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EDUCATION AND COMMUNICATION

2018 SUMMARY


EDUCATION & COMMUNICATION Education OVERVIEW The East Kootenay Invasive Species Council (EKISC) education program is responsible for the delivery of invasive species campaigns, professional development courses, public outreach, volunteer opportunities, and stakeholder support. Our vision is to provide professional education, training, and information to a variety of audiences. We strive to ensure that public are informed of invasive species impacts and preventative methods and options are available to learn more about invasive species management. We aim to educate our community, so they are aware of the impact of invasive species and are inspired to take action to prevent their spread. In 2018 the education team consisted of a full time Education and Communications Manager and two seasonal full time Education Assistants.

EDUCATION GOALS The educational goals for 2018 included: •

• • • • •

Delivery of information on the campaigns endorsed by EKISC: o Clean, Drain, Dry o Don’t Let It Loose o PlantWise and Grow Me Instead o Play, Clean, Go! o Buy It Where You Burn It o Neighbourhood Invasive Plant Program o Report-A-Weed Delivery of EKISC courses and workshops: o Invasive Plant Management for Industry Professionals o Invasive Plant ID Workshops o Municipal Weed Workshops Increase the reach and cover the RDEK more evenly than 2017. Continue BC Parks interpretive programs. Continue partnerships with other organizations to include invasive species education in their messaging and organize co-hosted events. Provide the agriculture industry with educational information and resources through the Grasslands and Range Enhancement Program funding (GREP). Monitor and evaluate program successes and challenges.

EDUCATION SUMMARY Overall the education team attended 87 events between January and November 2018, up 97% from 44 events in 2017. Participation in pre-organized community events and markets was spread across the Regional District of the East Kootenay (RDEK) as much as possible, influences which concentrated


EDUCATION & COMMUNICATION efforts were increases events in more populated areas, support and correspondence with particular groups, and staff availability. To make it easier for reporting purposes, events that were in areas away from a town or city were grouped into the same category as the nearest closest town or city. For example, most BC Parks events: Kikomun Park was grouped with Jaffray/Baynes Lake and Bummers Flats was grouped in with Cranbrook. The number of events hosted or attended in each community in 2018 is as follows: Invermere, 11; Radium, 3; Fernie, 8; Cranbrook, 28; Kimberley, 7; Elkford, 1; Sparwood, 5; Jaffray/Baynes Lake, 7; Wasa, 4; Nipika, 1; Spillmacheen, 1; Panorama, 3; Aqam Lands, 2; Canal Flats, 2.

EVENTS BY LOCATION Spillimacheen 1%

Invermere 14% Radium 4%

Cranbrook 35%

Sparwood 6% Canal Flats 3% Panorama 4%

Aqam 3% Kimberley 9%

Elkford 1%

Jaffray 9% Nipika Fernie 1% 10%

EKISC varies the type of outreach and education events hosted and attended to include various social groups and members of the public, people of different learning styles, target areas of the East Kootenay, and a variety of campaigns and messages. Each event was categorized depending on the type of presentation: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Farmers’ Market outreach booth: 16 events (1 cancelled or unable to attend) Non-Market outreach booth: 21 events (8 cancelled or unable to attend) Workshops and presentations: 34 events (4 cancelled or unable to attend) Weed Pulls or restoration projects: 12 events Indirect events: 4 events


EDUCATION & COMMUNICATION EVENTS BY TYPE Weed Pulls 14%

Indirect 5%

Farmers' Markets 18%

Non-Market Events 24% Workshops and Presentations 39% EKISC divides these events into active and passive engagement approaches. Active engagement allows the delivery of specific messages and information to a direct reach target audience using a prepared presentation, program, or activity. These events target a specific group of people, have high engagement levels, and usually are attended by people who had some sort of passive engagement in the past. Active engagement includes workshops, courses, special presentations, and weed pulls. Passive engagement does not target a specific audience or utilize specific programming. These events rely on a broadcast of (usually) various information and many people to consume the information at will. Passive engagement includes farmers’ market and special event type outreach tables and displays or brochures at a partner’s table or a mail-out campaign. Of the 87 events EKISC attended and presented in 2018, EKISC used active engagement 57% of the time and passive engagement 43% of the time.


EDUCATION & COMMUNICATION Events by Type Of Engagement 60

Farmers Markets 50

Non-market Events

40

Weed Pulls

30 20

Courses, Workshops, Presentations

10

Indirect Events

0 Active

Passive

Each event tracked the number of people reached. EKISC categorizes reach in 3 ways: 1. Target audience: The total number of people at the event. 2. Indirect reach: The total number of people who stop at the booth or walk by and glance at EKISC resources, read a sign, or who take a brochure or sticker but don't directly engage with in conversation or purchasing an item. 3. Direct reach: The total number of people who engage with EKISC either through conversation, workshops, purchasing merchandise, or in some way interact with EKISC in a meaningful way. In 2018 EKISC had a target audience of 14,896 people; of that audience, 4,962 people were indirectly reached, and 2,454 people had direct engagement with EKISC. These numbers represent an increase of 198% people indirectly reached, and 137% people directly engaged in 2018 compared to 2017.


EDUCATION & COMMUNICATION Direct and Indirect Reach in 2018 Compared to 2017 6000 5000

5037

4000 3000

2526

2000

1667 1034

1000 0 2018

Indirect Reach

2017

Direct Reach

EKISC focused on delivering invasive species campaign messaging appropriate to each event. For example, at the Koocanusa Wakesurf competition, the primary message and resources displayed were from the “Clean, Drain, Dry” campaign and secondary messaging pertained to the “Play, Clean, Go” campaign. Resource distribution was tracked through the summer. At each event a tally of the specific resources that EKISC distributes was made; however, due to the large amount of information and loss of continuity in tracking, the resource list was condensed to total all resources distributed through the summer including merchandise. The total number of resources distributed in 2018 was 1,929 items. Appendix 1 comprises a complete list of the events, dates, comments, and recommendations.

EVENTS OVERVIEW In 2018, EKISC expanded its outreach effort to include events that hadn’t been attended in the recent past; including events such as triathlons, kayak festivals, and mountain biking races. Overall, the target audience at these events is worthwhile however there are some recommendations for better engagement if these events will be attended in the future. As mentioned, the types of events EKISC pursues are categorized as farmers’ market outreach booths, non-market outreach booths, workshops and presentations, and weed pulls or restoration projects with each event targeting a different audience or engaging participants in a different way. The campaigns that EKISC promotes vary by event and can generally be divided into aquatic invasive species (AIS) or terrestrial invasive species (TIS) categories. In 2018 approximately 7% of EKISC events targeted only AIS and 15% focused on solely on TIS; the majority (78%) of the events represented a combination of both AIS and TIS information being delivered. A further breakdown specific to each campaign can also be assigned. Clean, Drain, Dry was represented at 20% of the events; Play, Clean, Go or Buy It Where


EDUCATION & COMMUNICATION You Burn It at 20%; Plantwise or Grow Me Instead at 16%, Don’t Let It Loose at 14%, and EKISC based programming at 29%.

REPRESENTATION BY CAMPAIGN EKISC Programming 29%

Clean, Drain, Dry 21%

PlantWise 16%

Play, Clean, Go 20%

Don't Let It Loose 14%

EDUCATION PROJECTS Projects are an important part of the education and communication program. In 2018 EKISC education assistants were assigned several projects to complete through-out the summer.

Allelopathy Project: This project was an experiment to understand the effects of Spotted Knapweed on native forbe and grass species. With seeds and seedlings donated by Tipi Mountain Native Plant Nursery the EKISC education assistants set-up and experiment that consisted of testing how the native seeds and seedlings would react to doses of Spotted Knapweed root powder and shoot powder. The results showed that there was an effect from the Spotted Knapweed plant. This experiment was a great educational tool to use for explaining the effects of allelopathy on native plants. Below are photos from the project. See Appendix 3 for full report.


EDUCATION & COMMUNICATION Plant Press Project: This project created two small binders of real pressed plant samples of some of the most common invasive plants in the RDEK. The resource will be a useful educational tool for times when there are no live or plastic plant samples available.

Social Media Project: The education assistants were assigned a media project for the season but did not have time to complete it. The idea behind the project was to increase reach on social platforms by adding EKISC specific video content. The goal is to create short, catchy videos on topics such as: - A tutorial on how to tell the difference between 2 different species - How to manage a certain species (ex: show how to remove a species) - How to spot biocontrol - An explainer video of what it means to love BC Grass and/or BC Water - Knotweed - how to identify and report - Advertise EKISC events and/or merchandise - Find a wildflower seed mix with invasives in it and uncover the ugly truth - talk about the need to read and ask questions.

FARMERS’ MARKET OUTREACH BOOTH EKSIC attended 16 farmers’ markets throughout most municipalities of the RDEK. Canal Flats and Edgewater did not host markets in 2018; but a new market popped up this season in Spillimacheen which gave EKISC a good chance to engage the often-forgotten northern reaches of the RDEK. The target audience for all markets was 7,695, indirect reach of 1,364, and direct reach of 631 people. Farmers’ markets represented 52% of the total target audience for the year, 27% of the indirect reach of the year, and 26% of the direct reach. Based on engagement numbers, the most successful markets were in Fernie, Baynes Lake, Invermere, and Cranbrook. Farmers’ markets are a great way to spread the word throughout the local community and the tourist population.


EDUCATION & COMMUNICATION Recommendations for 2019: •

The City of Cranbrook and Kimberley don’t allow non-profits to attend more than one farmers’ market; EKISC could possibly attend farmers’ markets as a ‘business’ selling items (t-shirts, native plants, Plant ID books, salves, and seeds) so that we can attend more than one per season. There was not a lot of consistency in promoting upcoming events and stewardship at the outreach tent. In 2019, be sure to have a volunteer sign-up sheet for upcoming events and courses. Start Education Assistant Projects early so there is time to finish them before the end of the season and put them to good use.

NON-MARKET OUTREACH BOOTH EKSIC attended 21 non-market events with the outreach tent with an overall the target audience of 4,976, indirect reach of 2,536, and direct reach of 888 people. These outreach events represented 33% of the total target audience for the year, 51% of the indirect reach of the year, and 36% of the direct reach. Based on engagement, the most successful events were the Kootenay Krusher Mountain Bike event; the Boys and Girls Club Fundraising event; the Freshwater Fisheries of BC (FFSBC) Summer Kickoff event; the Environmental Education and Communication (EECOM) Conference; and the Wasa Pancake Breakfast. Many of these events encourage interaction with the outreach boot and offer prizes for participation or giveaways. Unlike farmers’ markets, which generalize and promote all campaigns, these markets usually have a focus depending on the type of event. For example, the Kootenay Krusher focused on Play, Clean, Go messaging for bikers to clean their equipment and gear before and after riding, giving purpose and context to invasive species from a biking perspective. Recommendations for 2019: • •

The location of the event tent seems to play a large role in whether the events is successful or not. In most cases it is best to be close to other tents (preferable with similar messaging). Engagement is key with these events, be sure to maintain engagement through an activity, game, give-away, or contest.

