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Cub Reporter Lawrence Central High School, Indianapolis, Indiana

cubonline.org • Vol.65 • Issue 3 • November 22, 2013

Shop until you

DR O

P

Plan your trip on Page 12 2 22 10 17

This month is “No Shave November.” Lawrence Central teachers are participating to raise awareness for men’s health. Follow the facial hair on Page 2.

Netflix and Hulu are growing in popularity and leading to the rise of a new trend; binge watching. Join the discussion on Page 10.

Conner Prarie’s annual event, Follow the North Star, continues this weekend. Follow a Cub’s first-hand account on Page 17.

With fall sports wrapping up, many LC athletes are looking forward to college athletics. See where LC athletes have committed to play on Page 22.


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November 22, 2013 • Cub Reporter

News

NEWS What’s Online

Clear, concise reporting on the good, the bad and the ugly. Someone’s got to do it. Steve Gretencord Before

Donnie Zelaya After

Before

After

Draw

After

LC’s first ever debate team already competing

Debate Team is a new edition to LC’s extracurricular activities. It is advised by government teacher Drew Horvath. Recently, both LC and the Debate Team were represented by juniors Sarah Rodenbeck and Kara Hairston as they placed first in a public forum debate at Fishers High School.

Alfie Hernandez Before

Spanish class makes Calaveras for the Day of the Dead

On Nov. 1, Laura Renner’s M5 Spanish I students decorated their own 3D Calaveras. Next semester, Renner plans to do creative activities with her students for the different holidays occurring in the Hispanic world. For exclusive online content go to cubonline.org. Follow us on Twitter at @ CubOnline and on Instagram at @cub_online. Have great story ideas or photos? Use #cubonline to share and you could be featured online or in the next issue.

On the Cover With the holiday shopping season quickly approaching, students are stuffing their trunks with seasonal deals. Cub photo/Michael Rice

Photo Illustration/Carley Lanich

your own

Cub graphic/Leah Arenz

awareness for men’s health AmandaBoyce

a competition with Lawrence North to see who can get the most members. amandaboycecub@gmail.com “Men’s health gets overlooked by The goal of “No Shave November,”or our society’s focusing on women’s “Movember” as it’s sometimes called, health, especially discussing cancer,” sois to embrace your hair, let it grow and cial studies teacher Nick Derado said. then donate the money you spend on Social studies teacher Steve Gretenshaving to help cord has never spread knowlhad facial hair edge of cancer “My wife isn’t a fan of any before. It’s raised prevention. The facial hair I have but goes a few questions Movember Founwith his friends, along with it.” dation started No and it has given Donnie Zelaya Shave November him the “perfect English teacher in 2004, and it opportunity to spread to the U.S. spread the word.” in 2007. “I was not aware of Movember until Thirty-eight LC men are participat- Mr. Valadez put out an e-mail to invite us ing in No Shave November. Also along to be a part of a worldwide effort for men’s with just growing a beard, LC is having health awareness,” Gretencord said.

Gretencord has challenged his classes to bring in pennies to raise money for No Shave November. This is also related to a story on Channel One that they watched in class, about whether or not to keep pennies in circulation. “I told my students I would match their contributions up to 5,000 pennies — $50,” Gretencord said. English teacher Donnie Zelaya did No Shave November last year before he came to LC. He was a “one-man team in Arizona.” “Most people just ask if I’m doing No Shave November and when I say yes they nod and go about their day. My wife isn’t a fan of any facial hair I have but goes along with it,” Zelaya said. “I hope this becomes a tradition among the staff every November/Movember.”


