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The Project Book The Symbiosis of Two Brands

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Table of Contents

Table of Contents

1.0 Introduction

4.0 Style Guide

1.1 Project Overview 1.2 Company Histories 1.3 Goals & Inspirations

4.1 Campaign Image 4.2 What Not To Use 4.3 Color Palette 4.4 Typography 4.5 Logo Use

2.0 Research Phase 2.1 Research Abstract 2.2 Research Paper 2.3 Competitive Audit 2.4 Client Brief

3.0 Development Phase 3.1 Design Research 3.2 MoodBoards 3.3 Logo Design Process 3.4 Sketches & Final Logo

5.0 Final Products 5.1 Physical Media 5.1.1 Game Case Sticker 5.1.2 In-Box Pamphlet 5.1.3 Print Ad 5.2 Digital Media 5.2.1 Website 5.2.2 Motion Ad

6.0 Closing Notes G&G

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1.0 Many people today know of SEGA, the video game software company. However, only a few select groups know of Child’s Play, a video game based charity. 4

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This campaign seeks to unite the assets of both in a promotion that would greatly benefit both parties: SEGA repairs their tarnished reputation, while Child’s Play stands to receive additional contributions and publicity from the crosspromotion presented here.


Section 1.1 Project Overview

1.1 Project Overview Game & Give: A SEGA Child’s Play Partnership is a proposed campaign that would see the SEGA Corporation and the Child’s Play Charity. There are several benefits for both parties to come from this cross-promotion. Here’s the gist of how it’s supposed to work: • SEGA marks participating software titles they publish with a Game & Give logo sticker (the token), indicating to consumers that the game is part of the campaign. The psychical (non-downloadable) titles are also packed with a pamphlet that gives consumers information about Child’s Play and how to make further donations. • For each Game & Give title sold, a 1-2% of the profits made on that title are donated directly to Child’s Play. The included pamphlet encourages further donations, giving donors an option of which hospital their donation goes to. • SEGA gains the benefits of repairing their reputation, which has taken damage over the years from their marketing mistakes and poorly made software titles. Child’s Play benefits in the fact that they will gain additional donations, and additional publicity outside of their web community.

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Section 1.2 Company Histories

1.2 Company Histories The SEGA Corporation is a multinational video game software developer and publisher. Founded in 1952, the company’s claims to fame include the Sonic the Hedgehog and Phantasy Star series. SEGA’s history is painted with a rich arcade heritage, dating back to the days of coin-operated arcade machines. SEGA’S history is also unfortunate paved with failed consoles and poor software sales. While they are slowly recovering from these past mishaps, they still stand to regain a good deal of lost ground.

Child’s Play was founded in 2003 by Jerry Holkins and Mike Krahulik of Penny Arcade fame, in order to improve the lives of sick children by donating toys and video games to children’s hospitals worldwide. Krahulik was inspired to start the charity after reading an article claiming that video game were being used to turn America’s youth into trained killers. The writer of the article later retracted his statements after seeing Child’s Play in action. Although the charity originally started at the Seattle Children’s Hospital, today it works with over 70 hospitals internationally.

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Section 1.3 Goals & Inspirations

1.3 Goals & Inspirations The Goals of the Game & Give Campaign are fairly clear; to rebuild SEGA’s reputation, and to also draw in further publicity and contributions for Child’s Play. The initial inspiration came from the artist’s brand loyalty to SEGA as a child, in addition to watching their downfall in the market. Additionally, the inclusion of the Child’s Play charity was inspired by the artist’s desire to make worthwhile contribution to their cause.

The SEGA of Quality, used in company’s marketing campaigns in the 90s.

Inspiration for the visual aspects of the campaign was taken from SEGA’s old and current ads, as well as some elements of the Child’s Play website. For example, the SEGA Seal of Quality from their 1990s ad campaigns was the inspiration for the Game & Give logo token. Sonic the Hedgehog, SEGA’s mascot, also earned himself a minor place in the campaign, holding a game controller based on the Child’s Play Logo. Sonic the Hedgehog, SEGA’s official mascot since 1991.

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2.0 Before the designing process began, a large amount of research had to be done regarding both companies involved.

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In order to understand what needed to be done for the campaign, an understanding of both companies had to be reached as well. In this section, the research conducted for this campaign will be presented in a manner relevant to Game & Give’s development and conception as a marketing campaign.


Section 2.0 Research Phase Many methods were conducted to obtain research materials about both companies. The histories and current affairs of SEGA and Child’s Play had to be referenced, of course. These were referenced from both printed and online written materials; ranging from books to online articles. In addition to the aforementioned research, an online poll was conducted to gather some opinions of SEGA from their more loyal consumer base. This was done in order to solidify the thesis statement of the Game & Give Campaign; that SEGA’s reputation and trustworthiness are not viewed well by their consumer base. Hence, something needs to be done to fix their image. Likewise, Kristin Lindsay of Child’s Play has been contacted a few times during the creation of this campaign for opinions or information regarding the charity.

An online poll conducted at a forum for people interested in SEGA and their games (Sonic the Hedgehog games in particular).

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Section 2.1 Research Abstract

2.1 Research Abstract Game & Give: A SEGA Child’s Play Partnership is a proposed cross-promotion between the SEGA Corporation and the Child’s Play charity. Here you’ll find a detailed look at SEGA’s checkered past, its current actions, and its current reputation in the eyes of its consumer base. All of this is based on research taken from old and current articles, books of video game history, and a consumer poll. In addition, an overview of Child’s Play’s initial founding and success is shown as well, detailing the charity’s redemption of the gamer community in the eyes of mainstream media. With both taken into consideration, it is proposed that a cross-promotion be created between the two in order to rebuild SEGA’s reputation. In the proposed campaign, SEGA will see a small percentage of the profits on its titles donated to Child’s Play. In order to indicate

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their participation in this campaign, SEGA titles with be marked with a “partnership game token” logo. This action, along with several print ads, web banners, and a rebranded website, will indicate its participation in this campaign to its consumers. The idea is to rebuild SEGA’s damaged reputation in the eyes of its consumers by making use of Child’s Play’s equity. In this way, SEGA gains better press, and Child’s Play gains more publicity and contributions to its cause. Both organizations will be led toward further success through these results.


