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Cub Reporter Lawrence Central High School, Indianapolis, Indiana

cubonline.org • Vol.65 • Issue 4 • December 20, 2013

He’s the ‘Guy’

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Shawn Smith, of Pike Township, has been named pending superintendent of Lawrence Township Schools. Get to know Smith on Page 2.

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Should religious principles be taught in a public school setting? Should prayer be allowed? Join the discussion on Page 10.

See Page 23

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LC’s Student Athletes of Character hosted a Special Olympics halftime scrimmage. Check out the event on Page 12.

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LC’s Thespians are putting on The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged) beginning on Jan. 31. Read about it on Page 17.


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December 20, 2013 • Cub Reporter

NEWS What’s Online Follow the Spirit of Central through their 20-hour journey to Bands of America Grand National Finals

Clear, concise reporting on the good, the bad and the ugly. Someone’s got to do it.

Superintendent candidate announced: Shawn Smith Searching for our district’s next leader CarolineVarie carolinevariecub@gmail.com

Canvas will replace My Big Campus next school year

Starting next school year, My Big Campus will no longer be used at LC. The eCoaches and eLearning Coaches voted to discontinue the use of the educational social network. A new program, Canvas, will be used starting next year. My Big Campus will continue to be used until the end of this school year. For exclusive online content go to cubonline.org. Follow us on Twitter at @CubOnline and on Instagram at @cub_online. Have great story ideas or photos? Use #cubonline to share and you could be featured online or in the next issue of the Cub Reporter.

On the Cover Sophomore Kyle Guy leads the basketball team to triumph over the LN Wildcats 56-54. Following last year’s loss, the Bears brought back home the Hodgin Trophy. Cub photo/Michael Rice

News

The Lawrence Township School Board has selected Shawn Smith as the candidate for school superintendent. “I applied for Lawrence Township because of the Smith quality of this community. You have tremendous resources; the facilities are excellent. Something that’s really important for a superintendent … is the superintendent’s impression of the board and the leaders of the community,” Smith said. “After my first meeting with the Board of Education here I was extremely impressed with their backgrounds and their passion for education in this community…I’ll join any team when you have the quality you have in this district.” Smith served most recently as assistant superintendent of secondary education in Pike Township. He began his career in education as a social studies teacher at Indianapolis Public Schools (IPS). Smith is a graduate of IPS and was a first generation college graduate, earning his bachelor’s and master’s degrees at Indiana University in Bloomington, and his Ed.S. and Ph.D. from Indiana State University. He has worked at every level of education. He said he grew up with a “humble background” and “a strong commitment to education.” Smith currently lives in Indianapolis with his wife and three children. Two of his children will attend Lawrence Township schools. “I love my kids and once they come here…once they get into high school,

we’re going to stay,” Smith said. come to school to He describes himself as a “student cause havoc and See related story on person” and said that students can ex- discourse for oth- Page 8. pect to see him in schools every week, as ers, they’ll see he currently spends two days a week at me…I have a firm hand when it comes Pike High School. to discipline,” he said. “I am excited about the opportunity Principal Rocky Valadez said that alto work in this district because Law- though he does not yet know Smith very rence has a great reputation, and that well, he is “optimistic.” reputation is built on the backs of great “I’m looking forward to being able students,” Smith said. “My goal for each to spend some more time with him to student… is to first and foremost get a get a feel for what he expects out of LC quality education. When you walk out and expects out of me as a leader, and of these schools… that we have you pre- what he expects out of our staff and stupared to start your future.” dents…,” Valadez said. “…but also to Superintendent search board chair- hear what new ideas he has.” person and school board vice president The superintendent contract ends Kathy Varie said that Smith’s “pas- June 30, 2017. Smith said he will remain sion for education and his student first in the district for at least five to seven philosophy were immediately appar- years. ent.” The search board and the Board “I am a product of Indianapolis. of Education used the Leadership Pro- This is where I was born, and I love file developed by employees, students, this city. I don’t have any plans of leavparents, elected officials and commu- ing,” he said. “I’m excited about being nity members to in Lawrence and I guide them in will be here as long their candidate “I applied for Lawrence as the community Township because of the selection. wants me to stay.” “Dr. Smith’s quality of this community.” Smith said the abilities and exbest way to support Shawn Smith periences aligned a superintendent superintendent candidate closely to the is for students, emcharacteristics ployees and comthat were developed in our 27 communi- munity members to tell their superinty focus groups and online and written tendent what they want, and to support surveys: student-centered, communica- the community. tor, visionary and a consensus builder,” “If I showed up to a meeting and 200 Varie said. “The Board is very excited to people came and they were concerned begin working with Dr. Smith.” about something, I absolutely embrace Smith said one of his immediate it, I love it, because what it tells me is goals will be to increase the graduation that I got people ready to work, who are rate. While he was assistant superinten- willing to do what’s right on behalf of dent at Pike High School, the graduation the community,” he said. rate reached 92 percent. A public hearing will be held Dec. 23 “When I look at students, regardless at 5:30 p.m. at the Lawrence Education of race, background…it doesn’t matter. and Community Center to discuss and I think what’s possible, because each of hear objections to the proposed contract. you have the skills to do something spe“I love what I do…because we work cial as an adult,” he said. with the future,” Smith said. “The most Smith also said he plans to get dis- important thing we have is each other, ciplinary issues “under control right and developing and cultivating each away.” other to do great things…that’s the pow“If I’ve got any knuckleheads that er of man.”


News

December 20, 2013 • Cub Reporter

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District to implement Teen Court CarleyLanich carleylanichcub@gmail.com Administrators at Lawrence Central and Lawrence North high schools are researching alternative disciplinary actions, including a partnership with Reach for Youth’s Teen Court program. The program, currently in use at schools such as Warren Central, allows students facing suspension or expulsion to be tried by a local judge or lawyer

Hands Raised

in front of a jury of their peers. The jury would be made up of a select group of upperclassmen who have been trained by Reach for Youth representatives. Trials proceed in a formal manner, similar to real court trials. A legal guardian of the accused student must be present during the trial process. In such court cases, the panel of student jurors selects from a variety of consequences, such as community service, as opposed to sentencing a suspension or expulsion.

To avoid student biases, a pretrial hearing occurs where jurors are asked if they know the student in question. Students may be asked to leave the jury if such connection exists. The ultimate verdict in the case is made by the presiding lawyer or judge, rather than by the students. Although only in its early planning stages, principal Rocky Valadez envisions blended LC and LN trials occurring once a week at the Lawrence Education and Community

Center (LECC). “One of the things we learned from Warren is that they were using (Teen Court) primarily for attendance related issues,” Valadez said. “A majority of (cases) were for cutting classes and habitual tardies.” Following the return of the Tardy Room, LC administrators has been looking to cut down on both tardies and truancies. Beginning next semester, administrators will be actively “campaigning tardies,” using posters and student produced

“I think it would be a good educational opportunity for students to get real world experience about courts.”

“I don’t think that this would be a good idea. There could be a lot of potential bias on the student panel.”

“No, because I wouldn’t want to be put in a situation where I decide someone’s future.”

Jessie Thomas senior

Alex Aktinson junior

Jakeline Nieto sophomore

videos to See related story appeal to on Pages 4 and 8. students. The Teen Court program for Lawrence, still in its planning stages, will likely not be seen until midway through second semester at the earliest. According to Valadez, potential student jurors will be identified in January to attend training sessions that month. The district’s goal is to be finished with training by Feb. 1 and to begin the Teen Court program on a trial basis in the spring.

“This is a good idea because some things that are important to teachers are not important to students.”

Kiara Brantley freshman

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December 20, 2013 • Cub Reporter

News to Use Mark Your Calendar

Dec. 20: Final exams end with M8 and then M7 classes Dec. 20: Winter break begins at 3:40 p.m. Jan. 6: Teachers return to school following winter break Jan. 7: Students return to school following winter break Jan. 20: Martin Luther King Jr. Day is celebrated; no school

News Briefs Study halls move to the 400s Study halls are moving to rooms in the Student Life Center. This change will allow students easier access to guidance counselors and the MAC during their study halls.

Sales for 2014 yearbook to end in January

Orders for the 2014 yearbook must be made by Jan. 20. The cost is $70. Orders may be made through LC’s bookstore or through the Herff Jones website at www.YearbookOrderCenter.com. LC’s order number is 8457. The website provides details on ordering a book, creating a senior and/or business ad and submitting photos that may be included in the book. The book will be delivered to school in May.

For Parents Info on school delays, closings available early a.m.

When bad weather forces the delay or closing of school for the day, families may get news through local television and radio stations as well as the school district’s website: www. ltschools.org. The district also sends a phone call to school families. Days that are cancelled must be made up. The designated make-up days are at the end of March.

‘Honor an Educator’ available

The Lawrence Township School Foundation offers the “Honor an Educator” program to families as a way to thank teachers, administrators, bus drivers or other staff members who have helped make their children successful. Information and online forms are at www.msdltf.org. Information compiled by Cub Reporter staff

News

Community North holds group grief counseling MolliLoftus

At the end of the nine weeks the group does a memorial service on their molliloftuscub@gmail.com last meeting. When the Community A grieving group called Community Healing Hearts groups were first startHealing Hearts has been started at Law- ed, many of the group members felt that rence Central. The group, led by youth they’d never had a chance to say goodgrief specialist Kelly Petersohn, meets bye to their lost loved ones. “So the group requested an opportuonce a week for nine to 10 weeks during nity to hold a memorial service to honor school hours. There are eight LC students involved their loved ones and provide a chance to with the program right now. Petersohn say what they wanted to say — in their also travels to several other Lawrence own way. Many read poems, some read eulogies, and most importantly all expeTownship schools. “The program itself was created to rienced healing,” Petersohn said. When new students express interest, expand the help of kids,” Petersohn said. additional groups In the group, will begin based students that ex- “These groups give the kids on their schedules. perience death get “Advice that together to talk an opportunity to not feel I would give to about the feelings alone.” that come with Kelly Petersohn others that atlosing someone, youth grief specialist tend Community Healing Hearts in their story, and the the future is that it is OK to get out of changes that happen in the family. “Grief can be so isolating. These your comfort zone because it benefits groups give the kids an opportunity to you a lot in the end. And helps you with coping with your loved one’s death,” a not feel alone,” Petersohn said. The group does a lot of art-based group member said. Students can see their guidance activities. According to Petersohn, there is research that supports art therapy, es- counselors if they are interested in joinpecially in working with children and ing the group. “The most helpful group topic for adolescents who are dealing with grief. “I believe art provides an opportuni- me was ‘Story Sharing” because we ty for students to express thoughts and shared our stories with other people and feelings that are often too hard to talk some of them had the same stories,” another group member said. about with words,” Petersohn said.