News

November 22, 2013 • Cub Reporter

3

Redesign aims for new educational experience CarolineVarie

carolinevariecub@gmail.com An update on secondary redesign is given at each board meeting. Most recently, the committee, according to Principal Rocky Valadez, is “…creating the most relevant and applicable educational experiences for the students of Lawrence Township.” Changes to course offerings will allow students to have a more flexible, individualized schedule. The committee is looking to create one master schedule to provide students

Hands Raised

with the opportunity to take courses that may not be offered at their home schools. Course enrollment and data trends are being researched to potentially offer courses that “students would benefit from or need access to” or eliminate courses that “have become irrelevant for today’s student,” according to Valadez. New course offerings recommended at the Nov. 18 school board meeting include AP human geography, criminal justice I and II, citizenship and civics, biotechnical engineering, jobs for American graduates, and fiber arts.

“We want to make sure that LT secondary schools offer the most current, relevant and rigorous courses available,” Valadez said. Outside of the classroom, the committee is looking at new ways to form partnerships with local businesses, industry and educational institutions. MSDLT College Liaison Chris McClatchy said these partnerships are important for keeping up with current trends. “Employers’ needs are constantly changing and it is critical that our high schools continue to graduate students with the

work readiness skills required to compete for open positions,” he said. “We have an outstanding internship and business co-op program already established in our district. Increasing these partnerships will assist in growing these programs.” New programs could include internships, work study programs, mentoring and dual credit opportunities. The committee is also in the process of researching the possibility of academies. “We are looking at pathways for students to focus their studies around high-demand

“There should be more classes. Like marine biology or classes that help you learn a trade.”

“French, Spanish and German immersion programs should be in all schools. Also, bring back Latin. ”

“I would like our township to focus more on funding our school and helping all students.”

Alexis Russel senior

8150 Oaklandon Road (317) 855-7054 www.inallstardrive.com NOW OFFERING ONLINE REGISTRATION Registration now open for Christmas Break Classes Mention this ad for a $335 class special

Elaina Roach junior

Nick Aktinson sophomore

areas of inSee related story terest,” Va- on Pages 4 and 8. ladez said. Early this week, a team of educators traveled to Miami, Fla., to view an academy model at Miami-Dade County Public Schools, which, according to Valadez, has “a very extensive and creative high school system, and their demographics are comparable to Lawrence Township.” “Our hope is to... see what they have done to benefit all students through technology, curriculum and programs,” he said.

“I think we need more classes to teach kids more about how life is going to be after graduation.”

Nick Riley freshman


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November 22, 2013 • Cub Reporter

News to Use Mark Your Calendar Nov. 22: Thanksgiving break begins at 3:40 p.m. Dec. 2: Classes resume after break Dec. 5: FAFSA seminar, 7 p.m., LGI Room Dec. 12-13: Holiday Spectacular, 7 p.m., auditorium Dec. 17-20: Final exams Dec. 20: Winter break begins at 3:40 p.m.

News Briefs

Heckman honored

German teacher Carol Heckman has been awarded the Reichmann award from the Indiana Chapter of the American Association of Teachers of German. It is for “a German high school teacher who has a proven record of promotion of the German language in Indiana.”

Yearbook price increases after Thanksgiving break

The cost of the 2014 yearbook will increase from $60 to $70 on Dec. 2. Orders may be made before then through the Herff Jones website at www.YearbookOrderCenter.com. The ad on page 16 provides details on not only ordering a book but also creating a senior and/or business ad as well as submitting photos that may be included in the book.

Interviewing begins The acceptance period closed on Nov. 9, and the Board of Education, with the assistance of B.W.P. and Associates, has begun the interviewing process. The applicant pool will be narrowed to inCarolineVarie vite selected candidates to a first round of interviews. carolinevariecub@gmail.com The Board of Education will conduct Thirty applications were received for the first round of interviews to further Lawrence Township’s superintendent narrow the candidate field for a secposition. The candidates, whose names ond round of interviews. The interview will remain confidential as decided by process will continue into the first two the Board of Education, come from 12 weeks of December. According to the board’s application different states and have held positions procedure, the including superinnew superintentendent, assistant “The Board of Education is dent “is expected superintendent, to assume the role chief school offi- impressed with the depth of superintendent cer, principal and and quality of candidates on Jan. 1, 2014, or college or univerwho have applied.” later.” sity professor. Kathy Varie The applica“The Board of search board chairperson tion and interview Education is improcesses will repressed with the depth and quality of candidates who main confidential to ensure “the broadhave applied,” Superintendent Search est and deepest spectrum of high quality Board chairperson Kathy Varie said. candidates,” Varie said. A link to the most up-to-date infor“We appreciate the broad interest in our district and are excited to begin the mation on the Superintendent Search interview process with this highly com- can be found on the district website on any school’s homepage. petitive pool of candidates.”

