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ELAINE K. O’MARA design portfolio


RESUME EDUCATION 2012: b.s. architectural studies, university of illinois at urbana - champaign 2014: summer semester study abroad at technische universit채t m체nchen 2014: m.arch (preservation option), university of illinois at urbana - champaign PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE aug 2012 - may 2014: teaching assistant, university of illinois at urbana - champaign aug 2012 - may 2014: computer lab technician, university of illinois at urbana - champaign jun - aug 2009: design intern, mcdonald's corporation of canada AWARDS AND PUBLICATIONS 2014: graduate winner of the natalie alpert prize for outstanding writing in landscape history 2012: published in "montage arts journal," spring edition 2010: published in "the illini independent editorial journal," fall edition 2009: published in "montage arts journal," fall edition LEADERSHIP alpha rho chi fraternity for architecture and the allied arts 2011: president (fall semester) 2011: corresponding secretary (spring semester) 2011: assistant house manager (spring semester) 2011: formal superintendant (fall and spring semesters) 2011: formal superintendant (spring semester)


CONTENTS KICKAPOO STATE PARK VISITOR'S CENTER, oakwood il fall 2010

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MIXED - USE APARTMENT COMPLEX, chicago il spring 2011

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ENERGY SCIENCES LABORATORY, argonne il summer 2011

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CRYSTAL LAKE PARK CHILDREN'S MUSEUM, urbana il fall 2012

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STADT MÜNCHEN GLASPALAST, munich de summer 2013

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ADDITION TO THE G. MATSUMOTO RESIDENCE, urbana il fall 2013

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KICKAPOO STATE PARK VISITOR’S oakwood il, undergraduate studio fall 2010 CENTER


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having once been a strip mine, kickapoo state park is a landscape with exceptional qualities of terrain and vegetation. the new visitor's center required a design no less distinctive than its surroundings. the visitor’s center will act as a monument to the regeneration of the landscape, both a celebration of new growth and a reminder of its violent past. the building incorporates an auditorium, classroom spaces, conference rooms and an educational walkthrough documenting the history of the park before, during and after it was used as a mine. the new visitor’s center is situated on a sharp drop-off on the northeastern edge of clear lake, located roughly in the center of the park. the dramatic difference in elevation allows for a deeper building, using less land and emphasizing the message of non-invasive practices in land use. the park’s history, both geologically and of its use, was a major consideration in the development of the form of the new visitor’s center. formally, it is constructed of a row of strips, like the layers of limestone and bedrock that have been brought to the surface throughout the park by the invasive mining techniques. these striations have been pushed and pulled out of their rows, mimicking the violent seismic activity, both natural and man-induced, to which the land has been exposed. the prominent center element is a dramatic extension of the diagonal plane, itself a shaft reaching from the open air to deep into the earth as it travels through the building. this element acts as a marker to place the building within the park, as well as a light shaft that extends uninterrupted from air to water for a spectacular solar experience within the building. a dramatic cantilever frames the striking views of the lake and surrounding park, an ever-changing exhibit for visitors to admire.


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striate

rotate

fold

extrude

site plan 1" = 125'

extend


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upper and mid level plans 1/32" = 1’ - 0�


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lower level plan 1/32" = 1' - 0"


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longitudinal section 1/32" = 1’ - 0”


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MIXED-USE APARTMENT COMPLEX chicago il, undergraduate studio spring 2011


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a mixed-use project on a corner lot in downtown chicago proved an excellent opportunity to challenge vertical conventions with the introduction of the oblique. the project, a building comprised of both apartment and condominium units, included commercial space on the first floor and three levels of underground parking for residents. the developer also wished to keep some of the lot available for public space. the resulting building takes on a sculptural, mountainous form in an exciting contrast from its orthogonal fellows, creating dynamic views for both the residents and passerby. it meets the ground at a shallow slope, forming the desired public area on a well-traveled corner in chicago’s arts district. the slope wraps around the edge of the building, forming a canopy over the entrances to the residential lobby and commercial space at its highest point. the units themselves range from studio to three bedroom units, each with its own terrace. environmental concerns were also a factor in the design; passive methods of heating or cooling were encouraged. the inclusion of a solar chimney, which runs the length of the eleven-story lobby, assists in the ventilation of the units, ensuring that they are pleasant spaces in which residents will enjoy living.