SPECIAL PRESENTATIONS, WORKSHOPS, AND COURSES EKISC held 34 special presentations, courses, and workshops in 2018. The target audience for these events was 1,625 reaching 809 people indirectly and 682 people directly. These outreach events represented 11% of the total target audience for the year, 16% of the indirect reach of the year, and 28% of the direct reach. These events include one-off type presentations which often cater to a certain user group or audience; in targeting audiences like this, engagement tends to be higher than generalized events and the quality of material resented is higher. Many of these events require pre-registration, and in some cases, a fee for service is charged. Examples of these events include: Plant ID courses, industry courses, annual general meetings, classroom presentations, and field tours. These events generally host EKISC


EDUCATION & COMMUNICATION programming at their core, although other campaigns may be mentioned. Many of these events have surveys with recommendations and successes from the course or presentation; these can be found in Survey Monkey. Recommendations for 2019: •

Many of these events require a pre- and/or post-engagement survey or follow-up email with resources. Be sure to maintain records of these in Survey Monkey and/or an email follow-up folder. 2018 surveys can be found in EKISC’s Survey Monkey account.

WEED PULLS Weed pulls are a large component of the educational messaging with EKISC; they are often some of the most memorable and engaging ways for the community learn about invasive plants and take part in the fight against them. As with special presentations, courses, and workshops, these events are often very engaging to the target audience and have high reach. This year the EKISC education team hosted 12 educational weed pulls with a target audience of 516 people with both indirect and direct reach at 169 people. Weed pull events represented 3% of the total target audience for the year, 3% of the indirect reach of the year, and 7% of the direct reach. Weed pulls offer great partnership opportunities and are most successful when the partner organization has a pre-established group of volunteers who use the weed pull as a community stewardship project. EKISC has not had success with organizing weed pulls without the help of other partners or commitment from participants. As an example, a pull was organized for Wardner Provincial Park and advertised using Facebook; while 2,000 people were ‘reached’ through the posted event, 81 people viewed the event page, 11 people indicated they were interested in the event, and a few comments indicating it was a good idea were written, only the EKISC staff and Park Rangers attended. Recommendations for 2019: • • •

Keep track of number of bags and species of weeds pulled at each event. Continue to partner with other organizations. More weed pulls can be done if more partners are contacted earlier in the year, particularly school groups (contact late in April to organize pulls in May and June).

INDIRECT EVENTS Indirect events were events where EKISC was represented through staff or Board members attending. These events ‘spread the word’ though they are not necessarily events that EKISC are invited to present at. These events are inherently hard to track because we rely on our staff to communicate invasive species messaging at events they attend outside of the scope of our education department. An example may include our Board Chair attending an AGM for a partner group where the topic of invasive species is discussed. This year the EKISC tracked 4 events which represented a target audience of 84 people with both indirect and direct reach at 84 people. Indirect events represented 1% of the total target audience for the year, 2% of the indirect reach of the year, and 3% of the direct reach.


EDUCATION & COMMUNICATION Total Reach By Event 100%

1 3

90%

11

2 3

3 7

16

80% 70%

28 33

60% 51

50%

56

40% 30%

52

20% 27

10%

26

0% Target Audience

Indirect Reach

Direct Reach

Farmers' Markets

Non-Market Events

Workshops & Presentations

Weed Pulls

Indirect Events

INDUSTRY OVERVIEW Industry courses are included in special presentations and workshops category; in 2018, three industry courses were delivered to a total reach of 75 people. Comparatively, in 2017 EKISC delivered two courses with a total reach of 24 participants, and 2016 there was one course with 20 participants. The Industry course was free in 2016 and 2017; in 2018, EKISC began charging $25.00 per participant or $250.00 per private group (maximum of 20) to cover instruction costs. Two of the 2018 courses targeted forest industry professionals while one was opened to a variety of industry professionals including aggregate, roadside, mining, consultants, landscapers, oil and gas, and utilities. The motive for expanding the target audience to include more industries was to increase general invasive plant awareness, offer networking and learning opportunities among professionals, and educate to more professionals working with invasive plants. The course introduced participants to invasive plant management at the field level. Instruction included invasive plant ecology; right-of-way maintenance and its influence on the introduction and distribution


EDUCATION & COMMUNICATION of invasive plants; mapping and monitoring invasive plants using IAPP and Report-A-Weed; invasive control and disposal methods; the proper and safe use of recommended equipment; and applicable regulations and best management practices. Recommendations from 2017 were brought forward to include more field-based reporting techniques in the 2018 courses. An EKISC Certification of Completion was awarded on completion. Feedback from the 2018 courses suggested that the course structure was well designed, and the instructor was competent; overall, participants felt that the course was well worth the money spent and that they felt they learned more about invasive plant management from attending.

“I found the instruction to be excellent as well as the assistants that were there.” - Industry course participant As a result of the industry courses there was a request for some Best Management Practices (BMP) educational material to be made for Canfor. Below is what EKISC created for distribution to Canfor for them to use freely.

Based on instructor experience and participant feedback, recommendations for future industry courses include: • •

If resources exist, continue to have an assistant (or two) to help with indoor identification skills and outdoor field portion. Evaluate the participants to make the course (and certificate) feel more meaningful.


EDUCATION & COMMUNICATION An individual field evaluation using the IAPP field reporting forms will sum up the majority of the course objectives. Choose a field location closer to the classroom. Continue to offer generalized “industry” courses but offer the opportunity for specific audiences to take the training as well. Provide lunch so that participants can mingle and not have to worry about finding somewhere close to order. Make sure the instructor as access to IAPP extracts to better show participants the full capabilities of the platform. To get more course evaluation responses, get course feedback at the end of the course via paper and input it into digital format after. o

• • • • •

MUNICIPAL WORKSHOPS In 2018 EKISC continued to offer a Weed Workshops for City Workers. This 3-hour course was designed to teach operations staff invasive plant identification, the impacts of invasive plants, removal, disposal, and management options. In 2017, Fernie, Cranbrook, Kimberley, and the Aqam community opted into the course with a total of 40 participants; in 2018 the City of Cranbrook participated in the workshop with a total of 11 participants.

EDUCATION RECOMMENDATIONS In general, the education team had a successful season with inclusions of new events and an increase in reach throughout the region. Some key recommendations moving forward will help ensure the success continues: 1. Industry training: a. Offer courses early in the season just in time for the participants not to be overly busy and just when the invasive species are in bloom. b. Charge a higher registration fee to give more merit to the course. c. Find a location that has access to both indoor classroom space and outdoor area for weed identification. d. Develop a means for EKISC to understand the level of interest and engagement in industry other than forestry. e. Consider offering short, 1 – 2 hour courses in the spring before the season gets underway. f. Promote those business who are now “certified” weed free (think: CBSM strategies). 2. Horticulture Industry/ Plantwise campaign: a. Re-visit or contact garden centers early in the year before they start to stock up. Perhaps mail out packages with a follow up phone call instead of visiting garden centers. Keep an up-to-date list of the contacts available for future reference. b. Continue partnership with Tipi to sell native plant species at a discounted rates. c. Contact landscaping companies to promote “PlantWise” endorsements. 3. Real Estate:


EDUCATION & COMMUNICATION a. Consider contacting real estate brokers. Perhaps mail out packages with a follow up phone call instead of visiting. Keep an up-to-date list of the contacts available for future reference. b. Offer a webinar for agents to take on their own time. 4. Weed Pulls: a. Continue to encourage community groups to host weed pulls and make them aware of the requirements to earn the stipend for their club. b. Ask people to sign up for weed pulls and other upcoming events at outreach table. 5. Farmers’ Markets and Non-market Events: a. Consider purchasing another EKISC themed outreach tent set-up and have 2 teams working simultaneously in different parts of the region. b. Ensure that farmers’ markets in all municipalities are attended to in the peak months of the season (June through September). c. Some farmers’ markets require you to be selling merchandise to be able to attend more than one market. Consider selling Plant ID Books, EKSIC merchandise, and native plants at the markets. 6. General Recommendations: a. Continue to attend training courses offered through CBEEN; they are a wonderful way to stay connected with our education network, learn new education techniques, and make new contacts. b. Education Assistant training: i. More formal hands-on training (ie: how to set-up outreach booth, how to conduct interpretive presentations, field plant ID of native and invasive species, weed management, and file management). ii. Start educational projects early in the season before the busy outreach events start (ie: media projects, allelopathy project). c. Coordination and Management: i. Education and Communications Manager should communicate with the operations department regularly through-out the summer; include time to go to operational activities.


EDUCATION & COMMUNICATION Communication OVERVIEW The East Kootenay Invasive Species Council (EKISC) communication program is responsible for the delivery of invasive species messaging through marketing and advertising, presenting news and updates, promoting campaigns, scheduling courses and presentations, and endorsing the vision of EKISC. Our vision is to provide up to date information about invasive species from a local perspective and beyond. We strive to ensure that public are informed of the work of EKISC and our partners and that EKISC is seen as a supportive and transparent not-for-profit council.

COMMUNICATION GOALS The 2018 communications goals included: •

• • • • • •

Advertising campaigns endorsed by EKISC: o Clean, Drain, Dry o Don’t Let It Loose o PlantWise and Grow Me Instead o Play, Clean, Go! o Buy It Where You Burn It o Neighbourhood Invasive Plant Program o Report-A-Weed Advertising EKISC courses and workshops: o Invasive Plant Management for Industry Professionals o Invasive Plant ID Workshops o Municipal Weed Workshops Increase the number of people in the RDEK who understand the impacts of invasive species. Continue partnerships with other organizations to include invasive species education in their messaging and organize co-hosted events. Act as the main source of information in the RDEK for invasive species information Provide regular news and updates to the public, industry, and partner organizations. Monitor and evaluate communication successes and challenges. Provide a variety of platforms and media for target audiences to engage with EKISC.

COMMUNICATION SUMMARY EKISC’s communication program uses multiple platforms to get invasive species messaging and information to target audiences. Currently a combination of communication resources are used: print publications, EKISC branded website, social media platforms including Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, newspapers, online newspapers, and outreach events. In 2018 EKISC’s main marketing and advertising was done through outreach at events and presentations; however, some additional strategies were taken this year including advertising on social


EDUCATION & COMMUNICATION media, partnering with other organizations on social media to give us ‘shout-outs’, advertising in the Wings Over the Rockies program, brochure and rack card delivery to target retailers, and updating the search engine optimization (SEO) on our website. EKISC uses community-based social marketing (CBSM) to promote people to take action in reducing and preventing the spread of invasive species. We promote behaviour change through leading by example, advertising on social media, word of mouth, direct marketing, media releases, events, presentations, courses, and workshops. Collaborating with other organizations also helps EKISC target a larger audience.