Searching for our district’s next leader

Shrinking the digital divide

For Parents

ChloeFeyock

LC will host a workshop to assist families in completing the FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) forms at 7 p.m. Dec. 5. Matt Kreig from ISM College Planning will conduct the seminar. He will include types of college aid (grants, low interest loans, work study, etc.) and will show parents how to complete the FAFSA forms. The application deadline is March 10, 2014.

Comcast Corporation has created a technology initiative, Internet Essentials, to bring the internet to low income households. “To close the digital divide,” Comcast senior vice president David Cohen said. “The internet has the potential to equalize the access to news and education. The internet has the potential of helping others. But they aren’t getting it. It has the potential to level the playing field.” Comcast is to provide low cost internet service and a computer to families in need. To qualify one must be eligible to participate in the National School Lunch Program. An application for the service can be found online or requested. “We cannot talk about the quality of education without talking about technology, ExactTarget Foundation Executive Director Karen Jung said. “Sixty percent of students don’t have access to the tools

FAFSA workshop Dec. 5

Info on school delays, closings available early a.m.

When bad weather forces the delay or closing of school for the day, families may learn about the situation through local television and radio stations as well as the school district’s website: www.ltschools.org. Information compiled by Cub Reporter staff

News

chloefeyockcub@gmail.com

they need to do their homework.” This means that students cannot use websites like My Big Campus or find information they need to do a research project. “Every connection means new perspective and new possibilities. It means a more educated society,” U.S Rep. Andre Carson said. Former Colts coach Tony Dungy is a partner to Internet Essentials. He knew the importance of breaking down the barrier. “The internet is not a luxury. It’s very essential to learning for the job market later on,” Dungy said. “Students know how important the internet is. Make sure your parents know how important it is,” said Cohen. This program could encourage a person to go back to school and make a difference in the lives of their family. The conference took place at the LeGore Boys & Girls Club in Indianapolis. During the event, six netbooks were auctioned off to student journalists and students of the club.

New AP class to be offered next year AP human geography will be added to LC’s list of courses offered to freshmen KatieBillman katiebillmancub@gmail.com LC will offer a new advanced placement (AP) course next year, AP human geography. The collegelevel course will be geared toward freshmen so they can learn the geogFranklin raphy of the world before learning the history of it. The class will use a different textbook than the current geography classes and use a syllabus approved by the College Board. Geography and law teacher Jennifer Franklin will teach the class. She plans to attend training over Thanksgiving break to learn more about the course and how to teach it next year. “I’m excited to teach a new AP course,” Franklin said. “We’ll focus really heavily on skill building next year.” The social studies department plans on having one block of AP human geography, but it is prepared to divide into two depending on how many students sign up. “I would’ve liked to have been able to take AP geography because it would have been more challenging,” freshman Caitlin Helmus said. “It also would’ve prepared me better for future AP classes and college.” A recruitment fair was held on Nov. 14 to inform students about the class, but interested incoming freshmen can receive information and schedule the class through their counselors. “Offering it to freshmen is to get them ready to take notes in a collegebased form, do the correct amount of reading and keep up with the pace of the syllabus,” Franklin said. “When they get to AP world geography, they’ll be ready to go.”