Section 2.2 Research Paper

2.2 Research Paper Introduction This campaign is about rebranding a video game software company in order to give it a better reputation in the eyes of its consumers. The two companies involved would be the SEGA Corporation and Child’s Play; the former being a large-scale video game software developer and publisher, and the latter being a video game based charity. It is through the cross promotion of the two that this campaign seeks to assist both companies in a symbiotic manner: SEGA looks better in the eyes of the public, and Child’s Play gets additional funding and promotion. This will be accomplished through print ads, web banners, a rebranded website, and a thirty-second television spot. The major problem this campaign seeks to solve is SEGA’s tarnished reputation, as a developer and publisher, as well as the decreasing trust of its consumers. The company has made many decisions in recent years that have bred mistrust in their consumer base – everything from its failed hardware from the late 90s to its poorly made software titles. A loyal customer, once jilted or scorned, is hard to regain. This seems to be one of the firm’s major problems in attempting to do business as it once did. Therefore, a proposal is put forth that makes it possible to regain such trust. Through certain acts and certain decisions that will reflect upon the firm in a more positive light, in addition to making SEGA seem more human than other companies, the partnership will serve to rebuild the lost

trust in the company’s consumer base. It is through this rebuilt trust that the company will be able to draw in a larger amount of business, thus reclaiming its former glory.

History The SEGA Corporation is a multinational developer and publisher of computer entertainment/video game software. It was initially founded in 1940, and over the course of several decades, the firm expanded greatly. It gradually went from a small pinball machine distribution and repair company to a large, independent software developer and publisher. It is known worldwide for its mascot, Sonic the Hedgehog; in addition to its other lucrative video game franchises such as Phantasy Star and Shenmue. The firm has an unfortunate past of failed hardware sales and poorly produced software titles, which has led to a negative stigma in the eyes of consumers (SEGA Corporation). Many brands rely on consumer loyalty, yet SEGA has had issues maintaining loyalty in its audience for well over a decade and a half. In the 1995 publication Games War, authors Michael Hayes and Stuart Dinsey refer to early signs of SEGA’s bigger mistakes. “Some brands will, of course, always attract their loyal devotees, but failures such as Mega CD and 32X have probably gone some way to teaching unfortunate purchasers the dangers of blind faith (well, Sega fans at least)” (Hayes & Dinsey, 1995). Child’s Play is Seattle-based charity,

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Section 2.2 Research Paper founded in 2003 by Mike Krahulik and Jerry Holkins, the authors of the web comic Penny Arcade. Krahulik got the idea for starting the charity after reading a HeraldNet article in which the author was claiming that video games were training American youths to kill. Krahulik was quoted as saying “The media seems intent on perpetuating the myth that gamers are ticking time bombs just waiting to go off. I know for a fact that gamers are good people” (Wheaton, 2004). In an attempt to prove to the public that gamers were good people, both Holkins and Krahulik went to work and put together a charity in collaboration with the Seattle Children’s hospital and Amazon.com. Its first year (2003) the charity went on to collect twohundred thousand dollars in toys and video games to give to sick children for Christmas. An additional twenty-seven thousand dollars in monetary donations was also collected and utilized by the organization that year as well (Wheaton, 2004). In the years since, the charity has expanded to sixty hospitals in the US, Canada, the United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand, and Egypt. Contributions from the previous year exceeded one millions dollars. The fruits of seven years’ worth labor have paid off by more than proving Krahulik’s point: that Gamers are, indeed, not bad people (Lindsay, 2010).

Implementation The proposed campaign would see the formation of a collaboration between the two firms. In this situation, both companies are gaining something; Child’s Play gains additional contributions for its cause. Meanwhile, SEGA is doing something to change its image as a company. This notion is based on the fact that Child’s Play “is also seen as a way to refute mainstream media’s perception of gamers as violent and antisocial” (Information technology charities, 2010, p13).

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By such logic, if Child’s Play can change public opinions about gamers, it might be able to do so similar things for people’s opinions of SEGA. The game developer has shown that it is more than aware of how negatively it’s viewed due to its software. In a recent press release, the company revealed that it plans to “delist” game titles with low metacritic scores (anything below a fifty percent rating), effectively pulling them off store shelves permanently (May, 2010). In a recent poll conducted on members of their more loyal consumer base, it was indicated that twenty-seven out of fifty-one of participants were cautious of giving the company their trust. This is measured against fourteen participants who fully trusted SEGA, and the remaining ten that did not trust the company at all. Out of the twenty-nine that admitted they answered “no” or “maybe” to the question regarding their trust in SEGA, fourteen people indicated that it would be possible for the company to re-earn their trust, while two indicated that trust could not be reearned, and thirteen indicated that they were unsure. When asked about what they felt were the reasons for a lack of faith in the SEGA Corporation, a number of answers were collected regarding their opinions. A whopping forty-three out of fifty-one indicated that company’s poor software titles were a reason behind the company’s declining image. Thirty-three out of fifty-one claimed the degradation of the Sonic the Hedgehog franchise was a prime reason as well. Meanwhile, twenty-two out of fifty-one


Section 2.2 Research Paper indicated the company’s poor marketing decisions, fourteen out of fifty-one marked that it was their history of failed hardware, and two out of fifty-one indicated other reasons. The two participants who marked “other reasons” left their elaborations too vulgar to be quoted, unfortunately (Carman, 2010). Nevertheless, it is more than obvious (especially to SEGA itself) that this company needs an overhaul of their reputation. Game & Give would be a great way do such a thing. This campaign will be new and unexplored territory for SEGA, as it would be for any video game company. And yet, it would seem to be the natural order of things that SEGA take the initiative, as the company has always been at the forefront of performing in a new and unexpected way. For example, when many companies were breaking into the market of online games, the director of Sonic Team, Yuji Naka, chose a different route. Rather than creating an online multiplayer game that focused on competition and gloomy, dark fantasy worlds (such as EverQuest and Ultima Online), Naka produced Phantasy Star Online. Set on a brightly colored planet, in a science fiction/fantasy setting, the title called for co-operation between players in lieu of competition (Donovan, 2010, P 333-334). This is just one example of SEGA’s history of taking new approaches to its games and marketing. It even claims on its corporate site “Sega has always been a pioneer and will continue to provide the most advanced and compelling products to consumers” (Sega of America, 2010). The proposed Game & Give campaign fits with such a history in a positive way. In addition, this cross-promotion brings many benefits to both companies. It makes both firms stand out, giving SEGA an edge over its competitors, and brings more light to Child’s Play’s existence. The promotion also allows for Child’s Play to reach more people quicker

and for less money. Finally, it would allow SEGA to rebuild its credibility via Child’s Play’s promotion of the assistance provided (“Road to marketing,” 2008).