SUCCESS METRICS Success for marketing and communications is currently being gauged in the following ways: • • • • •

Social media insight numbers Website metrics Reach (direct and in-direct) at events Post-event or presentation surveys Resource distribution

DIRECT MARKETING In 2018, EKISC used direct marketing in the form of email marketing, social media ads, resources distribution, ad placement in key publications, and newspaper articles. To measure the success of EKISC’s marketing and advertising efforts, reach calculation and cost benefit analysis were done. Resources Overall, EKISC distributed +/- 1,937 resources at the 87 events attended in 2018. These resources included both merchandises sold and given away as well as rack cards, stickers, tattoos and small prizes. EKISC also delivered 681 brochures and rack cards to key retail locations across the RDEK. For a complete list of resources, please see Appendix 2. e-Newsletter In 2018, EKISC sent out 12 monthly e-Newsletters in 2018 to an average of 589 people per month via email and link sharing on our website and social media accounts. This was the first year that EKISC delivered a newsletter monthly. Success in engaging the reader improved through-out the year; in January the percentage of people who opened the e-newsletter was 35% and in December that number had grown to 53%. Numbers are expected to increase again in the new year when EKISC subscriber database is re-organized and the ‘did not open’ and ‘undeliverable’ mails decrease. Below is a table of the action from each e-Newsletter.


EDUCATION & COMMUNICATION Facebook Ads Overall, Facebook advertising was effective. EKISC boosted 14 Facebook posts between January 1 and December 1, 2018 and spent a total of $207.90 USD with an average of $22.64 per 1,000 people reached. Email and Link

Month January February March April May June July August September October November December

Email Only

Total number of people newsletter was sent to 524 606 577 564 560 555 759 565 500 405 387 348

Total email and web views 695 575 369 321 353 512 784 660 662 603 491 420

Total email and web clicks 97 174 28 40 51 77 74 54 99 53 68 79

Clicks percen tage 14 30 7 12 14 15 9 8 15 9 14 19

Delivered 573 554 577 574 567 537 589 543 477 384 367 331

6350 529

6445 537

894 74

13

6073 506

Total Average

Opened 211 196 190 161 173 181 232 195 232 188 181 176

Opened percenta ge 37 35 33 28 30 34 39 36 49 49 49 53

2316 193

39

Clicks 40 58 27 29 30 25 42 30 72 27 31 32

Clicks percen tage 19 30 14 5 5 14 18 15 31 14 17 18

Did Not Open 362 358 387 413 394 356 357 348 245 196 186 155

Not Deliver ed 21 52 5 10 7 18 159 22 23 21 20 17

Unsubs cribed 1 2 4 2 3 2 2 1 0 5 4 0

New Subscri ptions 3 0 2 4 6 33 6 4 0 0 0 0

443 36

16

3757 313

375 31

26 2

58 4

The following statistics were taken from EKISC Facebook site between January 1, 2018 – December 1, 2018: • •

• •

25,259 Impressions: The number of times that EKISC adverts were on-screen; up 1,610% from 2017. 11,202 Reached: The number of people who saw EKISC adverts at least once. Reach is different to impressions, which may include multiple views of EKISC adverts by the same people; up 1,469% from 2017 2,185 Post engagement: The total number of actions that people took involving EKISC advertising efforts; up 7,183% from 2017. 248 Link Clicks: The number of clicks on links within the ad that led to destinations or experiences, on or off Facebook; up 3,000% from 2017.

The table below shows the results from each campaign (advertisement) including reach, and cost per result. Objective

Results

Cost per result

Reach

Amount spent

Post Engagement 3 Campaigns

1,054 Post Engagements

$0.04

2,382

$44.19

Event Responses 7 Campaigns

86 Event Responses

$1.21

4,113

$104.00


EDUCATION & COMMUNICATION Traffic 4 Campaigns

163 Link Clicks

$0.37 Per link click

4,707

$59.71

Newspaper Articles and Published Ads Media articles are unpaid but represent a good amount of publicity for EKISC in terms of keeping the public informed of who EKISC is, what they do, and what’s happening with in the invasive species world. EKISC was mentioned in/ produced 15 stories that made headlines in 2018:

16 Jan 2018 https://www.kimberleybulletin.com/community/newsfrom-the-kimberley-garden-club-7/ 10 MAY 2018 https://www.e-know.ca/regions/eastkootenay/preventing-introduction-and-spread-of-invasive-species/ 11 MAY 2018 https://www.e-know.ca/regions/eastkootenay/invasive-species-programs-get-three-years-funding/ 21 MAY 2018 https://www.e-know.ca/regions/kimberley/learnmore-about-plants-with-mainstreams/ 30 MAY 2018 https://www.cranbrooktownsman.com/community/cranbrooks-weedwarrior-frank-is-back/ 01 JULY 2018 https://www.e-know.ca/regions/east-kootenay/dontinvite-an-invasion-into-your-gardens/ 04 JULY 2018 https://www.e-know.ca/regions/east-kootenay/mrzebra-mussel-is-returning/ 07 JULY 2018 https://www.e-know.ca/regions/eastkootenay/knowledge-is-power-when-it-comes-to-invasives/ 02 AUG 2018 https://www.kimberleybulletin.com/home/wildsighthosting-weed-pulls-at-open-garden-and-marysville-eco-park/ 04 AUG 2018 https://www.e-know.ca/regions/east-kootenay/homeinvasion-japanese-knotweed/ 07 AUG 2018 https://www.e-know.ca/regions/elkvalley/fernie/community-ecogarden-open-house-august-23/ 15 AUG 2018 https://www.thefreepress.ca/community/helpneeded-to-restore-sparwood-wetland/ 25 AUG 2018 https://www.e-know.ca/regions/east-kootenay/halfton-of-purple-loosestrife-removed/ 29 AUG 2018 https://www.cranbrooktownsman.com/opinion/theweed-warrior-cluster-tarweed-dont-you-be-my-neighbour/ 10 OCT 2018 https://www.e-know.ca/regions/cranbrook/ekischosting-general-meeting-oct-24/

An $11 classified ad was placed in the Columbia Valley Pioneer for an industry course in Invermere that was later cancelled due to lack of interest. Because the course didn’t run, and therefor was never evaluated, it’s hard to say if the ad was the spark for the 3 people who signed up or if it was through another means.


EDUCATION & COMMUNICATION EKISC placed an ad in the 2018 Wings Over the Rockies flyer. The cost of the ad was $300; it was printed and distributed to 17,000 people before and during the 7-day event. Overall, this ad seemed to have a good cost benefit to EKISC.

The full flyer for Wings Over the Rockies can be viewed here: https://www.wingsovertherockies.org/files/data_events/descr_18WOR_Program-FINAL.pdf Contests EKISC held a photo contest to raise awareness of the impact of invasive species and get the community involved in the fight against invasive species. The prize was a smart phone lens kit valued at $25. Overall, the contest had 18 entries and 4 prizes were given away – one for each category. The contest was marketed on our website, social media platforms and at events; although the engagement was fairly low, it was still worthwhile for the photos that were produced.

The contest and other photos entered can be seen here: https://1.shortstack.com/QqLG7n


EDUCATION & COMMUNICATION

The contest was promoted through partners social platforms as well.

2019 Direct Marketing Recommendations: •

A key factor in the success of our direct marketing campaigns should be to include a "call to action,” offering an incentive or enticing message to get the target audience to respond or act in a desired way. o It is a good idea to think about what EKISC can offer as a benefit, whether it is money off their purchase at a partner store (think: 10% off at XXX if they bring in invasive seeds for disposal or if they get a transfer station receipt for invasive weeds) or an invitation to an EKISC members only event. While direct marketing involves EKISC attempting to change behaviour, promote weed management, and make information available to our customers, it is also good to have a ‘return -on-investment.’ If, when handing out brochures at an event, we see them in the streets or in the garbage, it's not worth the effort. The good thing about direct marketing is that there are so many alternatives that if one approach doesn't work, we can easily switch to another. Offering a coupon or gift card for people who got the brochure from xxx farmers market with a lucky number written inside.


EDUCATION & COMMUNICATION •

Have the education assistants do a brochure run early in the season. Do not wait until midsummer to distribute brochures to retailers.

INDIRECT MARKETING An online presence allows EKISC to communicate indirectly with the target audience, in other words, if people are interested in EKISC they will use the website or social media platforms to find out more. Depending on the platform used, EKISC is able to interact with online users who are interested in invasive species. On social media, it is widely understood that fans or followers fans are there because they are aware of the product or business and want to learn more. While followers certainly are expecting to receive useful information from EKISC’s social pages, useful information for EKISC can also be collected from follower participation. The objectives of an online presence include: • • • • • • • • •

Providing resources; Allowing opportunities to register for courses; Sharing event information; Posting useful, relevant, and interesting links; Asking fans engage and contribute with comments; Organizing contests and promotions; Providing a place to leave reviews and other feedback; Offering incentives for activity on the page; Adding another way for people to contact EKISC.

WEBSITE The EKISC website analytics illustrate that, since the launch of the new Wix platform of EKISC (December 2016), the website is gaining momentum. From January 1, 2018 – December 1, 2018 EKISC had 2,937 new users since the initial launch of the Wix platform website in December 2016. Total users is now 2,964. These users visited 10,495 pages in 4,530 sessions and spent an average of 2:11 on the EKISC website per visit. The charts below show the number of active users on a monthly, weekly, and daily basis as well as information on users by country, time of day, and device.


EDUCATION & COMMUNICATION The website saw huge spikes in visitation after announcements of job postings and smaller, but equally significant increases of website hits after an e-Newsletter was published. Website visits also increased with popular social media posts directing users to visit the website. The graph below shows the number of users online during a given day throughout 2018 with the comment boxes (bottom axis) showing the dates e-Newsletter or Facebook posts with jobs links were released.

Total visits can be broken down into unique and repeat visits. 85% of the traffic in 2018 were unique visits, while 14% were repeat visits (those who also visited the website when it was launched in December 2016). Since the website has just finished its first year of operation, numbers in 2019 will give EKISC a better understanding of our followers. If total visits growth is driven entirely by repeat visits, this would indicate that EKISC is successfully building a loyal following but isn’t doing enough to attract new visitors. In any case, 2019 will be a tell-tale year to identify whether EKISC should be adopting new strategies to improve discoverability, which will bring new eyes to the website.

2018 AUDIENCE - NEW & RETURNING VISITORS Returning visitors 14%

New Visitors 86%


EDUCATION & COMMUNICATION

There are 4 main ways for users to find the EKISC website: 1. Search Engine Optimization (SEO) / Organic Searches: Visitors that searched some part of the website and were directed to EKISC through a search engine. This metric measures how effective the EKISC SEO strategy is. 2. Referral Traffic: Visitors that came to the EKISC website from another website link. High referral traffic shows that EKISC is doing good work, and produces content that others want to share. 3. Direct Traffic: Visitors who typed the EKISC website into their browser (ex: www.eksic.com). A good percentage of direct traffic visits is a good indicator of a loyal following. 4. Social Traffic: Visitors who came from social networks. This metric provides information to how sharable the content on the EKISC website is; the more engaging social media posts are, the more social traffic the website receives. Of the 2,964 users EKISC saw in 2018, 920 were from direct searches, 822 from referrals, 757 from organic searches, 605 from social platforms, 34 from email links, and 22 from other sources.

