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INZOZI IN-FLIGHT MAGAZINE AUGUST-OCTOBER 2011

RwandAir Dares to Dream Destination Kenya | Nyungwe: A Walk on the Wild Side | Kigali Master Plan | The Junior Wasps | EAC Customs Union


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Be Part of the first Boeing Sky Interior in Africa

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ugust 25, 2011 is not only a day I look forward, to but also one that bears a great significance in the history of RwandAir. On this date I will be in Seattle, USA, taking delivery of our first Boeing 737 – 800 on behalf of RwandAir staff and management. By all means, the past year has been an intriguing and exciting walk towards this achievement. Much has been said about the first “Boeing Sky Interior on the African continent” being delivered to us; though thrilling, my excitement has been one of a different kind. We will be adding 154 seats to our already existing average of 1200 seats per day. By the time we take delivery of the second 737 – 800, we will be availing an average of 1,500 seats a day. This to me translates into more frequencies on our network and the capability to offer more destinations. For the first time RwandAir will have inflight entertainment which will greatly enhance the total onboard experience and with a business class of 16 seats at 51 inch pitch, premium customers especially those on our mid haul flights will have sufficient legroom and stretch. I want to thank the Government of Rwanda, RwandAir staff, all the suppliers and Boeing Commercial Airplanes that have worked with us tirelessly towards the delivery of this state of the art aircraft. I am upbeat about the growth of air travel in the region and more so with the increased traffic movement within the East African community. Kigali International Airport (KIA) continues to report

increased inflows of visitors coming to Rwanda and this will only get better with the planned airport expansion set to kick off soon. With this expansion our customers and visitors coming through KIA will have better facilities and amenities. We welcome the new Pearl Lounge, which opens its doors this August 2011; I am sure the lounge will transform the business class travel experience at our airport. We recently completed the GAP analysis as part of our IATA Operational Safety Audit (IOSA) preparedness and our teams are working on corrective actions. I want to thank the Rwanda Civil Aviation Authority for its continued guidance and support in this process. Our network continues to offer interesting destinations for both business and leisure travellers. At over 3,000 feet above sea level Lake Kivu in Rubavu is certainly a sight to behold. I invite you to make time for the sands of Kivu; we fly six times a week to Gisenyi Airport. May I take this opportunity to invite you to be part of the first “Boeing Sky Interior in Africa”. Enjoy the rest of your flight. Murakoze!!!

John Mirenge. CEO, RwandAir


INZOZI

MAGAZINE STAFF

Director: Franco Kanimba Editor: Rosella Chibambo, Alissa Odell Art Director: Julius Kwame Photography: Gael Vande weghe Editorial team from RwandAir: Michael Peter Otieno, Jackie Tumuhairwe Writers: Dr. Wolfgang H. Tome, Keith Mwanalushi, Flora Kaitesi, Pascal Buhura, Rosella Chibambo Marketing: Nadege Gaju All advertising enquiries should be addressed to: INZOZI Magazine c/o R.S. Creative SARL. P.O. Box 6491,MTN Centre, Nyaru tarama, Kigali, Rwanda. Tel: +250 78889 8079 Tel: +250 788 877225 Email: info@inzozinflight.com Web: www.inzozinflight.com Inzozi is a registered trademark of RwandAir Limited inflight magazine Publisher on behalf of RwandAir: R.S. Creative SARL, P.O.Box 6491, Kigali, Rwanda. Tel. +250 78835 3535 Tel. +250 78887 7225 RwandAir Corporate communications office: P.O Box 7275, Kigali, Rwanda. Email: communications@RwandAir.com


CONTENTS 16. RWANDA DEVELOPMENT BOARDREFORMS THAT SPELL GROWTH 23. KIGALI MASTER PLAN 28. CAPITAL MARKET ADVISORY COUNCIL ENHANCING RWANDA’S FINANCIAL SECTOR

RWANDAIR DARES TO DREAM

30. THE NITTY GRITTY OF THE EAC COMMON MARKET 32. PROMOTING ECONOMIC GROWTH INEAC THROUGH CUSTOMS UNION 36. IMBUTO FOUNDATION ENRICHING LIVES AND EXPANDING HORIZONS 40. FORT JESUS MOMBASA NOW A UNESCO WORLD HERITAGE SITE 52. A WALK ON THE WILD SIDE

80 AND COUNTING A RETURN TO LAKE NAIVASHA

58. ARTS & CULTURE

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64. SKY LIKE SKY 74. RWANDAIR ESSENTIAL INFORMATION: NEWS, MOVIES & AUDIO, TIME TABLE CONTACTS AND ADVICE

46 PHOTOGRAPHY

THE JUNIOR WASPS A TRUE EXPRESSION OF RWANDAN SPIRIT AND GLORY

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RWANDAIR DARES TO DREAM By Keith Mwanalushi

COVER STORY

Every day the young national carrier of Rwanda takes off with indomitable spirit. The company dared to dream of a time of prosperity. Having overcome the turbulence of the past the airline now aspires to join the ranks of Africa’s more prosperous carriers. In 2009 RwandAir began implementing the initial phase of a critical five-year business plan; hence the last 18 months or so have been busy times at the airline. The first task was a rebranding exercise that led to a change in name. The airline was previously known as Rwanda Express - the dropping of “Express” was justified by the fact that it gave the impression of a small point to point airline whereas its management had much bigger aspirations.

1975. Air Rwanda operated to several points in the region as well as a regular Kigali-Ostend (Belgium) service using a Boeing 707. The rest of the fleet included two DHC-6 Twin Otters and a Piper Aztec.

“We want to position our airline as a leading carrier in the region while at the same time aggressively market our product overseas. Worldwide today, there is massive excitement about Rwanda as a country and a destination,” said RwandAir, CEO John Mirenge.

Coincidentally, the airline was renamed as Rwanda Air in 1996 but this was later changed again to Alliance Express Rwanda in 1998. The change took effect after a deal was signed with Ugandabased SA Alliance Air that took over operations along with 49% equity in the Rwandan airline.

Rightly so, Rwanda is generating interest from opportunity seekers and tourists after the long and painful struggle to overcome the aftermath of political instability of the 1990s. Historically, RwandAir is linked to its predecessor Air Rwanda that was established by the government in July

With the onset of the Rwanda genocide in 1994, the airline was forced to cease domestic operations whilst reducing its international network to include only Kigali to Bujumbura and Entebbe.

Despite the reinstatement of services to cities such as Kinshasa, Nairobi and Johannesburg after the genocide, Alliance Express Rwanda was haemorrhaging cash. The airline posted a reported U$4 million operating loss during the first year under the new


commercial arrangement. To add salt to injury its Ugandan shareholder Alliance Air shut down permanently in 2002. An agreement with South African Airways (SAA) enabled the airline to continue flying but operations remained unsustainable and services were wound up by November 2002. RwandAir Express was quickly established as a replacement and in March 2009 the airline was rebranded as RwandAir. STRIKING A BALANCE Since operations began in 2003, the airline has operated a range of aircraft. Several lease contracts were signed over time including a 737-500 from Maersk Air, an MD-82 from Jet Africa and a Dash 8 Q200 from Trans Nation Airways of Ethiopia.

Interior of RwandAir’s Boeing 737-800

RwandAir has now terminated its wet lease arrangements in favour of striking a balance between dry-lease and outright purchase. The airline has now pledged that by 2013 it intends to operate and manage its own fleet. The


In

RwandAir’s Boeing 737-800

process kicked into gear in early 2010 with the arrival of two 50-seat CRJ-200s purchased from Lufthansa. The planes were quickly deployed on popular routes in East Africa.

COVER STORY

RwandAir’s affection with the 737 started with the delivery of 9XR-WD and 9XR-WE from GECAS during the summer of 2010. The main focus of the fleet strategy now rests on the arrival of two ultra-efficient Boeing 737-800s. The first delivery is slated for August 25, 2011 and the second aircraft arrives in October. There is a feeling of pride at the RwandAir head quarters in Kigali as the new Boeings are being prepared for delivery. “The first stage of our fleet expansion strategy will be complete with the delivery of the new 737-800s. We have planned to use them to improve our product offering on some of our key trunk routes like Dubai and Johannesburg,” explains Mirenge. The CEO says that the new 737s join

the fleet at an exciting time for both the airline and the continent which are both experiencing growth in passenger travel demand. “They will become the mainstay of our fleet,” he adds. RwandAir passengers are the first in Africa to sample Boeing’s new signature Sky Interior cabin on the 737 model. The new jets are the first in the RwandAir fleet to be fitted with an inflight entertainment system; they will improve the on-board passenger experience especially on the Johannesburg and Dubai routes. OPERATIONAL STRATEGIES The airline launched its first intercontinental service from Kigali to Dubai via the Kenyan resort city of Mombasa in November 2010. A few months into operations and the airline reports that the route is doing well: “The market response has been very good and optimistic especially from the domestic market,” said Mirenge.

“We also continue to receive substantial enquiries from cities like Goma and Bukavu in Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, and also from the Kenyan coast about our Mombasa – Dubai direct service. The loads are looking reasonable and forward bookings are very good. Currently we are doing three flights a week and if the current trend continues we will be considering more frequencies.” Along with the appointment of John Mirange as the new CEO last year, the airline began a process aimed at showcasing a number of internal and external changes. Mirenge is adamant that the airline cannot afford to be left behind. He also indicates that the diversification of the company’s distribution and payments system was imperative. Apart from the traditional sales offices, the website has been redesigned giving it a fresher and more sophisticated look but still easy to navigate.


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RwandAir’s Boeing 737-500

RwandAir’s Dash 8-100

The website will soon incorporate a new online reservation and multi-platform payments system. REGIONAL GROWTH IS THE PRIMARY FOCUS. In March 2011 the airline kicked off the expansion drive by launching a thriceweekly service to Brazzaville in the Republic of Congo. At the launch of the new operation the airline announced that it has been evaluating a number of destinations west of Kigali with a view to link Central and West African cities with East Africa. Brazzaville became the 13th destination to be added to the RwandAir network and it’s first this year. The city is home to over one third of the Congolese population. From April 2011 the airline introduced services between Kigali and Libreville the capital of the West Central African republic of Gabon. The thrice weekly flights were designed to operate a triangular schedule between Kigali,

Libreville and Brazzaville with full right to uplift passengers between Libreville and Brazzaville. Carriers from Gabon and Rwanda were recently granted fifth freedom rights – a move that has been widely praised considering the slow pace of Africa’s liberalisation programme. With the increase in demand the 737800s come at just the right time says the airline. General Manager for commercial services Alice Katiti confirmed that the airline is already experiencing capacity constraints on routes such as Kilimanjaro and Dar es Salaam whose operations have now been upgraded from the 50-seat CRJ-200 to the 737500. As a result, the two Tanzanian routes now offer a business class service and a fifth weekly frequency from August. Expansion within Africa will remain critical for the airline. The general commercial uprising on the continent has sparked interest in the developing

RwandAir’s CRJ-200

markets around Africa. Further south, Zambia is expected to become the second destination served in Southern Africa - the airline recently obtained traffic rights to serve the Zambian capital but no schedules are yet available. “We still have internal workings to put together towards Lusaka,” Mirenge clarifies. The East African aviation community is one of the more mature regions on the continent in terms of the flow of regional traffic. However the industry is adamant that this trend needs to grow as opposed to restrictive modes of operation. Codeshare agreements are just one way to help stimulate that traffic flow. RwandAir is making a concerted effort to maximise the benefits generated by cooperating with other regional carriers.


A codeshare with Air Uganda was initiated on flights between Kigali and Entebbe. Both airlines operate a daily service each between the two capitals with one operating the morning sector and the other flying the evening service. A synchronised schedule allows the travel trade to sell combinable fares using the same ticket. Both carriers operate the same aircraft type on the route - the CRJ-200, thereby maintaining the same service standards irrespective of which airline the passenger chooses to fly. Another top priority will be to facilitate intercontinental growth, and a number of codeshares have been set up to this end. Two years ago a commercial deal was signed with Brussels Airlines and the RwandAir ‘WB’ code is placed on flights between Kigali and Brussels.

PATH TO PROFITABILITY Operating an airline and doing so profitably is generally only possible a few years after operations begin – assuming the strategies required to achieve that profit have been worked out and implemented. In order to achieve profitability RwandAir is ironing out a number of critical aspects of the business. Appropriate safety accreditation has a bearing on the direct flow of international passengers. The airline is also investing in modern IT applications to help streamline the business. Mirenge explained: “We want to make it convenient for customers to access our services by taking advantage of the reach of the Internet and emerging e-commerce applications. The SITA e-commerce platform does not only provide a new booking option for customers already familiar with our airline and its services, but also helps us reach more international travellers around the world.” “The prospect of having the miles based reward program from SITA will not only help us recognise and reward our frequent flyers but we will also be better

COVER STORY

Mirenge explained: “We want to make it convenient for customers to access our services by taking advantage of the reach of the Internet and emerging e-commerce applications.

placed to learn more about them and their travel needs”, he added. Late last year, the airline partnered with local mobile telephone companies in Rwanda and Burundi to provide flight schedule services by text. The airline plans to make mobile ticket sales and check-in a possibility for its customers and is currently putting up an in house call centre facility to help it better manage inbound and outbound calls. The airline has just recently entered into a strategic partnership for the distribution of Amadeus products in the Rwandan market. RwandAir is the official distributor of Amadeus travel technology solutions and will help secure IT and customer support on the ground. What is interesting about RwandAir is the feeling of overwhelming eagerness for recognition and a drive to be successful from a business perspective, as John Mirenge concluded: “Today we can confidently say that we know where we want to be and how we can get there. One of our key goals is profitability and ensuring return on investment to the shareholder.” If dreams can come true, then RwandAir might just be in for a bright awakening In


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THE MAKING OF RWANDAIR’S BOEING 737-800

COVER STORY

This is Bay 10, where most of the final assembly takes place – wings attached, engines fitted and fuselages ‘stuffed’ – that means putting in all the avionics and wiring. The 737’s in the air today came into being here. C’est dans la Baie 10 que se déroule l’assemblage final : fixation des ailes, montage des moteurs et « garnissage » du fuselage, c’est-à-dire l’installation du câblage et des appareillages de vol. Les deux cents 737’s en service aujourd’hui, sont sortis de là.


The 737-800 is getting prepaired to be branded with RwandAir. Le 737-800 va ensuite être préparé pour être revêtue de la marque RwandAir.

Talk about stuffing – it’s like insulating your attic, but the Boeing engineers pictured below are working to keep your flying experience as peaceful as possible. Underneath is the aluminum skin of the aircraft, which is thin but extremely strong. Le garnissage. On dirait la pose de l’isolant dans les combles. Les techniciens de Boeing s’activent pour que vos vols se déroulent en tout confort. Derrière tout ça, il y a la peau en aluminium de l’avion – elle est fine, mais extrêmement résistante.


Rwanda Development Board Reforms that spell growth

Rwanda Development Board (RDB) Boulevard de l’Umuganda, Gishushu, Nyarutarama Road. P.O. Box 6239 Kigali, Rwanda Fax: +250 252 580388 Email: info@rdb.rw

Rwanda is one of the most favourable destinations for investors in the region and the world. The country has provided an investment climate that enables the private sector to flourish. In 2007, Rwanda was ranked 158th and 150th in 2008 in the World Bank Doing Business Report. In 2009 the country was ranked in position 139 and in 70th becoming the world’s top reformer in 2010 and 58th in 2011 after Kazakhastan. The steady rise in rankings is not by accident. The country has introduced radical reforms that have made it easier for investors to begin their businesses and take control of their profits. The Rwanda Development Board (RDB) that is at the vanguard of spearheading the reforms says more surprises are in the pipeline. Clare Akamanzi, the RDB Chief Operating Officer talked to the press about the processes that have been simplified in order to build a complex economy.


formerly required to start a company in Rwanda was reduced to Rwf.15, 000, making it cheaper and affordable, so that even more companies can come onboard. We also introduced free online registration. We have established tele-centers in all districts of Rwanda to make it easy for local entrepreneurs who want to register their companies using the free online services. In addition to that, we have also become more practical by going to the field because we want more informal businesses to register. We are not just waiting for them to come to RDB. For instance, recently we sent our team to Kicukiro market to sensitise local traders about the importance of registering their businesses and they responded positively. We were able to register 151 companies and businesses in Kicukiro. We are now going to other markets across the country with the same message and I am sure we will register more businesses and companies as we explain to owners its value to the economy.