Tardy room returns BrittannieTravis

brittannietraviscub@gmail.com The Tardy Room is making a return next semester. “ . . . I do not anticipate any changes from how the room operated when we first implemented it at LC in the fall of 2011,” Ryan Banas, dean of operations, said. Last year the Tardy Room was located near the Dean’s Office. If students were not in their classrooms when the bell rang, they were to report to the Tardy Room. Administrators would write passes for the students to go back to class, but the tardy was marked on students’ records.

Banas suspects See related stories the Tardy Room on Pages 3 and 8. will function in the exact manner, but with an elevated role from LC’s security staff. Plus, students should be expecting more hall sweeps during every passing period of every day. Issues with numerous students failing to be on time to class and skipping multiple classes in one week are two of the many reasons for the recent change. “All areas of the school will be swept in all departments and in all locations,” Banas said. Administrators are still discussing changes regarding other changes related to school policy.

Cub earns Pacemaker CarolineVarie

carolinevariecub@gmail.com The Cub Reporter has won the Pacemaker award, among the most prestigious awards for scholastic newspapers across America. The winners were announced at the National Scholastic Press Association national high school journalism convention in Boston Nov. 16. Finalists for the Pacemaker award are judged on coverage and content, quality, leadership, in-depth reporting, design and art. This year there were 70 winners out of the 350 submissions for Pacemakers, with only two being from Indiana. The Carmel HiLite is Indiana’s other Pacemaker. Homestead High School in Fort Wayne was a finalist. “The Pacemaker is considered the Pulitzer Prize for scholastic newspapers,” Cub Reporter adviser Elizabeth Granger said. “This is something that doesn’t come easily, so when you are the recipient of it, you really know that someone out there in the journalism world has read your paper and thinks it is one of the top scholastic papers. It really puts a feather in your cap.” The Pacemaker award is based on issues from the 2012-2013 school year; the editor in chief was Samantha Strong. She is now a freshman at Indiana University. “I am always proud of the staff I worked with during my time as Cub Reporter editor in chief,” Strong said. “It was so much fun to watch the staff and myself grow throughout my junior and senior years. We grew into an accomplished, award-winning staff that came together as a family, and I could not have asked for anything more. I always beam with pride when I think about the hours we spent together in the newsroom.” Former sports editor Alex Kryah was “ecstatic” when he learned that the Cub had been awarded a Pacemaker. “I know it’s been a while since the Cub earned a Pacemaker, so it’s exciting that I was a part of a staff that won this prestigious award,” Kryah said. He is now a freshman at Bradley University in Illinois. Editor’s Note: Jayden Kelly contributed to this story.


News

December 20, 2013 • Cub Reporter

Bringing holiday cheer

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to the

STAGE

The annual Holiday Spectacular was on Dec. 12 and 13. It features all the performing arts programs including band, orchestra, choir, dance and Santa.

Members of Sweet Sensations, senior Megan Miller and juniors Molly Conner and Jacy Inskeep, sing George Frideric Handel’s “Hallelujah Chorus.”

Freshman Alan Jiang plays violin as first chair of the Serenata Orchestra. He is performing the “Hallelujah Chorus” as the choir accompanies the orchestra with singing. Later in the show he and senior Sally Finkel play as Sweet Sensations sing Edward Elgar’s “Snow.”

The LC Players come to life as a Christmas tree as they help a little girl discover the magic of Christmas.

Seniors Whitney Conners and Scott Van Wye open the Holiday Spectacular by singing Louis Armstrong’s “Baby, It’s Cold Outside.” Van Wye acts as Don Burgundy, a parody of Ron Burgundy from Anchorman.

Sophomore Kahla Hunter, a soloist from the symphonic choir, sings Leonard Cohen’s “Hallelujah.”

Sophomore Elise Williams dances to “A Wintery Mix” as part of the beginning intermediate class.

Junior Kari Boyd as one of Santa’s elves greets Santa as he comes to see the Holiday Spectacular. Cub photos/Amanda Boyce


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December 20, 2013 • Cub Reporter

News

Winter formal to be Jan. 18 BrittannieTravis brittannietraviscub@gmail.com

Cub photo/Michael Rice Seniors Mariah Manley, Rena Shaw and Allison Reid rehearse before school. Their show will be presented in competition for the first time on Feb. 1 at Pike High School.

Winter guard show announced AnnaAngrick

annaangrickcub@gmail.com The winter guard’s new show was announced Dec. 3 with the name still under wraps. Last year, the group, composed of World Guard and “A” guard, got sixth place at the Winter Guard International Finals with their show “Something in the Air,” and members are hopeful for this year’s new show. “Unlike last year, our new show doesn’t have any props. It’s mostly focusing on the soundtrack, which is aca-

pella music. There isn’t a bass line that I can detect very well, so it should be interesting,” senior World Guard member Allison Reid said. The group’s first competition is Feb. 1 at Pike High School, and they are preparing by practicing before school and on the weekends. “This show will be different than any winter show that I’ve done. It’ll be much more sophisticated than the others as well. It will be a good season, that’s for sure,” Reid said. Senior “A” guard member Meredythe Cross also said the show is “com-

plex.” “There’s no See related story on heartbeat, and Page 8. the guard has to do their routines based off of words and made up counts,” Cross said. Senior World Guard member Tavia Easton-Seard is excited for this year’s flag feature. “...it’s creative, but it has to take faith from the guard to deliver the message of the music,” Easton-Seard said. “The guards are off to a great start and I cannot wait for their debuts,” guard director David Crook said.

A winter semi-formal masquerade dance will be held 8-11 p.m. Jan. 18. This is the first time in three years LC has hosted a winter formal event. The event is co-hosted by National Honor Society (NHS) and the Student Advisory Council (SAC). Senior and NHS president Bailey Garey and senior class president Lena Nguyen co-created the event. “I’m so excited to have the winter formal this year,” Garey said. The theme is “a snowy masquerade where all your fantasies come true.” Students will be able to wear masks hiding their identities. Another feature will be a candy bar where students can create their own candy bags to take home. “Lena and I have spent a lot of time planning this event,” Garey said, “. . . the winter formal will be a classy night that both underclassmen and seniors alike can enjoy.” Tickets will be sold during lunches. The prices are $8 for singles and $14 for couples. “It’s been a success in the past,” Nguyen said. “The officers would like to do something memorable for student council.”


News

December 20, 2013 • Cub Reporter

In the CLASSROOM: ceramics

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Junior Sam Taylor (above) uses carving tools to shape a teapot in ceramics class, and junior Kiaris French (right) hand carves a teapot. Nancy Barnes’ ceramics class has been working on constructing and glazing teapots based on a student-chosen theme for the class’s first semester final project. The projects were first sculpted by hand using the coiling technique. The plastic clay was then fired and glazed with multiple colors. The final product is a shiny or matte finish with bright color. Cub photos/Carley Lanich

carry-out only

Expires Aug. 1, 2014


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December 20, 2013 • Cub Reporter

Opinions

OPINIONS Cub Reporter Early out? Maybe.

Students’ perspectives on problems affecting Lawrence Central’s halls and the world beyond 56th Street.

Contact us.

Cub Reporter Lawrence Central High School 7300 E. 56th St. Indianapolis, IN 46226 (317) 964-7400 cubonline.org Facebook Twitter Instagram

Tell us.

Letters to the editor are welcome, but they are limited to 200 words. The author’s name will be printed with the letter. Letters should not contain obscene or libelous language. Letters may be submitted in Room 132, placed in the mailbox of Cub Reporter adviser Elizabeth Granger or mailed to her at elizabethgranger@msdlt.k12.in.us.

Purpose.

To provide news to the Lawrence Central community.

Display advertising.

Businesses may advertise in the Cub Reporter if their ad adheres to guidelines. The advertising policy is available in Room 132 or via email at elizabethgranger@msdlt.k12. in.us.

Corrections.

The Cub Reporter corrects its mistakes. If you believe the Cub Reporter made a mistake in a previous issue, please let us know by contacting a member of the staff or sending an email to elizabethgranger@msdlt. k12.in.us.

Staff. Print Editor-in-Chief Carley Lanich

Business Manager Anna Zanoni

Online Editor-in-Chief Leah Arenz

Reporters Anna Angrick Chloe Feyock Tajhanae Gillard Haley Hamilton Rebecca Johnson Jayden Kelly Justice Springer Jordan Williams Logan Young

News Editors Darian Benson Caroline Varie Opinions Editor Chad Sharp Features Editors Katie Billman Molli Loftus A+E Editors Ali Duff Brittannie Travis Sports Editors Jacob Helmus Drew Nixon

Photographers Amanda Boyce Michael Rice Adviser Elizabeth Granger Principal Rocky Valadez

Ultimately, graduating early is a large step that should be thought through thoroughly. While it does carry many positive possibilities, the option of early graduation must be weighed considerably before making a final decision. As a student, have you taken every class of interest? Do you have all necessary credits? Have you explored your education at LC to your maximum potential? Will you use this extra time out of school productively? If the answer is no to any of these questions, you might want to rethink graduating early. Early graduation is an excellent opportunity for seniors who choose to use their time out of school wisely. If a student’s sole purpose of early graduation is to simply avoid going to school, how likely is this student to use their time out of school productively? With that being said, there are many benefits to graduating early. Not every student learns at the same pace or is pursuing the same interests. For students with enough credits, See related story early graduation opens the on Page 14. door to a vast world of opportunities ranging from extended work experience to additional education opportunities. Students can use the time they would ordinarily be in school to develop their own goals and work towards their intended future. Why should a student sit in a classroom of no interest to their future career, when they could be using this time to gain real world experience? In other cases, students may use this time for per-

sonal reasons or to help support their families. No student is the same. With the various educational opportunities provided in Lawrence Township, early graduation is certainly an option worth exploring.