ACQUISITITION OVERVIEW Social 19%

Other 1% Direct 29%

Email 1%

Organic 24% Referral 26%

The bounce rate metric, displayed as a percentage, tells EKISC how many visitors leave the website immediately after arriving or who only had a single-page sessions in which there was no interaction with the page. The lower the bounce rate, the more visitors there who browse the site and use the resources EKISC provides. Typically, a bounce rate in the range of 26 to 40 percent is excellent; 41 to 55 percent is roughly average; 56 to 70 percent is higher than average, but may not be cause for alarm


EDUCATION & COMMUNICATION depending on the website; and anything over 70 percent is disappointing. EKISC’s bounce rate in 2018 was 54.39%. EKISC is still evaluating the new website content; one of the main goals of the new site was for it to be a resource for visitors to learn about invasive species. Based on the top ten pageviews, most visitors are responding positively to this goal in addition to trying to better understand who EKISC is.

Top 10 Pages Viewed in 2018 Pageviews Home Page Employment Our Staff Event Registration Contact Us Invasive Species ID Invasive Species (General) What We Do Who We Are Terrestrial Invasive Species 0

500

1000

1500

2000

2500

3000

2019 Website Recommendations: • •

Improve bounce rate by making sure the website looks great, works properly, and the content is high quality and relative. To increase the page interactive hits and information sharing capabilities, experiment with different types of content and analyze what’s working through top 10 pageviews and produce more of the material the readers like. Increase readership through linking to the website through more outreach to referral groups and continue to build through our e-Newsletters and social platforms.

SOCIAL MEDIA Currently EKISC uses Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram as social media presence; each providing a different means of interaction with information and audience. The goals of using social platforms are to increase brand awareness; drive traffic to the website; generate new leads; boost engagement; build a community around EKISC; and to increase mentions in the press. New content on Facebook is posted at least 6 days a week, Twitter, 2 days a week, and Instagram on an as-and-when basis depending on where EKISC staff are and what they are doing. It is important to


EDUCATION & COMMUNICATION keep content moving as people tend to use these platforms daily and old material will quickly get passed by.

Source: https://www.smartinsights.com/ Facebook @EastKootenayInvasives The EKISC Facebook account is meant to build a lasting connection with EKISC partners, followers, and the public; increase brand awareness among members of the EKISC target market and the general public; informally interact with the target market; gain insights about EKISC brand, services, and opportunities; advertise products, services, and events; and network with other organizations. The EKISC Facebook page gained momentum in 2018 with number of impressions, or times a post was on a user’s screen, totaling 878,424. The site gained 95 new followers in 2018, for a total of 444. EKISC also increase the number of people who liked the Facebook page by 100 likes to 447. The demographic on the EKISC Facebook site identifies that the majority of followers are women between the ages of 55 – 64; they are also the most engaged demographic followed closely by women aged 35 – 44.


EDUCATION & COMMUNICATION

EKISC uses Facebook as a platform to deliver news and information, engage target audiences, and share interesting articles with followers. In 2018 EKISC created 444 posts, of that 4,504 people engaged with the material that was posted or shared. The most engaging posts were those advertising jobs either for EKISC or partners. Second most engaging posts included a news release about a close call with Canadian Tore selling Flowering Rush, and a recipe for cooking with Japanese Knotweed.


EDUCATION & COMMUNICATION Twitter @EK_Invasives The EKISC Twitter account acts as a news and information sharing platform; with goals of interacting with public and partners; driving people to participate in promotional activities and campaigns; enhancing the EKISC brand; and monitoring the EKISC brand as well as the brands of others. Tweets are mostly constructed of news or journal articles, Retweeted articles, and event announcements. Since the account was established in May 2012, EKISC has 611 total Tweets, has liked 124 other Tweets, has 203 followers, and is following 304 people. In 2018 EKISC Tweeted 263 times; these Tweets had 43,659 impressions (times a user is served a Tweet in timeline or search results) and a total of 392 engagements (total number of times a user interacted with a Tweet or clicked anywhere on the Tweet, including Retweets, replies, follows, likes, links, cards, hashtags, embedded media, username, profile photo, or Tweet expansion), and generated 130 likes. EKISC saw a substantial improvement in the account activity in 2018 compared to 2017’s 161 followers; 6,986 impressions; and 50 engagements. Just the top 3 posts in 2018 gathered 14,143 impressions on their own. Key use of @ and # symbols for tagging key groups or specific newlines helped increase the impressions on these posts.

Instagram @EKInvasives EKISC’s Instagram account handle was renamed to make it easier to use and to match that used with Facebook and Twitter; the account went from @East_Kootenay_Invasive_Species_Council to @EKInvasives. The goal of EKISC’s Instagram account is to increase brand awareness; demonstrate company culture, showcase the EKISC team, increase customer engagement and loyalty, and showcase products and services. The demographics of the Instagram account are fairly congruent with that of Facebook and Twitter with 74% of the audience being females between the age of 25 – 44. There is a very interesting metric that showcases Vancouver as the main source of EKISC’s audience at 12%, followed by Cranbrrok at 6%.


EDUCATION & COMMUNICATION

The Instagram account saw a substantial increase in 2018 with 73 new posts (compared to just 6 in total from 2016 and 2017 combined) and 149 followers (up from 43 in 2017). Instagram has the most engagement of all platforms with 41% of the posts being commented on and 100% of posts being liked at least once; many with numerous comments and likes. Some examples of the most popular posts can be seen below:


EDUCATION & COMMUNICATION

Social Shout-Outs EKISC created social shout out packages for partners to post on their social platforms allowing EKSIC to be mentioned and tagged in posts related to invasive species as they pertain to a specific user group. For example, a Facebook partnership with Norco Canadian Enduro Series and the BC Enduro Series (@CanadianEnduro) allowed EKISC to post to the group page and mention EKISC and hashtag relative news. In total, EKISC partnered with 9 different groups with various messaging. An example with Canadian Enduro is below:


EDUCATION & COMMUNICATION

2019 Indirect Marketing Recommendations: •

Social Media allows EKISC to gain valuable insights into user information; however, EKISC isn’t currently using these metrics to their full capacity. EKISC should engage in “social listening” the process of tracking conversations around specific topics, keywords, phrases, brands or industries, and leveraging your insights to discover opportunities or create content for those audiences. Ex: Hootsuite, BuzzSumo, Meltwater, SproutSocial etc (more here: https://financesonline.com/top-20-social-media-monitoring-tools/) Generally, EKISC looks for an increase in numbers to determine success; however, a qualitative methodology should also be considered to determine which interactions are the most meaningful (or change behaviour most). More social shout outs would be very helpful in engaging different groups. Ensure that individuals are contacted early in the season and that the strategy is easy to use.

PROMOTIONAL ITEMS, SIGNAGE, AND BROCHURES As a compliment to the education and communications program, and to offset the cost of outreach materials, EKISC sold merchandise in 2018 at or slightly above cost. A partnership with Tipi Mountain Native Plant Nursery allowed us to sell native plants at farmers markets, highlight the importance of planting non-invasive species and add a talking point to our outreach booth. In addition to EKISC hats and t-shirts, EKISC also added an invasive plant-based body salve from Purcell Organics and a wildflower seed mix from Nature’s Garden Seed Company available as merchandise options online (available in markets in 2019).


EDUCATION & COMMUNICATION EKISC Branded Graphics EKISC designed a number of branded graphics to use in social media posts in 2018. The idea behind creating these graphics was to maintain continuity in our brand and to offer pre-made post material (social shout-outs) to other groups to post on our behalf. The graphic is meant to be eye catching and easy to read, and was always accompanied by a more detailed explanation of the message.


EDUCATION & COMMUNICATION

Promotional Items Promotional items are for the purpose of publicity, giveaways, and public engagement. These items include EKISC branded t-shirts for adults and youth, adult tank tops, stickers, and tattoos. EKISC branded hats, patches, wildflower seed packs, skin salve, and Plant ID books, were available for sale or given away as gifts of appreciation. In 2018 EKISC created an “I <3 BC Water” sticker, patch, and hat to promote AIS and compliment the “I <3 BC Grass” items from 2017.


EDUCATION & COMMUNICATION

Resources EKISC maintained a number of brochures and rack cards through-out the year including: AIS and TIS brochures, 3 different Play, Clean, Go! and Burn It Where You Buy It rack cards, boater wash stations cards, PlantWise and Grown Me Instead cards and booklets, noxious weeds of BC booklets, Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Let It Lose rack cards, and whirling disease information cards. Signage EKISC contracted the sale of 1 boot brush kiosk to EK Parks (BC Parks Contractors) for a trailhead at Mount Fernie Provincial Park. Four 9x12 Play, Clean, Go! signs were also distributed to the Kimberley Trails alliance to be placed on high-traffic trailheads at Bootleg Mountain. Follow up needs to be made to determine whether the signs are being used and withstanding the weather. The following photos show the 2018 signage and installations.

Merchandise Sales EKISCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website added an online store mid-way through 2018 allowing an opportunity to purchase Plant ID books, EKISC skin salve, wildflower seeds, hats, and t-shirts online. Since the launch of the store EKISC has processed 2 orders with a total of $47.23 in sales. In total, EKISC sold $1,130.64 from our Square account; this includes online ticket sales to events, merchandise purchased online, and point-of-sale tickets and merchandise sold at events. A total of


EDUCATION & COMMUNICATION 732.75 was collected in cash from the sale of merchandise at events and course fees. In total, EKISC collected 1863.39 from the sale of merchandise and course fees. 2019 Promotional Items, Signage, and Brochures Recommendations: •

A better system needs to be developed to keep track of sales at farmers markets and events to ensure that the EKISC education assistants are keeping record of items sold in a way that is easy for the Director to use. Continue to sell native plants at farmers’ markets – and be sure to start at the beginning of the summer.

2019 Communication Recommendations: In general, the communications effort was increased in 2018 compared to 2017. Some key recommendations moving forward will help ensure EKISC maintains communication in 2019: 1. General recommendations: a. Continue to attend marketing and communications training workshops and webinars. Hootsuite and PCG.org hosted some good ones in 2018. b. Education and Communications Coordinator should manage the EKISC website and prescheduled social media posts. Education and Field Assistants should help with updates to on-the-ground work outside these constraints. c. When possible, conduct engagement, pre-course, and after-course surveys via Survey Monkey. Where paper forms are used to measure success, data needs to be converted and placed in Dropbox. d. A marketing and communications plan should be implemented for 2018.