News

November 22, 2013 • Cub Reporter

In the CLASSROOM

5

Terrestrial The uppermost part of the eco-columns represent the terrestrial layer, where humans and many plants and animals thrive. This area contains a soil profile, indicated at left, made up of gravel (bedrock), a thin layer of sand and top soil. Students planted a tablespoon of grass seed and water it on a weekly basis. Holes were nailed into the lids at the bottom of the soil profile to allow the water to seep through to the decomposition layer below.

Decomposition

Collecting data from her eco-column, senior Velma Holifield observes the aquatic chamber that contains two fish and a snail. Students take various measurements of their eco-columns, including pH, water temperature, nitrate and nitrite levels, organism health and plant growth. Cub photo/Brittannie Travis

The middle layer of the eco-columns represents decomposition. Students used dead leaves and grass to create a base. Compostable organic matter, such as banana peels or apple cores, are added to allow students to observe the natural process of decomposition. Two worms and a roly poly were placed in this layer; however, some students have seen other insects, such as flies, appear in their eco-columns.

APES classes construct mini ecosystems BrittannieTravis brittannietraviscub@gmail.com Alan Burrell’s AP Environmental Science (APES) students are constructing their own ecocolumns, a re-creation of our physical world along with its organisms. “It’s a project that’s going to help us learn about the world on a smaller scale,” senior Daezare Fifer said. The eco-columns are an ongoing classroom activity and have been done nationwide. “We have our own little mini ecosystem . . .,” Burrell said. The eco-columns contain

three chambers. The aquatic chamber contains at least two live fish that live off the decomposition chamber, which is filled with layers of organic and inorganic material. The terrestrial chamber is situated below and contains soil and grass. The terrestrial and decomposition chambers also include snails, spiders, pill bugs, worms and other living critters. “It’s interesting because this is what happens in life. We are creating nature,” senior Lena Nguyen said. The class plans to collect data over a five-week period by observing the different changes occurring and how the organisms interact with one another.

Aquatic The aquatic layer of the eco-columns contains two rosy red minnows, a snail and aquatic plants from LC’s pond. Several students’ fish or snails have died, which shows how all parts of an ecosystem can affect life in aquatic habitats.

Cub Graphic/Leah Arenz

For data collection in the aquatic layer, the pH, nitrate and nitrite levels, temperature and turbidity are measured. Students must write an essay explaining the death of any organisms in their ecocolumns, which could be a result of the water’s chemical levels.


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November 22, 2013 • Cub Reporter

Drum

majors: the ultimate time keepers

Junior Quentin Beverly, along with junior Andrew Howser and senior Kate Harris, helped lead the Spirit of Central Marching Band to an eighth place finish at Bands of America nationals. This was Beverly’s second year as drum major. Cub photo/Michael Rice

News MolliLoftus molliloftuscub@gmail.com Junior Quentin Beverly stands on a podium 8 feet above the Spirit of Central marching band. Time is in his hand. He, along with senior Kate Harris and junior Drew Howser, has been responsible for the band members staying together in time this season. Beverly said conducting has always been an interest for him. “When I was younger, every time the theme from ‘Jurassic Park’ would come on, I would flap my arms around like the orchestra was right in front of me,” Beverly said. He started taking a real interest in conducting when he was in eighth grade. “That’s when I got my first baton,” he said. A baton is used as an extension of the arm and for shaping music. Beverly was a drum major for The Spirit of Central marching band in his sophomore year. It is rare that sophomores get picked for drum major so when Beverly was chosen it was a big deal. He repeated the job this year. He is not sure what he wants to do

with conducting in his future. “I feel that if I keep going with it I could possibly get pretty far but at the same time I wonder how promising it is to get a profession in it,” Beverly said. Beverly is also interested in astronomy. Despite his experience as the band’s drum major last year, Beverly had to audition for the spot again last May. He said he thought he had not done as well as he had in the previous year’s audition. “I was very nervous; the entire time my baton was shaking,” he said. He made it. “When I found out I wasn’t shocked, but I didn’t see it coming, either,” he said. Beverly shares this year’s drum major title with Harris and Howser. It is unsual for LC to have three drum majors. “It was a phenomenal experience...I wouldn’t have traded the bond we had and still have for the world. I’ve learned so much from them and throughly enjoyed leading with them,” Beverly said. Howser said, “Being a drum major, you have to get the band encouraged and you are more responsible for the mentality of the group instead of the physical preparedness of the group.”