Conclusion Through this campaign, it is more than possible for the SEGA Corporation to regain the trust of its consumers and reconstruct its reputation. Since Child’s Play has proven capable of changing the perception of gamers in the mainstream media, it is expected that a similar effect can be achieved for SEGA. The campaign itself would show SEGA in a more positive light, due to the initial success and overall mission of Child’s Play as its own organization. This new reflection of the corporation would help repair their damaged reputation, all the while giving more publicity to Child’s Play. It’s a win-win situation, as SEGA stands to gain a better image, and Child’s Play stands to gain additional resources for its cause through both corporate and consumer donations. Consumer trust is a very important selling point in today’s market. In recent years, it seems to be one of the things SEGA really stands to improve upon (the quality of its games aside). Child’s Play has been able to dispel the image of gamers as violent, antisocial people from the mainstream media and the minds of the public. In that very same regard Child’s Play can dispel the negative images of SEGA and its past blunders from the minds of consumers, leading the company back into prosperity. Through a visible contribution to Child’s Play, the SEGA Corporation will appear more human, and thus more likeable. Fixing their reputation is one of the final steps toward climbing to the top of the industry once more. Through this campaign, SEGA can more than accomplish that, by marketing the message to “give, game, and love.”

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Section 2.2 Research Paper

REFERENCES Carman, E.B. (2010, September 30). Your trust in SEGA. [Online Forum Poll]. Retrieved from http://forums.sonicretro.org/index.php?showtopic=22863 Donovan, T. (2010). Replay: the history of video games. East Sussex, UK: Yellow Ant Media Hayes, M., & Dinsey, S. (1995). Games war. London: Bowerdean Publishing Company Ltd.

Information technology charities. (2010). Memphis, Tennessee: Books LLC. Lindsay, K. (2010). About child’s play. Retrieved from http://www.childsplaycharity.org/ about.php May, P. (2010, July 7). Sega wants to erase all its awful games from history. All About the Games, Retrieved from http://www.allaboutthegames.co.uk/feature_story. php?article_id=11157 Road to marketing: blog marketing tutorials and marketing plans. (2008). Cross promotion and its Benefits, Retrieved from http://www.roadtomarketing.com/ cross-promotion-and-its-benefits.html SEGA Corporation. Reference for business, encyclopedia of business. Retrieved (2010, September 8) from http://www.referenceforbusiness.com/history/Ro-Sh/SEGACorporation.html Sega history. (2010). Sega of America, Corporate Site, Retrieved from http://www2. sega.com/corporate/corporatehist.php

Sega seal of quality: brain surgery ad. (1993). [Web]. Retrieved from http://homepage. mac.com/greggillis/images/1993/brainSurgeryAd.jpg Steinberg, S. (2007). Videogame marketing and pr. Lincoln, NE: P3: Power Play Publishing. Wheaton, W. (2004, January 3). fun fun fun in the fluffy chair [Web log message]. Retrieved from http://www.wilwheaton.net/mt/archives/001479.php

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Section 2.3 Competitive Audit

2.3 Competitive Audit In addition to the bulk of the research collected, an audit of SEGA’s top competitors was completed in order to paint a better picture of their competitive landscape.

Electronic Arts Inc. • Older company, but younger than SEGA. • 3rd Party Entertainment Software Developer. • Similar number of developers, less marketing failures than SEGA. • Franchises: The Sims, Dead Space, SPORE.

Konami Corporation • Older company, almost as old as SEGA, if not the same age. • 3rd Party Entertainment Software Developer. • Less failures than SEGA, but not a huge success. • Franchises: Silent Hill, Dance Dance Revolution.

Both of these lucrative companies do stand as SEGA’s competitors, each with their own successes and failures. Neither company has done a charity cross promotion of this kind before (although Electronic Arts does openly give to charity), so it’s assumed that this campaign will allow SEGA to stand out in comparison to its competitors.

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Section 2.4 Client Brief

2.4 Client Brief A Client brief was completed using the research done in order to solidify the campaign’s direction and goals.

CLIENT BRIEF Key Areas COMPANY/CLIENT The focus of this campaign.

CAMPAIGN OBJECTIVE The intention and objective of this campaign project.

SCOPE Parameters and primary task of the work being completed.

DELIVERABLES & TIMEFRAME The final goods to be presented to the client and the time of delivery.

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Brand Development Client Input, Data, Details The primary focus of this campaign is the SEGA Corporation, a multinational video game software developer and publisher; the Child’s Play charity has become the deuteragonist in this campaign due to their involvement in it. The intention of this project is to bring positive press to SEGA, while at the same time bringing additional attention and funding to Child’s Play. The overall idea is to help SEGA’s reputation. The task at hand is to promote them openly contributing to Child’s Play in order to achieve that result. • Game & Give participant seal to go on covers of software titles. • Magazine ad(s) about promotion. • Pamphlet/form encouraging additional donations to Child’s Play to be placed in software cases. • Motion Ad for television and online use. • Develop began in Fall of 2010 and will be completed by late June of 2011.


Section 2.4 Client Brief

CLIENT BRIEF Key Areas

Brand Development Client Input, Data, Details

TARGET AUDIENCE

The target audience is 20+ years old, both male and The target group of this campaign. female; both being adult gamers and/or parents of gamers.

TENETS The intention and objective of this campaign project.

MEASURE Parameters and primary task of the work being completed.

NOTES Additional Notes and Information

• Legendary – The Brand (SEGA) is well-know and heard of. • Adventurous – The Brand (SEGA) is always willing to explore new venues. • Compassionate – The Brand (SEGA) sees consumers are human beings. The success of the campaign will be measured by the overall sales of Game & Give titles, and more so by the amount of contributions made to Child’s Play because of the materials released for this campaign. • The overall plan for the promotion is that Game & Give titles will see 1-2% of each piece of software’s profits donated directly to Child’s Play. • The additional form included in software cases will briefly educate consumers about the charity and encourage them to make further donates, either online and via a mail-in form.

With thorough research completed and a basic direction chosen for the campaign, it is now possible to move onto to the design stage of the campaign’s development. Using the information gathered about both SEGA and Child’s Play, a visual campaign representing both organizations can be effectively crafted and marketed.

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3.0 The development of the campaign’s materials and style began after a good deal of thorough research about both participants in the campaign. 18

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Here the development process through which the campaign’s logo and style guide were created is presented. It is only through these numerous concepts that the image of this campaign was solidified and polished into its final form.


Section 3.0 Development Phase The development of Game & Give’s logo began, in its earliest stages, alongside the research done in the previous section. These designs were not, however, further developed and solidified until after the initial design research. Only through the further research and developmental techniques, was the campaign’s style and logo developed into what it was. When the research began, there was a strong desire to make the logo itself a marriage or average of both brands. While this wasn’t used for the end result for a variety of reasons, the influence of both brands did find its way into the final logo and elements, however subtly. Here you will find the sketches, moodboards, and preliminary designs that led up to the creation of Game & Give’s logo(s), style guide and final products.

Obviously, not all of the concepts presented were used in the final campaign. However, they give an interesting insight into Game & Give’s growth and development.

One of the unused and undeveloped designs sketched during development.

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Section 3.0 Development Phase

These thumbnails were used for the development of Game & Give’s print ad, website concept, and motion ad, respectively.