To begin with, registration of businesses, local and foreign is one of the key functions of RDB. The private sector in Rwanda includes both local and foreign companies. Both of them have a big role to play in the Rwandan economy and we cannot avoid looking at them. However, most of the foreign companies are multinationals that have already invested in their countries and they are ready to invest in other countries since they have that capital advantage. More than 90% of our businesses are small and medium enterprises (SMEs) but some are growing out of this size. So our Doing Business reforms are not only for foreign investors as the local ones are increasingly realising the advantages as well. For investors who were already registered in Rwanda we looked at the challenges they’re facing, and how they can be addressed. For example, apart from looking at the reforms, we also considered how we can facilitate SMEs to participate more in economic development as they are important in the economy. Some of the reforms that we’ve done are in response to this, for example, the Rwf. 25,000

IT PAYS TO REGISTER Firstly, when you register your company or business, it means your employees can get Social Security benefits, say by registering them with the Rwanda Social Security Board former Caisse Sociale du Rwanda (CSR). This can only be possible if the company is formal. Secondly, when you pay Value Added Tax (VAT), you can claim the VAT refund, which cannot be the case for an informal enterprise that is not registered. I therefore advise people who are reluctant to register their companies, thinking that they will start paying taxes that they are avoiding now, to do so. The law is clear on taxes. For example, if the small businesses have a turnover of Rwf20 million the other presumptive tax is much lower. So once you read the law and understand that taxes vary, then you don’t have fear to register businesses. If you register you can get all these formal rights like VAT claims, social security cover, and you can enter into contracts with other companies, including applying for Government tenders. Once a company is registered, it has more access to opportunities that come with formalisation. That means if your company is formal, you are more attractive, you are more transparent, you have records and that helps your company to grow tremendously as a business rather than staying small all the time because you don’t have the opportunities mentioned above.


CORPORATE GOVERNANCE IN EQUATION It is important to note that good governance in business works well in the formal sector because you can track how businesses are participating in the economy say, in paying taxes and debts, but also follow them in terms of how much they are contributing to the economy. The Company Act was amended to ease registration and corporate governance. For example the company directors are required to immediately declare their interests to the board in case they own businesses with goods or services that their employers could require. In this way investors’ interests are protected in such a way that directors do not abuse their posts to get much profit. This is an international practice. THE BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT ENHANCED Doing Business has been popular in Rwanda because of RDB’s sustained efforts to establish an enabling environment for the private sector over the last three years. But promoting businesses is not a new thing as far as the Government concerned. Right from the start, the current Government realised the importance of the private sector in economic development and as such began the process of privatization. It therefore means that Doing Business in Rwanda comes within the context of a reformdriven country that wants to grow economically with the private sector playing a major role to produce jobs, create wealth and increase people’s incomes. Important to note is that the Economic Development and Poverty Reeducation Strategy alongside Vision 2020 aim at delivering Rwanda from a low to a middle income country. Therefore, RDB’s determination to provide the best business climate through on-going reforms is one way through which this aim can be achieved. REGULATIONS AND LAWS The fact that reforms contribute very much to the overall growth of the economy, calls for the provision of a business environment that allows businesses to expand. Rules and regulations that don’t support businesses curtail their potentials to perform as much as they would. For example in the past, companies had a lot of restrictions in terms of what age you had to be, before you started a company and women or men who would be eligible to participate in businesses. This has now changed to embrace new reforms. Today entrepreneurs can be young yet with good ideas. So you need laws that make it easier for such groups to implement their business ideas.

TIME WASTED IS MONEY LOST We also had good reasons to reduce paper work. It had to do with saving time for business people. If someone spends half their time running after a piece of paper or a license or after an institution, that means they have resources to start a business. So, if you tie them down to a lot of procedures you are wasting their time, which they could have used to start the business. We know that the faster investors start their business, the faster they give jobs to Rwandans who in turn earn more money to spend and increase the consumer base of the country. When the consumer base of the country increases, more get interested in starting businesses because they know their products and services will be bought, hence growing the economy. Secondly, when people spend a lot of time running after institutions or licenses, the economy also suffers in terms of the taxes the former can start to pay. This brings about a delay for the economy to start benefitting from what the business could have benefitted. It is the reason why we have made it a priority to reduce delays and address bureaucratic


delays in Government institutions. Dealing away with delays increases the pace at which investors can potentially make money or get the benefits. Practically, it now takes just one day and one procedure to register a company in Rwanda compared to 14 days and nights three years ago. RETURNS TO INVESTMENT What we have seen as a result of the on-going reforms is that now we register 6,000 businesses a year compared to hundreds we registered before the reforms came into effect. For instance, if you compared what we achieved in five years before the reforms to one year after reforms, you find that in one year we registered almost the same number of businesses registered in 5 years prior to the reforms. This means that by making it faster and easier, we increase what we can do in a particular year. Today we are giving an opportunity to many businesses in the economy to participate compared to the past. It is the same thing we have done with the construction permits. Today––– we have many construction projects mushrooming in Kigali. All these efforts are contributing directly to the economy

of Rwanda. For example, Rwanda’s current per capita income is USD561. Ten years ago it was only less than USD230. That is really what we are up to when we say we want Rwandans to live a better life with more income and full of opportunities. ACCESS TO PROJECT FINANCE Government has provided an enabling environment for the business community to access loans. Among the reforms that we have had in the financial sector has been the establishment of a private Credit Reference Bureau where banks share updated financial data that they use to establish the credit worthiness of borrowers in order to give or not give them the loans. The Credit Information Systems Law requires that all financial institutions give information, just like it is in other countries. This is meant to protect lenders and borrowers. This process is expected to translate into low interest rates for clients who service their debts as non-performing loans increase. Still, the mortgage law amendments which allow borrowers to mortgage their property 100 percent


Rwanda Development Board Reforms that spell growth Continued makes it easy for financial institutions to give loans to clients as the latter are able to assess the property to avoid losses. The valuation law which advocates for the professional code of conduct in this field helps bankers to lend to borrowers who present their properties as collateral as it sets ethics, penalties and qualifications for those involved. However, Government is looking at the issue of credit seriously. The Government has provided a guarantee fund in Rwanda Development Bank for SMEs and Agriculture. The high interest rates offered by commercial banks are a key concern in the East African region. But as more financial institutions come into Rwanda, competition will increase, making interest rates go down which should increase borrowing. CHALLENGES AND WAY FORWARD Every time you introduce a reform there is potential to meet a challenge but our reforms have created many opportunities that should override the challenges. The benefits have overlapped challenges. Our track record has shown that focus on good benefit can actually address those challenges. For example, by introducing reforms to eliminate bureaucratic delays, we have shown officials that few procedures increase the number of clients. Such benefits are more than keeping the cumbersome procedures. For example, company registration started with two registration officers, we increased them to four because the volume was increasing. Secondly, some of the reforms have made some services redundant. For example, before we introduced changes in the company registration, you had to go to a lawyer for Articles of Association and they would charge you for that. Then you would have to go to the notary and

the notary would charge you per page. So we made notarization optional and included a standard Article Association into a form that people submit to the company registration agency, cutting off lawyers. The lawyers kind of lost business there, but again we explained to them the benefits. We did the same with Government bureaucrats. The support of President Paul Kagame has also helped overcome these challenges .The president and his Cabinet have that vision of how all the reforms will help the overall growth of the economy. The political leadership helped to actually recruit everybody into the reforms. THE RDB-MINICOM AFFINITY The Ministry of Trade and Industry is in charge of policy-making as far as trade is concerned; so it develops policies, laws, and then table them in cabinet before are passed. The RDB is in charge of implementing and in that way we support each other. They help to come up with policies, then we implement those policies and give them feedback on those policies. For example, when we thought it was a good idea to reduce fees for company registration from Rwf25, 000 to Rwf15, 000, we raised the issue with the ministry. The ministry developed a ministerial order and had it passed in cabinet and told us to implement it. In our implementation, we also inspire what areas need to be improved, then we take it to the ministry in charge, say, ministry of trade, ICT, public services, and then they take the policies forward. PARTNERSHIP WITH PSF RDB is in complimentary relationship with the Private Sector Federation (PSF). PSF members identify the needs

and take them to the Government for a solution. Many times they come to RDB and we work with them to identify what reforms to take to the Government for approval. As a Government institution, RDB takes keen interest in the reforms that are proposed by the private sector since we work with them on a daily basis. RDB is in between Government and the private sector. In that situation, we communicate for Government to the private sector and vice versa. That means for us to serve both sides, we have to understand them and the issues they both have for the mutual benefit. For example when Government brings policies or has issues that it wants the private sector to benefit from, then we explain them to the private sector, ensuring that each of the two sides wins. IMPROVING THE RANKINGS I must say it becomes difficult when reforms need a lot of resources. For example when we look at the countries that are top ten and the areas that we think need a lot of resources. In those countries almost every transaction is done online. To be able to do everything electronically, you need to invest heavily in ICT infrastructure to use technologies like ATMs and Credit Cards. We have challenges here compared to the reforms that are not very capitalintensive. But the good thing is that although we can’t achieve this in one year, it is achievable over the years. For instance, The Government has invested in national fiber optic all over the country. The idea is to make the population access Internet cheaply and use the services. With the groundwork already underway and with efforts to provide electricity cheaply, we are on track moving towards the top ten In


KIGALI MASTER PLAN In recent years, The City of Kigali has undergone a major transformation aimed at creating a well-planned and modernized Rwandan capital. This began with the development of the Kigali Conceptual Master Plan in 2004, followed by the Detailed Physical Plan for Nyarugenge District and sub-area plans for Kinyinya, Rebero, Kimihurura and Masaka, which were endorsed in 2008. Kigali has one of the fastest urbanization rates in Africa, according to The Economist. With an urbanization growth rate of 10.7%, it far exceeds the reported average of 3.5 %. While the speed of Kigali’s urbanization may inspire excitement for many, it also presents one of the city’s greatest challenges: sustainable growth. In response to this challenge, The City Master Plan is designed as a tool to facilitate sustainability. Without an effective management plan, the sustainable exploitation of resources is impossible. Therefore, the Master Plan includes a land use management strategy aimed at ensuring responsible development and a bright future for Rwanda’s capital.

The road to a bright future for Kigali begins as the city, its residents, investors and relevant partners set the implementation of The Master Plan in motion. While providing a vision spanning the next 50 years of strategic urban development, the Master Plan is aimed at addressing the issue of unplanned settlements and enhancing the aesthetic value of the City, as well as encouraging economic opportunities for Kigali’s residents. It highlights residents’ basic needs and factors contributing to the livability of the city, such as adequate housing, education and workplace opportunities, infrastructure, transport, healthcare and quality of life.


Imbuto Foundation is guided by the values of excellence, solidarity, commitment and integrity

The Existing Central Business District (CBD) in Nyarugenge is being revamped to create a financial hub worthy of the investment interest it has stirred. It will also provide recreational activities that contribute to the vibrancy of the city. And alternative leisure and tourism opportunities will be available to provide a sanctuary from the hustle and bustle of daily life. Among these, are the Rebero

resort area, public parks, bird watching and treks to the highest point in the city, which offers an unforgettable view of Kigali. Ideal zones for the development of residential neighborhoods are primarily composed of residential mixed-use blocks. These blocks include housing and some local commercial shops on the first floor—typically at the corners— parking, community centers and community gardens. With


Kigali’s growing population, the models for development are primarily neighborhoods or townships that are tailored to provide all services to residents at a close proximity, and to use our limited resources sustainably. As part of responding to the needs of our growing city and serving the implementation of the Master Plan, the City of Kigali has embarked upon a major infrastructure development drive. In the last 10 years, the City has constructed and rehabilitated over 150 Km of space. And the development of roads has not only restored some of the most dilapidated colonial roads but also, opened up most of the urban suburbs—Gisozi, Kabeza and Gikondo— that had no access to tarmac roads. In September 2010, the City kicked-off a project that will see the construction of 103 Km of new tarmac roads on Gishushu-Shell (Kicukiro), Gishushu-Remera, RemeraNyarutarama, Kibagabaga-Nyarutarama and Remera road among others. With growing neighborhoods, new infrastructure will not address the challenge of traffic management without help. In response to this, a transport plan is to be elaborated upon in order to remedy all future traffic bottlenecks. In addition, the essential component of waste management has been addressed through a sewage master plan, the first phase of which will begin in the CBD, Nyarugenge District. In order to overcome barriers to investment in the construction industry, the construction One Stop Centre was established in 2010. Through it, various government reforms fostering and facilitating investment are being implemented. The establishment of the One Stop Centre improved Rwanda’s ranking in the World Bank’s Doing Business Report 2010 from 67th in 2009, to 58th in 2010. Most importantly, all development initiatives in Kigali have been tailored to ensure that, through the Master Plan, the city is able to implement its vision for a clean, green, safe and business friendly environment In


CAPITAL MARKET ADVISORY COUNCIL: ENHANCING RWANDA’S FINANCIAL SECTOR Economic growth in a modern economy hinges on an efficient and effective financial sector that pools domestic savings and mobilizes capital for productive projects. The absence of effective capital markets can leave most projects carrying a developmental agenda unexploited.

As part of these efforts, for example, In February 2011, the Government of Rwanda made an effort to enhance its capital market by issuing a three-year treasury bond, valued at Rwf 2.5 billion with a 10.5 percent annual interest rate, subscribed by 324 percent. Rwanda consulted with regional regulators to address the issue of public confidence such as refunds, foreign exchange risk and customer service, through the process of the Bralirwa Initial Public Offer (IPO).

The Bralirwa IPO allotment policy provided 30 percent for foreign investors and 70 percent for Rwandans and East African Community citizens. The first domestic issue of equities was well received by the public, as the Bralirwa shares issued were subscribed by 274%. This translated into an oversubscription of 174%, while the foreign share was subscribed at the level of 530.1%.

With respect to the secondary market activity, the RSE (Rwanda Stock Exchange) was launched on January 31, 2011 and took over all the activities of the Rwanda Over-the-counter (ROTC) market, which had been operational since 31 January, 2008. In the bond market, the RSE witnessed the listing of the first bond on its trading floor on March 3, 2011. It had the listing of a three-year Government bond, which offered Rwf 2.5 billion at face value, and had an annual interest rate of 10.5


The first domestic issue of equities was well received by the public as the Bralirwa shares issued were subscribed by 274% translating into an oversubscription of 174% percent. A total of five treasury bonds, valued at Rwf 15 billion, and one corporate bond worth Rwf 1 billion, are outstanding. The equity market became more active with the listing of Bralirwa shares on January 31, 2011. In February and March, the RSE recorded a total turnover of more than Rwf 4 billion from more than 24 million Bralirwa shares traded in approximately 300 deals. Bralirwa shares were offered at Rwf 136, and by the end of March 2011, they recorded a high of Rwf 235 and a low of Rwf 170 at the RSE. As of March 24, 2011, the share price was valued at Rwf 173, demonstrating an increase of 27 percent from the offer price. Bralirwa shares were dematerialized in the IPO process. The service was offered by the Central Depository & Settlement Corporation (CDSC) Kenya. CDSC services have a one-year contract after which, the Central Bank of Rwanda will takeover. To increase national public education and awareness on capital markets, the Capital Market Advisory Council [CMAC] aggressively continued its programs to educate the general public through various seminars, presentations, print and broadcast media. TV programs and radio talk shows are ongoing and air three times a week in Kinyarwanda and once in English. CMAC also uses diverse regional and international news channels to report on capital market development. In terms of the legal framework, two capital market laws, the CMA bill and the Collective Investment Scheme bill have been adopted by Parliament and are awaiting Presidential ascent.

As well, the Trust Law has already been adopted by the Cabinet and will be sent to Parliament by the end of March 2011. NEW LISTINGS The predicted sale of government shares at Bank of Kigali (BK) will be conducted in the near future, before the end of 2011. Eventually, the BK IPO will be cross-referenced on all East African markets. To distinguish between the functions CMA and RSE, the latter was constituted as an independent private company with its own board of directors and capital structure. Finally, as part of market development efforts, work on the Unit Trust of Rwanda is in progress. A unit trust is a form of collective investment constituted under a trust deed. CMAC is also in the process of modernizing the Rwanda Integrated Payment and Processing System (RIPPS), which encompasses the Automated Clearing House (ACH), the Real Time Gross Settlement (RTGS) and the Central Securities Depository (CSD). The CSDC Kenya has been contracted to offer depository services until the CSD under the Central Bank is fully operational. CDSC Kenya handled the registry services during the floating of BRALIRWA shares.