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Show us your UGLY

CHRISTMAS SWEATER!

Show us your ugly Christmas sweater and you could win $20 to buy a better sweater! Submit a picture of yourself in the sweater at cubonline.org and vote on other students’ sweaters. Submit photos Dec. 2-9, and voting will be Dec. 10-13. The winner will be announced before winter break. Dig up a sweater and show us your ugliest holiday spirit!


News

November 22, 2013 • Cub Reporter

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6:45 a.m.

9:45 p.m.

7:15 a.m.

11:00 a.m.

11:20 a.m.

Band takes eighth at nationals Follow the Spirit of Central Marching Band through the day of their Grand National performance. 6:45 a.m. Report to LC 7:15 a.m. Rehearsal Begins 8:45 a.m. Breakfast 9:15 a.m. Change into uniform 9:45 a.m. Tune 10:00 a.m. Load busses 10:30 a.m. Depart from LC 11:00 a.m. Arrive at Lucas Oil Stadium 11:20 a.m. Enter Southwest Tunnel 12:30 p.m. Semi-finals performance 1:15 p.m. Load busses and depart for LC 1:45 p.m. Arrive at LC 2:00 p.m. Lunch 5:00 p.m. Watch finalists announcement 5:45 p.m. Dinner 7:30 p.m. Depart for Lucas Oil Stadium 8:35 p.m. Transit to warm-up 9:45 p.m. Finals performance 11:00 p.m. Finals awards ceremony Midnight: Depart for LC 12:30 a.m. Arrive at LC and celebrate 2:00 a.m. Dismissal time

11:00 p.m.

In the past three weeks, the Spirit of Central marching band placed -- fifth in the ISSMA (Indiana State School Music Association) state finals on Nov. 2; -- third in the Bands of America regionals on Nov. 9; -- eighth at the Bands of America Grand National Finals on Nov. 16. This year’s program, titled “Shades of a Day,” shows the different stages of a day through the perspective of a lamp. “We tried something new and it was scary. But to watch the show transform and how the kids stepped up to the challenge is what made the show such a success and the season an amazing success,” band director Matt James said. Cub photos/Molli Loftus

2:00 a.m.


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November 22, 2013 • Cub Reporter

Opinions

OPINIONS

Cub Reporter Contact us.

Students’ perspectives on problems affecting Lawrence Central’s halls and the world beyond 56th Street.

L.U.S.T. unifies LC

Let Us Stand Together (L.U.S.T.), a new club available this year, was founded by one student, junior Xavier “X” Tribble. His goal: to strengthen the community and bring teens together. Through group mentoring and team building activities, the club seeks to reduce conflict within LC.

With fights and disrespect clearly present in our halls, Tribble’s club is a See related story welcome example of how we on Page 11. can all be kinder to our peers. It will take a group effort to eliminate such insensitive behavior in our school, and L.U.S.T. provides the perfect outlet for students to learn and grow. Tribble also wants to reach out to teens battling depression. While attending a school as large as LC, it is easy for one to feel lost in the crowd. Joining clubs, sports, performing arts or any other extracurricular activity is one way to make our school seem a little smaller. L.U.S.T. is a unique club that offers such an experience to a large group of students, while also being uniquely individualized. We, as students, spend hours of each day at school. Whether students leave directly when the bell rings or stick around for after-school activities, they spend a majority of their day at school. With such great amounts of time put in, LC becomes a second home to many. Yet many students do not feel at home entering these halls. It is time to restore this feeling in our school. Students should enjoy coming to school. It should be an anticipated and celebrated experience for all. We applaud L.U.S.T. for getting the ball rolling, but creating a more friendly school environment falls upon all of us. We must all work together, as a unified body of 2,300 students, to be accepting of all students. If one person can create such a group, we can all take the measures to rally around one another. It takes only one person to make a difference. It takes only one person to make a change. Be that person.