• It is sad that many families will be divided this holiday season. Even though their duty is important, it just seems wrong that parents will miss Christmas with their children. Children with both their parents at home should feel grateful. • It is obvious that there is a problem with tardies, skipping and attendance at LC. The administration is making an attempt to solve this issue with the reintegration of the Tardy Room. It is difficult to find a balance between disciplining students and forcing them to miss class time. • I think it is great that Ismin is marrying the guy she loves. Love at first sight is rare, and she is very lucky that she found it so early in life. Many Americans put down arranged marriage, but with a nearly 50 percent divorce rate here, maybe something should change.

• Winter guard can be good for just about anyone who wants to make improvements in hand-eye coordination, dexterity, speed, agility, concentration and discipline. And it’s great fun. • Having a new superintendent with new goals for the township is exciting. A higher graduation rate and more discipline would be beneficial to all schools in Lawrence Township. • Special Olympics See related stories on gives athletes with intelPages 11, 4, 15, 6, 2, 12 lectual disabilities the same opportunities that athletes at LC have. The half-time scrimmage between the Special Olympics athletes and some of the LC Athletes of Character showed how much the two are similar, and it’s important to raise awareness for what they are all capable of.

Cub graphic/Anna Zanoni

30-second editorials


Opinions

December 20, 2013 • Cub Reporter

The Life Obscura by Ali Duff

Quirky holiday films to watch over break With Christmas coming up, it’s the perfect time to talk about the quirky origins of the Christmas tree. While Germany is known for being the showrunner of the concept of such decorated trees, the first recorded account of a Christmas tree actually came from Latvia during the 1500s. During each Christmas Eve, bachelor merchants would don all black attire and bring rose adorned evergreen trees to the merchant’s guild in the port city of Riga. Upon gathering there, the single merchants would then set the trees ablaze in a toast for the upcoming year. Christmas is also a great time to watch a movie. One of the most well-known traditions on Christmas Day is the 24 hour marathon of A Christmas Story on TBS. Kicking off at 8 p.m. on Christmas Eve, A Christmas Story is based on the semi fictional anecdotes of raconteur Jean Shepard, as contained in his book In God We Trust, All Others Pay Cash. The film “Christmas is also a stars Peter Billingsley as 9-year-old great time to watch a Ralphie Parker, a movie.” boy who desperately wants a Red Ryder BB gun for Christmas. Over the first three acts of the movie, Ralphie attempts to convince his parents (portrayed by Darren McGavin and Melinda Dillon) to buy him the BB gun using various schemes. Along the way, he simultaneously runs into people who object to his wish, telling him that he’ll only “shoot his eye out.” Another hilariously funny holiday movie is Elf. Elf follows a human young man, Buddy (Will Ferrell) ,who has been raised by elves in the North Pole for most of his life. Upon growing suspicious of his origins due to his tall stature and failure at toy making, he is finally told by Santa Claus that he was given up for adoption by his now deceased human mother, Susan Wells, and that his father, Walter Hobbs (James Caan), never knew of his existence. Buddy, inspired by the realization that he has a real family, bids goodbye to his friends in the North Pole and sets off to New York City to find his father. Along with Ferrell and Caan, Elf also has hilariously good acting by Mary Steenburgen as Emily Hobbs (Buddy’s stepmother), Daniel Tay as Michael Hobbs (Buddy’s 12-year-old half brother), and Zooey Deschanel as Jovie (a young department store employee whom Buddy develops a crush on). Other than being seen on TV, Elf can be viewed on Netflix and rented at most video stores.

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The real reason for the season December. It’s a month filled with mistletoe, Christmas movie marathons and hot chocolate. And as any American superstore would advertise, December is about holidays and more importantly, the gifts that come with them. What society fails to realize, however, is that the greatest gifts are the ones that can’t be wrapped. No, I’m not talking about a 64 inch television set that can’t fit under the tree. I’m talking about the intangible gifts like being able to participate in the season of giving, break out the ugly Christmas sweaters and spend the holidays with the people you care about the most. The thing I’ve realized the most over my 18 years is that it doesn’t matter who you are, what you have or what holiday you’re celebrating. What matters is that you’re surrounded by your closest family and friends and express your thankfulness for all of them. And all too often, we take those intangible gifts for granted.

season, both LC See related story and LN came to- on Page 12. gether and helped make the night a success. In my opinion, that’s the reason for the season. Focusing on giving back to the community and being a part of something bigger than yourself is priceless. That’s what the season is: priceless. It’s not about the money. Too much emphasis has been placed on the materialistic aspects of the holiday season, like the by Katie Billman decorations, food and gifts under the tree. Although it helps our society thrive economically, our Last Wednesday, the LC society will be doomed if we don’t Student Athletes of Character come together for the betterment of raised $550 to go toward Special mankind. Olympics, an This year, organization that “...the greatest gifts are try raising provides yearthe ones that can’t be money instead round athletic of spending training to chilwrapped.” it needlessly. dren and adults Volunteer your with intellectual disabilities. Although the fundrais- time and talents to a local organization. Help the community er was placed in the middle of the around you. biggest rivalry game of the whole

The competition is over and the winner has been chosen. Sophomore Raven Carr has won a free lunch with Yours Truly, Bubba the Bear. She’ll bring a friend with her to the Commons soon after school resumes following winter break to enjoy a not-so-ordinary meal. The lunch will have just about everything a person could want — nice food, a candle, a bear in a suit. Remember, Raven will be able to invite a friend, so you might want to be extra nice to her. Whoever Raven decides to bring is her business. And they’ll surely dress appropriately. They may not have to dress as nice as me, but I’m sure they will try not to wear anything too casual. The calendar says it isn’t quite winter yet — that comes Saturday — but it’s as cold as if it were winter already. You’ll have to bundle up as much as you can with mittens, scarves and even boots, because after all, you don’t have as much fur as I do (seems like quite a setback for humans). This winter, I will resist the urge to hibernate for long enough to finish

The basketball season helps, that’s for sure. Never have I been happier for an indoor sport. I will have to go out to get nuts and berries eventually, but it is an action that I dread nevertheless. I’m thinking that instead of standing out in the cold and getting frostbite, I might as well just go to the grocery store. The “Lunch With Bubba” contest may be over, but I still encourage you to follow the Cub by Bubba the Bear Reporter, tweet to us, and check our page every once in a while. This way, you can keep up with out the sports season, so naturally us and not miss any special events I will have to stay hyped up on (like another lunch with Bubba). berries, nuts, salmon and ungodly This week we have had an amounts of juice and water. interesting With it being schedule due to so cold outside, “Raven can bring a finals. I hope you there’s bound friend with her, so you studied well and to be ice on the ground. So remight want to be extra didn’t stress out too much. But the member: No matnice to her.” week is almost ter if you drive, over, and you’ve walk, or ride the only a little bit longer. bus to school, you should all be I hope you had a great 2013. careful. I care about the well being have a phenomenal winter break, of each and every one of you, so and I wish you all a great 2014! stay as safe as you can.

Organized Chaos

‘Lunch With Bubba’ winner announced

Can’t bear it any longer


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December 20, 2013 • Cub Reporter

Con

Opinions

Pro you So Say Religion in schools

See related story on Page 14.

CarolineVarie carolinevariecub@gmail.com

Should the words “under God” be in the Pledge of Allegiance?

No. Although participating in the Pledge of Allegiance is optional, students should be able to honor their country without any religious association. As a country founded in a fight for liberty and equality, it seems irrational to incorporate the beliefs of a particular monotheistic religion.

HaleyHamilton haleyhamiltoncub@gmail.com

Yes. The pledge has included the words “under God” for as long as I can remember. Changing this now wouldn’t be “making everything equal”. It would be saying that the values of people who don’t believe in God are being held over those of the people that do.

Should coaches be permitted to lead prayer before sporting events? I believe that coaches should be allowed to lead prayer only with the consent of each member of their team. Again, a student should not be put in a position to choose between supporting his team or his beliefs.

Yes, If the players are OK with it, then I don’t see a problem. The reason it is even being questioned is the schools don’t want to exclude or offend anyone. If a person isn’t OK with the prayer, then he can choose to not join in.

Should Creationism be taught in schools? Teaching Creationism in science classes would be disregarding everything that students know science to be: based in factual evidence. Creationism not only lacks scientific evidence, but it also promotes the beliefs of a single religion.

If evolution is being taught, then Creationism should be as well. This goes back to cutting religion out of schools because they don’t want to offend people. They don’t take into account that some students are religious and do want to learn about it.

Speak Your Mind: What role do you think religion should play in schools ? I wish they would teach more about religion. Every religion, not just one, should be emphasized. Jessica Hodson, 12 I believe that it should stay where it is now. It’s not avoided, but it’s not forced on people. Timothy Wilbanks, 12

We should take time out in every day to talk about religion. One block each day should be reserved for it. Daija Miller, 11

Religion should play a large role because kids need Jesus for a source of guidance. Aaren Bandy, 11

None. School is supposed to bring people together, not separate them by religion. Marylu De Los Santos, 10 Religion should not play any role because not everyone has the same religion. Daniel Blackwell, 10

None, because people might get offended if they are not really religious. Tyra Edwads, 9 None. People might think that a certain religion is being imposed on them.