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THE NITTY GRITTY OF THE EAC COMMON MARKET By Flora Kaitesi

What does the East African common market mean? As an investor it will be easier to open a business in any of the members states of the East African community. Industry owners will find full movement for all the factors of production between member countries, which means factors of production become more efficiently allocated, further increasing productivity. For bigwig firms it means economies of scale, increased competitiveness and lower costs. Finally, domestic consumers will see cheaper products, more efficient providers of products and also increased choice of products. In the simplest terms, according to Permanent Secretary in the ministry of East African Community affairs Robert Ssali, the common market comprises of five partner states – Rwanda, Burundi, Uganda, Kenya and Tanzania – all of which the ordinary person can buy from and sell to. “If I walked the streets and an ordinary citizen asked me what it was I would simply tell them that it is as good moving your goods from Muhanga to Kigali or Huye whereby you are not required to pay import duties, simple as that.” Ssali explained. Automatically, this arrangement triggers inevitable competition and consequent creation of new products and services. The Protocol on the Establishment of the

East African Community (EAC) Common Market entered into force on 1 July 2010, following ratification by all the five Partner States. The Protocol was signed by the Heads of States on November 20, 2009, coinciding with the 10th Anniversary celebrations of the revived Community. The establishment of the East African Community Common Market is in line with the provisions of the EAC Treaty. It provides for “Four Freedoms”, namely the free movement of goods, labor, services and capital, which will significantly boost trade and investments and make the region more productive and prosperous. The Common Market represents the second stage of the regional integration process (as defined by the Treaty for the Establishment of the East African Community), following the Customs Union, which became fully-fledged in January 2010. The Common Market Protocol is a significant step towards the achievement of the next milestones in the integration process, namely the Monetary Union and the EAC Political Federation. The common market scraps off duties on goods within member states which means goods are available at a cheaper price than they would have been when there were duties.

“If an ordinary citizen of any of the EAC member states is dealing in imports, it’s easy for this person to import because there are no duties. It is also easy for that very same person to export within the community” Ssali told Inzozi magazine. Free movement of labor, according to Ssali, means that one shouldn’t shy away from seeking employment within the bloc if you qualify for the job. “We are also in an arrangement of how people can be allowed to reside in any partner state and ensuring that people understand rules of how you get residence and how you get permanent residence. There is also what we call the right of establishment for any national of a partner state having the right to register his or her business without any restrictions, so it is just a matter of imagining Rwanda bigger and include the territories of these other countries, what you do in Rwanda is exactly what you do in these other countries.” Ssali adds. Other benefits and opportunities of the EAC common market include wider skill base in the region, expansion of investments through joint ventures, increasing specialization, need for crossborder markets, and removal of internal tariffs and so on. However this whole package that poses serious benefits to the economies of


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these countries comes with ardent discipline from member states. Political stability is one determining factor to ensure the quest for full integration is achieved. The EAC ministry permanent secretary observes that charity begins at home, a good neighbor consequently means peace, security and development and of course confidence on the part of investors if they understand that what makes the bloc countries is business and not squabbles. With these benefits however comes challenges. Considering that the common market protocol is only a year old since implementation was incepted, the journey is still long especially when it comes to awareness. In Rwanda, the east African community ministry has embarked on nationwide sensitization campaigns to educate the population of what the EAC is and what it brings to the table. According to the ministry, the response is fairly good. This campaign will however be accelerated via the use of radio programs, drama and other

sensitization mechanisms in a bid to ensure full economic integration. News reports have also underscored delays by partner states in harmonization of national laws and legislators in conformity with the East African community common market. Rwanda’s EAC ministry says given the fact that since all the five partner states have ratified the protocol, ratification procedures means that in case of conflict of the protocol and national laws, the protocol takes precedence expect for the constitution. Mr. Ssali explained that “there is a regional team that is looking into prioritizing which laws can be started with such as business laws and migration laws, this is an ongoing process.� EAC ministries and the secretariat have come up with a template to monitor the implementation of the common market protocol and what implications it has on the economies of member states of the bloc.

An EAC training module dated February 2011 indicates that the monitoring and evaluation framework aims to ensure the operations of the common market conform to the objectives of the protocol. This will be achieved by annually reviewing the specific commitments and programs in the protocol and taking necessary measures to ensure that the partners adhere to their commitments within the agreed time frames, as well as assessing any causes of delay in the implementation and taking the appropriate measures to remedy the situation. Prior to that partner states are soon submitting progressive reports on the performance of the economies to compare the period before and after the enforcement of the common market In


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Promoting Economic growth in EAC through Customs Union By Paschal Buhura With the coming into force of the East African Common market, and with partner states setting their sights on monetary union, many East Africans are still unaware of the realities accompanying full integration. Customs Union is one of the bodies leaving them with questions. Customs Union is part of the EAC’s Common Market protocol. It is an entry

point for the bloc’s economic integration. “We have as a community, a very big dream of having a political federation,” says Robert Ssali, Rwanda’s Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of East African Community Affairs. “First and foremost, the EAC has got four stages of integration; customs being the entry point, Common Market being the next stage of integration. The

Common Market and Customs Union are both in force, so now the community is negotiating for the establishment of a monetary union.” But what is it all about? “It means three things,” Sasali says. “We are [talking about] the five partner states. We are declaring our territories. We are ceding our sovereignty, as far as the customs related matters are


concerned. And we say, the five of us, we are giving in our territory of 1.82 million square miles to be treated as a single customs territory. We shall allow the free movement of goods within these territories without restrictions, particularly those goods that originate from member states.” Ssali says under the Common Market protocol, partner states have agreed that, as a single customs territory, goods imported from outside the community will be treated under what is called the “common external tariff.” This works on a three-tiered system of taxation where imported raw materials from nonpartner states are tolled at zero percent, the tax for intermediate goods has been lowered to 10 percent and finished goods are taxed at 25 percent. The main reasons for this move are to facilitate doing business within the community and to boost economic development by accelerating investment within the region. According to Ssali, raw materials in the common external tariff category have been taxed at zero to promote industrial growth. The second and third tiers are intended to facilitate investment within the community. “It means that we don’t want imbalances, and if an investor is in Rwanda, he shouldn’t feel that he wishes he invested in Kenya, because the duties in Kenya are lower than in Rwanda. No, because we all apply the same duties. Then this is what we agreed. It’s 0%, 10% and 25% to all goods coming from foreign countries other than the five,” Ssali said. Nevertheless, this does not mean all goods are taxed in exactly the same manner. Those that can be produced within the bloc for example, are taxed more severely—sugar, rice and other consumer goods on the “100 percent sensitive list,” are among them. This measure is intended to discourage the importation of foreign commodities otherwise sourced within the bloc, and to encourage more economy-boosting investment in production within bloc countries.

Under the Customs Union and Common Market protocol, an effort has been made to remove what are called, “nontariff barriers”(NTBs). NTBs are other factors hindering the pace of business, such as poor infrastructure. “Travelling from Kigali to Mombasa or Dar es Salaam, there are a lot of issues,” Ssali says. “We need to improve on our roads as a region. There are long distances, because we don’t have a railway line connecting, for example, Kigali to any of the ports. Imagine if we had a railway line—how cheap our commodities would be. Because the statistics show that between 40 and 45 percent of the price of commodities we consume, [and] especially those we import, comes from transport costs.” There are a number of other similar hindrances to the efficient movement of goods within the region—police roadblocks, bureaucratic border post procedures and corruption, for example. While roadblocks, and particularly those at border points, have been removed and procedures eased, corruption is still an issue to be tackled by partner states if the protocol is to be successful. “In the region, one of the very funny parts of non-tariff barriers is corruption. We need to see that corruption is addressed

because, for a truck moving from Bujumbura to any port in the region, or from there to the final destination, corruption is one of the challenges . . . That’s why in the community, we are also talking of good governance,” Ssali says. Bureaucratic clearing procedures are also an issue that has not been fully remedied. But various measures have been introduced to bring them to an end. For Rwanda’s EAC ministry, there has been a lot of cumbersome paperwork to clear up. This is still a problem in some customs offices and border points. To address this problem, the One Stop Border arrangement was established. It ensures importers will be able to access the customs clearing officials of two countries under one roof, and that they will be cleared at once. This kind of arrangement is operating at the Nemba border (Rwanda-Burundi), Gatuna/Katuna, (Uganda-Rwanda) and the Rusumo border (Rwanda-Tanzania). “It has not reached where we wish, but the summit of heads of state deliberated on the establishment of a single customs authority,” Ssali says. One area of concern over the Customs Union Protocol relates to EAC citizens crossing border points with goods from one of the bloc states: confusion around duty free classification for products originating within the region (Article 14).


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Individuals crossing borders with products they believe to be duty free are sometimes confused by the requirements for such a classification. According to Eugene Torero, the former Rwanda Revenue Authority (RRA) Deputy Commissioner General, for a product to qualify for duty free status, it has to meet certain criteria. Products must be wholly produced in the EAC, and the worth of the raw materials should not exceed 60 percent of its value. Competent authorities must also certify the product. And at border points, one is required to produce a certificate of origin to receive tax. For small, regional cross-border businesses, traders must produce a simplified certificate, which is provided by the first border authorities to ensure tariff exemptions can be applied. However, Torero says not all taxes can be removed from such products, because the Value Added Tax (VAT) and withholding taxes still apply. “What should be made clear is that EAC products have not been exempted from all taxes. Only tariffs were removed. One still has to pay VAT and other dues,� Torero says.

What is obvious in Rwanda and among her bloc partners, is that many citizens know little to nothing about the various protocols established by the EAC. And so, the Rwandan government has initiated a number of efforts to educate citizens about their meaning and importance. Such efforts are jointly conducted among RRa, the Ministry of trade and Commerce and the EAC Ministry. The five EAC partner states occupy approximately 1.82 million square miles of land and a combined population of over 126 million people. The bloc is marketed as a single economic entity for investment, with an average GDP of over $73 billion. As experts continue to develop the next phase of the EAC integration treaty implementation process, monetary union, a lot of work remains to be done to ensure the Common Market and Customs Union will be successful. The Customs Union protocol was intended to facilitate free movement of goods and services, while promoting economic growth within the block. Though concerns remain over implementing its provisions, the economic future of the bloc is undeniably promising, considering what has been achieved so far In


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IMBUTO N O I T A FOUND

Enriching lives and expanding horizons Founded in 2007, Imbuto Foundation has embarked on a journey of transforming the lives of Rwandans under the stewardship of the First Lady of Rwanda, Jeannette Kagame. Young and old, boys and girls, women and men – thousands of Rwandans have been empowered by the work the Foundation continues to do in its vision of creating a nation of empowered and dignified Rwandans, as seen with its initiatives in health, education and youth. Imbuto Foundation is guided by the values of excellence, solidarity, commitment and integrity, which enables its small 25-member team to incredibly implement projects that span across all 30 districts in the country. According to the Director General, Mrs. Radegonde Ndejuru, Imbuto Foundation’s priorities are to “empower youth for prosperity; support the wellbeing of Rwanda’s disadvantaged; and change mindsets through communication.” A snapshot of Imbuto Foundation’s dynamic programs leaves you with the understanding of how committed it is to uplifting the livelihoods of all Rwandans. For instance, one of its health programs

that focuses on the area of HIV/AIDS prevention is the Family Package program, which builds on the benefits of the national program to Prevent Mother to Child Transmission (PMTCT) of HIV/ AIDS. The Family Package program does this by extending prevention, treatment, care and support to pregnant women living with HIV and their families. A unique feature of this program is that it also provides a holistic package, by contributing to socio-economic empowerment through the facilitation of income generating activities. Rwanda is known for its ambitious programs, as seen with its move to not only prevent the vertical transmission of HIV, but eliminate it (to 2%) by 2015. As of June 2011, Family Package aims to contribute to national programs on the Elimination of the Mother to Child Transmission (EMTCT) by making health services available and accessible to communities, and educating and encouraging people to make use of these services. Youth empowerment lies close to the heart of Imbuto Foundation, evidenced by its numerous youth initiatives. A recent addition to its Youth Empowerment and Mentorship Program (YEMP) is


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Imbuto Foundation is guided by the values of excellence, solidarity, commitment and integrity

the Rwanda Speaks! project. This youth project aims to contribute to the development of Rwanda’s future leaders by equipping Rwandan youth with confidence in public speaking and communication skills, which are

hallmarks of leadership. This is done through televised debates between schools, universities and young professionals. In addition, the Rwanda Speaks! project has a Mentorship Program in secondary schools, aimed at fostering mentees’ personal growth by mentoring on topic areas such as planning and organisation; transgenerational communication; public speaking and critical thinking, amongst other things. Another component of the Rwanda Speaks! project is the Toastmasters Clubs program, implemented in 3 universities across the country – SFB, NUR & KIST. The university Toastmasters Clubs are affiliated to Toastmasters Club International based in the USA, which teaches public speaking and leadership skills through a worldwide network. As Claudette Irere, a Toastmaster Club member from NUR, said, “In my several attempts of writing and making

speeches, the only time that I felt satisfied about my work is after joining Toastmasters. I am now very confident that leadership and public speaking skills that I am acquiring are great tools in shaping my future.” As Rwanda steadfastly and speedily progresses towards development and transformation, Imbuto Foundation recognises that there is need to take stock of and celebrate achievements, in particular those accomplished by Rwandan youth. The Celebrating Young Rwandan Achievers (CYRWA) Awards are held every two years by the Foundation and First Lady Jeannette Kagame awards the trailblazing achievements of Rwandan youth from Rwanda and the Diaspora. To date, nine women and six men have been awarded as Young Rwandan Achievers, and there have been two editions of CYRWA. The next CYRWA awards will be taking place in August


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Each year Imbuto Foundation support a total of 1,000 boys and girls, based on the funds it continues to receive from the goodwill of well-wishers and organisations committed to the education of Rwandan youth.

cover school fees and an academic package that includes health insurance, transport, uniform and fees for textbooks and scholastic material. In addition, Imbuto Foundation organizes an annual youth camp bringing all scholarship recipients together for four days to share experiences and acquire life-skills. Each year Imbuto Foundation support a total of 1, 000 boys and girls, based on the funds it continues to receive from the goodwill of well-wishers and organisations committed to the education of Rwandan youth. 19th 2011, as CYRWA continues to inspire youth towards building a culture of excellence and hard work. Imbuto Foundation is known for its unwavering commitment to education, as seen with its Scholarships Project.

The Project was created in response to children with high academic potential failing to pursue their secondary education due to lack of financial support. An entire secondary school cycle of six years costs US$ 1, 200, at US$ 250 per year per student. Funds

As Mahatma Gandhi once said, “Be the change you want to see in the world.� Imbuto Foundation does this as it continues to effect change amongst Rwandans, planting seeds of hope, seeds of prosperity and seeds of dignity

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FORT JESUS MOMBASA

DESTINATIONS

NOW A UNESCO WORLD HERITAGE SITE


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The latest round of recognizing sites of significance to the world’s cultural heritage by UNESCO has seen ‘Fort Jesus’ included in the list of now protected and globally acclaimed monuments, landscapes and locations. The fort, originally built over 400 years ago by the Portuguese who treasured the safe anchorage they found in Mombasa, besides the opportunities to restock water and supplies for their onward journeys across the Indian Ocean. Fort Jesus has long been part of the Kenya Museums, and while already in great demand by tourists and on the itinerary of every city tour of Mombasa, the latest accolade bestowed by UNESCO will undoubtedly lure even more visitors to the site, which is often used for evening functions with special light displays on its massive walls overlooking the inner courtyards.

Visitor numbers in recent years were growing towards the 200,000 entries mark by both foreign tourists and locals including school and study groups but this latest elevation of the status of Fort Jesus is bound to drive the numbers across this threshold. At the same announcement the Kenyan lakes in the Great Rift Valley were also declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site, extending from Lake Naivasha over Lake Elementaita, Lake Nakuru and Lake Bogoria to Lake Baringo. This is both a recognition of Kenya’s conservation efforts so far but also a further challenge to maintain biodiversity and expand conservation measures along the rift valley floor around the lakes to ensure that their water sources, especially critical for Lake Naivasha and Lake Nakuru, remain intact.