• While it’s great that the district’s Biology ECA scores improved, we still have a long way to go. Although our pass rate for the Biology ECA exceeds the state average, the school district needs to keep in mind that nearly half of the test takers failed. There was a time when parents moved to Lawrence Township for the schools. We should not strive for average; we should strive for excellence. • Volunteering during the holidays is a great way to give back to the community. It’s great that so many students and teachers in the LC community are providing meals for the needy close to Thanksgiving, and it’s even better that these people continue this philanthropy throughout the year. • Black Friday is a day that people tend to get over-

zealous about. Yes, the prices See related stories are low, but if you know how on Pages 6, 15, 12, to shop right, you can get the 2, 3 same things for the same prices online. Not to mention avoiding the violence. • No Shave November is an entertaining way to raise awareness of men’s health issues. Seeing men grow out their facial hair spreads the word about cancer prevention for men. • The Secondary Redesign Committee is making large strides in overall improvement to Lawrence Township schools. Although many of the suggested ideas seem somewhat intangible at this point, it is clear that the township is working to make these goals realistic and more concrete.

Cub Reporter Lawrence Central High School 7300 E. 56th St. Indianapolis, IN 46226 (317) 964-7400 cubonline.org Facebook Twitter Instagram

Tell us.

Letters to the editor are welcome, but they are limited to 200 words. The author’s name will be printed with the letter. Letters should not contain obscene or libelous language. Letters may be submitted in Room 132, placed in the mailbox of Cub Reporter adviser Elizabeth Granger or mailed to her at elizabethgranger@msdlt.k12.in.us.

Purpose.

To provide news to the Lawrence Central community.

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Businesses may advertise in the Cub Reporter if their ad adheres to guidelines. The advertising policy is available in Room 132 or via email at elizabethgranger@msdlt.k12. in.us.

Corrections.

The Cub Reporter corrects its mistakes. If you believe the Cub Reporter made a mistake in a previous issue, please let us know by contacting a member of the staff or sending an email to elizabethgranger@msdlt. k12.in.us.

Staff. Print Editor-in-Chief Carley Lanich

Business Manager Anna Zanoni

Online Editor-in-Chief Leah Arenz

Reporters Anna Angrick Chloe Feyock Tajhanae Gillard Haley Hamilton Rebecca Johnson Jayden Kelly Justice Springer Jordan Williams Logan Young

News Editors Darian Benson Caroline Varie Opinions Editor Chad Sharp Features Editors Katie Billman Molli Loftus A+E Editors Ali Duff Brittanie Travis Sports Editors Jacob Helmus Drew Nixon

Photographers Amanda Boyce Michael Rice Adviser Elizabeth Granger Principal Rocky Valadez

Xavier “X” Tribble records the winners of the L.U.S.T. ping pong tournament in the LC Commons. Cub photo/Chloe Feyock