Marlon Wells, 9


Features

FEATURES

December 20, 2013 • Cub Reporter

11

In-depth coverage of students, global issues, rising trends and the not-so-average Bear

Source/MCT Campus/Kim Kim Foster-Tobin/The State

Deployed parents often miss important family occasions RebeccaJohnson

make do.” The military has been part of the rebeccajohnsoncub@gmail.com extended Osborne family for some Senior Ashley Osborne’s dad is time. “My dad’s dad and older brother in the National Guard and has been both joined the military, so I think that deployed to several war zones in recent inspired him,” she said. “It was hard years — Iraq, Afghanistan, Bosnia. And family-wise when he was deployed. he’s been away for several significant Not being able to talk to him every day, family celebrations. missing birthdays and holidays, too.” “He’s missed several birthdays, Osborne’s father has been in the Thanksgivings, his wedding anniverNational Guard for 28 years and has saries,” Osborne said. But he’s always been deployed three times in the last been home for Christmas. five years. He’s a helicopter pilot. “I’m thankAnd, Osful that he enjoys borne said, he has “I will miss him terribly and his job,” Osborne will look forward to his visits been an inspirasaid. “And I’m tion through his home. May God keep my glad he’s always strength and courbeen able to come boy safe.” age. home for Christ“I am totally Kimberly Clark mas because I mother of senior Brandon Powell inspired,” Osborne know some aren’t said. “I actually so lucky.” have my pilot’s license because of how She continued, “My family underinspired my dad has made me.” stands how much his job means to him The desire to serve is not only with and protecting the freedoms and rights parents but also students like senior of America, so while we miss him, we Brandon Powell. He is signed up to go

About four out of five children cope with deployed parents better when their other parent/family members support the deployment. Cub graphics/Leah Arenz, Source/font/dafont. com/Brandon Turner, Source info/militaryonesource.mil

on standby in January, which means he could be called any time to go in for training. “I feel excited, pumped up and a little scared,” Powell said. Powell’s mother, Kimberly Clark, said, “Brandon had been talking about the Armed Forces for a few years. However, I thought it was just another option in life that could be a possibility.” At first, Clark was not warm to the idea of her only child going into the military. “For months I tried to talk him out of this decision, and our family did as well. I was a bit afraid with him turning 18 in June that he would sign on

the dotted line without me, so I made an appointment with the recruiter for the three of us to sit down and discuss it,” Clark said. “At that point, I realized that he was serious in his decision with the next chapter of his life.” These soldiers have a strong desire to make a difference in life, which they are fulfilling. Although having a loved one who is in the Army and won’t be home for the holidays can really affect people and how they feel, knowing they will be home again soon after serving the country keeps hope alive. “I will miss him terribly and will look forward to his visits home,” Clark said. “May God keep my boy safe.”


12

December 20, 2013 • Cub Reporter

Features

Special Olympics athlete Gavin Sterchi looks to pass a ball while fellow Special Olympics athlete Richard Andrews plays lockdown defense during the half-time scrimmage of the LC vs. LN varsity basketball game last Wednesday. Cub photo/Michael Rice

LC Athletes of Character raise more than $500 for Special Olympics Indiana KatieBillman katiebillmancub@gmail.com

Top: Special Olympics athlete Gavin Sterchi pats senior Braxton Krieg on the back as the participants of the unified Special Olympics scrimmage come off the court. “It was surprising how competitive the athletes were and how badly they wanted to win,” Krieg said. Krieg participated in the half-time scrimmage, LC mentor Kenny Randall officiated the game and Special Olympics provided the coaches. Bottom: Some of the LC Athletes of Character sell raffle tickets and collect donations before the game, which was dedicated to raising awareness and funds for Special Olympics. Cub photos/Michael Rice

The Lawrence Central Athletes of Character raised $550 for Special Olympics at the LC vs. LN varsity basketball game last Wednesday. Special Olympics is a worldwide organization that provides year-round sports training and athletic competition in a variety of Olympic-type sports for children and adults with intellectual disabilities. Before the basketball game, the Athletes of Character educated the incoming crowd with information on the history of the organization, ways people can donate and other ways people can get involved. They also had a poster hanging on the wall for people to sign, symbolizing their pledge to end the use of the de-

13

Right: Principal Rocky Valadez congratulates senior Mike Hughes after the Special Olympics scrimmage on a game well played. Cub photo/Michael Rice

makes slam dunk

rogatory “R-word” commonly said in reference to people with intellectual disabilities. Tickets were also sold for three different raffles. $1 raffle tickets were sold for a chance to win a variety of gift cards donated by businesses like Subway, Incrediplex and Sundae’s Ice Cream. $2 raffle tickets were sold for a chance to win a basketball signed by LC’s varsity team and a 2013-2014 boys basketball T-shirt. $3 raffle tickets were sold for a chance to win a pair of Pacers tickets or a pair of Butler basketball tickets. Winners were announced after third quarter and prizes were claimed in the athletic office. The basketball game featured a half-time scrimmage between local Special Olympics athletes and four of the Athletes of Character, which was the first of its kind at LC. “It was a once-in-a-lifetime experience for these athletes and one that they and their families

will never forget,” Lee Lonzo of minimum of 80 volunteer hours the Champions Together organi- and raise a minimum of $1,500 zation said. for Special Olympics in Indiana. Champions Together is the The halftime basketball partnership between the Indiana scrimmage was an example of High School Athletic Association one of Special Olympics’ “uniand Special Olympics Indiana fied sports,” sports that pair up that came Special Olymabout in 2012. pics athletes The partnerwith partners “We appreciate the ship aimed to (without dissupport the LC Bears have students abilities) for engage in training and have provided to leadership and competition. Champions Together discover ways “We apto give back to as we continue to preciate the their schools support the promote leadership, and communiLC Bears have awareness, inclusion ties. LC joined provided to the Champions and healthy activities...” Champions Together as Together Banner Program Lee Lonzo we continue to this year, Special Olympics coordinator promote leadership, awarewhich proness, inclusion vides a banner and healthy activities for those to all schools that plan activities in our schools and communities to raise awareness for Special with intellectual disabilities,” Olympics, have a minimum of 20 student athletes providing a Lonzo said. “The Bears’ efforts

reflected the best aspects of education based sports and gives us all reason to celebrate the efforts and attitudes of our current students.” Donations were collected throughout the night, with the bulk of money being collected by the Athletes of Character while the halftime game was going on. According to Special Olympics’ website, 83 percent of all money donated to Special Olympics goes toward sports training, competitions and other programs. More than 4 million athletes have been served, more than 300,000 coaches have participated in the program and more than 70,000 competitions have been played. Volunteering opportunities are available by contacting the foundation directly or by visiting the Special Olympics website at http://soindiana.org/. Editor’s note: Haley Hamilton contributed to this story.

Special Olympics athlete Tommy Sliva puts up a floater for his team in the Special Olympics half-time scrimmage, the first of its kind at LC. Cub photo/Michael Rice


12

December 20, 2013 • Cub Reporter

Features

Special Olympics athlete Gavin Sterchi looks to pass a ball while fellow Special Olympics athlete Richard Andrews plays lockdown defense during the half-time scrimmage of the LC vs. LN varsity basketball game last Wednesday. Cub photo/Michael Rice

LC Athletes of Character raise more than $500 for Special Olympics Indiana KatieBillman katiebillmancub@gmail.com

Top: Special Olympics athlete Gavin Sterchi pats senior Braxton Krieg on the back as the participants of the unified Special Olympics scrimmage come off the court. “It was surprising how competitive the athletes were and how badly they wanted to win,” Krieg said. Krieg participated in the half-time scrimmage, LC mentor Kenny Randall officiated the game and Special Olympics provided the coaches. Bottom: Some of the LC Athletes of Character sell raffle tickets and collect donations before the game, which was dedicated to raising awareness and funds for Special Olympics. Cub photos/Michael Rice

The Lawrence Central Athletes of Character raised $550 for Special Olympics at the LC vs. LN varsity basketball game last Wednesday. Special Olympics is a worldwide organization that provides year-round sports training and athletic competition in a variety of Olympic-type sports for children and adults with intellectual disabilities. Before the basketball game, the Athletes of Character educated the incoming crowd with information on the history of the organization, ways people can donate and other ways people can get involved. They also had a poster hanging on the wall for people to sign, symbolizing their pledge to end the use of the de-

13

Right: Principal Rocky Valadez congratulates senior Mike Hughes after the Special Olympics scrimmage on a game well played. Cub photo/Michael Rice

makes slam dunk

rogatory “R-word” commonly said in reference to people with intellectual disabilities. Tickets were also sold for three different raffles. $1 raffle tickets were sold for a chance to win a variety of gift cards donated by businesses like Subway, Incrediplex and Sundae’s Ice Cream. $2 raffle tickets were sold for a chance to win a basketball signed by LC’s varsity team and a 2013-2014 boys basketball T-shirt. $3 raffle tickets were sold for a chance to win a pair of Pacers tickets or a pair of Butler basketball tickets. Winners were announced after third quarter and prizes were claimed in the athletic office. The basketball game featured a half-time scrimmage between local Special Olympics athletes and four of the Athletes of Character, which was the first of its kind at LC. “It was a once-in-a-lifetime experience for these athletes and one that they and their families

will never forget,” Lee Lonzo of minimum of 80 volunteer hours the Champions Together organi- and raise a minimum of $1,500 zation said. for Special Olympics in Indiana. Champions Together is the The halftime basketball partnership between the Indiana scrimmage was an example of High School Athletic Association one of Special Olympics’ “uniand Special Olympics Indiana fied sports,” sports that pair up that came Special Olymabout in 2012. pics athletes The partnerwith partners “We appreciate the ship aimed to (without dissupport the LC Bears have students abilities) for engage in training and have provided to leadership and competition. Champions Together discover ways “We apto give back to as we continue to preciate the their schools support the promote leadership, and communiLC Bears have awareness, inclusion ties. LC joined provided to the Champions and healthy activities...” Champions Together as Together Banner Program Lee Lonzo we continue to this year, Special Olympics coordinator promote leadership, awarewhich proness, inclusion vides a banner and healthy activities for those to all schools that plan activities in our schools and communities to raise awareness for Special with intellectual disabilities,” Olympics, have a minimum of 20 student athletes providing a Lonzo said. “The Bears’ efforts

reflected the best aspects of education based sports and gives us all reason to celebrate the efforts and attitudes of our current students.” Donations were collected throughout the night, with the bulk of money being collected by the Athletes of Character while the halftime game was going on. According to Special Olympics’ website, 83 percent of all money donated to Special Olympics goes toward sports training, competitions and other programs. More than 4 million athletes have been served, more than 300,000 coaches have participated in the program and more than 70,000 competitions have been played. Volunteering opportunities are available by contacting the foundation directly or by visiting the Special Olympics website at http://soindiana.org/. Editor’s note: Haley Hamilton contributed to this story.