For Lake Nakuru, the plans by the National Highway Authority to carve out a piece of Lake Nakuru National Park’s land for a ‘bypass highway’ around the municipality of Nakuru needs to be binned for good now, lest public opinion turns against the highway promoters with equal ferocity as was the case when Tanzania planned their controversial highway across the Serengeti. But for now, it is congratulations to Kenya for this remarkable achievement which will go a long way in supporting the country’s drive for more tourists visiting all corners of the republic In


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80 AND COUNTING A RETURN TO LAKE

NAIVASHA


Peninsula’ as it now appears to have become. The first five rooms, still standing today at the same spot though repeatedly modified, enlarged and modernized were completed by 1933, allowing Ann and Herbert Sparks to take in paying guests but the ‘official’ opening, cutting tape and cake and all, still took until Christmas Day in 1935 when according to records obtained the ‘Sparks’ was fully booked The hotel soon gained a reputation as a comfortable and conveniently located rest stop for those taking the hard road from Nairobi into the Great African Rift Valley or vice versa, but only when Imperial Airways commenced their long distance flights between London and Durban with the legendary ‘flying boats’ – huge ‘beasts’ in those days – was it that the hotel began its rise to fame and glory which lasted to the present day. These flying contraptions landing on water came from the River Thames via the Mediterranean Sea to the Nile delta near Alexandria and then flew along the river with further landings in Khartoum before breaking the journey in Naivasha, the lake being Kenya’s first international airport in a manner of speaking.

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The first task was a rebranding exercise that led to a The calls of the fish eagles echoed across the extensive manicured grounds in the early hour of the day as the first rays of light crept across the horizon, just as it must have sounded and looked like 80 odd years ago. Ever since the erstwhile Sparks Hotel’s construction was started in 1931, at the very spot where I now sat on the verandah of my cottage to soak up the birdsong from the tall ‘fever trees’, aka acacias, did this distinct bird call capture the imagination of owners, managers and travelling guests alike, nature’s wake up call for sure and greatly assisted and enhanced by the myriads of other birds making the Lake Naivasha shores their habitat and singing their hearts out day in day out to the delight of visitors from the city but also from abroad, who probably see more birds at Naivasha in a day than in a year back home where they come from. (Across the water is ‘Crescent Peninsula’ formerly ‘Crescent Island’, now connected to the mainland) The lake since then has seen variations in water levels, and at present, probably for a variety of reasons, the water is well back from the time the Sparks’ set out to build their little hotel, a time when Crescent Island was indeed still an island as opposed to ‘Crescent

Crews and passengers stayed on land for night stops along the route and the trip taking several days allowed in particular the passengers to take in some real life experiences en route, with lions reportedly still roaming the floor of the Rift Valley back then and their roars being heard at night, causing probably fear and hopes amongst the airline guests for the swift onset of daylight, considering the stories passengers had heard about the man eating lions of Tsavo which had taken quite a few fellow Englishmen in their days and more locals in addition to the ‘imported food’. Transport to and from Nairobi was by railway from the not too distant Naivasha station ob else by available cars or trucks or in the worst case by ox drawn wagons, having to make the way up the escarpment and across the Limuru hills before reaching the then capital of the colony. Ancient pictures on display in the lobby, the lounges, the bar and the dining room still remind the guests of what is today called the Lake Naivasha Country Club, giving a glimpse back into times long passed but still remembered by a few ‘old hands’ as this writer can vouch for. During the Second World War the hotel was for a brief period converted into a boarding school when the ‘Prince of Wales’ had to be evacuated until the Abyssinian campaign had been concluded and the Italians been defeated in their only African colony. In the early 1940’s the hotel changed hands twice


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Zebras and waterbuck are ‘friendly’ and freely roam the grounds of the club but best be careful not to walk up to a hippopotamus when seen according to records found, first bought by one Mr. Storey, no other names found, before his manageress a Miss Evelyn Denwett bought it off him in 1944 and changed the name to ‘Lake Hotel’ – one which has stuck to the place ever since. A rather nondescript period evolved between the end of the war and independence for Kenya, with little information found in the short time I was back in Naivasha, and just a few years after Kenya became a republic Michael Cunningham – Reid bought the hotel and promptly renovated and refurbished the hotel, building more rooms in the process to cater for the growing demand by the local farming community, then still largely white ex-Brits who had taken Kenyan nationality on independence and of course the initial trickle of tourists coming to Kenya on big game safaris, later to become a tide. Notably, not far from the Lake Hotel’s extensive grounds is ‘Elsamere’ found, now a memorial and educational site plus museum for the work done by

George and Joy Adamson who propelled Kenya into the international spotlight with their efforts to successfully release captive lions back into the wild at the Kora Game Reserve in Northern Kenya, while they still spent much time every year at their lakeside residence. ‘Dodo’ Cunningham – Reid, Michael’s wife, was often seen at the hotel, inspite of Block Hotels, in the 70’s THE hotel, resort and safari lodge management company in Kenya and training ground for a number of first class Kenyan hotel managers, having taken on the management of the Lake Naivasha Hotel, getting her hands on the gardens and even the service on weekends back then when this writer made the Naivasha lakeside his regular weekend stomping ground. During those years the property grew in size and the final addition, a more remote lake side Presidential Cottage, was THE place to be for a Saturday night when wanting to impress. I gather it still is, away from prying eyes with meals on request served ‘in cottage’. A crowd favourite until this day, the Lake Naivasha Hotel was a perfect stopover between the Northern national parks and the Masai Mara for the increasing number of safari guests who flocked to Kenya in those days and while talks have been more off then on between the Cunningham – Reid’s and Block Hotels, the latter eventually managed to buy it lock stock and barrel in 1989, at which time the name became the Lake

Naivasha Country Club. Block Hotels and owners United Touring Company or better known as UTC eventually suffered of the owners financial woes and related problems and today the LNCC is managed by Sun Africa Hotels, which also got the famous Keekorok Lodge in the Masai Mara – the first ever built in the game reserve back in the 60’s and the Lake Baringo Club in their portfolio. For this writer the trip to Naivasha during a stopover in Kenya enroute to Uganda was a welcome opportunity to also see how the roads between Nairobi and Naivasha have improved, as the route chosen down the ‘old escarpment road’ was in perfectly good shape and not one pothole to be seen or experienced during the 100 or so kilometre journey from the capital. The view points at the escarpment, more than there used to be in the old days, are still a ‘must’ stop to take photographs, with the Mt. Longonot volcano, now a national park, rising majestically from the floor of the Great African Rift Valley. Another eye catching feature of course is the original satellite station near Mt. Longonot, which with the giant dishes pointed skywards keeps Kenya connected to the world, now of course supplemented by three major underwater fibre optic cable systems which enter the country at Mombasa. Plenty of plains game was seen once down on the bottom of the Rift Valley, zebras, impalas and gazelles, but no giraffes, wildebeest, leave alone a cheetah or two or even a lion as was the case in the ‘old days’. Saying this makes me feel slightly weird, but considering that I have been around the block for more than 3 ½ decades in East Africa now this may be forgiven by my readers. Still, some of the locals’ I spoke with during my stay at the Lake Naivasha Country Club insisted that cheetahs and lions still roam the valley floor, though admittedly fewer than in ‘our days’. Visit www.sunafricahotels.com for more information like tariffs, reservations and details on their other properties which include the upcoming ‘Sovereign Suites’, nestled in Limuru’s green hills above the city of Nairobi but more about that at a later time In


In Nyungwe Top View Hill Hotel is the elegant place; a heaven on earth, idyllically situated on top of one of the hills of Nyungwe forest area; the largest tropical forest in East Africa and the biggest water reservoir in Rwanda. Nyungwe Top View Hill Hotel offers most beautiful and tranquil accommodation facility comprised of 12 self-contained apartments, with 4 twin and 8 queen size beds, a sitting room with a fire place to warm you up and a balcony with picturesque view of sunrise or sunset from all the rooms including incomparable view of part of the Nyungwe National Park, Kahuzi Biega National Park, Tea plantations, Lake Kivu, the volcanoes and Idjwi Island right from the top of the hill. The accommodation is offered with bed and breakfast, half board or full board facility.

Contact us: Phone: +250 788 306663, 78 8605665 Email: reservations@nyungwehotel.com, Website: http://www.nyungwehotel.com


PHO TOG RA

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GAEL R. VANDE WEGHE Gaël R. Vande weghe spent his childhood in Akagera National Park and became passionate about nature. His first interest was in birding, which was a rather easy activity in the savannah of Akagera. At the age of nine he discovered the Nyungwe Forest which triggered his interest in a wide range of nature diversity. Later, in Burundi and Tanzania, he discovered Miombo woodlands, another very different ecosystem which triggered his interests in botany, particularly orchids, which he studied extensively as an amateur in Ruvubu National Park in Burundi. With his interest in biology piqued, he expanded soon after to entomology and developed his first butterfly collections in Ruvubu and later in Uganda.

Only a few of his photographs are presented in this magazine, but have also been showcased in an exhibition called Nature Illuminated displayed at Shokola Lite in the Kigali neighborhood of Kacyiru. They have been developed not only to showcase the artistry and skill of the photographer but also to shine a spotlight on often-missed wonders of Rwanda’s wildlife. Mr. Vande weghe is also Managing Director of Illume Creative Studio which put on the exhibition. He photographed all the images for the exhibition. A total of 25 images were taken in various locations in Rwanda over a period of two years and represent only a small fraction of the rich tapestry that forms Rwanda’s natural habitat. These images offer a captivating glimpse into the incredible diversity and intense beauty of the country In

He undertook university studies in biology and graduated from the Open University of Milton Keynes. At the same time he extensively studied the butterflies of Gabon within the framework of a Wildlife Conservation Society program. His first book summarizing his ten years of butterfly research was published in 2010 and his second book on Birds of Rwanda (co-authored) is expected out in July 2011. His photography skills, environmental awareness as well as environmental communications have been developed during extensive travels in Central Africa.

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1. Olive-bellied Sunbird, taken on the verge of Mashoza forest in southern, eastern province. 2. Dying Eucalyptus trees on Lake Nyirakigugu on the road to Rubavu coming from Musanze. 3. MScadoxus flower, just after fires, in Akagera National Park. 4. Impatiens gesneroidea, albertine rift endemic balsam, in Nyungwe Forest National Park. 5. Fringing vegetation of Lake Birengero in Akagera National Park.

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6. Mount Sabinyo in Northern Rwanda. 7. Dusky Crimsonwing, little albertinerift endemic bird common in Nyungwe forest. 8. Flower of impatiens generoidea (balsam)Taken on the bigugu trail 9. African Fish Eagle on lake Ihema (Akagera National Park). 10. Spectacled Weaver, in the extensive papyrus swamps of the Bugesera area.tempus tincidunt.

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A WALK ON THE WILD SIDE


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Jeremy Head gets up close and personal with the remarkable wildlife in nyungwe national park. But what about the new aerial walkway? At first, I couldn’t see anything up there high in the swaying canopy. Then suddenly a dark furry head and shoulders appeared from behind rustling branches. It was my first sighting of a wild chimpanzee–man’s closest relative– munching his breakfast of wild sweet figs. It was a special moment. Rwanda is of course famous for mountain gorillas, but savvy tourists and smart locals in search of a far bigger range of wildlife and plenty of other adventure are also heading to the south west of the country to Nyungwe National Park. This chunk of preserved medium-altitude rainforest is the largest in Africa and it’s stuffed with rare species–orchids, birds, primates and reptiles. For many visitors, the highlight is seeing chimpanzees in their natural environment. The park is home to around 500 chimps and two groups have been habituated, making it possible to be fairly sure you’ll see them. The hike to reach the chimps was short but quite intense. We set off with our guide, Head Tourism Warden Kambogo Ildephonse, up a steep pathway. By the time we crested the hill, sweat was dripping from my forehead. Around an hour later, we halted, and with a gentle rustle, a tracker materialised like a spirit from the foliage. He’d approached so quietly I hadn’t

even heard him. We continued to an opening in the canopy. And there we found them–a group of five chimpanzees munching on wild figs high in the tree tops. The trackers know many of them by name now. These two were Gahara (bald patch) and Rukujuju (many colours). Nyungwe isn’t just for hardcore trekkers though. There are nearly 20 guided walking trails ranging from a couple of hours of relatively easy walking to a three-day hike to the Congo Nile divide. You can see waterfalls, birds, monkeys and all sorts of tropical flowers–over 148 species of orchids alone. They haven’t even had time to catalogue all the species of butterfly and frogs yet! Birdwatchers will be particularly keen on trying to spot all 26 of the endemic Albertine Rift species and specialist birding guides are available to help you. The latest attraction is a 60-metre high aerial walkway built with a state-of-the-art long cable bridge and concrete technology. A walk along it offers the most immense rainforest views. The walkway trail starts at the informative new Uwinka Visitor Center. After a steep set of steps, the going was pretty easy. On the way a huge troop of Colobus Monkeys came crashing and chattering through the tree tops, bright flashes of black and white fur–upwards of 100 of them.


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The walkway spans a wide valley, high up in the tree tops and it’s a spectacular sight. But as we arrived it started to rain, you can’t do the walkway in the rain for safety reasons. Secretly I was a little relieved. I get vertigo and I’m still not sure if I’d have had the courage to do it. The best thing about Nyungwe? Perhaps it’s the sheer variety. If–unlike me–you’ve a head for heights, there’s full-on adventure. But if you prefer more sedate forest walks or wildlife viewing of all shapes and sizes, that’s there too. And if it all gets a bit too much, retire–as I did–to the luxurious environs of Nyungwe Forest Lodge. That evening I sat on the rainforest-fringed balcony of my designer bungalow and sipped an ice cold beer… the splendours of Rwanda’s primeval past with the comforts of its modern conveniences sideby-side and in perfect harmony In TRAVEL FACTS Getting there: Rwandair flies daily from Kigali to Kamembe about an hour’s drive from Nyungwe. By road from Kigali it takes about 6 hours via Huye. WHERE TO STAY: Top end - The Mantis collection’s Nyungwe Forest Lodge offers designer rainforest bungalows. Check their website (www.nyungweforestlodge.com) for seasonal deals which can be much cheaper. The new Mid-Range – Nyungwe Top View Hill Hotel (www. nyungwehotel.com) has 12 comfortable bungalows on the crest of a hill with amazing views. Budget - Cheap but clean rooms at Gisakura Guest House (www.gisakuraguesthouse.com) with shared bathrooms. There are also 3 campsites at Uwinka. Permits: Chimp trekking $90, Canopy walkway trail $60. For inquiries: Please write to reservation@rwandatourism.com For more information about all of Rwanda’s tourist attractions: Visit www.rwandatourism.com

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IVUKAARTS R W A N D A N

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IVUKA ARTS RWANDAN REBIRTH Rosella Chibambo

The youthful hub of Rwanda’s visual arts scene is cleverly hidden in the Kacyiru district of Kigali. No matter how many visits you have made, wandering down the dusty path leading up to the vibrantly painted gates of Ivuka Arts Studio is like discovering buried treasure, though pieces of this treasure are already on display around the world. The world inside these gates has been re-drawn in a kaleidoscope of colour, and re- defined by a group of self-taught artists using their talent to change their communities and put Rwandan art on the international stage. In 2007, Ugandan-born Collin Sekajugo founded Ivuka Arts, as a collective of visual artists. One of their main goals is to promote young Rwandan artists on an international stage. Ivuka prides itself on helping to restore Rwanda’s modern cultural heritage. Through showings at galleries and events around the globe, the collective’s

artists—now fifteen in total—are reaching beyond borders and sharing their work throughout Africa, North America and Europe. They bring with them a message of a new Rwanda, rebuilding after a painful past, and reaching for a bright future. After all, Ivuka means “rebirth,” in Kinyarwandan. Since its creation, Ivuka has engaged in community building through creative expression. It’s not uncommon to walk in on thumping drumbeats, punctuating the synchronized movements of neighbourhood children rehearsing a dance at the studio. Nor is a toddler, grasping a paintbrush and playing among art installations and stacks of paintings, out of place. The artists of Ivuka have built a home for some of Rwanda’s most sought after artwork. They have provided a haven for aspiring Rwandan and visiting artists. And they have also engaged in community outreach work, organizing workshops at local orphanages, through the “Art with a Mission” project, supporting genocide survivors with arts-and-crafts sales and

even working with US-based Healing Hearts Northwest, which provides art therapy to individuals undergoing heart surgery. The work on display at the gallery reflects a deep connection to Rwandan culture and everyday life. One painting by Ivuka artist Emmanuel Nkuranga, depicts the subtle but essential connection between the bicycle and a society’s culture and basic survival. Every day, people ride bicycles to buy food, seek help, visit a loved one, or even propose marriage. As if roads were veins, a bicycle can flow between houses and even villages. It can connect friends and relatives, keeping the heart of a community beating. Nkuranga’s work depicts this essential, but oftenoverlooked element of community life. Such vignettes, evoking the character of East African life, are carved, painted and molded meticulously in the work of Ivuka artists.