EDUCATION & COMMUNICATION APPENDIX 1 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; EDUCATION AND OUTREACH ACTIVITIES

Event/Activity

2018 Event Date

Location

Post-event Comments

Farmers Markets Invermere Farmers' Market

09-Jun-18

Cancelled due to overlapping schedule

Invermere Farmers' Market

14-Jul

Agri Park Farmers Market

18-Jul

Invermere Invermere (Columbia Valley Chamber of Commerce)

Agri Park Farmers Market

27-Jun

Invermere (Columbia Valley Chamber of Commerce)

Radium Hot Springs

29-Jun

Radium

Radium Hot Springs

20-Jul

Radium

Market at Fernie Alpine Resort

24-Jun

Fernie

Fernie Mountain Market

15-Jul

Fernie

Very large busy market. Located next to other environmental information booths.

a short market (only ran for 2 hours); most people came to get produce and other food Very small market but considering the few vendors there was a good amount of people there. Many patrons were interested in local invasisves. We talk to two different people who were interested in the ID course but they did not want to sign up. Maybe well get them ne1t time! We were only scheduled to be there for 2 hours, but we could have stayed longer. We were the only booth that packed up at 7. Recommendations: Stay longer. Bad Location. Set up ne1t to all the food vendors away from the merchandise booths. The main portion of the patrons were tourists uninterested in local invasive species. Tried to gain passerbys interest by passingout stickers but no one wanted them. Around 6 a storm blew in. We do not have weights for the booth so we had to pull the tent down or else it would blow away. The wind did not let up so we decided to pack up the tent completely and cut the event short. Recommendations: get weights amd rope for the tent. We were located in a much better location as opposed to the last time we were at this market. Our booth was right ne1t to the Wildsite tent which was nice because people with children or were interested in learning something gravitated to our area. Lots of tourists from Alberta and Europe interested in EKISC and the Invasive Species in our area. Recommendations: Set up tent ne1t to similar infromation booths when possible. lots of engagement and questions about specific invasives on people's properties; interest in native plants but didn't sell any - more of a good conversation starter. Very busy market. Lots of people interested in the No1ious weeds booklets. Set up and take down was quick and easy as we were able to drive up right to the tent site.


EDUCATION & COMMUNICATION Fernie Mountain Market

10-Aug

Fernie

Cranbrook Farmers' Market

28-Jul

Cranbrook

Elkford (River View)

11-Jul

Elkford

Sparwood Farmers' Market

13-Jul

Sparwood

Sparwood Farmers' Market

10-Aug

Sparwood

Jaffrey / Byanes Lake

30-Jun

Jaffrey / Byanes Lake

04-Aug

Jaffray Community Center Jaffray Community Center

Spillimacheen Market

08-Sep

Spillimacheen

Kimberley Market

26-Jul

Kimberley

COTR Career Fair

07-Mar

COTR Science Fair

9 - 10 March

Cranbrook Cranbrook Curling Club

Lots of folks interested in the plants for sale - thinking they could be invasives - good conversation starter! lots of interaction and interest in information; no plants were sold but lots of questions about specific invasive plants in the area. Sold 1 “I heart BC grass patch” A lady told me that saskatoon bushes are only native to Saskatoon, therefore the saskatoon bushes here are actually called Service berry bushes.Lots of interaction at this market, lots of interest in information. No one bought any plants though Decently busy market, some questions about invasive species, a bit of interest in native plants. Small market, not very busy. Talked to a good amount of people considering the size of the market. The set up and take down were easy as you could drive right up to your location. Lots of people inerested in Grow Me Instead campaign as many people had local native plants in their gardens. Bust market but low engagement and not much interest in the tent or plants. Lots of people from Alberta asking about the boat checking stations. Signed upi 8 people for upcoming ERA/EKISc event; Asked people “Where they are from from” tostart talking about the invasives relative to them (and get locals to signup for the pull); Told all vendors about the photo contest; Told all people about the photo contest (showed them on iPad); American bull frogs that used iPad to hear the frog sound Very busy day! There were a lot of people at the farmers market and the information booth was lcated at a pathway intersection. Due to the location of the booth many people who were standing waiting around ended up at the information booth talking and gaining interest on the different campaigns. Lots of native plants were sold; two saskatoons, one brown eyed susan, and one bergmot plant. Grasses and choke cherry plants are not selling well, perhaps we should not sell them anymore. There were many locals as well as tourists, both very interested in aquatic invasives. Bring lots of plants to ne1t market! Large market, well organized and lots of foot traffic, high interaction and interest in the bullfrogs, make sure to get there early (around 7am) to secure a booth spot as this market is first come first serve (market ran from 9 am to 12 pm) First time this market was ever hosted in Spilli - turnout was low but engagement was high. Was a good introduction for folks in the northern reaches of the RDEK Located at the end of the market and poured rain 30 minutes into the start of the market for about half an hour so did not have a lot of people visiting the booth. After the rain ended there were more people visiting the booth. Talked to a man who wanted to do a radio interview with me about Giant Hog weed and invasive species of concern in the area. Told him Jessie or Pat would be a much better person to interview. I gave him Jessie and Pats emails so he could set up an interview.

Outreach Booth Events (Non-Market) Todd attended Decided it wasn't worth it.


EDUCATION & COMMUNICATION

Great Outdoor Show

May 5 & 6

Columbia River Paddle Palooza

26-May

(1777 2nd Street N). Cranbrook Curling Club (1777 2nd Street N). Invermere (Kinsmen Beach)

Kootenay Krusher

27-May

Nipika

Grand Opening - COTR Gateway Trail

02-Jun

Cranbrook

Panorama Hare Scramble

03-Jun

Panorama

Boys & Girls Club Fundraiser

09-Jun

Cranbrook (College of the Rockies Track)

Wasa Lake Triathlon

10-Jun

Wasa Lake

Radium Days

16-Jun

Radium

Sam Steele Days

16-Jun

Cranbrook (Balemont Park)

Canadian Enduro Races

17-Jun

Panorama

Fernie Lucky 7's Bike Event

23-Jun

Fernie

Summer Kick-Off

07-Jul

Cranbrook

Cancelled due to short staffing A fun event! Lots of kids and their parents stopped by the booth to play our “Zebra Mussel Shake” game Had good conversations with ~10 adults about aquatic invasives Nice day, great weather

Open Garden Tour

07-Jul

Cranbrook

Not enough notice given and already had something booked for this day

Heart of the Rockies Triathlon

08-Jul

Invermere

Low interest in booth; lots of people walked by; talked to a few people

Event was cancelled by coordinators CDD themed; bullfrogs were a big hit for engagement. Recommendation: help with advertising for ne1t year; Have a water activity for kids. Lots of engagement for a small event. Lots of kids participating in helping educate the adults. Recommended again for ne1t year. Good event with both education assistants and Randy Harris in attendance. Good event but the location could have been better. Would also suggest going on Saturday instead of Sunday as people seemed to rush home and not want to stop and chat. Lots of kids interested in the bullfrogs, played bean bag toss game for prizes, rainy day may have resulted in lower turnout. Bullfrogs worked well for getting children interested in the tent Bean bag toss increased engagement Gave out animal pencils to children that stopped by to ask about the bullfrogs. Chatted with some kids about the harmful effects of aquatic invasive species but most were just interested in the prizes Sold one hat Set-up location wasn't the best, sold a few hats, talked to a few people, but most racers just left after the event CANCELLED due to full schedule Fun interactive games for kids increased engagement. We were selling native plants and pressed plants, however there was not much interest – only sold 3 plants Lots of interest in specific invasive species, area, and how to manage plants on properties. Lot engagement; tent located near bikewash station; bikers not interested in tent. Set-up by bike wash station not reccomended for future Most cyclists were uninterested in the tent as they just wanted to wash their bike and leave In future set-up by other tents is recommended Hosted a game (find 5 hidden stickers on mountain bike) to win a door prize – 3 people entered, 4 people loked for stickers – game was not very successful


EDUCATION & COMMUNICATION Bloom Where You Are Planted Art and Garden Tour

08-Jul

Kimberley

Not enough notice given and already had something booked for this day Lots of people interested in the Bull frogs, Possible sighting of bullfrog at Rushmier Lake, 14 km down west side road; We were set-up right ne1t to the free pancake breakfast lineup; there was a lot of foot traffic around our booth, many people came by to talk to us while they were waiting for food

Valley Appreciation Day

21-Jul

Panorama BC Cup Nationals

27-Jul

Cranbrook Panorama (Invermere)

Toby Creek Festival

27-Jul

Panorama (Invermere)

Griz Kids

28-Jul

Rod Loan Program

05-Aug

Fernie Cranbrook (Jimsmith Lake)

Community Showcase (Transboundary Tour)

09-Aug

Fernie

Low engagement; set up location on path near dock Great showcase to a very engagaed group and great to get together with the Elk Valley crowd of stewardship groups: ERA, FFSCB, WildsafeBC Wildsight Fernie

Rod Loan Program

12-Aug

Cranbrook

One man came and talked to us for a bit; no one else came; cold weather

Wasa Pancake Breakfast

25-Aug

Wasa

Koocanusa Wakesurf Competition

20 - 21 July

Jaffray (Lake Kookanusa)

Sold five native plants, set up tent right beside the line for pancakes, lots of interaction Really nice day. Lots of kids at the event so we handed out a lot of stickers. Many people came to tent to look at the preserved American Bull frogs so there was a big focus on the Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Let it Loose and Clean Drain Dry campagins. There was many questions about how lake Koocanusa prevents the spread of Zebra mussels in the lake as there are Zebra mussels in montana and the lake crosses boarders. Recommendation: Find out how the American side and Canadian side of the lake work together to prevent the spread on Aquatic Invasive Species. Kids interested in bullfrogs and stickers, otherwise low engagement

COTR Community Showcase

04-Sep

Cranbrook

OK engagement. Location in foyer wasn't great.

EECOM Outreach booth

19-21 Oct

Aqam

Headbanger Festival Community Showcase

02-Nov

Radium

Lots of giveaways at a table that was set up for 3 days with replenishing resources. Not a great turn out this year; WildSafe BC was also there. The interactions we had were very good and engaging.

Canceled due to overlapping schedule Not very busy event on Friday evening. Set up tent ne1t to the registration booth. Talked to some of the organizers about the clean drain dry program and a few people signing up. Sold one I love BC water hat and gave 3 hats to the organizers as a prize. Apparently Saturday would have been busier down at the river. Consider putting info in registration packages. Cancelled due to overlapping schedule and short staffing

EKISC Special Presentations, Courses, Workshops

Classrooms to Communities Place-based Learning Workshop

23-Feb

Cranbrook

Todd attended: Fairly good attendance (~75) but not very engaged teachers. All of the community partners (~12) set up booths in the gym and teachers could roam around and ask questions. There was a presentation about place-based learning, then the teachers could choose to attend various sessions. Most of the community partners were in the CBEEN session about Community Partnerships for Place-based Learning. We had an opportunity to e1plain what EKISC can offer to teachers and schools. It was useful to get the word out, but could have been more engaging with the teachers.

CVLCF 10-year anniversary

10-Apr

Invermere

Todd attended: 5 minute talk about Leafy spurge control; Neighbourhood Invasive Plant Program.