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ground floor plan 1/16" = 1' - 0"


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second floor plan 1/8" = 1' - 0"


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fourth floor plan 1/8" = 1' - 0"


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fifth floor plan 1/8" = 1' - 0"


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cross section 1/32" = 1' - 0"


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south elevation 1/32" = 1' - 0"


ENERGY SCIENCES LABORATORY argonne il, undergraduate capstone studio summer 2011


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the energy sciences building at argonne national laboratories, undertaken in partnership with another student at the university of illinois, required a unique approach to design. as a new building on an already extensive campus, great care had to be taken to ensure that the building meshed well with its surroundings without losing its individuality. in addition to this, the clients wanted a modern building that embodied the advanced scientific research that would be carried out within its walls. this task proved difficult, since the existing buildings surrounding the intended site were built in the 1940’s and followed the style of the time. to maintain its modern style, the form of the building, rather than its façade, was altered to fit its surroundings. since the building needed entrances for the campus community, service and loading, and a formal entrance for visitors, a y-shape was deemed most appropriate. this shape suited the site splendidly, displaying a welcoming set of open arms on each angle of approach. the concept for interior organization of the building was based on a series of neighborhoods. each arm is given to a different research cluster, with a large atrium joining them together. laboratories form the interior core of each arm of the building, with offices and workstations lining the exterior walls in order to take advantage of natural daylight. corners are left as open spaces for collaboration for each research cluster. collaboration between each branch of research was one of the main concerns for the clients, so open pockets along the atrium serve as meeting places for communal discussion. the administrative suite occupies the south wing of the ground floor, convenient to visitors and guest researchers. this space includes several conference rooms and a seminar room, as well as a cafÊ nearby in the lobby at the bottom of the atrium. smaller conference rooms are also located on each floor for convenience to the researchers. a campus entrance is located under the west arm of the building, convenient to the walkways linking the energy sciences lab with the existing buildings on campus, and a loading dock is located under the east arm, near the existing service road. a bridge on the second floor connects the new building to its predecessor, allowing for convenient continued use of the older space. there was great concern over the arrangements of the laboratory spaces themselves; as some would be equipped with extremely sensitive equipment, exposure to light, unconditioned air or even movement had to be carefully controlled. the laboratories with the most sensitive equipment, those elements which needed to be kept separate from the natural vibrations of the building, were placed on the basement level, where they could be set on a separate foundation. other laboratories were placed in interior spaces, away from windows.


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master plan 1" = 2000’

site plan 1/128" = 1' - 0"


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ground floor plan 3/128" = 1' - 0"


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second floor plan 3/128" = 1' - 0"


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third floor plan 3/128" = 1' - 0"


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basement plan 3/128" = 1' - 0"


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north and south elevations 3/128" = 1' - 0"


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cross and lateral sections 3/128" = 1' - 0"


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typical hvac and structural plans 1/64" = 1' - 0"


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CRYSTAL LAKE PARK CHILDREN’S urbana il, graduate studio fall 2012 MUSEUM


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crystal lake park is located on the north-east corner of urbana. the rarity of mature wooded landscapes in a part of the country which has been almost entirely converted to farmland has made it a popular destination for recreation, particularly for families with small children. as such, the proposed museum also needed to double as a community center of sorts, a place where parents can take their children to participate in art as well as view it. the program requirements for the museum included gallery spaces and workshop spaces for the creation and subsequent display of children’s art, an auditorium, café and kitchen area, museum store and office spaces for the museum director and staff. the auditorium has a second, separate entrance, so that it can be used by the community after museum hours for film screenings and public lectures. the proposed location for the new children’s art museum is on the western end of the park, bordering orchard street for convenient access for cars and trucks, as well as its proximity to the church street bus stop. the boathouse and picnic pavilion on the east end of the lake are the only existing permanent structures in the park. an important consideration was the existing memorial grove, dedicated to urbana resident betty schroeder by her family. the museum was situated in such a way as to disturb as few of the trees as possible, and named in her honor: the schroeder center for urbana’s budding artists, or scuba. playing upon its name and its proximity to crystal lake, the scuba mimics aquatic forms. the main body, with its radial chambers, resembles a shellfish, and a periscope raises high above the lobby to mark its presence in the landscape. port-hole windows carry on the theme. the design is meant to provide a stimulating atmosphere for the creation and appreciation of art for children.


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site plan 1" = 50'


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first floor plan 1/32" = 1' - 0"


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second floor plan 1/32" = 1' - 0"


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basement floor plan 1/32" = 1' - 0"


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east and north elevations 3/128" = 1' - 0"


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west and south elevations 3/128" = 1' - 0"


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cross section 3/64" = 1' - 0"


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model 1/16" = 1' - 0"


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STADT MÜNCHEN GLASPALAST munich de, graduate studio summer 2013 (technische universität exchange program)