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Though self-taught, there is an intense perfectionism among members of the collective. Nkuranga says being self-taught allows an artist to define his or her own style without rules and to produce work no one has ever seen. “Practice makes perfect,” he says. “That is what has changed our art and made [it] unique in different ways.” Across the canvasses lining Ivuka’s walls, warm, rich colour has been delicately articulated into textured, masterful works of modern art.

There’s a signature sense of movement in every piece in the studio, not unlike the hustle and bustle of daily life in Kigali. Behind the indoor gallery, Ivuka’s outdoor art studio gives visitors a glimpse into the continuous wave of creativity flowing through the collective. This opportunity to engage with artists at work is part of what makes Ivuka a must-see in Rwanda. As well, unlike most galleries, Ivuka’s artwork is not confined to its indoor space. A walk around the compound reveals art installations, mixed-media

art pieces and more paintings. Art is everywhere at Ivuka. Nkuranga even jokes that the flowers are painted. On any given day at Ivuka, you may encounter a children’s dance group, craft co-operative, artists at work on pieces that may one day travel across the globe or the harmonious mixture of all three. Visiting the studio becomes more than a trip to a local art gallery. It is an experience—a glimpse at the vibrancy of community, the unbridled creativity of Rwanda’s youth and their burning desire to continue re-drawing their country’s legacy In


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SKY LIKE SKY “And here is our room!� Natacha swept the door open and she and Martine held their breath, waiting for our reactions. The two of them had already spent a night, but the three others in our cast were just arriving

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“It’s beautiful!” We were being facetious, and they burst into laughter. As tropical Africa dwellers, accustomed to Rwanda’s perfect weather, we weren’t ready for Grahamstown and South Africa’s freezing rains. A lost hotel reservation meant that our theatre group, Art Works Ink, had been rebooked into a high school classroom. We looked at the iron bed frames, the dusty desks piled in half the room, the science posters in English and Afrikans decorating the walls, and the mattresses, which were, as Natacha said, as thin as SIM cards.

Luckily, we had not come to the National Arts Festival in Grahamstown to spend a lot of time in the room. We had come to perform our new collaborative play, sky like sky and to see as much music, theatre, dance and art as we could at Africa’s largest art festival. We had worked hard to come this far, so one drafty classroom wouldn’t stop us. Sky like sky began as an improbable dream, started by a conversation between three Rwandese and two American artists about the state of women in the world

and the question of nations. In animated conversations, we discussed what it meant to be from a place or to belong to a place you weren’t from. We thought about borders, both metaphorical and the ones between nations, in airports where everyone tries to fill out the forms and no one ever has a pen. Initially, we weren’t sure what we wanted to make, but we knew that we wanted it to be genuinely collaborative in both artistry and production.

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Our early concept earned us an invitation to the prestigious National Arts Festival in Grahamstown. NAF is in it’s 37th year and showcases participants from South Africa and abroad. It is the largest arts festival on the continent, with more than 500 shows and 200, 000 spectators. Sky like sky would be the first Rwandan production to come to Grahamstown. Our conversation continued: we talked about borders, women, history and nations, we remembered the story of Ndabaga, one of

Rwanda’s warrior queens. Ndabaga was a young woman who wanted to replace her father at the front; at the time, a man fighting in the war was only allowed to quit when he got old if his son came to replace him. But Ndagaba had no brothers or sisters, so she figured she would have to do it herself. She decided to cut off her own breasts so that she could act as a man. In the course of the story, she becomes an accomplished warrior, and when she is discovered, the king rewards her (in some versions he marries her and declares that old men can go home from the war if there is no one to replace them). We liked this story for its questioning of what a woman might sacrifice for her nation, but we were also curious about other tales. Our Ndabaga references Virgina Woolf’s Orlando, another tale of a woman who was sometimes a man, and one who lived through epic times. Our conversations centered around borders— the borders of our bodies, our capacities, the national borders that can be so arbitrary, crucial or tragic, and finally the borders of our imaginations. As the play grew, we found moments for music, rap, poetry and dance to tell our story of Ndabaga Orlando. We interwove French, English and Kinyarwanda, wanting to stay true to the experience of the daily polyphony of Kigali life. As our ideas started to cohere into a script, we still had a lot of work to do on the production side. The fact that we were committed to everyone being a producer meant that everyone was responsible for helping raise the money. We approached embassies and companies–Rwandair generously offered three of the plane tickets and Art Moves Africa, who shares our commitment to the need for intra- African dialogue, funded two of the others. A Kickstarter campaign helped with technical and travel expenses. We were on our way. Which, after a rousing preview of our new show at Ishyo Art Center in Kigali, landed us in the cold classroom in Grahamstown. Still, we didn’t have time to complain, and generous South Africans loaned us blankets and scarfs so we could set out. Our first obstacle was a tech rehearsal in which

we discovered that the theatre we’d been booked into had carpeting on the floor— problematic, as the play involves an avocado getting all over everything. A few plastic bags taped down (we realize plastic bags as solution is not very Rwandan, but we were doing our best) and we were good to go, without making life hard on Cor, our cheerful and skilful theater tech. Grahamstown has the feel of a funky student town, with cozy cafés and crowded bars. The town is dominated by the university, and the hub of the festival is in a labyrinthine bunker of a building called the Monument, which looms over the campus from a nearby hill. We drove up to registration, and quickly realized that one of the challenges of seeing art would be figuring out not only how to negotiate the jam-packed timetable, but the many locations. Just as every classroom had been converted into a hotel room, every conceivable performance space was being used, including one performance which took place in military hummers. We spent our first full day together getting ready for the opening and readjusting the show to fit the confines of a new space. After our successful opening performance, though, we felt ready to go see what other arts the town had to offer, warming ourselves with cups of tea in between shows. Grahamstown festival had a peak attendance this year, with more than 200, 000 spectators, and more than500 shows. Unable to wait, two of us snuck off to a the late concert after our own premiere, to see Durban based singer-song writer John Ellis, who, in between his own songs about refugees in South Africa sang versions of Bob Marley and Tom Petty, arguing that as it was his birthday he would sing what he wanted. The variety of work available to choose from was daunting. We saw a stunning dance theatre piece from Remix, an integrated dance group from Cape Town. In the piece, Love Affair, the hyper-able bodies of some of the performers mingle with excellent disabled dancers in the cast for moments of lucidity, eroticism and sorrow. There was ariel work and stunningly beautiful


An easy place to locate on Kajangwe Avenue, the third branch on your left after National Bank of Rwanda and perfect distance from the center of town to feel the escape necessary after a busy week                  Khazana has the great ambience with extremely attentive service contributed to brilliant dining

                        

Opening soon another branch at Kigali City Tower For reservations and takeaways: Khana Khazana, 10-Kajangwe Avenue, Kiyovu, Kigali Rwanda. www.khanakhazana.rw, Email:khazanarwanda@yahoo.com Please call: 0788772087, 0788499600, 0788301729

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An ideal place to be anyday anytime. Plot, 1 Revolution Avenue, opp. BCR, Contact: 0788301729, 0788772087 Email: downtown.kigali@yahoo.com


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SKY LIKE SKY acting as a woman repeated words in a language none of us spoke, moving from joy to tears, and at times telling us she was not able to translate. We caught a puppet show mostly for adults called Sadako, based on the tale of a Japanese girl who made 1000 cranes as she tried to heal from the ‘atom bomb disease.’ We rocked out to a black metal band, watched the virile and potty- mouthed men of On the Border lure each other deeper into the violence of South Africa’s secret wars. At the pop-up restaurant the Long Table, we rubbed elbows with artists from other shows and those who had come to see them. We sampled the varieties of vegetables and lettuces, and the dishes like vegetarian enchiladas and sushi that seemed far from Kigali’s isombe or frites. We saw a workshop with local artists and community leaders as they helped the author of an autobiographical play refine her work. We scattered in order to see more: a play on older men telling stories; a young physical theater group whose performance included a duet between a man, a large deer puppet and a hustler in gold spandex; a Chinese remake of a Coen Brother’s film; a new classical opera in which the main character was an animated nose. During the day, performers bounded down the streets on hoppy stilts, and at night you could follow the music into a concert at any local bar. In Grahamstown, you always have the sense that you are missing something, so it’s best to just go to as

much as you can and enjoy. By our last day, the sun had even come back, so we could admire the quaint beauty of Hill street, the town’s main drag. After returning our blankets and hats to our new friends, and divvying up our props for the trip home, we were relieved to return to Rwanda’s perfect climes. But grateful for the new artistic ideas still buzzing in our minds and for the new friends, and ready to continue work on our show. Looking back on the festival, we can say without irony, “it’s beautiful.” If you want to go to the National Arts Festival, book early for hotels, and know that winter can be very cold, so see if your hotel offers heat. Renting a car makes transportation in the town easier, although there are shuttles and taxis available. The nearest airport is Port Elizabeth, about a 1.5 hour drive. Sky like sky is a production of Art Works Ink, a collaboration between women artists working in partnership with Ishyo Art Center. The cast and crew include Emily Mendelsohn, Natacha Muziramakenga, Elizabeth Spackman, Solange Umuhire, Martine Umulisa. The next performance will be at the Center by Center festival, in Kigali, in August In


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R O I N U J THE WASPS


A TRUE EXPRESSION OF RWANDAN SPIRIT AND GLORY By Paschal Buhura

In the mid to late ‘90s Rwanda was portrayed by many in the international community as a hopeless nation, devastated by the 1994 genocide. Bad enough, a lot of human and financial resources that would have been used to develop the country were wasted in the course of the war and genocide, which took an even more destructive human toll. It was hard for anyone to imagine the Rwanda we proudly live in today. Or that in the space of only seventeen years, headlines decrying the unimaginable suffering of the Rwandan people would be replaced by ones touting Rwanda as an African success story. Today, Rwanda confidently stands out as a true role model for peace, unity, reconciliation and good governance. The country has set an internationally commended example through the empowerment of women and its fight against corruption. As Rwanda rebuilt herself, various measures were taken to unite her citizens. Football is one of the greatest Rwandan passions and symbols of national unity. Through it, many have put differences aside, rallying behind a favorite club team. Though Rwanda’s national football team “Amavubi,” or the “Wasps” have not performed well internationally, the country’s junior team the Junior Wasps, referred to as “Amavubi mato,” in Kinyarwanda, have inspired Rwandans to keep their national pride and football dreams alive. This season, they reached the African Under-17 Championship, which earned them a World Cup Under-17 tournament ticket. And though the young Rwandans could not break through to the round of sixteen, a new era of Rwandan soccer dreams was born. Despite losing games against the England and Uruguay teams, the Junior Wasps made an impressive showing for a team no one thought would make it. They tied against Canada and showed considerable skill against the football giants they went up against.

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Football is one of majority Rwandans’ passion, through it, any difference is put aside as they rally behind their favorite clubs on national team “Amavubi” or the wasps.

What is truly remarkable about the Junior Wasps is that the team represents the generation born right after the 1994 Genocide. They portray a new Rwanda, where dreams are attainable. Their story reflects the determination that has helped Rwanda rebuild herself as a proud, developing nation. That they left the Junior World Cup empty-handed does not mean their dreams have come to an end. They remain an inspiration for more young people to work to achieve their own football dreams, and for every Rwandan to pursue his or her goals, no matter what they are. After their historic debut onto the international football stage, Rwanda’s young team is expected to grow into excellent senior squad. The Junior Wasps have gained confidence and great national pride through their experiences. “I feel very happy whenever I am on duty for my motherland,” says the team’s skipper Emery Bayisenge. “It is the love for our country and pride that drives us whenever we face opponents.” Bayisenge says when U-17 preparations began last year many Rwandans did not expect the team to reach quarterfinals, let

alone finals. “But as we started by beating giants like Burkina Fasso and Egypt, they were left in dismay and started to trust us. This also helped in boosting our morale as we also believed in ourselves,” Bayisenge says. He says the team has a strong desire to take their skills to a higher level in U-20 competitions beginning next year. “We did not perform poorly in the world cup. I would rather call it bad luck. Our game was impressive. We tried our best,” Bayisenge says. Rwanda’s national U-17 team manager Emery Kamanzi, says the Wasp’s representation of the post-genocide generation demonstrates young Rwandans’ determination to be part of the nationbuilding process. “All these players were born between 1994 and 1995. They have proven to be a beacon of success. As they get promoted to the next level, the search for young local talent continues. In the next lot, our target will be those born between 1996 and 1997,” Kamanzi says. In


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In RWANDAIR OPTS FOR KALE’S PASSENGER REVENUE ACCOUNTING SOLUTION Airline to use Revenue Accounting Solution to automate and increase efficiencies in existing revenue accounting processes RwandAir has selected Kale’s Passenger Revenue Accounting Solution for its revenue accounting operations. The solution will be deployed as a hosted model, giving the airline better control on costs and access to best practice data center capabilities.

execute their passenger revenue accounting requirements. We are confident that REVERA’s industry leading capabilities will bring immense value to RwandAir’s growth plans. REVERA has proven to be one of the best PRA solutions and we are positive of exceeding the expectations of all our customers,” said Ravi Chakravarty, Sales Head - EMEA & Asia Pacific, Kale Consultants Ltd.

Speaking on the occasion, John Mirenge, CEO RwandAir said, “RwandAir is on a growth path and we are steadily building our plans for the future. In this scenario, revenue accounting plays a criticalrole, from early recognition of revenue to feeding timely information to other systems internally. Kale’s REVERA is a globally recognized solution – and being able to access it as a hosted platform gives us best practice capabilities while reducing significant investments in hardware and maintenance costs. We look forward to a long and fruitful partnership with Kale.” “We are pleased that RwandAir has opted for REVERA, to

Today, the global airline industry is facing various challenges such as volatile market conditions, price sensitivity and low margins. In such a scenario, airlines need to adopt technology driven business processes to deter the growing industry challenges, optimize revenues and remain competitive. Kale’s passenger revenue accounting solution REVERA, helps airlines implement best industry practices to proactively adapt to the changing market conditions. It enables airlines to deal with the most complex revenue accounting environments and respond to the demands of internal customers, with speed and accuracy.

RUBAVU SET TO BECOME RWANDAIR’S SECOND DOMESTIC DESTINATION Rubavu-Gisenyi to be served with four frequencies per week beginning June 2, 2011 The domestic air travel scene in Rwanda is set for more connectivity with the announcement by the national carrier confirming scheduled flights to Rubavu bordering the DRC town of Goma. With a launch date firmly set for June 2, 2011, the four weekly frequencies will operate everyMonday, Tuesday, Friday & Sunday. In a press statement from RwandAir, CEO John Mirenge stated that Rubavu is a highly strategic domestic destination both for local and neighbouring regions’ travellers. “We planned for this destination on the basis of connectivity needs for travelers in that region. We believe Rubavu flights will make a valuable contribution to our network. The twenty-minuteflight makes a big difference for a traveler who otherwise has to spend half a day on the road ”, said Mr Mirenge. Rubavu-Gisenyi in the northwest of Kigali becomes the third destination this year for the national carrier coming closely on the heels of Brazzaville –Republic of Congo and the more recent Libreville - Gabon. The airline already operates daily flights to Kamembe southwest of Kigali with double daily flights every Tuesday and Saturday.