Special Olympics athlete Tommy Sliva puts up a floater for his team in the Special Olympics half-time scrimmage, the first of its kind at LC. Cub photo/Michael Rice


14 December 20, 2013 • Cub Reporter

Features

Christmas for non-Christians 55% 97%

/Lea

hA

ren z

89%

Christmas

phic

In America after Thanksgiving, it seems as if the whole country starts focusing on Christmas. Families put up Christmas trees and decorate their houses with lights, stores put on their Christmas playlists, and people hunt down the best holiday sales to buy that perfect gift. There are two sides to Christmas, especially in the United States. First is the widely popular commercialized Christmas. If you ask little kids about what they think of when they hear the word “Christmas,” they usually say something along the lines of Santa, presents or Christmas trees. Everyone knows that they must be good all year or Old Saint Nick will put coal in their stocking. However, there is another side of Christmas: the religious

by the numbers

gra

justicespringercub@gmail.com

any sense.” side. Some Christians don’t Church bells ring, Nativlike the idea of non-Christians ity scenes sit on the mantle celebrating a religious holiday and people attend candlelight church services. For Christians, because they don’t celebrate it for Christ’s birthday, but only the holiday marks the day for Santa and presents. that Jesus was born, therefore “To me, the holiday season making it a religious holiday. is more about giving and hopAlmost every religion has ing for the new something year than about to celebrate “I still plan on putting up Christ,” Lloyd around Christmas Christmas decorations, said. “I still plan on putting time, which giving presents and up Christmas leaves some having holiday parties decorations, people wondering when I’m on my own.” giving presents and having what those Lydia Lloyd holiday parties who aren’t junior when I’m on religious do my own.” during this Sophomore Michael Duke time. has a similar opinion about Junior Lydia Lloyd doesn’t practice Christianity or any celebrating the holidays. “I celebrate Christmas,” other religion, but she still Duke said. “However, I don’t enjoys the holidays. focus on the religious aspect, “I went to a Mormon but think of it as a good way to church until I was 13,” Lloyd see family and friends and give said. “I just never felt like the and receive presents.” idea of a higher power made

55% of atheists celebrate Christmas

Cub

JusticeSpringer

89% of agnostics celebrate Christmas 97% of Christians celebrate Christmas

Seniors graduate early to get a ‘jump start on college’ AnnaZanoni annazanonicub@gmail.com

“When I realized I would have all my credits for graduating early, I didn’t see much of a benefit for sticking around,” senior Tiara Strong said. So today is Strong’s last scheduled day of the school year. “Approximately 10 to 15 current seniors are on track to graduate in early January,” co-director of LC’s Guidance Department Kimberly Dynak said. “All have the option of walking in June (with their Class of 2014 peers).” “It kind of feels surreal in a way, but I’m anxious to leave,” Strong said. With her semester of “free time” between high school and college, Strong has chosen to stay involved at LC,

at least for a while longer. “I’m participating in winter guard next semester, so I still get to do what I love,” Strong said. Although there are perks, there are also drawbacks that exist when graduating early. “I’m a little sad I won’t see some of my friends. It takes a lot of hard work to leave, even a semester early,” Strong said. “For that reason, I wouldn’t recommend this route for everyone.” Strong intends to save up and attend college next fall. According to the National Center for Education Statistics, fewer than 3 percent of high schoolers graduate early nationally. For these hardworking 3 percent, monetary incentives exist to encourage students to graduate early.

motivate myself,” Strong said. “There’s a scholarship “Students interested in for students who graduate at graduating early must see their least one complete year early counselor for a ‘request for from high school, the Mitch early graduation’ form,” DyDaniels Early Graduation nak said. “(Those) requesting Scholarship,”Dynak said. “It to graduate early want to get a covers $4,000 of tuition and jump start on college.” regularly assessed fees (fees However, one must be charged to all students) as meet specific defined by the criteria to do Indiana Commission for “It kind of feels surreal so. “A stuHigher Educain a way, but I’m anxdent must be tion and the ious to leave.” on track to State Student Assistance Tiara Strong graduate with Commission senior at least a Core 40 diploma of Indiana.” Strong and must have isn’t eligible for the scholarpassed both the Algebra I and ship. Nevertheless, the senior the English 10 ECA,” Dynak has learned self-reliance from said. her high school experiences. Students still can earn an “I’ve learned that to get Academic Honors Diploma if they choose to graduate early. where I want to be, I have to

Senior Kiya Elridge has also decided to get a jump start on college and graduate a semester early. “For me, there are a lot of benefits. I get to work more hours, help my family and take time to apply for colleges,” Elridge said. “It makes me feel great that I’m ahead of most people.” As for her experience here, she admits it has changed her. “LC has strengthened me because I get to make my own decisions and now stand on my own two feet,” Elridge said. “Being at LC for four years will change you; you have no choice but to change, and I’ve accepted that,” Strong said. “If you make it through high school, then you’re prepared to take on the rest that life has to offer.”


Features

December 20, 2013 • Cub Reporter

15

Left: Junior Illora Ismin takes a tour of her in-laws’ house with her sister-in-law and cousin-in-law. Right: Ismin’s husband, longtime family friend Mohammad Hossain, shows her flowers that can’t be found in America. Courtsey photos/Ilora Isman

‘We instantly fell in love’ At 17, LC junior marries a man who lives in a different hemiphere

However, Ismin said she and Hossain had not seen each other for 14 years. “When I first saw him, there were instant sparks,” Ismin said. “We hadn’t seen each other since we were very DarianBenson young. He said he didn’t expect me to look so mature and beautiful. We darianbensoncub@gmail.com instantly fell in love.” Ismin said she does not consider her As junior Ilora Ismin watches marriage to have been arranged. her peers deal with their high school “Technically it was arranged, but to relationship problems, she faces her me, it was different,” Ismin said. “Arown relationship troubles on a whole ranged is when you have never seen the other level. The 17-year-old is married. person before. But he Her husband lives has known me since I in an entirely difwas born, my parents ferent hemisphere “Technically it was know his parents, and more than 8,000 miles arranged, but to me, it we love each other.” away. Ismin’s husband, This past sumwas different.” Hossain, remained in mer, Ismin and her Ilora Isman Bangladesh when she mother traveled to junior returned to the U.S. Bangladesh, a South Ismin and Hossain Asian country where will remain separated her family is from. While there, she reunited with longtime until he is able to receive his United States visa, which can take up to a year. family friend 25-year-old Mohammad Being a young wife in high school and Hossain. A few weeks later, on July 4, being separated from her husband has the young couple got married. brought many changes in Ismin’s life, Ismin’s and Hossain’s parents had some good and some bad. grown up together in Bangladesh.

Isman is living in Indianapolis where she has grown up. Hossain is living in Bangladesh where the couple got married. “It is extra difficult. Sometimes you can’t get good internet connection and I can’t Skype with him very often. But he understands me more than anyone, and I couldn’t be any happier,” Ismin said. “My grades have improved, and I am overcoming past problems that I didn’t know how to deal with. He really put meaning back into my life. Plus, I don’t have to deal with stupid high school relationships.” Many people have given their opinions on Ismin’s recent marriage. She said while most comments are positive, there are a few who voice negative opinions on her marriage at such a young age. “They think that I don’t get to live my life the way I want to and are

Source/www.psdgraphics.com

against it,” Ismin said. “People just don’t understand my culture, which is OK; I don’t expect them to. But at the same time, I don’t like hearing the negative stuff. At least respect that I’m married, and I’m happy. People ask me if I can date. Obviously not, I am kind of married.” Ismin said that being married at such a young age has helped her learn how to respect herself and value her family’s customs and traditions. “No woman should give up her self-respect for a guy or for what they believe in,” Ismin said. “You need to ignore the hate and respect yourself. Otherwise, who else will?”


16 December 20, 2013 • Cub Reporter

Features

Tasty treats and holiday sweets Last week the Cub staff had its third annual bake-off. After the tasting, the following recipes were voted the five best holiday st treats.

1

1

Sugar Cookies 2 cups white sugar 2 eggs 1 cup butter softened 3/4 cup sour cream 1/4 cup buttermilk 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon baking soda 2 teaspoons baking powder

Vegan Chocolate Chip Cookies

st

2 cups unbleached flour 2 teaspoons baking powder 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon cinnamon 3/4 cup vegan chocolate

1 teaspoon nutmeg 4 1/2 cups flour Icing: 1/2 cup butter 2 cups powdered sugar 1/3 cup milk 1 tablespoon vanilla Food coloring

recipe/Anna Angrick

Michael Rice

3

Peppermint Bark

nd

12 ounces white chocolate morsels

rd

Several candy canes

Line baking sheet with waxed paper. Melt chocolate. Place candy canes in heavy-duty plastic bag, and crush candy canes. Pour crushed candy canes into chocolate. Stir chocolate-candy cane mixture. Spread mixture to desired thickness on prepared baking sheet. Let stand for about 1 hour or until firm. Break into pieces. Store in airtight container at room temperature. Family recipe/

3

rd

Anna Zanoni

Red Velvet Cookies

4

th

1 box Duncan Hines Red Velvet cake mix 2 eggs

4

th

1/3 cup vegetable oil Powdered sugar (optional)

Combine 1 box of Duncan Hines Red Velvet cake mix, 2 eggs and 1/3 cup vegetable oil using a hand blender or wire whisk. Form teaspoon size balls and place on a lightly greased cookie sheet or baking pan about 1” apart. Slightly pat down the top of each ball. Bake at 375 F for 8-10 minutes. The top of the cookie will crack. Lightly sprinkle the top of the cookie with powdered sugar (optional). Family recipe/Ali Duff

Crunchy Bridge Bites 5

th

16 oz. semi-sweet chocolate chips

5

th

1 1/2 cups Fritos chips

Melt chocolate chips over water or slowly in microwave. Crumple the Fritos chips. Add crumpled Fritos to melted chocolate. Stir until the chips are covered. Drop my heaping spoonful onto wax paper. Refrigerate until hard. Family recipe/Carley Lanich

2

nd

Preheat oven to 350 F. In large bowl, mix flour, baking powder, salt, chocolate chips and cinnamon. Make a well in the center of the dry ingredients. In medium bowl, mix vegan sugar, canola oil, vanilla extract and almond milk. Pour the wet mixture into the well. Mix well, but don’t overwork the dough. Spoon dough on cookie sheets in tablespoon scoops. Put sheets in oven vertically. After baking for 5 minutes, turn horizontally and bake for another 4 minutes or until done. Remove cookies from oven and let cool. Family

Cream together the sugar, eggs, butter, sour cream and buttermilk. Mix the salt, baking soda, baking powder, nutmeg and flour. Combine all ingredients, and chill overnight or for at least 3 hours. Roll out dough on a floured surface and cut out. Bake at 325 F for 8 to 10 minutes. Combine butter, powdered sugar, milk, vanilla and food coloring to make icing. Apply icing to cookies. Family recipe/

2

chips 3/4 cups raw sugar 1/2 cup canola oil 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1/2 cup almond milk

Cub photos/Michael Rice Cub graphics/Leah Arenz


A+E

A+E

December 20, 2013 • Cub Reporter

Trends are changing, the popcorn’s popping and yesterday’s ‘in’ is tomorrow’s ‘out.’ Don’t worry, we’ll help you keep up.