It’s worth stating that – though this section details more about the development of the campaign’s style guide and logo – the same methods were used to create the campaign’s final deliverables. However, these materials were not designed until after Game & Give’s logo and toolbox had been finalized. Their development will be discussed to an extent in this section, however, the campaign’s theme and logo will be the main focus. The purpose of this section overall is to give a broader picture of how Game & Give in its entirety came to be.

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Section 3.1 Design Research

3.1 Design Research While a small portion of the design work began alongside the campaign’s initial research, a majority of it was not done until after the research was completed. For instance, Game & Give did not actually have an official name until after a bulk of the written research from the previous section was completed and compiled. It began its life under the preliminary name of “The SEGA Child’s Play Partnership”, which is reflected in many of the earlier designs of the logo. When a name was officially chosen for the campaign, the preliminary name was retained as a subtitle of the campaign name. Hence why the full name of Game & Give is “Game & Give: A SEGA Child’s Play Partnership”. This change is being noted to avoid any confusion when viewing the preliminary sketches and works that lead up to the final design(s). In the infancy of development, the designer was very strongly intending to create a logo and branding that was a marriage of the two brands being used for this cross promotion campaign. This, of course, did not function well visually. Obviously, the bright blues of SEGA’s logo, with Sonic the Hedgehog’s red and gold elements, were not going to mesh well with the simple green and white of the Child’s Play’s logo. The designer had to move beyond trying to combine the elements of both brands, design something new that – rather than directly using elements

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Section 3.1 Design Research

of the parent brands – simply reflected them while being an entirely different concept. Moodboards were completed in order to give the designer a more defined direction to follow, as well as a wider range of possibilities as to what to finalize the logo as. Three were created to help define the campaign’s style, in concern to color, type, and imagery. Of course, only one of these was chosen in concern to the logo, the campaign’s toolbox, and its style guide. The chosen moodboard and style utilized colors associated with money; such as a golden yellow, silver gray, and green. The gold and silver colors are also associated with arcade tokens, which is a nod to SEGA’s arcade heritage – their history producing arcade games and machines. The green colors are a remaining link to the green in the Child’s Play logo. Additionally, the green seems to fit well with the theme of the gaming in general, when placed against the black that would later be added to the final color palette. The two moodboards that were not chosen for the final elements did have their influence over the final campaign. The isolated nature of the second moodboard had its influence over the style guide; as the it helped the designer realize that it presented an atmosphere that would be undesirable for the campaign’s materials. Likewise, the third moodboard provided inspiration for the use of joystick/arcade imagery in some of Game & Give’s other materials.

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Section 3.1 Design Research

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The sketches, thumbnails, and preliminary designs show here made up a breadth of the design process. Some concepts made it to the ďŹ nal stages, while some did not. All, however, proved invaluable in piecing together the Game & Give campaign.

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Section 3.2 MoodBoards

3.2 MoodBoards

The first moodboard of the three completed, which would later become the inspiration for the campaign’s graphic toolbox, basis for its logo and its style guide. Some images here were not used, in the final campaign due to photo standards.

Three different moodboards were created in order to provide three distinct possibilities for the campaign’s image and direction. 24

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Although only one of them (Style 1) was chosen to create the backbone of the campaign’s style guide, elements from all three were taken into account during the guide’s creation. For example, the joysticks from Style 3 were used as inspiration for the joystick graphic used in the campaign’s web site and project book.


Section 3.2 MoodBoards

The second moodboard, which followed a “family friend” yarn and plush theme. While this board had its successes, it was not chosen due to appearing too isolated in nature.

The third moodboard followed a sleeker theme, with a large variety of deeply saturated colors. While it was not chosen, some of its imagery was used for the final campaign in the form of joystick graphics.

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Section 3.2 MoodBoards

Give & Game: A Sega Child’s Play Partnership Elbot Carman | 06.05.2011

The ďŹ nal result of the moodboards – the Graphic Toolbox shown here – was developed primarily from the moodboard “Style 1â€?, with some elements from the “Style 3â€? moodboard included. Other elements derived from the other moodboards would later be included in the campaign, such as the use of arcade imagery (joysticks), and image standards in the style guide about avoiding isolating imagery. The Graphic Toolbox itself was updated frequently during the development of the campaign after the creation of the logo, and during the creation of the campaign’s style guide and deliverables.

This campaign is titled Game & Give: A SEGA Child’s Play 3DUWQHUVKLS,WZLOOVHHDSDUWQHUVKLSEHWZHHQWZR¿UPVWKH SEGA Corporation, a multinational video game developer and publisher, famous for the Sonic the Hedgehog Franchise; and Child’s Play, a video game based charity that donates toys and video games to Children’s Hospitals worldwide. In WKHFDPSDLJQ6(*$ZLOOGRQDWHDVPDOOSRUWLRQRILWVSUR¿WV to Child’s Play, while giving the charity additional publicity. Their participation is going to be signaled by a partnership seal/token on the cover of their Games. This serves to boost SEGA’s tarnished reputation, and also to further Child’s Play’s cause.

Logos Current TM

Sample Imagery & Textures Testimonial Ads, Print and Web

For Partnership Campaign

Game/Arcade/Coin Images for Print Ads

Sample Type Now Your Game Purchase Does More. Ă‘Ă?l ^Ă?l+Ă? %LVHDWXVDDVHWXVHOLWDDXWLSVDQGXQGDHSRUVXPHWRIÂżFDERU sinctatium quaspis aborrovitia nat. Liquunt delectur aut eum quatiis nes eossin nus dolupta accusciet eum ex enitionecae quis re pe pliquun dipisti berume precum quam, et etusaepro minciis ad qui ulparci quia sapedicatem fugitio

Additional Notes: The game token and arcade heritage is an underlying theme in the campaign, if only for imagery and nostalgia. Arcade machines and tokens are important symbols to many older gamers. Since Child’s Play was originally founded to refute the image of gamers as withdrawn, antisocial, and unhappy people the images selected should portray a happy and social atmosphere. People pictured should not be gaming by themselves.

Colors R: 249 G: 224 B: 76 C: 3 M: 8 Y: 98 K: 0 Pantone: 115

Golden Yellow

R: 124 G: 99 B: 22 C: 44 M: 51 Y: 100 K: 26 Pantone: 1265

Umbra Gold

R: 196 G: 198 B: 206 C: 23 M: 17 Y: 13 K: 0 Pantone: 537

Silver Gray

R: 73 G: 76 B: 73 C: 66 M: 57 Y: 60 K: 39 Pantone: 446

Slate Gray

R: 84 G: 194 B: 71 C: 66 M: 0 Y: 98 K:0 Pantone: 360

Bright Green

R: 33 G: 66 B: 48 C: 81 M: 48 Y: 78 K: 53 Pantone: 553

Viridian Green

The revision shown here is not the original version, but rather the ďŹ nal version, updated during the last month of the campaign’s development.