EDUCATION & COMMUNICATION Wings Over the Rockies Festival

13-May

Canfor Industry Training

16-May

Weed Warrior Walk with Frank

17-May

Invermere (Pynelogs Center) Canal Flats (Skookumchuck FSR)

EKISC AGM

17-May

Municipal Invasive Species Workshop

18-May

Cranbrook Cranbrook (Manual Training Centre / Library) Cranbrook (Public Works Yard)

Mainstreams Weed Walk and Talk Nature Conservancy of Canada Invasive Species Workshop

24-May

Kimberley

29-May

Aquatic Invasives with Wildsight

29-May

Invermere Kimberley (Kimberley Independent School)

Plant ID Course - Fernie

30-May

Plant ID Course - Cranbrook

31-May

Eco-Blitz @ Elizabeth Lake

07-Jun

BC Parks Ranger Trainng Invasive Plant Management for Industry Professionals Invasive Plant Management for Industry Professionals

Laird Environmental Education Fair (LEEF) Know Your Watershed

Event was well advertised through the WOTR Program. The participants were engaged and interested. A post-course survey was sent out and the results were good. The time for this presentation was pushed back from an all day course to just 1.5 hours in the field focused on plant ID. No certifications given Frank hosted and invited us along for a look at the invasive species in your neighbourhood. Kids got a chance to pull some weeds along the way. Good turnout for the year. Some recommendations are to explain the board roles better and what being on the board entails before nominations or voting; allow more time - the timeframes were well over where they should have been. Guest speakers were good. Operational students for the summer. Engagement was ok and information delivered was engaging; the supervisors are keen. Cailey Chase showed up with goats (always an attractant to the public); Don was there to give a history of the area; Shannon was identifying native species. Overall there were too many subjects to engage whollyin IS but those who were interested seemed to ask questions re: invasives. Good engagement and field observations; these crews will likely engage in the Bummers Flats Weed Pull on July 25

07-Jun

Fernie Cranbrook (Community Garden) Cranbrook (Elizabeth Lake) Cranbrook (MoE)

Good short presentation about AIS 2 no show's. Collected a suggested 15.00 donation for paying for the ID Books and the instructor time. Id plants that we had pre-picked and identified them at the library. After ID we took a walk toward the JK and then to the river trails. 3 no show's. Collected a suggested 15.00 donation for paying for the ID Books and the instructor time. Id plants that we had pre-picked and identified them at the Cranbrook Community garden. No walk afterward (cold and one person left). A fun event! kids walked around park and presented on various ecological topics; we helped the invasive species group with their presentation Rangers enjoyed the hands on IAPP reporting in the field. Recommendation is to make time to go out with them on a IS survey ne1t year.

07-Jun

Invermere

Cancelled due to low RSVP numbers (3)

08-Jun

See Survey Monkey for feedback

12-Jun

Cranbrook Invermere (Laird Elementary School)

13-Jun

Jaffray

Interactive science fair, lots of kids came to check out the bullfrogs and games we had set-up Played race for survival game and then pulled weeds near train tracks; good engagement; students loved the race game


EDUCATION & COMMUNICATION Forest Industry Workshop for Professionals

20-Jun

Community Day at Idlewild Park

23-Jun

NBC Parks Interpretive: Mr Zebra Mussel

06-Jul

Cranbrook Cranbrook (Idlewild Park) Wasa (Wasa Provincial Park)

BC Parks: Evil Superpowers of Invasive Plants

14-Jul

Cranbrook (Moyie Provincial Park)

Lake Windermere Summer Camp Course

18-Jul

Invermere

EKISC Plant ID Course

22-Jul

BC Parks: Evil Superpowers of Invasive Plants

28-Jul

Forest Activity with Boys & Girls Club

30-Jul

BC Parks: Walk and Talk

03-Aug

BC Parks: Mr. Zebra Mussel

11-Aug

BC Parks: Mr. Zebra Mussel

19-Aug

Invermere (James Chabot Park) Jaffray (Kikoman Provincial Park)

Cranbrook Wasa (Wasa Provincial Park) Moyie Provincial Park Kikoman Provincial Park

See survey Monkey Poll Bio blitz and outreach tent - was a great way to connect with the community and get kids involved. Great turnout; lots of laughs due to Cheryl; forgot to bring stickers Met Nick the Interpretation Organizer at Moyie Park an hour before the event in order to discuss where to hold the activities and get the most participats. Decided to organize everythingon the beach. Set up the games and talked to families in the area to let them know about the event. Got 8 kids to come learn about invasive super powers and participate in the Evil Super power relay race. All participants were given stickers and tattoos at the end of the games. We were invited by the Lake Ambassadors to do a short talk and play some games centered around aquatic invasive species with the children participating in the day camp program. We did a very short talk about Zebra mussles and American bull frogs on why they are invasive and how they affect us and the environment (children discussed what an invasive specie is with the Thea and Rachel). After sitting and talking we played the Zebra Mussle Shake Down Relay Race. Kids really enjoyed the games and understood the concept behind the game. After the relay race we took the children on a nature walk where we found invasive and native plants. Children were given Noxious weed books to help ID the invasive species. Had two out of four people show up for the Plant ID Course. The two people who did show up were very keen and interested to learn about the local invasive plants. Brought about 10 samples of invasive plants. After the discussion and IDing of samples we walked around James Chote to identify plants in the area. We found Russian Olive tree, blue weed, 2 species of babies breath, and hog weed. Started with a short talk about invasive species then played Zebra mussel shakedown relay race, followed by a quick talk about invasive plant powers then played Race for Survival; kids had lots of fun Met Cheryl with the Boys and Girls club children at the Community forest. Handed out No1ious weed books to children and talked to them about Invasive Species and their impact on the community forest as well as us. We then did a nature walk to Silvan Lake where we identified invasive and native plants. At the lake we we had a snack break and then played the Invasive plants pull game. After the game we continued our nature walk where we pulled invasive plants on the way back to the trail head. Great turnout, lots of kids, talked about different native plants and their uses, along with forest pathogens and disease CANCELLED: Staff Illness CANCELLED: Staff Illness


EDUCATION & COMMUNICATION Low turnout possibly due to forest fire smoke, presented to 4 participants, others showed up later, no plants were sold, sold 3 ID books Very good engagement â&#x20AC;&#x201C; lots of people interested, good to set up a conservation showcase with the partners in Fernie

Fernie Eco-Garden Weed Workshop/Plant Sale

23-Aug

Fernie

Transboundary Field Tour

Aug 7-9

Fernie

COTR Community Showcase

04-Sep

Cranbrook

EECOM Worskhop

19-Oct

Cranbrook

EECOM Field Sesion

20-Oct

Aqam

COTR Ecology Class Presentation

16-Nov

Cranbrook

Great tour and lots of great feedback. Very high and quality engagement. Good engagement with students and profs would like to find a way to incorporate more into their colleuge's classrooms

OGM

24-Oct

Cranbrook

See Survey Monkey for feedback

RISO Field Tour

11 - 13 Sept

See Survey Monkey for feedback

Columbia Outdoor School Workshop

TBA

Kimberley Blue Lake Camp

Rod and Gun Club Presentation (PCG)

October?

OK engagement. Location in foyer wasn't great. great community interaction and engagement with low numbers. Competing with about 10 other workshops running at the same time - would be better to frame the workshop differently to create a broader audience than just "teaching about invasives"

Didn't coordinate with partner in time No response from club

Weed Pulls and Restoration Projects Elk River Alliance / EKISC in the Classroom

23-May

Sparwood

Good turnout of students and lots of enthusiasm - nice to partner with ERA

Weed Pull with SD 5

30-May

Fernie

Great turnout and a nice school event

Mainstreams Burdock Pull N' Learn

31-May

Weather was rainy and cold; low turnout; pulled burdock in rain with event organizers

Mainstreams Knapweed Pull N' Learn

14-Jun

Kimberley Kimberley (RCMP building beside Mark Creek)

Wildhorse Weed Pull

23-Jul

Cranbrook

Purple Loosestrife Pull

25-Jul

Wardner Community Pull

29-Jul

Cranbrook (Bummers Flats) Jaffray (Wardner Provincial Park)

Decent turnout for weed pull; pulled lots of knapweed near the river Weed pull at Fraggle Rock was very successful. We pulled several large Babies breath plants at the trail head.We then proceded to follow the main trail pulling mainly Knapweed. Pulled appro1imately 8 bags of Knapweed. Had snacks and drinks at the end of the pulll. Full day of pulling purple loosestrife. The entire crew of TNT worked all day with us pulling weeds. Had 3 other volunteers help pull until about 1pm. We pulled about 20 bags of purple loosestrife, from the entire infected location. Marked each infected area with pink marking tape and recored it. We worked until about 1 had lunch and went back to work for about 2 more hours before packing up and heading home. followed the main trail pulling mainly Knapweed. Pulled approximately 8 bags of Knapweed. Had snacks and drinks at the end. Only rangers and EKISC staff turned out.


EDUCATION & COMMUNICATION Wildsight Bring a Weed: Pull N' Tell

22-Aug

Kimberley (Marysville Eco Park)

ERA / EKISC Weed Pull and Wetland Restoration

01-Aug

Sparwood

ERA / EKISC Weed Pull and Wetland Restoration

21-Aug

Grassland Project Talk - Silvertip Ranch

02-Aug

Sheep Creek Weed Pull/Adopt-A-Highway

15-Sep

Sparwood Jaffray (GREP site near Bull River Guest Ranch) Canal Flats (Premiere Lake)

Great partnership with wildsight and a good twist to a traditional weed pull. Folk brought weeds from their yards and we were able to identify them with them using ID Books. A weed pull was held afterward but was cut short due to time restrictions. Good turnout! A little unorganized but overall went smoothly. Met everyone at ERA office in Fernie then drove to Sparwood Jewel Wetland. We pulled the Reed Canary Grass and adjusted the tarp for the first half of the pull. The second half of the event we went to the open field ne1t to the pond and pulled Knappweed. Laid down conveyor belts, distributed zebra t-shirts to kids, sold one grass hat, quick talk on how to pull knapweed and clip toadfla1, rest of time spent pulling weeds

Played from here/from away game, participants were very engaged and interested in learning more about certain invasives, stayed an e1tra half hour after presentation to talk during there lunch time

Great turn out from residents! Good information sharing about weeds along the sides of the hwy.

Indirect Events Attended by Pat Wray, Todd Larsen, Randy Harris and ?? spoke to about 36 resource stakeholders. // Objectives: Jeff Allen and Gary Tipper have just completed an assessment of this area, over 1100 ha in size. The trip will e1amine various treatments in the area, discuss a 10-year maintenance plan and address questions arising from the work including:

Waldo North Range Unit

Were ecosystem component objectives for original prescriptions met? How is ingress affecting treatments and forage production in area? What maintenance treatments are required? Where are invasive species the greatest concern and are how are they being managed?

Rocky Mountain Trench AGM and Field Tour

01-Jun

CBT Enhanced Environment meeting

06-Nov

Randy Harris attended

First Nation meetings Aqam

07-Nov

Randy Harris attended

First Nation meetings Tobacco Plains

08-Nov

Randy Harris attended


EDUCATION & COMMUNICATION APPENDIX 2: 2018 PROMOTIONAL ITEMS AND RACK CARDS EKISC Mr. Zebra Mussel Tattoos EKISC “I Love BC Grass” Sticker EKISC “I Love BC Water” Sticker AIS Brochure TIS Brochure PlayCleanGo Rack Cards (Camping) PlayCleanGo Rack Cards (Biking/Hiking) PlayCleanGo Rack Cards (ATV/Dirtbike) Plantwise Rack Cards PlantWise Wallet card PlantWise Booklet Don’t Let it Loose Rack Cards Don’t Let It Loose Decal Clean Drain Dry rack cards (various styles) Clean Drain Dry Wallet cards Clean Drain Dry Stickers Boater Wash Station Rack Card Whirling Disease Rack Card NIPP Brochure Noxious Weeds of BC Booklets (Green) Noxious Aquatics of the Crown Booklet (Blue) Play Clean Go! Tattoos EKISC “I Love BC Grass” Hat EKISC “I Love BC Water” Hat EKISC “I Love BC Water” Patch EKISC “I Love BC Grass” Patch EKISC “Grow Beards Not Weeds” T-shirt EKISC “Leafy Spurge” T-shirt EKISC “Yellow Flag Iris” T-shirt EKISC Wildflower Seed packages EKISC Skin Salve TNRD Plant ID book


EDUCATION & COMMUNICATION APPENDIX 3: 2018 ALLELOPATHY PROJECT REPORT The effect of Spotted Knapweed (Centaurea stoebe) root and shoot powder amendments on Wild Bergamot (Monarda fistulosa) and Junegrass (Koeleria macrantha) seeds and seedlings.