TWIST Shakespeare A

lip hi /P ald us er mp i H Ca iam CT M /M he ce , T ur er So rook B

Regional Thespian win sending LC actors to state competition

17

Klinestiver said. Senior Scott Van Wye agreed with Klinestiver. “A lot of it (the play) is ad lib and there are plenty of girls playing guys and vice versa,” he said. AliDuff To participate in the Thesaliduffcub@gmail.com pian play, students must earn LC’s Thespian play is a big 10 Thespian points through spoof on Shakespeare’s plays participation in at least three and sonnets. plays in high school. “And it’s absolutely hilari“To become a Thespian, you ous,” said junior Julia Klinestimust work 100 hours or earn ver. 100 points. The Thespian show The play is reserved is The Comfor Thespian “I think the audience plete Works Troupe 5627, of William the Thespians will really enjoy the Shakespeare at LC,” Klineshumor. It’s more high tiver said. (Abridged), which was Despite the school oriented.” originally show’s someScott Van Wye written and what erratic senior performed format, Van by a group of Wye said he three men. thinks the audience will get just As the play will be peras much out of this production formed with a total of six Thesas they do any other LC perforpians (including two girls) at mance, especially because this LC, casting the play was a little play is perhaps not as mature as different than it was in Shakesome of their previous ones. speare’s time. “I think the audience will “None of us had a specific really enjoy the humor. It’s role. We’ve just divided up the more high school oriented,” scenes. The actors are taking Van Wye said. their own names as the names The play comes in the light of the characters in each scene,” of the LC Thespians’ third place

on

Things To Know Date: Jan. 30, 31, Feb. 1 Time: 7 p.m. Place: Auditorium Admission Cost: $6 in advance and $8 at the door victory at the Indiana Thespian Conference recently, where they performed “Soap Opera” and “Arabian Nights.” In addition, Klinestiver and senior Anthony Espinoza were honored. “There were nine schools at the conference, and we were all competing for the top three spots. The top three spots continue on to state,” Klinestiver said. LC qualified. Besides giving awards for top three Thespian troupes, the Conference also presented awards for individual actors and actresses. “I won Best Supporting Actress, and the All Star Award for our cast. The All Star Award is given out by the State Thespian Officers for the best member in each cast, in their opinion. Anthony (Espinoza) took Best Supporting Actor, so that was really awesome to have both Best Supporting spots,” Klinestiver said. Like Klinestiver, Espinoza was pleased with how LC’s Thespians finished at the con-

Source/MCT Campus/Paul Gonzales, Los Angeles Times

ference. “There was a lot of tough competition, but ultimately I was happy with how we did because it means we’re going to state,” he said. The state competition is Jan. 24-26. Espinoza also said that winning Best Supporting Actor

was one of the best parts of the regional conference. “I just acted as realistically and truthfully as I could, and it really paid off,” he said. “It means so much to win Best Supporting Actor out of everyone at the conference. It felt like a fitting end to a lot of hard work.”


18

December 20, 2013 • Cub Reporter

Weak in the knees for Arctic Monkeys ChloeFeyock Feyock

chloefeyockcub@gmail.com

Smooth and funky describes British rock band Arctic Monkey’s newest album AM. It was released in September 2013. Unlike their last four albums which took on a more indie sound, AM borrows the soul of Motown and the blues-infused rock of the Rolling Stones. This album could have been a chart topping hit during the 70s, but that doesn’t mean its sound is stale. The lead single “Do I Wanna Know” opens up the album with a hot, head-bobbing beat. Frontman Alex Turner was quoted as looking to rap legend Dr. Dre as an influence on this album. The song “Knee Socks”, where Turner sings falsetto in a swift rhyming pattern, is an example of that. This is their most experimental album, but Turner’s writing has stayed consistent. His witty, insightful and charming verses are quintessentially Arctic Monkeys. Turner can paint a picture with his words. You can visualize his heartbreak, his excitement for new love or his frustration with an old flame. It is a new sound for the Arctic Monkeys, but it is still no less enjoyable or brilliant. This album would be a great gift to the lover of classic rock or a long time Arctic Monkeys fan. Each song will be stuck in your head, your feet won’t be able to resist stomping along to the beat of the drum and this album will be on a constant repeat.

AM

Artist: Arctic Monkeys Album: AM Genre: Indie Rock/ Alternative rock Song Suggestion: “Knee Socks” Rating: 5 out of 5 Similar Artists: The Strokes, The Last Shadow Puppets

A+E

Cute or warm in the winter: both Have you ever tried to go sledding with some friends or played in the snow? You probably have, and you probably know how freezing cold it is. A lot of us just layer on clothes and don’t think about what we are wearing for the sake of us being warm, which is fine. But there are plenty of ways to stay warm and toasty while not looking like a big trash bag. Everyone knows about layering already, but there’s different, sneakier ways of layering. If you’re planning on wearing yoga pants or leggings out, try wearing a pair or two of tights or leggings underneath. It will look a lot cuter than wearing sweatpants and you’ll still be warm. Also, if you’re wearing a sweater or a sweatshirt, try wearing a thermal shirt underneath,

by Anna Angrick

and if you want to be warmer, you can also wear a parka or anorak over it. If you haven’t used hand warmers before, you’re seriously missing out. You can get them at almost any gas station or drug store, and they are basically little packets of chemically created warmness that stay hot for up to 8

What’s H t in Indy

A Christmas Carol

Reynolds Light Farm

The Indiana Repertory Theatre presents Charles Dickens’s “A Christmas Carol.” The IRT is located at 140 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. A Christmas Carol’s last show ends on Christmas Eve. Come and join Ebenezer Scrooge for a faithful and fantastic night in this new adaptation. For more information go to www.irtlive.com or call (317) 635-5252.

Life in Color exhibit

Famous French impressionist artist Henri-Emile-Benoit Matisse will have his artwork displayed in its own exhibit in the Indianapolis Museum of Art (IMA) until Jan. 12. Tickets are $18 for adults and $10 for youth/ students. Hours will be extended over the Christmas and New Year holidays. For more information go to www.imamuseum.org Source/ www.amazon.com

Own That Look

hours. I love putting them in my gloves and my scarf, and also in my coat pockets. In terms of gloves, my favorite are the fingerless kind that allow you to work on your phone without getting your hands cold. It’s a lot easier than taking off your gloves every time you want to check Instagram or post something to Twitter. This winter break, if I ever have to venture out in the snow, you’ll probably see me wearing leggings, a sweater, my new UNIF bomber jacket, a beanie, and some boots. Hats like beanies and head wraps will keep your ears and head warm while still keeping you looking cute. So this winter, instead of looking like a big mass of clothes or a trash bag, show off your warm winter fashion in style.

Information compiled by Logan Young

Reynolds Farm Equipment is celebrating its 21st anniversary by offering another year of lights. located at 126 st and Ind. 37 in Fishers. The annual free Christmas light display can be seen thru Jan. 1. Reynold’s will be taking donations from the Come-To-Me food pantry, as well as collecting food items for people in need this holiday season. For more information go to www. reynoldsfarmequipment.com

Source/MCT campus/Sam Richie/

vs

Colts At Lucas Oil

Jaguars

The Indianapolis Colts will be going against the Jacksonville Jaguars at Lucas Oil Stadium. The game is at 1 p.m. on Dec. 29. The game will be aired on CBS channel. For more information go to www.colts.com

Walter Mitty in theaters

Ben Stiller directs and stars in the comedy The Secret Life of Walter Mitty, based on James Thurber’s short story written in 1939. Walter Mitty is a day-dreamer who escapes his anonymous life by disappearing into a world of fantasies. The film will be in theaters this Christmas. For more information go to www.imdb.com Editors Note: Brittannie Travis contributed


A+E

December 20, 2013 • Cub Reporter

Director Refn strays from conventional techniques

dered, the family tries to avenge his death by killing the man who murdered their brother. A highly respected and powerful police officer named Chang is known in this movie for punishBy Logan Young ing people for committing crimes. Rather than arresting them. He Ryan Gosling makes a lasting uses a much more permanent impression in his latest thriller method. Chang uses a martial arts Only God Forgives. It debuted in sword to chop off people’s hands. theaters July 19. Eccentric director/ There he is cutting off their sin or writer Nicholas Refn receives three guilt, and then they are in some stars for this mind bending film. way forgiven. Warning, viewer discretion highly The most common complaints advised for this film contains a lot about this movie are the lack of of violence and dialogue and some inappropristraight forward ate scenes. plot occurrence. Julian, played Availability: Available for rental But the vividly and viewing on Netflix by Gosling, runs meaningful and a Thai fight club symbolic imagRating: R in Bangkok after ery in this movie Running Time: 90 minutes moving there make up for it. from the U.S. There is several years a scene in the previously. Julian is secretly a drug movie where Julian is seen washsmuggler and uses the fight club as ing his hands and suddenly the a front. Julian moves to Thailand water turns to blood. He turns because of his crime ridden past he around and sees Chang, turns back wants to escape from. to his hands and the water runs After his brother Billy is murclear again. This tells us the he is

Feeling Movie

Only God Forgives

Source/www.independent.co.uk Julian (Ryan Gosling) prepares to fight Chang, the police officer.

plagued with guilt from his past and his hands must have strong significance to his guilt. Later in the movie the crime he committed in his past was revealed. Throughout the movie Julian goes through trance states where he imagines something else is happening. These daydreams expose how he internalizes his guilt and is very much haunted by it. The immense amount of symbolism in this film is extremely impressive. It’s one of the movie’s greatest attributes. Refn’s technique of diverting from a cliché happy ending is highly admirable. Although, in some ways it is a happy ending, as Julian is finally at peace with both himself and his actions at the close of the film.