In


In RWANDAIR TO SERVE NAIROBI AND JOHANNESBURG WITH MORE FREQUENCIES

Nairobi to be served with 7am, 11am, 4pm and 8.45pm flights while Johannesburg gets a fourth weekly flight beginningJuly 1, 2011 RwandAir has announced plans to add extra frequencies on the Kigali – Nairobi giving its customers more choice on a route that has been primarilyserved with two daily frequencies. While maintaining the daily 7am and 4pm departures from Kigali to Nairobi, the airline has introduced 11am flights every Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Sunday and 8.45pm flights every Monday, Thursday and Saturday.

While announcing these developments on the schedule, RwandAir’s GM Commercial Alice Katiti also confirmed that the airline will be adding a fourth frequency to South Africa’s capital, Johannesburg. “Nairobi and Johannesburg are key hubs on the continent for travellers and we feel the need to give our guests more flexibility and options. We are experiencing increasing demands on both destinations hence our move to avail more seats. The recently launchedGisenyi will also be getting two more flights bringing it to six times weekly”, said Mrs. Katiti.

“The delivery of our Boeing 737- 800 this August could not have come at a better time for the airline since we are already experiencing capacity constraints on some routes like Kilimanjaro and Dar es Salaam whose operations have now been upgraded from CRJ to Boeing 737 – 500 due to increased loads. We are pleased to now offer a business class service on this route”, she added. Kilimanjaro and Dar es Salaam will be getting its fifth weekly frequency this August.


In

EX-IM BANK BOARD APPROVES $60 MILLION FINANCING FOR RWANDAIR’S BOEING 737-800 PURCHASE Funds to be disbursed through The Eastern and Southern African Trade & Development Bank (PTA Bank) The board of directors of the ExportImport Bank of the United States has approved financing towards the purchase of the national carrier’s new Boeing 737800 due for delivery this year. RwandAir, CEO John Mirenge confirmed that the airline is well on course with the financing and delivery process of the much-awaited new aircraft from Boeing Commercial Airplanes. “The news from Ex - Im Bank on financing of our aircraft

purchase is indeed a show of confidence in our carrier and growth plans”, said Mr Mirenge. He added that delivery of the first Boeing 737-800 aircraft wasslated for August 22, 2011. While commenting on the financing approval, Bank Chairman and President Fred P. Hochberg said, “The world is rebuilding its critical infrastructure, and these types of opportunities are available to U.S. companies in developing areas of the world. We are ready to finance American exporters to win thosesales and keep Americans working.”

Ex-Im Bank is an independent federal agency that helps create and maintain U.S. jobs by filling gaps in private export financing at no cost to American taxpayers. The Bank provides a variety of financing mechanisms, including working capital guarantees, exportcredit insurance, and financing to help foreign buyers purchase U.S. goods and services. PTA bank has been a reliable financing partner for RwandAir since the carrier announced its plans towards an owned fleet in 2009 with the purchase of two CRJ200 and also in making the predelivery payments towards the Boeing 737-800. The bank will be acting as a guarantor for the national carrier on the Ex – Im Bank transaction.


In

BLACK SWAN Director: Darren Aronofsky Cast: Natalie Portman, Mila Kunis, Vincent Black Swan takes a thrilling and at times terrifying journey through the psyche of a young ballerina whose starring role as the duplicitous swan queen turns out to be a part for which she becomes frighteningly perfect.


In MOVIES MOVIES

ENGLISH

FRANÇAIS

BIG MOMMAS: LIKE FATHER, LIKE SON

Big Mama : de père en fils

Big Momma is back, and this time he has big backup: his teenage stepson Trent. Martin Lawrence returns as FBI agent Malcolm Turner and as Turner’s deep-cover alter-ego Big Momma. Turner is joined by Trent, as they go undercover at a performing arts school after Trent witnesses a murder.

Big Mama revient et cette fois, il a le soutien de son beaufils Trent. Martin Lawrence revient sous les traits de l’agent du FBI Malcolm Turner, transformé en Big Mama. Turner et Trent s’infiltrent dans une école des arts du spectacle après que Trent ait été témoin d’un meurtre.

CEDAR RAPIDS

CEDAR RAPIDS

Tim is sent to represent his company at the annual insurance convention, but he is soon distracted by three convention veterans who will show him the ropes and push his boundaries. For a guy who plays everything by the book, this convention will be anything but conventional.

Tim représente sa société à une convention annuelle d’assureurs. Il est vite distrait par trois vétérans des conventions, qui lui montrent toutes les ficelles et poussent ses limites. Pour un gars qui respecte toujours les règles, cette convention sera tout sauf conventionnelle.

Director: John Whitesell Cast: Martin Lawrence, Brandon T. Jackson 107 Mins Comedy PG-13 2011

Director: Miguel Arteta Cast: Ed Helms, John C. Reilly, Anne Heche 84 Mins Comedy R 2011

Réalisateur : John Whitesell Avec : Martin Lawrence, Brandon T. Jackson 107 Mins Comédie PG-13 2011

Réalisateur : Miguel Arteta Avec : Ed Helms, John C. Reilly, Anne Heche 84 Mins Comedy R 2011


In MOVIES

ENGLISH

FRANÇAIS

BLACK SWAN

BLACK SWAN

Black Swan takes a thrilling and at times terrifying journey through the psyche of a young ballerina whose starring role as the duplicitous swan queen turns out to be a part for which she becomes frighteningly perfect.

Le cygne noir est un voyage fascinant, parfois terrifiant, dans le psychisme d’une jeune ballerine. Son rôle de la reine des cygnes fourbe la rend effroyablement parfaite.

LITTLE FOCKERS

MON BEAU-PÈRE ET NOUS

The test of wills between Jack Byrnes and Greg Focker escalates to new heights of comedy in the third instalment of the blockbuster series. It has taken 10 years, two little Fockers with wife Pam and countless hurdles for Greg to finally get “in” with his tightly wound father-in-law, Jack.

Le bras de fer entre Jack Byrnes et Greg Focker atteint un paroxysme comique dans ce troisième volet de la célèbre saga. Greg a dû attendre dix ans, faire deux petits Fockers avec sa femme Pam et surmonter d’innombrables obstacles pour être enfin « accepté » par Jack, son beau-père hyper stressé.

LOVE CRIME

CRIME D’AMOUR

Director: Darren Aronofsky Cast: Natalie Portman, Mila Kunis, Vincent Cassel 106 Mins Drama R 2010

Director: Paul Weitz Cast: Ben Stiller, Robert De Niro, Owen Wilson 95 Mins Comedy PG-13 2010

Director: Alain Corneau Cast: Ludivine Sagnier, Kristin Scott Thomas, Patrick Mille 110 Mins Thriller NR 2010 Isabelle works under Christine, but Christine takes credit for Isabelle’s ideas, and a struggle ensues between the women. Christine has the upper hand and no mercy, but feeling humiliated and nearly destroyed, Isabelle begins to plot her revenge.

Réalisateur : Darren Aronofsky Avec : Natalie Portman, Mila Kunis, Vincent Cassel 106 Mins Drame R 2010

Réalisateur : Paul Weitz Avec : Ben Stiller, Robert De Niro, Owen Wilson 95 Mins Comédie PG-13 2010

Réalisateur : Alain Corneau Avec : Ludivine Sagnier, Kristin Scott Thomas, Patrick Mille 110 Mins Thriller NR 2010 Isabelle travaille sous les ordres de Christine, qui s’approprie les idées d’Isabelle. Une lutte s’installe entre les deux femmes. Christine remporte la victoire, sans merci. Humiliée et quasiment détruite, Isabelle prépare sa vengeance.

BEAUTIFUL LIES

DE VRAIS MENSONGES

Director: Pierre Salvadori “Cast: Audrey Tautou, Nathalie Baye, Sami Bouajila“ 105 Mins Comedy NR 2010

Réalisateur : Pierre Salvadori Avec : Audrey Tautou, Nathalie Baye, Sami Bouajila 105 Mins Comédie NR 2010

Emily receives a love letter, beautiful, inspired but anonymous. She throws it in the trash first, before seeing a way to save her mother, sad and isolated since her husband’s departure.

Emilie reçoit une lettre d’amour, belle, inspirée mais anonyme. Elle la jette d’abord à la poubelle, avant d’y voir le moyen de sauver sa mère, isolée et triste depuis le départ de son mari.


In

MOVIES

ENGLISH

FRANÇAIS

SERVICE ENTRANCE

LES FEMMES DU 6E ÉTAGE

Director: Philippe Le Guay Cast: Fabrice Luchini, Sandrine Kiberlain, Natalia Verbeke 106 Mins Comedy NR 2010 Paris, 1960. Jean-Louis Jouber lives a peaceful yet boring bourgeois existence with his wife. The couple have their world turned upside down when exuberant Spanish maids move in their building’s sixth floor, the servant’s quarters.

Réalisateur : Philippe Le Guay Avec : Fabrice Luchini, Sandrine Kiberlain, Natalia Verbeke 106 Mins Comédie NR 2010 Paris, 1960. Jean-Louis Joubert mène une vie bourgeoise paisible mais ennuyeuse avec sa femme. La vie du couple est bouleversée lorsque des femmes de ménage espagnoles exubérantes aménagent au 6e étage de son immeuble.

ALL I EVER WANTED

ALL I EVER WANTED

All I Ever Wanted showcases the challenges faced by single parent families especially when it becomes absolutely necessary to find love again.

Ce film présente les défis auxquels se confrontent les familles monoparentales, surtout lorsqu’il devient absolument nécessaire de retrouver l’amour.

BE NOT AFRAID

BE NOT AFRAID

Director: Tchidi Chikere “Cast: Rita Dominic, Pat Attah, Tchidi Chikere“ 136 Mins Drama NR 2009

Réalisateur : Tchidi Chikere Avec : Rita Dominic, Pat Attah, Tchidi Chikere 136 Mins Drame NR 2009

A thief finds a bundle of surprise in a car he has stolen. This, in an unexpected way, draws him close to the woman he stole from.

Un voleur trouve une surprise dans une voiture qu’il a volée. Sans qu’il s’y attende, il est ainsi attiré vers la femme propriétaire du véhicule.

Director: Gabrile Okey Okonwo “Cast: Desmond Elliot, Mercy Johnson“ 87 Mins Drama NR 2009

Réalisateur : Gabrile Okey Okonwo Avec : Desmond Elliot, Mercy Johnson 87 Mins Drame NR 2009


In MOVIES

ENGLISH

FRANÇAIS

JERUSALEMA

JERUSALEMA

The rise of power of a self made millionaire from the slums of Sowetto, South Africa.

La montée au pouvoir d’un millionnaire qui s’est fait seul, depuis les bidonvilles de Soweto, en Afrique du Sud.

KNOCK OUT

KNOCK OUT

Knock Out is a fast-paced thriller that happens in real time. In just two hours- 11am to 1pm - an enigmatic vigilante pulls off an incredible, mind-blowing coup and a new chapter of Indian history is written.

Knock Out is a fast-paced thriller that happens in real time. In just two hours- 11am to 1pm - an enigmatic vigilante pulls off an incredible, mind-blowing coup and a new chapter of Indian history is written.

GOLMAAL 3

GOLMAAL 3

India’s first ever trilogy! Golmaal 3 highlights the story of hatred between two bunches of siblings within a family. This is a family that eats together, prays together, lives together and a family ‘that can’t stand each other’!

La toute première trilogie indienne ! Golmaal 3 raconte l’histoire de la haine entre deux groupes d’une fratrie. Les membres de cette famille partagent leurs repas, leurs prières, leur maison, mais ils se détestent !

13 ASSASSINS

13 ASSASSINS

Director: Takashi Miike “Cast: Kôji Yakusho, Takayuki Yamada, Yûsuke Iseya“ 141 Mins Drama NR 2010

Réalisateur : Takashi Miike Avec : Kôji Yakusho, Takayuki Yamada, Yûsuke Iseya 141 Mins Drame NR 2010

A group of 13 assassins band together for a secret suicide mission to remove an evil lord. Unfortunately, the assassins are severely outnumbered by the lord’s team of bodyguards.

13 assassins se regroupent pour une mission suicide secrète visant à éliminer un seigneur maléfique. Malheureusement, les samouraïs sont surpassés en nombre par les gardes du corps du seigneur.

“Director: Ralph Ziman “ “Cast: Rapulana Seiphimo, Jefferey Sekele, Ronnie Nyakale, Malusi Skenjana“ 118 Mins Drama NR 2008

Director: Mani Shankar “Cast: Sanjay Dutt , Irfan Khan & Kangna Ranaut“ 117 Mins Action NR 2010

Director: Rohit Shetty “Cast: Kareena Kapoor, Ajay Devgn, Mithun Chakraborty, Kunal Khemu, Tusshar Kapoor“ 117 Mins Comedy NR 2010

Réalisateur : Ralph Ziman Avec : Rapulana Seiphimo, Jefferey Sekele, Ronnie Nyakale, Malusi Skenjana 118 Mins Drame NR 2008

Director: Mani Shankar “Cast: Sanjay Dutt , Irfan Khan & Kangna Ranaut“ 117 Mins Action NR 2010

Réalisateur : Rohit Shetty Avec : Kareena Kapoor, Ajay Devgn, Mithun Chakraborty, Kunal Khemu, Tusshar Kapoor 117 Mins Comédie NR 2010


In


In TV SHOWS TV

ENGLISH

FRANÇAIS

GLEE

GLEE

Theatrically Cast: Optional 60 Mins Comedy Glee Club express themselves to the music of Lady Gaga. “Mr. Schuester encourages the Glee Club to express themselves using the music of Lady Gaga. Rachael has a life-changing encounter; and Tina embraces her inner Goth.

Complètement Gaga Avec : facultatif 60 Mins Comédie La chorale s’exprime sur la musique de Lady Gaga. M. Schuester encourage la chorale à s’exprimer sur la musique de Lady Gaga. Rachel fait une rencontre qui pourrait changer sa vie et Tina se laisse aller à son look gothique.

HD GETAWAYS “Mountain Gorilla Safari “ Cast: Optional 30 Mins Nature A look at the most intelligent primates on earth. Deep within the heart of the continent of Africa lies the last refuge for some of the most intelligent and impressive primates on earth - gorillas.

GORONGOSA: AFRICA’S LOST EDEN Cast: Optional 60 Mins Nature Discover why species of Mozambique were almost wiped out. Known as the place where Noah left his Ark, 4,000 square kilometres of floodplains in Mozambique, full of wild animals. But 15 years of civil war took a heavy toll - In this programme explore why many species were almost completely wiped out.

HD GETAWAYS Safari gorilles des montagnes Avec : facultatif 30 Mins Découvrez les primates les plus intelligents de la terre. Au cœur du continent africain se trouve le dernier refuge de certains des primates les plus intelligents et les plus impressionnants de la terre, les gorilles.

GORONGOSA: AFRICA’S LOST EDEN Avec : facultatif 60 Mins La quasi disparition d’espèces au Mozambique. Connu comme le lieu où Noé a laissé son arche, 4000 km² de plaines d’inondation au Mozambique, qui regorgent d’animaux sauvages. Mais 15 années de guerre civile ont été désastreuses. Cette émission explore pourquoi de nombreuses espèces ont pratiquement disparu.

TWO AND A HALF MEN

MON ONCLE CHARLIE

Charlie helps Mia with her music. Charlie bumps into Mia at the coffee shop and she asks Charlie to help her out with some music she has been working on. Charlie initially declines, but then Chelsea says that if he has no feelings for Mia, then he should have no problem helping her out.

Charlie aide Mia avec sa musique. Charlie rencontre Mia au café. Elle lui demande de l’aider avec de la musique. Charlie commence par refuser, mais Chelsea lui dit que s’il n’a pas de sentiments pour Mia, il ne devrait avoir aucun problème à l’aider.

Season 7, Episode 1: 818-JKLPUZO Cast: Optional 30 Mins Comedy

Saison 7, épisode 1 : 818-JKLPUZO Avec : facultatif 30 Mins Comédie


In TV

ENGLISH

FRANÇAIS

BONES

BONES

Booth returns to the FBI. Booth returns to the FBI after being certified by Dr. Sweets and wonders if his feelings for Brennan are real or if they are just the effects from his brain surgery.

