasingly unsta-

spreading habit. But does that make

ble climate, more gardeners who

the species aggressive or invasive?

unwittingly plant invasives, greater

There can be much confusion about

scrutiny of invasives, and changes

the meaning of the terms “aggres-

in species (that is, individual species

sive” and “invasive.”

have adapted to cooler or warmer

Some plants, given their optimal

environments).

habitat, can become quite prolific in the garden. A plant can be considered aggressive if it spreads and has the potential to take over a garden area. However, some planting sites may call for an aggressive habit. A spreading plant can be considered invasive if it can also escape the garden setting and move into natural areas (prairies, wetlands, and so on)

To help you make better informed plant selections, we recently revised our publication Spreading Ornamental Plants: Virtues and Vices (Purdue Extension publication HO-295-W, formerly HLA-1-W). Search for it online at: extension.purdue.edu.

Rosie’s Tip

and displace native vegetation. Truly invasive plants have the potential to dominate natural vegetation. Many useful plants get bad reputations for their spreading behavior when they may simply be in the wrong place or managed the wrong way. Some spreading ornamental plants

B. ROSIE LERNER is the Purdue Extension consumer horticulturist and is a consumer of Tipmont REMC. Questions about gardening issues may be sent directly to Rosie at homehort@purdue.edu; mailed to “Ask Rosie,” Electric Consumer, 8888 Keystone Crossing, Suite 1600, Indianapolis, IN 46240-4606; or through our “Talk to Us” form online at ElectricConsumer.org.

have a high propensity for becoming invasive. You should always avoid using these plants in the landscape.

PHO TO BY G ETTY I M AG ES PLUS

AUGUST 2018

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profile

The Royal Treatment STATE FAIR QUEEN ON THE ROAD TO PROMOTE 4-H

Audrey Campbell of Veedersburg was crowned Indiana State Fair Queen in January.

PHO TO CO URTESY O F I NDI ANA STATE FAI R

BY NICK ROGERS

A

udrey Campbell was shooting

counties to promote the 2018 Indiana

— the next step on a career path she

State Fair (Aug. 3-17 in Indianapolis) at

has carved since fifth grade.

for a top 10 finish at the 60th

events and 4-H fairs.

Indiana State Fair Queen

“That year, I learned I was born

Wherever she goes, Campbell, who

about a month early and in the NICU

Pageant in January. More than 80

grew up on Tipmont REMC lines, pays

(neonatal intensive care unit). I started

young women vied for the crown.

forward the inspiration she gained from

researching what nurses do and that

Hearing her name announced as the

past Fountain County Fair queens. As a

fueled my drive to make this a career,”

winner was “a total holy cow moment.”

10-year Indiana 4-H’er, she loves to see

she said. Campbell plans to obtain a

“If my dress would have allowed me

youth presenting animals or projects

master’s degree and become a nurse

just as she once did for pigs, goats,

practitioner.

to fall to my knees, I would have,” said Campbell, a Veedersburg native who won the competition as Miss Fountain County. “But even just standing alongside so many amazing, accomplished women was a great experience. I don’t even really call

food, floriculture, clothing, cakes and rocketry.

is hard-pressed to pick one favorite

their bubble or their comfort zone, to

experience from her travels.

grow in their knowledge, and continue to apply that throughout their life,” Campbell said.

interview.”

Now a college sophomore, Campbell

That summer job is a busy one,

will begin classes this fall at St.

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AUGUST 2018

current 45-county caravan, Campbell

“I tell them it’s good to get outside of

it a pageant anymore. It’s like a job

covering 6,500 miles and 45 Indiana

At roughly the halfway mark of her

Elizabeth School of Nursing in Lafayette

“Everything I do is cool because everything comes with this great job,” she said. Nick Rogers is a communications manager for Purdue Agriculture.


Clark County REMC — August 2018 Electric Consumer  
Clark County REMC — August 2018 Electric Consumer