Matched Trilogy creates a new world BrittannieTravis brittannietraviscub@gmail.com

An indestructible bond unites Cassia, Ky and Xander in Ally Condie’s No. 1 New York Times Bestselling teen trilogy. The series consists of Matched, Crossed and the unforeseen conclusion Reached, which follows three main protagonists through their expedition into the unknown world. Seventeen-year-old Cassia Maria Reyes is encountered with a painful decision the day following her Match Banquet, the banquet that decides her fate, when she learns that not only is she matched with her childhood friend Xander Carrow, but with the cautious and mysterious outcast Ky Markham. The future the Society, the system of government that chooses everyone’s destinies, planned for Cassia is altered when she makes the impending choice to follow her own path. Cassia and her loved

ones are tested throughout the trilogy with the love they have for each other, the loss when someone vanishes from sight, and the loneliness they feel as they learn the truth about everything they once knew. The Matched trilogy has a fresh and groundbreaking twist similar to bestselling author Suzanne Collins’ magnificent series The Hunger Games. Cassia is very similar to The Hunger Games’ main character, Katniss, with her quick-thinking and gentle and diverse outlook on life. Plus, the plot of Matched will have your eyes glued to the page with the complex love triangle between Cassia and her polar opposite matches. Toward the middle of each novel in the Matched trilogy the plot does become dull, but the ending will pull you back in until you can’t help but start the next novel.

Matched Trilogy Author: Ally Condie Special Cost (on Kindle): $9 per book on Amazon Length: 520 pages (at the most) Genre: Fantasy

Overall, the final chapter in the Matched trilogy will have you wanting more.

Source/www.amazon.com Source/Amazon

19

Mind the App by Chad Sharp

iOS 7 vs. Android 4.4 KitKat: My transition

As a result of the recent releases of Android 4.4 KitKat and iOS 7, both platforms are quite compelling. I recently made the switch from the iPhone 4 running iOS 7.0.4 to the HTC One with stock Android 4.4. Overall, I have found getting to know both platforms to be a very positive experience Hardware: When it comes to Android, there is so much choice. With several high end Android devices. The HTC One is quite easily the best designed Android phone I have ever seen. It has a smooth metal body and very rounded edges. The design is definitely a step up from the glass-cased iPhone 4 and I would say it is slightly superior to the iPhone 5 and 5s. The front facing speakers on the One provide excellent sound. The audiophile will certainly not be disappointed. Apps: The Apple App Store boasts more than 1 million apps, while Google Play has around 800,000. While on paper the Apple App Store has more apps, the difference is not noticeable. With Vine and Instagram now on Android, there should be little to stop the majority of people from switching. Android also allows apps to run as services in the background, making many apps much more useful. The notification menu is also much more useful on Android. It allows you to mark emails as read, control the music player without ever leaving the menu. It should be noted, however, that apps do tend to come out on iPhone first. If you want the newest popular app, you might want to stick with iOS. “Overall, I have found Other thoughts: getting to know both One thing I really like about platforms to be very iOS is iMessage. positive experience.” It seamlessly figures out if the person you’re texting is a fellow iPhone user and automatically switches the user to Apple’s messaging protocol from traditional text messaging. In Android 4.4, Google took a step in the right direction. They added SMS support to Google Hangouts (Google’s instant messaging and video chatting service). While this is an improvement over previous implementations, it still feels half baked. The app does not automatically detect whether the person you are texting is an Android user and switch protocols as a result. In conclusion, I love my new Android phone. Its customizeability and its. wealth of features make it perfect for a power user such as myself. The iPhone still wins in a few areas, but Android is catching up.


e

20 November 22, 2013 • Cub Reporter

Sports

SPORTS

Scores, matches, games, meets and touchdowns. The Lawrence Central Bears are back and with a vengeance.

Young, but improving JacobHelmus

jacobhelmuscub@gmail.com If there’s one word to summarize the wrestling team, any word synonymous to youth would fit the description perfectly. However, for head coach Thomas Corbett, youth does not mean his team will roll over. “We have a young group this year but they are working hard to improve each day,“ Corbett said. The Bears knew they were going to be young going into the season, but they also had to swallow the loss of senior Quentin Rabin.

Rabin was poised to improve on his semi-state finish in his junior season, but before the season he learned that he would not be able to wrestle due to the mitral valve in his heart needing repair. “His leadership will be greatly missed all of his teammates looked up to him, having his work ethic in the wrestling room would have been contagious,” Corbett said. After winning the Rex Lewis Memorial tournament last year in Lake Forest, IL, LC finished 10th out of 11 teams this season. The Bears had no individual winners but senior

DeSean Mills claimed the only second place finish for the Bears in the 182 lb. weight class. The Bears are looking to put that performance behind them, and wrestle like they know they can at the Marion County tournament Saturday. “You have to be disciplined to accomplish your goals, I think once the team realizes and commits to this, we could be ready for the tournament,” Corbett said. After the Marion County Tournament, LC will participate in the Mishiwaka Invitational as well as the North Central Invitational.

Senior Katreal Boone wrestles in practice against some friendly competition. Boone is one of the few seniors on roster this season. Courtesy photo/ LC Wrestling

The BCS’ last hurrah DrewNixon

drewnixoncub@gmail.com The new college football season is under way as the Bowl games have been selected. The teams that have earned their way to be selected have begun preparation for their match-up. Along with this resurrection of the season, this season is the final year of the Bowl Championship Series (BCS). The BCS is a five-game college football showcase involving 10 teams, a majority of them who have won their conference championship, if there even is one for their conference. The five bowl games that are involved in this series are the Tostitos Fiesta Bowl, Discover Orange Bowl, Rose Bowl, Allstate Sugar Bowl and the BCS National Championship. The inaugural year of the

On the Spot

by Drew Nixon

College Football Playoff begins next year, in which four teams will compete in a playoff to determine the national champion. The teams to compete will be determined by a selection committee, similar to the one that college basketball has now. Yes, the BCS has been controversial. However, it has also been successful since its beginning in the 1998 season. The controversy has enveloped the attention of sports fans with the

chaos that has been produced son could be affected by the throughout not only this sea- outcomes of games in their conson, but seasons of the past as ference or any other conference in other parts of the country, all well. This season has been one because every game is so imof, if not, the best seasons I portant. Another highlight in the have ever witnessed. One thing that the BCS does well is that it BCS era was that it increased makes every game of each week the access for all teams to participate, and of the season has put some very important, “This season has programs in the given the fact been one of, if not, national spotthat it makes or light. Thanks to breaks a team’s the best college the BCS, Boise chance of a na- football seasons I State and Texas tional champiChristian Unionship or BCS have ever versity (TCU) . This mean- witnessed.” have become ingful, intriguing part of the regular season household names in college football. makes college football unique. Boise State upset Oklahoma The BCS has helped transform college football from a 43-42 in the amazing and unregional sport into a spirited forgettable 2007 Fiesta Bowl, national one. Every week there in which Boise State ran a trick is debate on how a team’s sea- play, the Statue of Liberty play,

to win in overtime. TCU upset Wisconsin in the 2011 Rose Bowl, 21-19. The BCS format allowed for there to be the “David vs. Goliath” match-ups that we see in “March Madness” for college basketball. Yes, the playoff will be a great innovation that will build on the tradition of college football and the excitement it produces. However, that’s all next season. If it had an epitaph, the BCS’ would say it will be viewed for all the good it has brought to the student-athletes, the fans, the postseason and to the game itself, producing incomprehensible bowl games and rankings in the process. The BCS got it right in its final hurrah. Ironically, it just happened to be one of the craziest college football seasons we have ever seen. What a way to end a 15 year tradition.


Sports

December 20, 2013 • Cub Reporter

21

Left: Former Pacers forward Ron Artest, glares down at a fan after punching him in the 2004 brawl when the Pacers played the Pistons in Detroit. MCT Campus/ Julian H. Gonzalez, Detroit Free Press Above: The Pacers fans flocked to Bankers Life Fieldhouse in a playoff game against the Miami Heat last year. The theme of the game was a gold out. MCT Campus/ Al Diaz, Miami Herald

Rising from the ashes DrewNixon

drewnixoncub@gmail.com It was just your average NBA game on Nov. 19, 2004. The Indiana Pacers were playing the Detroit Pistons and were winning by 15 points when “it” happened. With 45.9 seconds left in the game, Pistons center Ben Wallace was fouled hard by the then Ron Artest (now known as Metta World Peace). This foul led to an altercation which broke out into a brawl. Known as “the most infamous brawl in NBA history,” Artest was lying on the scorer’s table when a drink was thrown at him. Artest then went into the stands and started a fight between the players and the fans. The brawl concluded with nine players being suspended for a total of 146 games and

more than $11 million in salary being lost by the players as well. This was the start of the Pacers fall and resurrection as one of the best basketball teams in the NBA. “Complete Punk,” senior Louis Shadiow said of Ron Artest. “He thought he was better than everyone else on the team.” From 2006-2010, the Pacers suffered in the loss column. The team split apart with players leaving, coaches being fired and other things that contributed to the decline of the Pacers. In 2006, the Pacers finished with a 35-47 record, one of the worst in team history. Pacers head coach Rick Carlisle was fired in 2007 and was replaced by Jim O’Brien, who wasn’t much better. The Pacers went 36-46 in both the 2007-08 and 2008-09 seasons. In the 2009-10 season, things got

worse, with the Pacers going with the 10th overall pick and Lance Stephenson with the 40th 32-50. The Pacers also suffered overall pick. Both players curin attendance as well. Bankers rently start and are making a Life Fieldhouse has a total of huge impact with the Pacers. In the 2011 draft, the Pac18,165 seats in the stadium. The ers selected attendance reKawhi Leoncords from the “The Pacers were ard with the 2005-06 season 15th overall through the destroyed after the pick. Howev2009-10 season brawl suspensions er, the Pacers ranged from and it’s been a long traded Leon16,179 fans ard to the San in the 2005- rebuilding process, Antonio Spurs 06 season to but they’re fi nally for IUPUI 14,202 fans in graduate and the 2009-10 back as title Broad Ripple season, with contenders.” native George the lowest avZach Booher Hill, who also erage being senior starts for the 12,221 in the Pacers. 2007-08 seaIn 2008, the Pacers traded son. Jermaine O’Neal for current After the 2009 NBA Finals, starting center Roy Hibbert. the rise of the Pacers began. Along with trades, David West In the 2010 NBA Draft, the was signed in 2011 from the Pacers selected Paul George

then New Orleans Hornets. Head coach Frank Vogel has also been a great coach for the Pacers since he took the helm in 2011. “The team has evolved as a whole ... team chemistry has gotten much better. It proves that Vogel’s system is working,” Shadiow said. The Pacers have arguably the deepest roster in their history. The organization, led by Larry Bird, Herb Simon and Donnie Walsh, has done a great job of building a powerhouse in Naptown. A team that was once an underachieving one is now the best team in the NBA, by record, and an NBA Finals contender. “The Pacers were destroyed after the brawl suspensions and it’s been a long rebuilding process, but they’re finally back as title contenders,” senior Zach Booher said.