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R: 0 G: 0 B: 0 C: 100 M: 100 Y: 100 K:100 Pantone: 30

Black


Section 3.3 Logo Design Process

3.3 Logo Design Process In the process of designing the logo, originally a design inspired by the SEGA seal of quality from the early 1990s was sought. Since the seal of quality was a symbol of trust and wellmade products, it seemed to be perfect inspirational material for the Game & Give logo. A 1993 magazine ad stated “With it, you’re assured a game has passed the most rigorous battery of quality control and playability tests ever devised, and that it pushed the limits on the fun meter” (“Sega seal of,” 1993).

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There was an initial desire to have the Game & Give logo be a throwback to this seal. However, the marriage of both the SEGA logo and the Child’s Play logo proved too difficult to do, as both cluttered up the small space of a circular seal. Various other concepts were sketched out and tested. One concept bared a pair of wings and title ribbon, like the title screen of the classic Sonic the Hedgehog games, being one of SEGA’s more recognizable properties. This concept was quickly dropped during development, though the green medical cross from the Child’s Play logo maintained a presence for a longer part of the development. The cross was later dropped as well, though the green coloring became a main part of the logo.

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When the campaign gained a permanent name, the logo quickly solidified behind it.

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Section 3.3 Logo Design Process

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4.0 The Game & Give brand’s style is covered in this section. The standards of the brand are very specific. The entirety of the campaign is based upon Gaming culture,

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and Arcade culture to an extent as well. In that respect, the imagery and wording used reflect, respect, and represent the Gaming community. Certain steps have to be taken to ensure the items produced for the campaign maintains that image, and does not defame the Gaming community in any way.


Section 4.0 Style Guide The imagery and textures not only follow what gamers may see on-screen, but also they see off-screen in relation to video games. For example, the plastic texture of certain consoles and of game controllers is used as well. Several textures were made from photographs of real plastic in order to create more visually appealing effects. Those textures are actually available for designers to use, if need be. Additionally, the social elements of the gaming community must be

The green plastic texture used in the campaign, crafted from an actual photographic texture.

paid attention to, when working on the campaign. This is specifically a concern because Child’s Play, one of the partners in the campaign, is viewed as refuting many of the negative stereotypes of the Gaming community. In that concern, designers must be mindful of how they present people throughout the campaign, as to avoid furthering these negative images. The standards are strict, however not difficult to adhere to.

The black plastic texture, made through similar means to the green one.

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Section 4.1 Campaign Image

4.1 Campaign Image Campaign Image in Voice and Tone The language used in this campaign’s body copy should meet certain standards. Correct spelling and grammar are a given for any example of body copy. However there are other standards that maintain the brand’s image that must be considered when doing body copy for it.

Simplify, but Don’t Oversimplify Naturally, to reach as many audiences as possible, the language used must be clear and not overly complicated. Avoid using obscure synonyms for more commonplace words. For example, instead of using the word “precipice”, use the word “slope”; or instead of “extrapolate” use “conclude” or “decide.” Likewise, do not oversimplify your language. Oversimplifying what the body copy has to say will insult the intelligence of your audience. Find a happy medium and keep your audience happy.

Remain Casual, but Professional The video gaming community as a whole is one that is, overall, very casual. With that taken into account, this leaves us with another tightrope to walk: keeping the language of body copy casual, while also professional. The words “How It Goes Down” are a good example of this. Use a casual tongue with a professional attitude.

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Section 4.1 Campaign Image

Campaign Image, Visually In concern to our image, a few things should be kept in mind for our visual image, not just in concern to following the standards set for the logo and color palette. In photographs used, one must pay attention to whether or not it is appropriate for the campaign. They should adhere to the following specifications:

Another good example of an acceptable photo.

This image as well is another good example.

This image is a good example of a photo that meets the standards of the campaign.

• People playing video games should be shown in groups of two or more. It is not advised or acceptable to show people playing video games alone. The reasoning behind this is that we want to avoid furthering the perception of gamers as antisocial people. • People shown should look like they’re enjoying themselves. Photos of someone with a sullen, slightly disinterested look on their face don’t convey a positive image for the campaign, or a positive image for gamers. • The Family Image is desirable, but not always required. While you do want to show images of parents with their children for a few images used, the image of community is more important.

This is an example of an image that is acceptable, without a parent figure present.

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Section 4.2 What Not to Use

4.2 What Not to Use These are examples of what not to do when selecting a photograph for an ad, as they do not correspond to the standards set in section 4.1.

This child’s expression is desirable, however, since he’s alone this photo can’t be used.

This photo is not acceptable on both accounts: the child is playing a video game alone, while carrying an uninterested expression. It is one giant red flag. This photo can’t be used because the children look stoic and uninterested, despite being in a group of two or more.

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Section 4.3 Color Palette

4.3 Color Palette R: 249 G: 224 B: 76 C: 3 M: 8 Y: 98 K: 0 Pantone: 115

Golden Yellow

R: 124 G: 99 B: 22 C: 44 M: 51 Y: 100 K: 26 Pantone: 1265

Umbra Gold

R: 196 G: 198 B: 206 C: 23 M: 17 Y: 13 K: 0 Pantone: 537

Silver Gray

Displayed here is the Color Palette for the Game & Give Campaign Naturally, it is a requirement to stay within this palette when working with the Game & Give brand. All of the colors (excluding black) , as one might notice, are present in Game & Give’s main logo. Only Viridian Green and Black seem suitable for background colors; Black never taking over a background by itself. Umber Gold and both Grays would be too dull to use; while Golden Yellow and Bright Green would be too overpowering to the eye. Both Viridian and Black have been used to create plastic-like textures for the campaign. Both are available for use and show below.

R: 73 G: 76 B: 73 C: 66 M: 57 Y: 60 K: 39 Pantone: 446

Slate Gray

R: 33 G: 66 B: 48 C: 81 M: 48 Y: 78 K: 53 Pantone: 553

Viridian Green

R: 84 G: 194 B: 71 C: 66 M: 0 Y: 98 K:0 Pantone: 360

Bright Green

R: 0 G: 0 B: 0 C: 100 M: 100 Y: 100 K:100 Pantone: 30

Black

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Section 4.4 Typography

4.4 Typography Three typeface families are acceptable for use in the campaign; Diavlo, Junction, and Arial. The main typeface of the logo was actually drawn from scratch in Adobe Illustrator, and thus is not an actual font.

Headline Tagline

The Game & Give Logo text in its original state. Use the completed logos instead of this.

Give • Game • Love

In the tagline, use bullets in the place of commas between the words.

Body Copy This hierarchy can be amended in rare cases, such as what was done for the motion ad. This does not mean it can be disregarded, however.