30-second editorials


Opinions

November 22, 2013 • Cub Reporter

The Life Obscura by Ali Duff

Cult classic films that will make you squirm There are many things strange and unusual about bones. When you are born, the femur bones in your legs are made up of three separate bones that subsequently fuse together during childhood. This is how osteologists and forensic detectives are able to figure out the ages of unknown skeletons. This season is rich with quirky movies. When I wasn’t sitting outside by my fire pit passing out candy, I watched quirky movies. One of them was Eraserhead, a 1977 surrealist film directed by the master of the bizarre himself, David Lynch. Eraserhead was Lynch’s feature movie debut, starring Jack Nance as Henry Spencer, a young man with hair like…well, an eraser. The movie begins when Spencer is invited to dinner at the house of his girlfriend, Mary X (Charlotte Stewart). There, Henry is informed that Mary has recently given birth to his baby, an inhuman, snakelike child. As the couple cares for their strange baby, bizarre chaos soon ensues. While the film’s special effects are somewhat dated, Eraserhead’s insanely weird vibe has endured to make the movie a defining cult classic. The second movie I viewed was Hal Ashby’s 1971 effort Harold and Maude, an“This season is rich other cult classic. with quirky movies.” Harold and Maude stars Bud Cort as Harold Chasen, a death obsessed 23-year-old with a penchant for both staging elaborate (albeit fake) suicides and scouring the obituaries for funerals to attend. Oh, and it’s worth mentioning that he drives to those said funerals in his personal hearse. Harold’s socialite mother, Mrs. Chasen (Vivan Pickles) is overwhelmed by her son’s attempts on his life and signs him up for an online dating service which she hopes will result in him getting married. Harold, however, has no interest in marrying anyone until he meets Maude. Wonderfully portrayed by the late Ruth Gordon, Maude is an impulsive, car jacking 79-year-old woman whose zest for life rivals Harold’s affinity for death. As the two spend more time together, Maude slowly picks at Harold’s fractured soul, pulling it apart and fixing it back together as she teaches him the value of his own life. With brilliant acting, dark humor, and a score comprised entirely of Cat Stevens tracks, Harold and Maude is a terrifically free-spirited meditation on personal freedoms, forbidden love and the perils of existentialism.

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A holiday lacking gratitude

“I’m thankful for…” The phrase is repeated each year. On every fourth Thursday of November, students and families feast, spend time with each other and talk about what they’re thankful for. Usually, that phrase ends with “my health.” Rarely do we hear, “I’m thankful for my education.” Regardless of what generation you’re in, Americans as a whole are prone to taking things for granted. School, seven hours of the day that we often complain about, is seen as a chore rather than a privilege. We get caught up in saying, “I want this, I want that,” instead of expressing our gratitude for what we already have. What we don’t often think about is how lucky we are to live in a country where education is something that we’re guaranteed and have the right to obtain. We’ve been lucky enough to have been raised in a society where everyone is entitled to an education, regardless of race, gender, sexuality or age. That hasn’t always been the case. Races weren’t

world aren’t as lucky. If you can read this column, you’re more fortunate than the 774 million people in the world that don’t know how to read, according to Statisticbrain.com. If that alone isn’t enough to be thankful for, we don’t express our gratitude to the people that help us achieve success within it enough: our parents, teachers and administration. Parents typically pay school fees, teachers teach you the necessary material to help you by Katie Billman succeed in life and administration organizes and maintains a safe environment for us to learn in. always thought of as equal, and So while you’re sitting around women used to be thought of as the table this inferior to men. But fast for“... everyone is entitled to Thanksgiving, ward in time; it’s an education, regardless remind yourself of how lucky 2013. Our classes are now integrat- of race, gender, sexuality you are to learn in an established with students or age.” ment like Lawfrom every racial background, and women can study rence Central. And whether it’s to your parents, teachers or even whatever profession they like. We your bus drivers, remember that go through four classes a day, five a simple “Thank you” goes a long days a week, with most of us not realizing that other countries in the way.

I invite you to have lunch with me at school on Friday, the 13th. That’s Dec. 13. My treat. To get a chance to win in this contest, follow @cubonline and tweet using #cublunchwithbubba. The winner will be chosen randomly and will get to bring one friend who has the same lunch. You can scan the QR code and it will take you directly to the Cub Online Twitter page. Enter by Dec. 6. The winner, to be announced by Dec. 10, will be entitled to a choice from several different meals. I, of course, will be there at the table with you. The winner does not have to dress overly nice, but should note that I will be wearing a suit, so they should at least dress a little nicely. I will not be napping, either. Winter is starting and as you know, bears hibernate. I will be one of the only bears who stays awake during hibernation season. With the help of large amounts of coffee and many berries, I will stay