Booth returns to the FBI. Booth returns to the FBI after being certified by Dr. Sweets and wonders if his feelings for Brennan are real or if they are just the effects from his brain surgery.

CSI NEW YORK

LES EXPERTS : MANHATTAN

Enough Cast: Optional 60 Mins Drama

La règle de trois Avec : facultatif 60 Mins Drame

Three drug dealers set to stand trial are found dead. Three drug dealers set to stand trial are found dead in separate places. They were all trying to get rid of witnesses in their crime, but it looks like someone got to them first.

3 trafiquants de drogue sont retrouvés morts. Trois trafiquants de drogue devant passer en jugement sont retrouvés morts dans des lieux différents. Tous essayaient de se débarrasser des témoins de leur crime, mais il semble que quelqu’un ait eu leur peau avant.

HARBINGERS IN THE FOUNTAIN Cast: Optional 43 Drama

Harbingers In The Fountain Cast: Optional 43 Drama


In TV

ENGLISH

FRANÇAIS

THE RICHES

THE RICHES

Hugh offers a deal that may be too tempting to pass up. With their fabricated lives at risk in Eden Falls, Dahlia and the kids hit the road; Wayne stays behind to handle the Pete situation; and Hugh offers a deal that may be too tempting to pass up.

Hugh propose un marché trop alléchant pour être refusé. En danger en raison de leur vie usurpée à Eden Falls, Dahlia et les enfants prennent la route. Wayne reste pour gérer la problématique de Pete. Hugh propose un marché trop alléchant pour être refusé.

HOW I MET YOUR MOTHER

HOW I MET YOUR MOTHER

The Last Temptation Of Wayne Cast: Optional 60 Mins Drama

Robin 101 Cast: Optional 30 Mins Comedy Robin fears that Barney is cheating on her. Robin fears that Barney is cheating on her, but discovers that he is spending his evenings with Ted learning everything there is to know on how to date her.

La dernière tentation de Wayne Avec : facultatif 60 Mins Drame

Robin 101 Avec : facultatif 30 Mins Comédie Robin craint que Barney lui soit infidèle. Robin craint que Barney lui soit infidèle, mais découvre qu’il passe ses soirées avec Ted pour tout savoir sur elle.

SUBURBAN BLISS

SUBURBAN BLISS

A favourite with South African viewers about families. This is a favourite sitcom with South African audiences, as it puts in the spotlight the rocky relationship between a black and a white family.

La série préférée des Sud-Africains sur la famille. La comédie préférée du public sud-africain, qui met les projecteurs sur les relations houleuses au sein d’une famille mixte.

JOZI-H

JOZI-H

Smile Cast: Optional 45 Drama New drama set in Johannesburg’s trauma department. “Ancient customs and modern cutting edge medicine square up for a head-on collision in this enthralling drama, set in Johannesburg’s world renowned trauma department. “

Smile Avec : facultatif 45 Drame L’action a lieu au service de traumato de Johannesburg. Les coutumes anciennes et la médecine moderne à la pointe de la technique s’affrontent dans ce drame passionnant, qui se déroule dans le service de traumatologie renommé de Johannesburg.

Episode 70 Cast: Optional 26 Mins Comedy

Episode 70 Avec : facultatif 26 Mins Comédie


In


In EASY LISTENING

CONTEMPORARY

The capital of Republic of the Congo, not to be confused with neighbouring Democratic Republic of the Congo. River and the country stretches all.

The capital of Republic of the Congo, not to be confused with neighbouring Democratic atlantic coastline.

TRACK TITLE

ARTIST NAME

TIME

TRACK TITLE

ARTIST NAME

TIME

Slow

Rumer

3:32:00 AM

I'll Stay

James Blake

3:49:00 AM

Saade ("I'm Happy")

Radouane Laktib & Said Hakmoun

3:20:00 AM

Racubah

Ice

3:24:00 AM

Jambo Buana

Bawa Abudu

4:33:00 AM

Lady Luck

Jamie Woon

4:08:00 AM

Lights Out

Jojo Quo & His Challengers

3:26:00 AM

Lovin' Arms

Etta James

3:48:00 AM

I Left My Heart In San Francisco (Single Version)

Tony Bennett

2:49:00 AM

I'm Yours / Somewhere Over the Rainbow

Straight No Chaser

3:33:00 AM

End of May

Michael Bublé

3:53:00 AM

The Highwayman (feat. Mark Knopfler)

Jimmy Webb

4:17:00 AM Natural Juice (Ashanti Mix)

Fanga

4:21:00 AM

2:33:00 AM

Nairobi

Mombasa

7:29:00 AM

Barbra Streisand

3:51:00 AM

Helplessness Blues

Fleet Foxes

5:03:00 AM

What a Difference a Day Makes

Rod Stewart

3:21:00 AM

In Triple Time

Biosphere

5:50:00 AM

The Tide Pulls from the Moon

William Fitzsimmons

3:39:00 AM

Before I'm Done

Toro y Moi

2:42:00 AM

Tusk

6 Day Riot

3:33:00 AM

Killing Me Softly With His Song (Remastered)

Roberta Flack

4:47:00 AM

Odeiyolaoo

Ray Stephen Oche

3:46:00 AM 2:55:00 AM

Lucinda Williams

4:37:00 AM

...And the World Laughs With You (feat. Thom Yorke)

Flying Lotus

Born to Be Loved

She Just Likes to Fight

Four Tet

4:34:00 AM

Stardust (Remastered)

Matt Monro

2:24:00 AM

Matches

5:16:00 AM

Thou Art Loosed

Josh T. Pearson

3:14:00 AM

Afrodelic Stegosaurchestra

Sleepless

Jessica Lea Mayfield

3:32:00 AM

Stop and Stare

Fenech-Soler

4:06:00 AM

Crache La Douleur

Fanga

5:05:00 AM

Closest Thing to Crazy

Elaine Paige & LeAnn Rimes

4:10:00 AM

Everything Turned Upside Down

Thousands

4:03:00 AM

Wonderwall

Ryan Adams

4:11:00 AM

Nèstanèt

Akalé Wubé

4:41:00 AM

Heartbeats

José González

2:44:00 AM

Ain't No Sunshine (Single Version)

Bill Withers

2:05:00 AM

Moondance

Michael Bublé

4:14:00 AM

What a Wonderful World

Louis Armstrong

2:20:00 AM

Lovestain

Jose Gonzalez

2:17:00 AM

You Are the Sunshine of My Life

Stevie Wonder

2:58:00 AM

(They Long to Be) Close to You

Carpenters

3:41:00 AM

You're Gonna Make Me Lonesome When You Go

Madeleine Peyroux

3:28:00 AM

Over the Rainbow

Melody Gardot

4:35:00 AM

Just In Time (featuring Dave Koz) Woman In Love


In WORLD GENRE The capital of Republic of the Congo, not to be confused with neighbouring Democratic Republic of the Congo. River and the country stretches all. TRACK TITLE

ARTIST NAME

TIME

Sahara blues

Majid Bekkas

7:17:00 AM

Falsehood

Vijay Iyer, Prasanna & Nitin Mitta

6:38:00 AM

Lágrimas Mexicanas

Vinicius Cantuaria & Bill Frisell

4:35:00 AM

Zu schnell vorbei

Clueso

5:28:00 AM

INTERNATIONAL HITS

Diablo Rojo

Rodrigo y Gabriela

4:56:00 AM

Schiffsverkehr

3:57:00 AM

The capital of Republic of the Congo, not to be confused with neighbouring Democratic Republic of the Congo. River and the country stretches all.

Herbert Grönemeyer

Me Voy

Julieta Venegas

3:07:00 AM

Ben Ağlarken

Emel Sayin & Burhan Öçal

3:57:00 AM

TRACK TITLE

ARTIST NAME

TIME

Pumbeeri

Foji

3:55:00 AM

I'll Stay

James Blake

3:49:00 AM

4:04:00 AM

Radouane Laktib & Said Hakmoun

3:20:00 AM

Al mercato della fiera di lisbona (feat. Patrizia Laquidara, Hotel Rif)

Andrea Casaccio

Saade ("I'm Happy") Racubah

Ice

3:24:00 AM

Muzina

7:43:00 AM

Jambo Buana

Bawa Abudu

4:33:00 AM

Tabu Ley Rochereau

Lady Luck

Jamie Woon

4:08:00 AM

Taken By a Stranger (Single Version)

Lena

3:23:00 AM

Lights Out

Jojo Quo & His Challengers

3:26:00 AM

Laru Beya

Aurelio

3:25:00 AM

Dimokansa

Mayra Andrade

4:33:00 AM

Natural Juice (Ashanti Mix)

Fanga

4:21:00 AM

We Want Peace

Emmanuel Jal

3:54:00 AM

Nairobi

Mombasa

7:29:00 AM

Pelas Sombras (Live)

Arthur Verocai

2:45:00 AM

Helplessness Blues

Fleet Foxes

5:03:00 AM

Mere Munde Nu

Sukshinder Shinda

5:31:00 AM

In Triple Time

Biosphere

5:50:00 AM

Noche Cubana

Omara Portuondo

3:29:00 AM

Before I'm Done

Toro y Moi

2:42:00 AM

Hello

Yannick Noah

3:26:00 AM

Tusk

6 Day Riot

3:33:00 AM

Ni Aaja Teray

DJ Sanj & Raj Brar

4:07:00 AM

Odeiyolaoo

Ray Stephen Oche

3:46:00 AM

...And the World Laughs With You (feat. Thom Yorke)

Flying Lotus

2:55:00 AM

She Just Likes to Fight

Four Tet

4:34:00 AM

Matches

Afrodelic Stegosaurchestra

5:16:00 AM

Stop and Stare

Fenech-Soler

4:06:00 AM

Crache La Douleur

Fanga

5:05:00 AM

Everything Turned Upside Down

Thousands

4:03:00 AM

Nèstanèt

Akalé Wubé

4:41:00 AM


In OLDIES

CLASSICAL AND OPERA

The capital of Republic of the Congo, not to be confused with neighbouring Democratic Republic of the Congo. River and the country stretches all.

The capital of Republic of the Congo, not to be confused with neighbouring Democratic Republic of the Congo. River and the country stretches all.

TRACK TITLE

ARTIST NAME

TIME

TRACK TITLE

ARTIST NAME

TIME

I Say a Little Prayer

Aretha Franklin

3:34:00 AM

Indaco

Ludovico Einaudi

7:27:00 AM

For Once in My Life

Stevie Wonder

2:48:00 AM

Lakmé: Viens, Mallika, ... Dôme Épais (Flower Duet)

5:09:00 AM

African Waltz

Cannonball Adderley

2:11:00 AM

Zimpi Zombango

Madala Kunene & Syd Kitchen

5:10:00 AM

Dame Joan Sutherland, Jane Berbié, Orchestre national de l'Opéra de Monte-Carlo & Richard Bonynge

3:31:00 AM

Mungo Jerry

3:31:00 AM

Symphony No. 2 in D Major, Op. 36: III. Scherzo - Allegro

Daniel Barenboim

In the Summertime Mr. Blue Sky

Electric Light Orchestra

5:03:00 AM

Adrian Leaper

9:41:00 AM

Paquita

African Fiesta & Tabu Ley Rochereau

4:30:00 AM

Symphony No. 5 In C-Sharp Minor: IV. Adagietto. Sehr Langsam - Attacca Madame Butterfly, Act I: “Dovunque al Mondo”

3:57:00 AM

I Only Have Eyes for You

Art Garfunkel

3:36:00 AM

Make It With You

Bread

3:15:00 AM

Love of the Common People

Nicky Thomas

2:17:00 AM

U.S. Male

Elvis Presley

2:42:00 AM

Bye Bye Baby

Bay City Rollers

2:46:00 AM

How Does It Feel

Slade

5:55:00 AM

Andrea Bocelli, Carla Maria Izzo, Mariella Guarnera, Marzio Giossi, Antonio De Angelis, Antonio Taschini, Coro del Festival Puccini, Bruno Nicoli, Orchestra Città Lirica & Alberto Veronesi

Down Down (Single Edit)

Status Quo

3:51:00 AM

Bob Dylan

5:40:00 AM

Berliner Philharmoniker & Lorin Maazel

4:29:00 AM

Tangled Up In Blue

Capriccio Espagnol, Op. 34: IV. Scena e canto gitano

Amagwala

Baba Mokoena Serakoeng & Madala Kunene

6:17:00 AM

Concerto for Violin, Strings and Continuo in Bb Major, Op. 3, No. 7: II. Largo

Mela Tenenbaum, Pro Musica Prague & Richard Kapp

5:09:00 AM

4:11:00 AM

La Bohème, Act 1: "Che gelida manina"

Rolando Villazón, Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks & Bertrand De Billy

4:40:00 AM

Suite for Solo Cello No. 4 in E-Flat Major, BWV 1010: IV. Sarabande

Yo-Yo Ma

5:03:00 AM

La Forza Del Destino: Solenne in Quest'ora

Ettore Bastianini, Francesco MolinariPradelli, Mario del Monaco & Orchestra dell'Accademia di Santa Cecilia

4:14:00 AM

Liebesträume (Dream of Love) No. 3 in A Flat Major

Peter Szokolay

3:48:00 AM

Livin On a Prayer Don't You Want Me

The Human League

3:59:00 AM

Mickey

Toni Basil

4:13:00 AM

Jump

Van Halen

4:02:00 AM

Baggy Trousers

Madness

2:49:00 AM

Weex Bet

Fallou Dieng & Le DLC

5:03:00 AM


In RADIO SKY The capital of Republic of the Congo, not to be confused with neighbouring Democratic Republic of the Congo. River and the country stretches all.

Swan Lake - Ballet Suite Op. 20: Scene Adagio in G Minor

Riccardo Muti & Philadelphia Orchestra Ilmar Lapinsch & Latvian Philharmonic Chamber Orchestra

3:15:00 AM

7:49:00 AM

TRACK TITLE

ARTIST NAME

TIME

Me Voy

Julieta Venegas

3:07:00

Laru Beya

Aurelia

3:25:00

Hello

Yannick Noah

3:26:00

End of May

Michael Bublé

3:53:00

Over the Rainbow

Melody Gardot

4:35:00

The Tide Pulls from the Moon

William Fitzsimmons

3:39:00

Nairobi

Mombasa

7:29:00

Nèstanèt

Akalé Wubé

4:41:00 AM

Jambo Buana

Bawa Abudu

4:33:00 AM

Bright Lights Bigger City

Cee-lo Green

3:38:00 AM

Excuse Me Sister

2Face Idibia

4:20:00 AM

Black and Yellow

Wiz Khalifa

3:37:00 AM

I Say a Little Prayer

Aretha Franklin

3:34:00 AM

In the Summertime

Mungo Jerry

3:31:00 AM

Livin On a Prayer

Bon Jovi

4:11:00 AM

Mickey

Toni Basil

4:13:00 AM

Air For The G String

London Symphony Orchestra

4:14:00 AM

Djougouya Magni

Lobi Traoré

4:11:00 AM

Arabesque No. 1

Daniel Pollack

4:40:00 AM

In Triple Time

Biosphere

5:50:00 AM

The Armed Man - A Mass for Peace: X. Agnus Dei

Karl Jenkins, London Philharmonic Orchestra, Mike Brewer & National Youth Choir of Great Britain

3:39:00 AM

Lovin' Arms

Etta James

3:48:00 AM

Noche Cubana

Omar Portuondo

3:29:00 AM

Baggy Trousers

Madness

2:49:00 AM

Weex Bet

Fallou Dieng & Le DLC

5:03:00 AM

Bagatelle in A minor, WoO 59, "Fur Elise"

Jenö Jandó

3:28:00 AM

The Banks of Green Willow

English String Orchestra & William Boughton

5:58:00 AM

Mickey

Toni Basil

4:13:00 AM

Jump

Van Halen

4:02:00 AM

Baggy Trousers

Madness

2:49:00 AM

Weex Bet

Fallou Dieng & Le DLC

5:03:00 AM


In

ENTEBBE

LIBREVILLE

BRAZZAVILLE

Just 40km from Uganda’s capital, Kampala, Entebbe’s position on the shores of Lake Victoria makes it a popular destination in its own right.

Libreville is the capital and largest city of Gabon. The city is a port on the Komo River, near the Gulf of Guinea, and a trade centre for a timber region. Its population is less than 1 million. Libreville features a tropical monsoon climate with a lengthy wet season and a short dry season. Libreville’s wet season spans about nine months, with a heavy amount of rain falling during these months.