Prepared by the East Kootenay Invasive Species Council October 2018

Introduction Spotted Knapweed (Centaurea stoebe), a regionally noxious plant species under the BC Weed Control Act, has become a major concern in the Omineca, Peace River, Kootenay, Okanagan, Thompson, and Cariboo regions within British Columbia, Canada. First introduced to North America from Europe in the late 1800s as a contaminant in alfalfa seed and ship's ballast (Zouhar, 2001), this invasive plant can establish large monocultures in BCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s grasslands leading to a reduction of native biodiversity, wildlife and livestock forage production, and an alteration in soil nutrient composition (Kuang, 2015). Allelopathy, through the production of the phytotoxin (Âą )-catechin by C. stoebe is believed to contribute to the invasive success of Knapweed (May & Baldwin, 2011). These allelopathic chemicals are released by C. stoebe into the environment through removal from plant leaves by action of rain, dew, fog, and leaf washing, through residue decomposition, through volatilization, and as root exudates (Inderjit, 2005). The released chemicals then inhibit the growth, development and survival of surrounding plants by phytotoxicity, inhibition of nitrogen fixers or selective inhibition of mycorrhizal fungi (Inderjit, 2005). It has also been found that large quantities of stem and leaf tissue from live or dead C. stoebe plants on the soil surface, as when plants are trampled or mowed, may enhance allelopathic activity (Zouhar, 2001). The finding that C. stoebe can release allelopathic chemicals through various methods poses the question of which method has a greater negative effect on neighboring plant growth. In order to test this, C. stoebe plant samples were collected, dried, and separated into roots and shoots, which were then ground into respective powders and added to native plant species. To take this project one step further, two different types of native plant species were tested, a grass species commonly known as Junegrass (Koeleria macrantha), along with a forbe species commonly known as Wild Bergamot (Monarda fistulosa). Seeds and seedlings were obtained for both Junegrass and Wild Bergamot, to see if there was a difference in allelopathic effect between freshly seeded samples and previously grown samples. There are three research questions this project seeks to answer: is there a difference in the allelopathic effect between C. stoebe shoot powder and root powder; is there a difference in C. stoebe allelopathic effect between K.


EDUCATION & COMMUNICATION macrantha and M. fistulosa; and is there a difference in C. stoebe allelopathic effect between the native species seeds and seedlings? Methods For this experiment, two different native plant species in the form of seedlings and seeds were obtained from Tipi Mountain Native Plant Nursery located in Kimberley, British Columbia. The native plants consisted of five Wild Bergamot seedlings and five Junegrass seedlings, along with five Wild Bergamot seeds and one-hundred Junegrass seeds. On Thursday August 2, 2018, we hand pulled 45 flowering Spotted Knapweed samples from the field South of Parkland School in Cranbrook, British Columbia. The knapweed samples were located directly adjacent to a gravel alley. The individual knapweed plants were on average 50 to 90 cm tall with 4 to 10 shoots stemming off the main root. The Spotted Knapweed samples were then left to air dry for 7 days. The dried samples were then clipped and separated into roots and shoots (including stems, leaves, and flowers) and then ground into a powder using a Black and Decker Smartgrind coffee grinder (serial number CBG100SC) on August 9th and 10th, 2018. The shoot powder consisted of all plant matter above the root excluding the main stem due to grinding inability. A total of 12 ounces of root power and 8 ounces of shoot powder was obtained. The root powder and shoot powder were then transferred into plastic freezer bags labelled respectively and stored in a cool dark place for the duration of the experiment. On August 17, 2018 five Bergamot seeds were sown into five separate four-inch planter pots; twenty Junegrass seeds were sown in each of five separate plants pots. There were a total of twenty planter pots for this experiment. The pots were separated into five different amendments (refer to table 1): control, low concentration Spotted Knapweed root powder, high concentration Spotted Knapweed root powder, low concentration Spotted Knapweed shoot powder, and high concentration Spotted Knapweed shoot powder. Each amendment consisted of four planter pots: one Junegrass seedling, one Junegrass seeded pot, one Wild Bergamot seedling, and one Wild Bergamot seeded pot. For the Knapweed amendments, respective powders (i.e., root and shoot) were measured with measuring spoons and mixed with tap water and added daily to respective planter pots. The low concentration Spotted Knapweed root amendment consisted of a quarter teaspoon of root powder mixed with once ounce of water. The high concentration Spotted Knapweed root amendment consisted of a half teaspoon of root powder mixed with one ounce of water. The low concentration Spotted Knapweed shoot amendment consisted of a quarter teaspoon of root powder mixed with one ounce of water. The high concentration Spotted Knapweed shoot amendment consisted of a half teaspoon of root powder mixed with one ounce of water. The control pots were watered with one ounce of tap water daily. All pots were watered at approximately 13:00 daily.


EDUCATION & COMMUNICATION In the first two weeks, seeded pots were located in shade to retain moisture upon sprouting. Seedling pots were located outdoors in sunlight. On August 29th, all pots were moved indoors to avoid harsh weather. The experiment started August 17, 2018 in Cranbrook, British Columbia and finished September 21, 2018. Weekly data and observations were recorded at the start of every week beginning on the first day of the experiment (when the seeds were sown into the pots). Weekly data tables included percent germination (for seeded pots only), growth stage (refer to table 2), shoot length (mm), soil condition (e.g., dry, damp), other observations (e.g., color), and a photo of each plant. A growth stage chart was created for simplicity of data recording. Table 1. Photographs and description of all five amendments. Amendment Control

Add 1 oz. water daily to: -

1 Junegrass seedling pot 20 Junegrass seeds pot 1 Wild Bergamot seedling pot 5 Wild Bergamot seeds pot

Low concentration knapweed root powder

Add Âź teaspoon powder + 1 oz. water daily to: -

1 Junegrass seedling pot 20 Junegrass seeds pot 1 Wild Bergamot seedling pot 5 Wild Bergamot seeds pot

High concentration Knapweed root powder

Add ½ teaspoon powder + 1 oz. water daily to: -

1 Junegrass seedling pot 20 Junegrass seeds pot 1 Wild Bergamot seedling pot 5 Wild Bergamot seeds pot

Photograph


EDUCATION & COMMUNICATION Low concentration Knapweed shoot powder

Add Âź teaspoon powder + 1 oz. water daily to: -

1 Junegrass seedling pot 20 Junegrass seeds pot 1 Wild Bergamot seedling pot 5 Wild Bergamot seeds pot

High concentration Knapweed shoot powder

Add ½ teaspoon powder + 1 oz. water daily to: -

1 Junegrass seedling pot 20 Junegrass seeds pot 1 Wild Bergamot seedling pot 5 Wild Bergamot seeds pot

Table 2. Growth stage chart for weekly observations. Stage 1

Stage 2

Stage 3

Stage 4

Stage 5

Germination

Sprout

Seedling

Vegetative

Budding

Results

In the preparation stages, when the roots were harvested and chopped prior to grinding, 26 adult root weevils and 4 larval root weevils (Cyphocleonus achates) were found inside the roots.


EDUCATION & COMMUNICATION Qualitative and quantitative results were measured throughout a five-week period measuring both the size (growth) and observable overall health of the plants. This analysis indicated that there was an effect of adding the Spotted Knapweed amendment on both seed and seedling stages of each species. When comparisons were done across each plant in either stage, small differences were detected between root powder amendments and shoot powder amendments with root powder having a larger effect on heath, germination rates, and growth. In each seedling species, browning effects were prominent and grew with increase concentrations of root or shoot powder. The amendments on Bergamot seemed to have more of an effect than on Junegrass.

Table 3. Week one observations taken on August 17, 2018. Week 1

Pot

Percent germination (%)

Seed growth stage

Seedling shoot length (in)

Soil properties

Other observations (e.g., color)

Junegrass

0

1

103 mm

moist

-green

August 17 Control

-healthy Wild

0

1

103 mm

moist

Bergamot Low concentration roots

High concentration roots

Low concentration

Junegrass

-green/red/purple -healthy

0

1

128 mm

moist

-green -healthy

Wild Bergamot

0

Junegrass

0

1

115 mm

moist

-green/red/purple -healthy

1

128 mm

moist

-green -healthy

Wild Bergamot

0

Junegrass

0

1

76 mm

moist

-green/red/purple -healthy

1

128 mm

moist

-green -healthy

Photo


EDUCATION & COMMUNICATION shoots

High concentration shoots

Wild Bergamot

0

Junegrass

0

1

89 mm

moist

-green/red/purple -healthy

1

103 mm

moist

-green -healthy

Wild Bergamot

0

1

96 mm

moist

-green/red/purple -healthy

Weekly notes: twenty Junegrass seeds and five Wild Bergamot seeds were sown into respective seed pots. Unfortunately no photos were taken this week.

Table 4. Week two observations taken on August 24, 2018. Week 2

Pot

Percent germination (%)

Seed growth stage

Seedling shoot length (mm)

Soil properties

Other observations (e.g., color)

Junegrass

20/20

2

115 mm

moist

-green

August 24 Control

100% Wild Bergamot

Low concentration roots

Junegrass

â&#x2026;&#x2014;

(+6 mm) 2

60%

12/20

103 mm

-healthy moist

(no change)

2

60%

128 mm

-mostly reddish purple -healthy

moist

(no change)

-green Slight yellowing/ browning at base -healthy

High concentration

Wild Bergamot

0/5

Junegrass

3/20

1

0%

15%

103 mm

moist

(-12 mm)

2

128 mm (no change)

-green/red/purple -healthy

moist

-green -healthy

Photo


EDUCATION & COMMUNICATION roots

Wild Bergamot

0/20

1

0%

64 mm

moist

(-12 mm)

- yellowing of 2 shoots - Mostly reddish - Slightly green

Low concentration shoots

High concentration shoots

Junegrass

6/20

2

30% Wild Bergamot

0/5

Junegrass

8/20

1

0%

0/5

moist

(-13 mm) 52 mm

2

115 mm

moist

0%

88 mm

-green/red/purple -healthy

Moist

(+12 mm) 1

-green -healthy

(-37 mm)

40% Wild Bergamot

115 mm

-green -healthy

moist

(-8 mm)

-mostly green -slightly red at base of shoot -healthy

Weekly notes: plants received extra water due to rain on the night of August 26th,

Table 5. Week three observations taken on August 31, 2018. Week 3

Pot

Percent germination (%)

Seed growth stage

Seedling shoot length (mm)

Soil properties

Other observations (e.g., color)

Junegrass

20/20

2

118 mm

moist

-green with few yellow tips

August 31 Control

100%

Wild Bergamot

5/5

(+30 mm)

2

102 mm

-healthy moist

-mostly reddish purple

Photo


EDUCATION & COMMUNICATION 100%

Low concentration roots

Junegrass

20/20

(no change)

2

100%

128 mm

-healthy

moist

-green Slight yellowing/ browning at base

(no change)

-healthy Wild Bergamot

0/5

1

0%

105 mm

moist

(- 20 mm)

-green/red/purple -New leaflets curling inward -healthy

High concentration roots

Junegrass

7/20

2

35%

120 mm

moist

(- 8 mm)

-mostly green with tips of grass beginning to yellow -healthy

Wild Bergamot

0/20

1

0%

72 mm

moist

(8 mm)

- full yellowing of 2 plants - Mostly reddish - Slightly green

Low concentration shoots

Junegrass

10/20

2

50%

115

moist

-mostly green -tips of plant slightly yellowing

(no change)

-healthy Wild Bergamot

0/5

1

0%

60 mm

moist

(+ .9 mm)

-green/red/purple -lower leaves of one plant yellowing -overall healthy

High concentration shoots

Junegrass

11/20 55%

2

112 mm (+ 4 mm)

Moist

-mostly green with some yellowing of individual blades -healthy


EDUCATION & COMMUNICATION Wild Bergamot

1/5

1

20%

90 mm

moist

(+ 7 mm)

-mostly green -slightly red at base of shoot -some deformation in the top leaves -healthy

Weekly notes: Âź amount of water was given as plants are very moist de to weather. Plants are moving indoors now to avoid the rain.