Diavlo ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 1234567890&!?

Junction

Headline Text Min. size: 2p6 (Print), 20px (Web), 36px (Video) Max. size: 5p0 (Print), 34px (Web), 60px (Video)

Tagline Text (not used in web)

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 1234567890&!?

Min. size: 1p4 (Print), 24px (Video) Max. size: 3p0 (Print), 50px (Video)

Arial

Body Text (not used in video)

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 1234567890&!?

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Min. size: 0p9 (Print), 12px (Web) Max. size: 1p2 (Print), 24px (Web)


Section 4.5 Logo Use

4.5 Logo Use

1x

1x Always strive to use this logo, if at all possible. The logo spacing should always be 1x.

If necessary, you may use this logo for certain situations, such as the token logo not fitting in the given space.

Use the bitmap logo if restricted to black and white.

This alternate bitmap logo can also be used for the same reasons as the colored version, except in black and white media.

Minimum Sizes It is also acceptable to recolor the simplified logo, but only within the campaign’s color palette.

Token Logo: 1.25” X 1..375”/7p6 X 8p3 (Print) or 93 X 103 pixels (72 DPI Web) Text-only Logo: 1.625” X 0.425”/9p9 X 2p7 or 121 x 31 pixels (72 DPI Web)

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Section 4.5 Logo Use

DO NOT Skew the Logos to be disproportionate when resizing.

Add ANY effects to the Logos, token or text.

Recolor or modify the Token Logo. Recolor the text logo outside of the campaign’s color palette, or modify its text.

Also: • • •

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Do not scale the logos below the minimum size specified. Do not partially cover the logo. Do not place the token logo on a yellow background.


Section 4.5 Logo Use

Now Your Game Purchase Does More Here’s How it Goes Down: You buy a SEGA game marked with the Game & Give Token.

Child’s Play buys toys and games for over 70 children’s hospitals worldwide.

A portion of � � j  go to Child’s Play.

Look for the Token when you purchase your favorite SEGA titles.

Ă‘Ă?l ^Ă?l Love TM

Visit us at gamengive.com

The token logo being used in a magazine ad (8.5� X 11�) for Game & Give. Its size can vary so long as it’s past the minimum and doesn’t overpower the rest of the composition.

The text-only logo in use in the beginning of the Game & Give motion ad, since the token wouldn’t ďŹ t with the composition.

The token logo in use as a participation sticker on a Game & Give game title. It should be at the minimum size (1.25� X 1..375�/7p6 X 8p3) when printed for this use.

The token logo in use in the ending of the Game & Give motion ad, above the tagline.

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5.0 Here, the final products of months of research and development is presented.

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This section covers every deliverable created for the Game & Give campaign, and from the Game & Give Style Guide as well. Additionally, it identifies each item’s purpose and function in this cross promotional campaign.


Section 5.0 Final Products

The final products of Game & Give are presented in two mediums: physical and digital. One pertains to products that are to be distributed in stores (physically), while the other pertains products that will be distributed online. The products range from simple ads (print and motion), to informative materials, to actual branding via Game & Give stickers. Each item presented takes direct inspiration from SEGA’s arcade heritage, paired with the gamingrelated symbols of Child’s Play. As intended, they all represent a marriage of the two brands, but not as a combination; rather as a hybrid. The finalized marketing materials stand alone from their parent brands (minus the use of Sonic the Hedgehog), serving to further support the two brands rather than mimicking them. They fulfill the designer’s original intentions. It is through these materials that a consumer can hope to be effectively educated about Game & Give’s cause, while enticed to participate, and encouraged to further continue their participation. Rightfully, these materials will make your average consumer want to “Give, Game, and Love.”

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Section 5.1 Physical Media

5.1 Physical Media Now Your Game Purchase Does More Here’s How it Goes Down: You buy a SEGA game marked with the Game & Give Token.

Child’s Play buys toys and games for over 70 children’s hospitals worldwide.

A portion of � � j  go to Child’s Play.

This section of deliverables pertains mostly to the physical software releases participating in the campaign.

In concern to the campaign’s physical media, the designer mostly focused on items that would be found by the consumer on and inside the cases SEGA’s video game software is sold in. Look for the Token when you purchase your favorite SEGA titles.

Ă‘Ă?l ^Ă?l Love TM

Visit us at gamengive.com

On the outside of the game’s case, the consumer will ďŹ nd a clearly marked Game & Give sticker attached to the lower right corner of the case’s front side; this is an initial indicator of the title’s participation in the campaign. Inside the case, they will ďŹ nd a pamphlet containing further information about the campaign; as well as information about making further donations to Child’s Play. The other physical deliverable is a print ad, created with the purpose of advertising Game &Give, as well as educating consumers of its purpose and function as a campaign.

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Section 5.1.1 Game Case Sticker

5.1.1 Game Case Sticker A critical element of the campaign’s physical deliverables is a die-cut sticker of the Game & Give logo. It is intended to be placed upon software cases of SEGA’s physical software releases for the numerous hardware platforms utilized for gaming in today’s world. The Game & Give token was chosen to be produced in the form of a sticker for this purpose. This is because it would allow SEGA to bring titles produced before the campaign’s implementation to be made participants. Initially, it was considered to have the Game & Give token printed directly onto the software’s box art, however such an idea was discarded very early into development. Overall, it seemed more practical to have the logo printed as a separate sticker that would just simply be affixed to the software’s packaging. As advertised, it is an indicator of the title’s participation in the Game & Give charity campaign.

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Section 5.1.1 Game Case Sticker

The sticker should be placed to the lower right corner of the software case, above the SEGA logo. In placing it, the sticker is not to obscure or cover the SEGA logo in any way.

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Section 5.1.2 In-Box Pamphlet

5.1.2 In-Box Pamphlet Another important physical element of the campaign was a pamphlet to be included in the cases of physical video game releases. The pamphlet itself was designed to be printed at 58p6 x39p (9.75” x 6.5”) so that it would be able to fit in the differing media cases used across console platforms. It is intended to be folded tri-fold (or letter fold) as shown in the example on the left. It reflects the campaign’s overall packaging, as well as presenting a basic snippet that summarizes Game & Give’s mission. The pamphlet contains information on all of the participating hospitals that consumers can donate to directly. It also contains a tiny form that can be detached and spent in with donations submitted by mail, as well as information about donating online, and also through SMS message.

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Section 5.1.3 Print Ad

5.1.3 Print Ad The final physical element of Game & Give’s deliverables is an advertisement intended for use in print. The ad itself was designed to be used in gaming or electronics magazine, such as Game Informer or GamePro, as a full-page advert. Two nearidentical versions of the ad were created; one utilizes a stock photo, while another uses an illustration in the place of the stock photo. Both contain the same summary of Game & Give’s purpose, as well as their involvement with Child’s Play. Additionally, a brief overview of Child’s Play purpose and activities is stated in the ad. The two ads stand as short, educational materials for the viewer of the campaign’s overall purpose. While the two are intended for print, they could both easily be deconstructed for other advertising mediums. For example, the motion ad concept was inspired directly by these print ads.