The capital of Republic of the Congo, not to be confused with neighbouring Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Entebbe has hotels with spectacular lake views, restaurants, bars and colourful markets - what more could you need? Kigali

Entebbe

Days

Depart

Arrive

Flight No.

Daily

20:30

22:20

WB 105

Fri, Sun

13:00

15:00

WB205

Sat

8:10

10:00

WB 205

Mon

10:00

11:45

*WB 351

Tue, Wed

12:15

14:00

*WB 351

Thur

10:15

12:00

Tue

15:00

Entebbe

Kigali

Libreville

Brazzaville is located on the Congo River and the country stretches all the way to a small Atlantic coastline. The country is home to over 100,000 Western Lowland Gorillas and also home to the Livingstone Falls. Kigali

Brazzaville

Days

Depart

Arrive

Flight No.

Days

Depart

Arrive

Flight No.

Tue, Fri

1:30

3:50

WB 213

Tue, Fri

1:30

6:30

WB 213

Sat

11:00

14:50

WB 214

Sat

11:00

12:30

WB 214

Libreville

Brazzaville

Kigali

Kigali

Days

Depart

Arrive

Flight No.

Days

Depart

Arrive

Flight No.

*WB 351

Tue, Fri

4:50

11:00

WB 213

Tue, Fri

7:30

11:00

WB 213

16:45

*WB 351

Sat

15:30

19:50

WB 214

Sat

13:10

19:50

WB 214

Kigali

Days

Depart

Arrive

Flight No.

Daily

23:05

22:55

WB 106

Fri, Sun

15:30

15:30

WB 206

Sat

10:30

10:20

WB 206

Mon

9:30

9:15

*WB 350

Tue, Wed

12:00

11:45

*WB 350

Thur

9:55

9:40

*WB 350

Tue

14:30

14:15

*WB 350


In

DUBAI

MOMBASA

JOHANNESBURG


In

JOHANNESBURG

BUJUMBURA

NAIROBI

Five hours from Kigali, Johannesburg is a long way, but it’s worth it! All you could desire - at your fingertips...

Bujumbura is the capital of Burundi. The city is located on the shores of Lake Tanganyika, about one day’s drive north of Ujiji.

A scenic day’s drive from the Masai Mara National Park, Nairobi is a bustling city teeming with life.

Nearby attractions include The Johannesburg Lions Park, situated about 45 minutes away from Johannesburg a must see for all ages. Kigali

Johannesburg

Days

Depart

Arrive

Flight No.

Mon, Wed, Thur, Sat

11:00

15:00

WB 113

Johannesburg

Kigali

Bujumbura

Days

Depart

Arrive

Flight No.

Mon, Wed, Thur, Fri, Sun

07:00

07:35

WB 209

Tue,Sat

11:00

Bujumbura Kigali

Days

Depart

Arrive

Flight No.

Mon, Wed, Thur, Sat

15:45

19:45

WB 113

11:35

WB 209

Kigali

Days

Depart

Arrive

Flight No.

Mon, Wed, Thur, Fri, Sat

20:35

21:05

WB 109

Tue,Sun

17:30

18:05

WB 109

Modern hotels, outstanding restaurants and top-notch shops combined with traditional markets and world-class safaris. Kigali

Nairobi

Days

Depart

Arrive

Flight No.

Mon,Tue, Wed,Thu, Sat,Sun

06:50

09:05

WB 107

Tue, Wed, Fri & Sun

11:00

13:15

WB 207

Daily

16:00

18:15

WB 117

Mon,Thur, Sat

20:45

23:00

WB 317

Nairobi

LIBREVILLE

Kigali

Days

Depart

Arrive

Flight No.

Mon,Tue, Wed,Thu, Sat,Sun

10:00

10:15

WB 108

Tue, Wed, Fri & Sun

14:00

14:15

WB 208

Daily

19:00

19:15

WB 118

Mon,Thur, Sat

23:45

0:00

WB 318


In

KAMEMBE

KILIMANJARO

Kamembe is the industrial and transport heart of Cyangugu, Rwanda.

The gateway to Tanzania’s incredible wildlife heritage, Kilimanjaro International Airport serves the cities of Arusha and Moshi, and the international tourism industry based on Mount Kilimanjaro, Arusha National Park, Ngorongoro Crater, and Serengeti National Park.

It is situated near Lake Kivu on the western side of Rwanda. Its location makes it an ideal starting point for tourism in Nyungwe Forest. Kigali

Kamembe

Days

Depart

Arrive

Flight No.

Days

Depart

Arrive

Flight No.

Daily

06:55

07:30

WB 115

11:30

14:00

WB 103

Tue, Sat

13:30

14:00

WB 215

Mon, Wed, Sun Friday

12:00

14:30

WB 103

Kamembe Days Daily Tue, Sat

Kigali

GISENYI

Kigali Depart 08:00 14:30

Arrive 08:35 15:00

Flight No.

Kilimanjaro

Kilimanjaro

Kigali

WB 114

Days

Depart

Arrive

Flight No.

WB 216

Mon, Wed, Sun

16:30

17:35

WB 103

Friday

17:00

18:05

WB 103

Gisenyi is a city in Rubavu district in the Western Province of Rwanda. Gisenyi is contiguous with Goma, the city across the border in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The population of the city is about 100 thousand. Kigali

Gisenyi

Days

Depart

Arrive

Flight No.

Mon, Tue, Wed, Fri, Sat, Sun

9:00

9:30

WB 217

Gisenyi

Kigali

Days

Depart

Arrive

Flight No.

Mon, Tue, Wed, Fri, Sat, Sun

9:55

10:25

WB 217


In

DUBAI

MOMBASA

DAR ES SALAAM

Dubai is one of the seven emirates of the United Arab Emirates (UAE). It is located south of the Persian Gulf on the Arabian Peninsula and has the largest population with the second-largest land territory by area of all the emirates, after Abu Dhabi.

Mombasa is the second-largest city in Kenya. Lying next to the Indian Ocean, it has a major port. The city also serves as the centre of the coastal tourism industry.

formerly Mzizima, it is the largest city in Tanzania. It is also the country’s richest city and a regionally important economic centre. Dar es Salaam is actually an administrative province within Tanzania, and consists of three local government areas or administrative districts

Mombasa Days

Depart

Tue, Fri, Sun Dubai

Dubai 16:05

Kigali Arrive 22:45

Flight No. WB 211

Mombasa

Mombasa

Days

Depart

Arrive

Flight No.

Tue, Fri, Sun

12:45

15:30

WB 211

Mombasa

Kigali

Days

Depart

Arrive

Flight No.

Days

Depart

Arrive

Flight No.

Tue, Fri, Sun

0:00

4:40

WB 212

Tue, Fri, Sun

5:15

6:00

WB 212

DAR ES SALAAM

Kigali

Bujumbura

Days

Depart

Arrive

Flight No.

Tue, Fri

1:30

6:30

WB 213

Sat

11:00

12:30

WB 214

Bujumbura

Kigali

Days

Depart

Arrive

Flight No.

Tue, Fri

1:30

6:30

WB 213

Sat

11:00

12:30

WB 214


In

ENTEBBE

KIGALI

JOHANNESBURG


In

ADDIS ABABA

BRUSSELS

Addis Ababa is the capital city of Ethiopia. In Amharic, a language of Ethiopia, Addis Ababa means ‘new flower’. It’s the largest city in Ethiopia, with a population of over 3 million. The African Union is based in Ethiopia and therefore, Addis Ababa is often referred to as the political capital of Africa.

Brussels, is the de facto capital of Belgium and of the European Union. It is also the largest city in Belgium. Since the end of World War II it has been the main center of international politics.

Kigali

Addis Ababa

Days

Depart

Arrive

Flight No.

Mon, Wed, Sun

15:00

19:30

WB 810

Tue, Thur Fri, Sat

15:45

19:15

WB 806

Addis Ababa

Kigali

Brussels

Days

Depart

Arrive

Flight No.

Tue, Thus, Sat

19:55

05:45

WB 2465

Fri

19:55

06:30

WB 2463

Brussels

Kigali

Days

Depart

Arrive

Flight No.

Mon, Wed, Sun

10:50

13:35

WB 811

Tue, Thur Fri, Sat

10:45

12:15

WB 807

MOMBASA

Kigali

Days

Depart

Arrive

Flight No.

Tue, Thus, Sat

10:30

18:50

WB 1465

Fri

10:30

18:50

WB 1463


In


In ENSURING YOUR SAFE FLIGHT TO & FROM THE HEART OF AFRICA FLIGHT INFO SAFETY: Your safety and comfort are important to us. Please watch the demonstration or the video of the emergency equipment before takeoff. For more information refer to the safety leaflet in the seat pocket in front of you. TAKE-OFF: Immediately after takeoff the aircraft climbs very steeply. Shortly

CONTACT US KIGALI HEAD-OFFICE Kigali International Airport, Main Building (top floor) Tel. (+250) 252 503687 Fax. (+250) 252 503686 KIGALI HEAD SALES OFFICE Ground Floor, UTC Mall. P.O. Box 7275, Kigali Tel. (+250) 252 503691 (+250) 252 575757 Email: reservations@rwandair.com KIGALI AIRPORT SALES Kigali International Airport Tel. (+250) 782 154018 Email: reservations@rwandair.com KAMEMBE Airport Building, Kamembe Town Tel. (+250) 788 615466 / 788 856515 Email: sales.dar@rwandair.com DUBAI OFFICES Office no. 29, Mezzanine floor, Al Rais Shopping Centre Tel. (+97) 143 555 014 / 143 555 013 Email: sales.dubai@rwandair.com

afterwards you will hear a reduction in the engine sound, but the aircraft will continue to climb. All aircraft cabins are pressurized. Due to change in pressure during takeoff and landing, some passengers may experience slight discomfort in the ear. Relieve this by swallowing, yawning or pinching the nostrils gently and breathing out whilst keeping lips sealed. Should you feel unwell at any time, please ask the cabin crew for assistance.

LANDING: After touch down, you may notice an increase in engine noise level due to the reverse thrust being applied to assist braking. Please remain seated until the engines have been switched off and the doors are opened. Before leaving the aircraft, ensure you have all your belongings with you. Always keep your belt fastened until the plane comes to a complete stop.

ARUSHA Plot 15-A area T, Swahili St., Tropicana Shop Center (1st floor) Tel. (+255) 732 978558 Fax. (+255) 732 978501 Email: sales.tz@rwandair.com

NAIROBI International Life House Mezzanine 1, Mama Ngina St. Tel. (+254) 20 343870 (+254) 22 20918 Fax. (+254) 20 343871 Email: sales.nairobi@rwandair.com

JOHANNESBURG O.R. Tambo International Airport Terminal B, 1st floor Tel. (+27) 11 390 2456 Fax (+27) 11 390 2457 Email: sales.johannesburg@rwandair. com BRAZZAVILLE Miles Travel - Mairie Centrale 64, Rue Sergeant Malamine, Face Station Ex OilCongo Tel. (+242) 069 432525 / 069 532525 Email: sales.brazzaville@rwandair.com DAR ES SALAAM Reliance House, 1st floor United Nations Road, Upanga Tel. (+255) 222 122402 Fax. (+255) 222 122303 email: sales.dar@rwandair.com MOMBASA Moi Int. Airport, P.O. Box 94662-80115 Tel. (+254) 736 99 9931 Email: sales.mombasa@rwandair.com

LIBREVILLE La Mondia 769, Avenue Colonel, Parant BP 769 Libreville Tel. (+241) 740 511 (+241) 740 512 Fax (+241) 740 513 Email: lamondiagsa1.dg@gmail.com BUJUMBURA 40, Av. du Commerce Next to Air Burundi Offices Tel. (+257) 222 51850 (+257) 222 51849 Fax. (+257) 222 54266 Email: sales.bujumbura@rwandair.com KAMPALA Rwenzori Courts, Gr. floor Lumumba Avenue Tel. (+256) 414 344851/2 Fax (+256) 414 34485 Email: sales.kampala@rwandair.com


In HAND LUGGAGE: In addition to a handbag or small camera, one piece of hand baggage per person may be taken on board. It must weigh less than 7kg and be no larger than 56cm x 35cm x 20cm. Excess hand baggage will be placed in the hold. Place hand luggage in the overhead storage or beneath the seat in front of you. The cabin crew will remove hand luggage from passengers seated in exit rows for take-off and landing. Large wooden artifacts and carvings will be placed in the hold. Passengers are responsible for ensuring that these items are suitably packaged.

i

EXCESS BAGGAGE: Any items over your free checked allowance will be charged as excess baggage and is paid for at the airport. Please make sure you arrive at check in at least 20 minutes earlier than the recommended check in time when travelling with excess baggage.

i

PLEASE NOTE: Checked baggage allowances on code share partners may differ. Charges may apply. EXCESS BAGGAGE RATES: All baggage in excess of free checked baggage allowances is charged at a fixed fee depending on the route you are travelling to or from Kigali. ROUTE KIGALI (TO AND FROM)

EXCESS BAGGAGE CHARGE

Nairobi

$3 per kg

Entebbe

$2 per kg

Johannesburg

$8 per kg

Bujumbura

$2 per kg

Kilimanjaro

$2 per kg

Kamembe

$1 per kg

Libreville

i

$7 per kg

Brazzaville

$6 per kg

Dar es Salaam

$3 per kg

Mombassa

$3 per kg

Gisenyi

$1 per kg

SEATING: The position of your seat can be adjusted by pressing the button located at the arm rest. For take-off and landing, all seats must be in the upright position. ELECTRONIC DEVICES: Electronic Devices may not be used during taxiing, take-off, climbing, descent and landing. This includes laptop computers, remote-controlled games, radios, portable TVs and mobile phones, all of which may interfere with the safe operation of the aircraft.

i

IN-FLIGHT INFO: Passengers on regional and international flights are looked after by qualified cabin staff. Do not hesitate to ask them for assistance.

i

MEALS: A hot meal will normally be serviced during long-haul flights. A healthy snack is served on regional flights. REST ROOMS: Toilets are fully equipped with soap, towels and cleansing pads. Please note that all toilets are fitted with smoke detectors we therefore ask that you refrain from smoking in the toilets. ALL RWANDAIR FLIGHTS ARE NONSMOKING. IF FOUND SMOKING ON BOARD YOU MAY BE PROSECUTED.


In BOMBARDIER DASH-8 100 SERIES

SEATING CAPACITY

37 SINGLE CABIN

CARGO CAPACITY

N/A

OVERALL LENGTH

22.25M

WINGSPAN

25.89M

OVERALL HEIGHT

7.49M

CABIN WIDTH/HEIGHT

2.51M/-

MAX. TAKEOFF WEIGHT

36,300LB

CRUISING SPEED / MAX. SPEED

-/310mph

BOMBARDIER CRJ-200

BOEING 737-500

SEATING CAPACITY

12 BUSINESS CLASS, 80 ECONOMY CLASS

CARGO CAPACITY

23.3M3

OVERALL LENGTH

31.1M

WINGSPAN

28.9M

OVERALL HEIGHT

11.1M

CABIN WIDTH/HEIGHT

3.54M/2.20M

MAX. TAKEOFF WEIGHT

133,210LB

CRUISING SPEED / MAX. SPEED

MACH 0.74 / MACH 0.82

BOEING 737-800

SEATING CAPACITY

50 SINGLE CABIN

CARGO CAPACITY

N/A

OVERALL LENGTH

26.77M

WINGSPAN

21.2M

OVERALL HEIGHT

6.22M

CABIN WIDTH/HEIGHT

2.18M/1.85M

MAX. TAKEOFF WEIGHT

53,000LB

CRUISING SPEED / MAX. SPEED

MACH 0.71 / MACH 0.81

SEATING CAPACITY

16 Business Class 138 Economy Class

CARGO CAPACITY

21.4 - 52.0M3

OVERALL LENGTH

39.5m

WINGSPAN

34.3m

OVERALL HEIGHT

12.5m

CABIN WIDTH/HEIGHT

3.54m/-

MAX. TAKEOFF WEIGHT

155,500lb

CRUISING SPEED / MAX. SPEED

809.5kph / -


In


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Inzozi magazine - August - October Edition