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the goal of this project was to create a new exhibition center for the city of munich. the concept was of a crystal palace, similar to the one in london, which would replace one which previously existed in munich and burned down some years ago. centrally located in the old botanical garden, near both the hauptbanhof and the city center, the new building was to be of a temporary nature, easily constructed and deconstructed should it need to be removed or relocated. in response to this need, this design makes use of a steel node system in its supporting arches, which hold the glass building envelope on their undersides. the largest space requirement was for a 2000 square meter column-free exhibition space, which posed an interesting structural challenge. also required were a restaurant, lobby area with coat check and guest services, office spaces, restrooms, storage areas large enough for incoming displays and up to 2000 folding chairs, a workshop for construction of temporary displays, and a food storage and preparation area. the building is placed centrally within the park, effectively dividing it in two along its north-south axis. two factors decided its placement: first, it follows the axis of an existing pedestrian path, and second, it takes advantage of the full width of the park, allowing for easy access for deliveries at each end. to counteract the division of the park created by this scheme, the building includes a large cut-through on the ground floor for pedestrian use. the required gallery space occupies the second floor of the building, taking advantage of the unique space created by the elliptical three-hinged arch. secondary spaces such as the lobby and dining area are located on the ground floor, highly visible from the pedestrian thoroughfare. environmental considerations were also a factor in the project. with such a large open space to condition, non-traditional methods were greatly preferred. the pedestrian thoroughfare is left wide open in the summertime, allowing a considerable cross breeze to enter and naturally cool the space. the glass of the surrounding envelope is also printed in order to provide shading, and some additional shade is also provided by the structure itself. a robotic cleaning system similar to the scheme utilized at the messe leipzig cleans the exterior of the envelope and is also capable of producing a cooling spray to prevent overheating of the envelope.


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site plan 1 : 1500


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N

first floor plan : 600 PLAN GROUND 1FLOOR 1:200


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second floor plan 1 : 600 N

FIRST FLOOR PLAN 1:200


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LA

cross section 1 : 400


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NORTH-WEST FACADE 1:200

north - west elevation 1 : 400


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facade detail 1 : 100


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detail model 1 : 200


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building model 1 : 500


ADDITION TO THE G. MATSUMOTO urbana il, graduate studio fall 2013 RESIDENCE

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT


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the residence of architect george matsumoto currently sits on a wooded lot in raleigh, north carolina. for this project, an imaginative scenario was constructed: the new dean of the business department at illinois, formerly of north carolina, has purchased the house and wishes to move it to south-eastern urbana, just a few miles off of the university proper. against all odds a hilled site was found, as similar to the original site as possible. the dean wishes to add to the house in the process, and as the venerable architect himself declined to accept the commission, she instead turned to a team of young architects in the making, each of whom would propose a solution to her unique problem. as the house is on the national register of historic places, the first step was to determine which features are historic, and which may be safely altered. the original house was a mid-century modern ranch with three small bedrooms, one bathroom, and a semi-finished basement. the outstanding features of the house were its cantilevers, and a bridge to the entryway which made the house appear to be floating in midair. inside, it was the attention to detail and the built-in cabinetry that appeared in almost every room. the required additions included a 1500 square foot entertaining space, additions to the kitchen and dining room which nearly doubled them in size, a master bath and a larger master bedroom, a two-car garage to replace the single carport, and an office and workspace for the dean’s husband, an industrial designer who would be working from home. the proposed addition to the house is a three story cube that sits beside the original house, a bold statement and a definitive differentiation between the old and the new. this addition holds a master suite on its second storey, and three smaller bedrooms on the ground floor. meanwhile, the partition walls separating the original bedrooms have been demolished, opening up the ground floor of the original house to form the desired entertaining space. the kitchen has been expanded and the original bathroom left in place. all of the original cabinetry has been spared and repurposed. the dramatic difference in grade on the site allowed the garage to be placed on the basement level, directly beneath the original house. behind the garage is a fabrication area for the industrial designer; a second overhead door to this room allows for easy delivery of parts or machinery. also on this level, in the addition, is his studio, which includes a small conference area to meet with clients. with very little overall change to the original house, an historic landmark was expanded into a functional family home that fit the client’s needs.


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PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

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WITH TYP. DOOR 34

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site plan 1/16" = 1' - 0"

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UP

DN

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

REPLACE WITH TYP.

demolition plan 3/32" = 1' - 0"




UMOTO RESIDENCE



URBANA, ILLINOIS

KAPP

DN

DN

UP

DINING ROOM

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT BATH

BEDROOM 3 MASTER SUITE

second and ground floor plans 3/32" = 1' - 0"

BEDROOM 1

BEDROOM 2

 

 

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KITCHEN

BATH

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

6 DECEMBER 2013

WC

LIVING ROOM


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 

FAB

ADDITION TO THE GEORGE MATSUM UP

E. O'MARA

GARAGE

STUDIO

basement floor plan 3/32" = 1' - 0"


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north elevation 1/8" = 1' - 0"


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cross section 3/32" = 1' - 0"


Design Portfolio