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Section 5.1.3 Print Ad

Now Your Game Purchase Does More Here’s How it Goes Down: You buy a SEGA game marked with the Game & Give Token.

Now Your Game Purchase Does More Child’s Play buys toys and games for over 70 children’s hospitals worldwide.

A portion of � � j  go to Child’s Play.

Here’s How it Goes Down: You buy a SEGA game marked with the Game & Give Token.

Look for the Token ken when you purchase your fa favorite SEGA titles. avo

Ñ�l ^ ^�l  Love Child’s Play buys toys and games for over 70 children’s hospitals worldwide.

TM

Visit us at gamengive.com com

A portion of � � j  go to Child’s Play.

Look for the Token when you purchase your favorite SEGA titles.

Ă‘Ă?l ^Ă?l Love TM

Visit us at gamengive.com

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Section 5.2 Digital Media

5.2 Digital Media Digital elements were created to help market Game & Give online, as well as through television. One of these elements is website created to sell Game & Give titles, educate consumers about the campaign, and also to gather further donations. The other is a short motion ad, created to be aired online (presumably as YouTube and Hulu ads), as well as on television. Downloadable titles will be explained here, however not further in the section. The downloadable titles follow the same standard as physically released titles that are bought in stores; for every participating title purchased, a small portion of the profits go directly to Child’s Play. Of course, the sticker for physical titles could not be used for this. Henceforth, SEGA would merely need to change the display image for their downloadable titles to display the Game & Give token to indicate the title’s participation.

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Section 5.2 Digital Media

The website and motion ad, though the solitary two digital deliverables of this campaign, stand very strong in their purpose. The website was designed to be comprehensive, however easy to navigate, and utilize to participate and contribute to Give & Game as a consumer. The motion ad, likewise, was designed to brief but to the point about Game & Give’s mission. Both were intended to be Game & Give’s sturdy branch into digital media marketing.

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Section 5.2.1 Website

5.2.1 Website

The Game & Give website was designed to be online portal to the campaign’s purpose and products.

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The site itself provides information on participating titles, campaign events, and other valuable info about Game & Give. The site also allows users to connect to the site through social media networks, such as Twitter and Facebook, through its homepage.


Section 5.2.1 Website

The other parts of the site allow users to view the history of the companies involved, as well as contact them (the “About” and “Contact” pages). Information on where to purchase Game & Give titles is also included on “Buy” page, along with a list of participating titles and vendors. The “Donate” page links directly to the Child’s Play website, giving brief instructions on how to make further donations. Instructions on how to quickly make direct donations to the charity are also included on the same page.

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Section 5.2.2 Motion Ad

5.2.2 Motion Ad

A :20 motion advert was designed and roughly created to advertise Game & Give online and on television as well. The ad opens with Sonic the Hedgehog waggling his finger (per his trademark pose), and very quickly moves into the campaign’s function and purpose; ending with Sonic accompanying its call to action.

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Section 5.2.2 Motion Ad

The short ad’s soundtrack features a “chiptune”, Thin Skin by Twilight Electric of 8bitpeoples.com. The voice-over of the ad was done by the designer himself, due to resources available. The music – reminiscent of older video games – and the filtered voice-over fit well with the theme and imagery of the campaign, thus creating an effective soundtrack for this brief, but detailed advert. It should be noted, however, that this is still a rough rendition of what would be used if the ad were to actually be marketed.

The motion ad can be viewed, unlisted online at the following URL: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TRWVkLNkKjE

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6.0 This campaign has allowed me to take two things I greatly admire and create a reasearchdriven marketing proposal around them.

As not just a designer, but also a gamer, my love and admiration for both SEGA and Child’s Play is great. I am happy to have had the chance to create a proposal that would allow me to give back to these wonderful brands that are so dear my heart. – Elbot Carman, the Designer.

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Section 6.0 Closing Notes The images used in this project book are solely to be used for Comp purposes during the proposal process. If the client accepts the proposal, then the client must purchase the license for: 1) The picture named arcade cabnets, Copyright Owner: mantiswong, located at: http://www.sxc.hu/photo/8707 2) The picture named screenshot at arcade, Copyright Owner: mantiswong, located at: http://www.sxc.hu/photo/8703 3) The picture named Concentration, Copyright Owner: chidsey, located at: http:// www.sxc.hu/photo/596688 4) The picture named Playtime, Copyright Owner: chidsey, located at: http://www. sxc.hu/photo/1010241 5) The picture named Boys Playing Video Games, Copyright Owner: Radius Images, located at: http://www.gettyimages.com/detail/90142368 6) The picture named Men playing video game, Copyright Owner: Paul Bradbury, located at: http://www.gettyimages.com/detail/97970619/OJO-Images 7) The picture named Financial Gifts, Copyright Owner: Shana Novak, located at: http://www.gettyimages.com/detail/102062588/Photodisc 8) The picture named Knack Raising Your Toddler outtakes, Copyright Owner: Susan Barr, located at: http://www.gettyimages.com/detail/104875571/Photodisc 9) The picture named Father and son (6-8) lying on floor, playing video game, Copyright Owner: Andersen Ross, located at: http://www.gettyimages.com/detail/200122055-001/Digital-Vision 10) The picture named Father and his son looking at a video game, Copyright Owner: Jack Hollingsworth, located at: http://www.gettyimages.com/detail/200373504-001/Photodisc 11) The picture named Man in a Hospital Bed Plays a Computer Game With His Son, Copyright Owner: Flying Colours Ltd, located at: http://www.gettyimages. com/detail/dv2181019/Digital-Vision 12) The picture named Two Girls playing video game, Copyright Owner: scottdunlap, located at: http://www.istockphoto.com/file_closeup/?id=1903162&refnum= 245060&source=sxchu04&source=sxchu04 13) The picture named Different currency coins, full frame, Copyright Owner: Yasuhide Fumoto, located at: http://www.gettyimages.com/detail/sb10070124o-001/ Photodisc 14) The picture named Video Game Token, Copyright Owner: Dan Drew, located at: http://128.192.145.172/US/token/tokttca.jpg 15) The picture named Sonic Plushie Collection, Copyright Owner: ::CMG (UTOPIA)::, located at: http://forums.sonicretro.org/index.php?showtopic=18594 16) The picture named Boy playing video game while having breakfast, Copyright Owner: Andreas Brandt, located at: http://www.gettyimages.com/detail/90095973/Digital-Vision 17) The picture named crochet project, Copyright Owner: Sheridan Stancliff, located at: http://www.gettyimages.com/detail/96780328/Brand-X-Pictures 18) The picture named Girl Holding Doll at Living Room, Copyright Owner: D-BASE, located at: http://www.gettyimages.com/detail/102412083/Digital-Vision 19) The picture named Chibi Sonic Amigurumi, Copyright Owner: djonesgirlz, located at: http://www.flickr.com/photos/djonesgirlz/5081465731/in/photostream/