22 December 20, 2013 • Cub Reporter

New club promotes soccer expansion TajhanaeGillard

tajhanaegillardcub@gmail.com

A new club, Central Soccer, has been created at LC. The coed club is for grades 7-12. Belzer students are invited to join to help get them ready for high school soccer. Central Soccer is the brainchild of business teacher Dan Jackson and Spanish teacher Richar Torres, both of whom are involved in LC’s soccer program. It is part of a larger initiative Jackson has started, called the Strategic Community Out Reach Program for Soccer, or SCORPS (pronounced “score”). “The purpose of the club is to promote, develop, and nurture the sport of soccer within the Lawrence Central community,” Jackson said. Jackson said he would like to “begin developing players as early as fourth grade so ... LC soccer is better suited to compete in the ultra-competitive MIC Conference.” To begin, Central Soccer is organizing the inaugural 5 v 5 Winter Futsal Tournament. The tournament will be made up of teams with a maximum of seven players; teams must have at least three girls. The first five teams in each division to register are guaranteed spots in the tournament. Individuals or partial teams may also register and they will be placed on teams. A student does not have to be a member of Central Soccer to register. The registration fee is $50 per team or $10 per individual for each player of a partial team. The registration deadline is Jan. 14. Games begin at LC and Belzer Jan. 21. Additional information is available from Torres at richartorres@msdlt.k12.in.us or in Room 216.

Sports

Bears look for offense DrewNixon

drewnixoncub@gmail.com The Lady Bears are clawing their way through the season, currently obtaining a 2-6 record. The Bears came close last year’s 3A State Champion Mount Vernon, losing 55-46. Senior Kyra Tucker leads the Bears in scoring, averaging 19.6 points per game along with 9.1 rebounds per game. “Kyra brings a lot to the team, not just scoring. She is very mature and knows the game of basketball really well. She is strong, yet somewhat a quiet leader,” head coach Stephanie Keller said. In the Marion County tournament, the Bears played Ben Davis for the second time this season. This time, the Lady Bears gave the Giants a challenge, clawing away and forcing overtime. The Lady Bears

lost in overtime 67-60. LC started out well on both the offensive and defensive sides of the ball. In their first four games, the Bears averaged 53 points per game while allowing only about 35 points per game. However, in their last four games, the Bears have averaged 39 points per game while allowing 61 points per game. “We keep tweaking our offenses to find what works best for our team. We will continue to work on different offenses that we do well, and even different defenses to help us get some easy buckets off steals and turnovers,” Keller said. The Bears will keep practicing in preparation for the Shelbyville Shootout, scheduled for Dec. 27. After the shootout, the Bears have a two-game homestand against Carmel on Jan. 3 and Heritage Christian on Jan. 7.

Senior forward Kyra Tucker shoots over a Ben Davis defender. LC has lost twice to Ben Davis this season by scores of 67-36 and 67-60. Cub photo/Michael Rice

Swimmers few but positive AnnaZanoni

annazanonicub@gmail.com

Senior Sarah Higgins takes a breath before she plunges back into the water while performing the breaststroke. Cub photo/Michael Rice

With the pressure of swim season about to swell, sophomore Spencer Ball has one strategy to contend with the competition. “Work harder, train harder, and encourage my teammates,” Ball said. “Compared to last year, (the team) is a lot more positive.” Assistant coach Chris Etherington is anticipating a strong season. “This group will definitely be small for a year or two but this is a group that can go to state if they want to,” Etherington said. “Our team is surprising people at how much time they’ve dropped — and they’re not even rested, tapered, or shaped yet,” Etherington said. “Last year not many seniors wanted to fill the leadership role. This year underclassmen

have already stepped up, which is great.” Senior Sarah Higgins has seen a change in the team’s dynamics as well. “We graduated around 14 seniors last year so we’ve had to rebuild our whole team,” Higgins said. “However, compared to last year, the team is a lot more positive overall.” Due to the small number of team members, LC has lost most of its dual and three-way meets this season. The expectations, however, are not small in the eyes of the coaches. “We don’t have enough swimmers in every event to win, so what we’re looking at is technique, performance in practice, and how fast the kids are going right now,” head coach Andrew Renie said. “The No. 1 thing about swimming is you have to work hard during the season so you swim fast by the end of the season,” Renie added.


Sports

December 20, 2013 • Cub Reporter

23

Sophomore Kyle Guy rises above Lawrence North defender Josh Thompson for a 3-point shot. Guy made two 3-pointers en route to 14 total points. Cub photo/Michael Rice

Senior Devin Heath-Granger drives in for a layup late in the game against Lawrence North. Heath-Granger contributed 10 points. Cub photos/Michael Rice

JacobHelmus

fered their first loss of the season, the young team learned a lot from their first game in the Metropolitan Interscholastic Conference. “We know what it takes now to beat the best,” senior point guard Devin HeathGranger said. “With any luck, we hope to see them again in March at Bankers Life.” The Bears needed to rebound quickly, as they faced district rival Lawrence North three days later. And for only the second time in the last 12 years, the Bears got the best of the Wildcats, by a score of 5654. In front of a sellout crowd in LC’s gymnasium, LC was very good from the free throw line and made clutch shots when they needed to be made en route to the win. LC had a balanced scoring attack with three scorers in double figures,

Bears top Wildcats jacobhelmuscub@gmail.com The boys basketball team started the season off hot with two wins over Griffith and East Chicago Central. LC was part of a Black Friday tournament featuring six games featuring high schools from the Indianapolis and Gary areas. The Bears used their stifling full-court press the entire game to limit the Griffith offense to just 35 points in a 54-35 blowout win. Senior Abdul McGraw led LC with 16 points with sophomore Kyle Guy right behind him at 15 points. The Bears headed north the very next day to take on state powerhouse East Chicago Central. This game went wire to wire throughout its entirety, with LC pulling away at the end with a 67-63 victory over the Cardinals.

The Bears were down by and took full advantage on 4 at halftime but flipped the offense, going deep into postables in the second half due to sessions, since there is no shot good free throw shooting at the clock in high school basketend to thwart any chances of a ball, en route to a 68-60 win. comeback for The Bears were East Chicago plagued by foul Central. Soph- “We know what it trouble the enomore Chris tire night, givKing turned in takes to beat the ing Carmel the a monster dou- best... with any luck majority of its ble double with from the we hope to see them points 14 points and charity stripe. 14 rebounds, again in March at Guy led the eight of the of- Bankers Life.” Bears with 17 fensive variety, Devin Heath-Granger points, shootin only his secsenior ing 10-11 from ond varsity apthe free throw pearance. line and scorThe Bears ing 9 of his 17 had a week off after those two points in the fourth quarter. victories before they welcomed Carmel’s Zach McRoberts, the defending state champion brother of former Indiana Pacer and top ranked Carmel Grey- Josh McRoberts, led the Greyhounds in the first home game hounds and all scorers with 28 of the season. points. Carmel was very efficient Even though the Bears suf-

led by Guy with 14. The Bears looked like they had the game wrapped up after Guy drained a 3-pointer to push the lead to 51-40 with three minutes left. However, LN was able to mount a furious comeback and cut the lead to 56-54 with 10 seconds left. Sophomore Nash Griffin then missed the front end of a one and one and committed a foul on an LN Wildcat to put them on the free throw line with three seconds left. Both free throws were missed, and due to a lane violation on LN before the second free throw, the Bears were able to run out the rest of the clock and escape with the victory over Lawrence North. “It feels great. Beating your arch rival is always a goal,” Heath-Granger said. The Bears face off against MIC rival Pike tonight.


24

December 20, 2013 • Cub Reporter

Twins by birth, twins by KatieBillman katiebillmancub@gmail.com Traveling to cities like New York, Los Angeles and Chicago, spending countless hours every day of the week in a dance studio, practicing nine different styles of dance. And one of the most unique aspects? Being able to share the passion with a twin sister. Seniors Maddie and Margo Korn have been dancing since they were 8 years old, training from the Espressenz Dance Center in Indianapolis as well as in studios and camps all across the country. They saw their first ballet at that age and were signed up for classes soon after. Both of the girls dance in a variety of differ-

Student Profile

Passion

“I like the artistry the complex movement creates.” Margo Korn

senior

ent styles including modern, jazz, contemporary, lyrical, ballet and tap. “I like the artistry the complex movement creates,” Margo said. “It’s a great form of self expression, especially for things and emotions that can’t necessarily be put into words.” Margo had the opportunity to train with the Joffrey Ballet’s summer intensive two summers ago, and Maddie was among the 30 dancers picked from more than 300 applicants to train with the River North Dance Company at that time as well. “Dancers can speak to an audience by not ever saying anything, but still making an impact on them,” Maddie said. “I have watched companies perform and have had my mindset completely changed about every opinion I have ever had.” Both Maddie and Margo have been accepted into collegiate dance programs. Margo plans to double major in dance and marketing at the University of Iowa, and Maddie is undecided on where dance will take her after high school. “It’s cool how you can have hundreds of audience members and every individual can have a completely different interpretation of the movement, music and emotion that is presented in a piece,” Maddie said.

Courtesy photos/Maddie and Margo Korn

Characters? Characters We got ‘em!


Cub Reporter Issue 4