Table 6. Week four observations taken on September 7, 2018. Week 4

Pot

Percent germination (%)

Seed growth stage

Seedling shoot length (mm)

Soil properties

Other observations (e.g., color)

Junegrass

20/20

2

120 mm

moist

100%

30 mm

(+0.2 mm)

-green with few yellow tips

September 7 Control

- 3 yellowing blades -healthy

Wild Bergamot

5/5

2

105 mm

100%

(14 mm)

(+0.3 mm)

moist

-healthy

-single plant now has 4 leaves Low concentration roots

Junegrass

-mostly reddish purple

20/20

2

135 mm

Moist

100%

(19 mm)

(+0.7 mm)

-slightly moldy in seed pot

-green with few yellow tips Slight yellowing/ browning at base -healthy

Wild Bergamot

1/5 20%

2

108 mm

Moist

-green/red/purple

(+ 0.3 mm)

-slightly moldy in seed pot

-Leaves at base dying (2 fell off) -healthy

Photo


EDUCATION & COMMUNICATION High concentration roots

Junegrass

15/20

2

120 mm

75%

(15 mm)

(no change)

moist

-mostly green with tips of grass yellow on all blades -borderline healthy

Wild Bergamot

Low concentration shoots

Junegrass

0/20

1

72 mm

moist

- full yellowing of 2 plants

0%

(sign of a seedling potentially sprouting)

(no change)

12/20

2

116

Moist,

-mostly green

60%

(20 mm)

(+ 0.1mm)

Moldy fuzz

-most tips of plant yellow

- one plant dead - leaves dropping off base of most plants

- some yellowing blades -healthy -one other plant starting Wild Bergamot

1/5

2

65 mm

20%

(unhealthy looking)

(+ 0.5 mm)

Moist, mouldy fuzz

-green/red/purple -lower leaves of one plant yellowing -overall healthy

High concentration shoots

Junegrass

17/20

2

112 mm

Moist

85%

(20 mm)

(no change)

slightly moldy in seed pot

-mostly green with some yellowing of individual blades -most tips yellow -healthy

Wild Bergamot

3/5

2

93 mm

Moist

-mostly green

60%

(14 mm)

(+ 0.3 mm)

slightly moldy in seed pot

-one lower leaf dead -slightly red at base of shoot -some


EDUCATION & COMMUNICATION deformation in the top leaves - overall healthy Weekly notes: plants were kept inside for the duration of the week and did not need to be watered. â&#x2026;&#x201C; oz. of water was given to each plant after the observations were recorded only.

Table 7. Week five observations taken on September 14, 2018. Week 5

Pot

Percent germination (%)

Seed growth stage

Seedling shoot length (mm)

Soil properties

Other observations (e.g., color)

Junegrass

20/20

2

101 mm

Semi dry

100%

48 mm

(9 mm)

-green with few yellow tips

Each blade is branching into 2

(+ 18 mm)

5/5

2

102 mm

100%

38 mm

(- 1 mm)

(now 7 plants visible)

(+24 mm)

20/20

2

135 mm

Semi-dry

100%

27 mm

(no change)

-some blades branching

(+ 8 mm)

-mold not spreading

September 14 Control

Wild Bergamot

Low concentration roots

Junegrass

- 3 yellowing blades -healthy semimoist

-mostly reddish purple -lower leaves of main plant dead

-single plant now has 6 leaves

-overall healthy

-green with few yellow tips Slight yellowing/ browning at base -healthy

into two -most blades are wilted Wild Bergamot

1/5 20%

2

10.8 mm

Moist

-green/red/purple

(no change)

-slightly moldy in seed pot

-Leaves at base dying (2 fell off) -overall healthy

Photo


EDUCATION & COMMUNICATION High concentration roots

Junegrass

15/20

2

12 mm

75%

20 mm

(no change)

*Only 7 blades visible / others are wilted or dried up?

(+ 5mm)

Semimoist

-mostly green with tips of grass yellow on all blades -borderline healthy

-one blade is branching Wild Bergamot

2/5

2

40%

No data from plant that was being measured previously it died.

semimoist

- â&#x2026;&#x2DC; original plants are dead -one semi-healthy plant -2 new plants sprouting (23 mm seed sprout)

Healthiest plant is now 55 mm

- leaves dropping off base of most plants -

Low concentration shoots

Junegrass

Wild Bergamot

12/20

2

116

60%

25 mm

(no change)

*only 6 blades visible; 2 have branched; most have wilted and died

(+ 5mm)

1/5

2

6.5 mm

20%

(unhealthy looking)

(+ 0.5 mm)

Semimoist -mold not growing

-mostly green -most tips of plant yellow - some yellowing blades -overall healthy

Semi moist

-green/red/purple -lower leaves of one plant yellowing -One plant completely dead - 2 new plants sprouting -overall not healthy

No photo documentatio n for Bergamot


EDUCATION & COMMUNICATION High concentration shoots

Junegrass

17/20

2

115 mm

Moist

85%

30 mm

(+ 3mm)

(13 visible)

(+10 mm)

No sign of mold in seed pot

*plants are wilting

-mostly green with some yellowing of individual blades -most tips yellow -semi healthy

-mold seems to be dissipating Wild Bergamot

3/5

2

9.3 mm

60%

12 mm

(no change)

(- 2mm) * Widening of leaves

Semi dry; no sign of mold in either pots

No photo documentatio n for Bergamot

-mostly green -one lower leaf dead -slightly red at base of shoot -some deformation in the top leaves - overall healthy

Weekly notes: plants were kept inside for the duration of the week and did not need to be watered. 1 oz. of water was given to each plant after the observations were recorded only.

Discussion

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Proof of allelopathy requires demonstration of production of a phytotoxin(s) or a prophytotoxin(s) by a donor species, movement of the compound(s) and/or its phytotoxic derivatives(s) to a target plant at concentrations proven to cause harm to the target species, and measurement of a harmful effect to the target plant caused by the compound(s) in the environment containing both the donor and target plantsâ&#x20AC;? (Stephen et. al, 2009). In our research, we simplified the task by finding evidence that the target plant is affected through soil amendments. Allelopathy can be due to release of phytotoxins from live plants or to release of phytotoxins from decaying plant material. In our case we were not able to measure prophytotoxic or phytotoxic compounds produced by our donor plant, Spotted Knapweed (Centaurea stoebe). Instead, we measured interactions of plant growth based on the amount of Spotted Knapweed amendment that was added to the soil. Our results suggest that allelopathic effects are strongest on germinating seeds. We also observed a stronger impact on the broad leafed forb Wild Bergamot (Monarda fistulosa) more


EDUCATION & COMMUNICATION than with Junegrass (Koeleria macrantha) presumably because grasses are generally hardier plants than forbs. Our results showed that Bergamot germination and seedling growth was lower than in Junegrass. By implication, however, our data tentatively suggest that performance of individuals may have been somewhat hindered due to the timing of the experiment. Higher fitness of Junegrass could be largely due to its ability to live longer; although, it has been previously shown that an endophyte of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) had low allelopathic effects on the germination and emergence of tallgrass species (Renne et al.2004). Despite these issues, we still saw negative impact on both Bergamot and Junegrass when any concentration of either root or shoot powder was added to the soil.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the testing of how Spotted Knapweed roots or shoots influence plant growth can be improved upon. We saw suppressive effects despite the time of year and length of time the experiment was conducted. We also conclude that allelopathic effects are more visible with the root powder concentrations but that both root and shoots do affect plant growth. Our work shows that toxicity effects largely increase germination time and, in some cases, inhibit plant growth from the seed stage. These results are consistent with the prediction that allelopathic soil contamination inhibits or stunts the growth of other plant species.

Acknowledgements

On behalf of the East Kootenay Invasive Species Council we would like to thank Tipi Mountain Native Plants Nursery for supplying the Junegrass and Wild Bergamot seedlings and seeds along with the soil and planter pots. We would also like to acknowledge the generous support of our past and present funders that have allowed EKISC to progress as an organization to continue connecting the stakeholders, knowledge and technology needed to fight invasive species in the East Kootenay.

References


EDUCATION & COMMUNICATION Inderjit. (2005). Soil microorganisms: an important determinant of allelopathic activity. Plant Soil 274, 227–236.

Kuang, Y. (2015). The effects of Spotted Knapweed (Centaurea stoebe L.) on grassland plants and soils in British Columbia. Thompson Rivers University.

May, L., Baldwin, L.K. (2011). Linking field based studies with greenhouse experiments: the impact of Centaurea stoebe (=C. maculosa) in British Columbia grasslands. Biological Invasions, 13, 919–931. doi 10.1007/s10530-010-9879-4

Renne, I.J., Rios, B.G., Fehmi, J.S., and Tracy, B.F. 2004. Low allelopathic potential of an invasive forage grass on native grassland plants: a cause for encouragement? Basic Appl. Ecol. 5(3): 261–269. doi:10.1016/j.baae.2003.11.001.

Stephen et al. (2009). The case against (-)-catechin involvement in allelopathy of Centaurea stoebe (spotted knapweed) in Plant Signaling & Behavior 422-424.

Zouhar, K. (2001). Centaurea maculosa. In: Fire Effects Information System. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, Fire Sciences Laboratory. https://www.fs.fed.us/database/feis/plants/forb/censtom/all.html

Profile for EKISC

2018 EKISC Education & Communications Summary  

This is a summary of the 2018 education and communications activities from the East Kootenay Invasive Species Council.

2018 EKISC Education & Communications Summary  

This is a summary of the 2018 education and communications activities from the East Kootenay Invasive Species Council.

Profile for ekisc
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