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Section 6.0 Closing Notes 20) The picture named Portait of a Young Boy Holding a Games Controller and Grimacing at the Camera, Copyright Owner: Sarah Murray, located at: http://www. gettyimages.com/detail/dv1993001/Digital-Vision 21) The picture named Kirby’s Epic Yarn Walkthrough Logo, Copyright Owner: Nintendo of America, Inc., located at: http://www.videogamesblogger. com/2010/10/17/kirbys-epic-yarn-walkthrough-video-guide-wii.htm 22) The picture named DS Lite Huggable Handheld, Copyright Owner: Marine Beloir, located at: http://www.offworld.com/2009/05/soft-hardware-marine-beloirs-d. html 23) The picture named Xbox 360 Plushie, Copyright Owner: kickass-peanut, located at: http://kickass-peanut.deviantart.com/art/Xbox-360-Plushie65158029?q=gallery%3Akickass-peanut%2F248328&qo=160 24) The picture named Hispanic boy playing handheld video game on sofa, Copyright Owner: Jose Luise Pelaez Inc, located at: http://www.gettyimages.com/detail/73774002/Blend-Images 25) The picture named Japanese young name playing online game, Copyright Owner: BLOOMimage, http://www.gettyimages.com/detail/74150038/BLOOMimage 26) The picture named Couple sitting on floor, playing video games (focus on man in foreground), Copyright Owner: Stockbyte, located at: http://www.gettyimages. com/detail/77005264/ 27) The picture named Computer Joystick, Copyright Owner: Creative Crop, located at: http://www.gettyimages.com/detail/92983282/Digital-Vision 28) The picture named blue lights, Copyright Owner: Kelly Bowden, located at: http://www.gettyimages.com/detail/103860941/Flickr 29) The picture named A Seashell Reflected In A Shiny Table Top, Copyright Owner: Design Pics/Stuart Corlett, located at: http://www.gettyimages.com/detail/104058971/Design-Pics 30) The picture named DNA strand, Copyright Owner: Maciej Frolow, located at: http://www.gettyimages.com/detail/104479072/Photodisc 31) The picture named Abstract curved lines, diminishing perspective, Copyright Owner: Ralf Hiemisch, located at: http://www.gettyimages.com/detail/104574233/ fStop 32) The picture named Computer joystick, close-up, Copyright Owner: Gregor Schuster, located at: http://www.gettyimages.com/detail/200439730-001/Photographers-Choice-RF 33) The picture named Bayonetta Pictures (Image 35 of 172), Copyright Owner: SEGA of America, Inc., located at: http://xbox360.ign.com/dor/objects/14253761/bayonetta/images/bayonetta-20091023070004863.html 34) The picture named Phantasy Star Portable 2 Screenshots (Image 2 of 441), Copyright Owner: SEGA of America, Inc., located at: http://psp.ign.com/ dor/objects/23354/phantasy-star-portable-2/images/phantasy-star-portable-2-20100615095848410.html 35) The picture named Resonance of Fate Screenshots (Image 5 of 127), Copyright Owner: SEGA of America, Inc., located at: http://ps3.ign.com/dor/objects/14336225/tri-ace-new-rpg/images/resonance-of-fate-20100318112508198. html

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Section 6.0 Closing Notes 36) The pictured named Sonic Colors Pictures (Image 23 of 77), Copyright Owner: SEGA of America, Inc., located at: http://wii.ign.com/dor/objects/75624/soniccolors/images/sonic-colors-20100920072551982.html 37) The picture named Seaworn Plastic, Copyright Owner: Mayang Murni Adnin, located at: http://mayang.com/textures/Manmade/images/Plastics%20and%20 Related/seaworn_plastic_9260087.JPG 38) The picture named Plastic Texture 3 blue, Copyright Owner: Patternsstock, located at: http://patterns-stock.deviantart.com/art/Plastic-texture3-blue-133206422 39) The picture named Nintendo Wii Black .PSD, Copyright Owner: zandog, located at: http://zandog.deviantart.com/art/Nintendo-Wii-Black-PSD-152973367 40) The picture named Xbox 360 S, Copyright Owner: Unknown, located at: http:// upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/17/Xbox_360_S.png 41) The picture named Nintendo DS, Copyright Owner: Unknown, located at: http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_CW99MgzpdP0/TPcdbUzobBI/AAAAAAAAAfs/ uggMPkNolgA/s1600/Nintendo%2BDS.jpg 42) The picture named Sonic Colors cover, Copyright Owner: SEGA of America, Inc., located at: http://www.gamus.com.br/wp-content/gallery/sonic-colors07-08-10/4864093439_81531211d3_o_1.jpg 43) The picture named Alpha Protocol cover (Xbox 360), Copyright Owner: SEGA of America, Inc., located at: http://www.the-games-blog.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/Alpha-Protocol-Box-Art.jpg 44) The picture named Bayonetta cover (Xbox 360), Copyright Owner: SEGA of America, Inc., located at: http://media.photobucket.com/image/bayonetta%20 box%20art/elgefe02/BAY_360.png 45) The picture named Sonic & SEGA All-Stars Racing (Playstation 3), Copyright Owner: SEGA of America, Inc., located at: http://www.segabits.com/blog/wpcontent/uploads/2010/03/Sonic-SEGA-Racing-GameCover.jpg 46) The picture named Open hand, Copyright Owner: pidsmannen, located at: http://www.sxc.hu/photo/711174 47) The picture named Sonic_126, Copyright Owner: SEGA of America, Inc., located at: http://sonic.wikia.com/wiki/Category:Sonic_Pinball_Party_images 48) The picture named Bayonetta Xbox 360 box art, Copyright Owner: SEGA of America, Inc., located at: http://media.photobucket.com/image/bayonetta%20 box%20art/elgefe02/BAY_360.png 49) The picture named Sonic Generations box art, Copyright Owner: SEGA of America, Inc., located at: http://www.sonicstadium.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/ Sonic-Generations-PS3-box-art.jpg 50) The picture named Sonic 4 Episode 1 logo, Copyright Owner: SEGA of America, Inc., located at: http://ve3dmedia.ign.com/images/07/44/74483_Sonic4Episode1Logo-01.jpg

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Give • Game • Love Elbot Carman ebcarman@fullsail.edu elbot.carman@gmail.com 678-333-5249 58 • G&G


The Game & Give Project Book