If you’ve ever been to an LC Bears game, you may have noticed how many people like to greet me or high five me but just can’t get to me in time for me to be able to interact with them. If you want to come and hang out with me, or give me a high five, I urge you to come and find me. I enjoy hanging out with each and every one of you, so it would be greatly appreciated if you would come and see me. The longer I represent the school at football and basketball games, the more I enjoy it. I enjoy myself just as much as you guys enjoy hanging out with me. In some cases, I enjoy being with you all more than you do. Sometimes people enjoy themselves too much; they end up asking me to fight other school mascots. I’m friends with most of the other mascots and picking a fight with them would be going overboard. After all, I am a nice bear.

Organized Chaos

Free lunch with Bubba can be yours

Can’t bear it any longer by Bubba the Bear

awake long enough to have fun at games and hang out with you all. This winter should be an interesting one, for I will be collecting berries on my own, instead of my mom going and getting them for me. If I don’t collect enough berries, I could starve. In order to keep myself awake for the hibernation season, I will need to intake more berries than I usually do. There’s all that meeting and greeting for me to do.


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November 22, 2013 • Cub Reporter

SoYou Say

Opinions

Binge television watching

MichaelRice michaelricecub@gmail.com

Is binge TV healthy for your body?

Binge TV watching can be bad for your health. It can stress your eyes, which can harm your vision. If you watch TV sitting down for a long time, you’re not doing anything productive. Sitting on the couch for hours on end can’t be healthy for anyone.

JaydenKelly jaydenkellycub@gmail.com

Binging on television can be bad for your mind, body and personality. While watching TV, you don’t get any educational value. If you’re sitting down and watching TV you aren’t burning calories. Binging on TV is just being lazy and can influence others to do the same.

How many hours is considered to be binge watching? Watching TV for more than four hours is considered watching it on a binge. After four hours it gets into the area of laziness, and is very unhealthy.

I believe that watching TV for more than five hours a day is binging. You’re watching TV for five hours without getting up or doing anything, so it is probably going to affect your health.

Is TV binging acceptable? No. Siting too long and not getting any activity isn’t healthy. Kids’ grades drop because they come home and watch TV for many, many hours. It is something that needs to be addressed by medical professionals.

Watching TV for too long can not affect only your personal relationships, but it can cause you to slack off or procrastinate. If you don’t do your work because you’re watching an entire season of “Doctor Who,” you’re going to get bad grades.

Speak Your Mind: How many hours before it’s considered binge watching? I say six, because they could be doing better things with their life. Kyra Cullison, 12

Three to four, because after a while it just starts feeling lazy.

Anthony Espinoza, 12

Over five and a half hours. It depends on how long the show is. You need to get off your butt. Rachael Powell, 11

I would say four. You’re sitting and not doing anything. Calieel Muhammad, 11

Probably five hours or more, because that seems like a lot of time to just be sitting there, glued to the TV. Kahla Hunter, 10 I’d say at least three hours, because after that a show just starts to get boring. Andrew George, 10

Probably three hours. That’s about six episodes of something and that seems like a lot. Caroline Harris, 9 Anywhere from two to four hours. That’s too much time that you could be doing better things, like homework.

Darion Webb, 9


Features

November 22, 2013 • Cub Reporter

FEATURES

11

In-depth coverage of students, global issues, rising trends and the not-so-average Bear

L.U.S.T. hosts ping pong tournaments in the Commons during all the lunches. One winner was determined in each lunch, whose names were listed on the board at the sign-up table. Cub photo/Chloe Feyock

Club L.U.S.T. strengthens teen community ChloeFeyock chloefeyockcub@gmail.com

He wanted to see more smiles on people’s faces. He was tired of seeing other teens go through hard times alone. Junior Xavier “X” Tribble knew he needed to do something to make a change. Tribble’s idea was to create a new club at LC. He started L.U.S.T. For Life (“Let Us Stand Together”), a not-forprofit initiative to bring teenagers together and to strengthen the community. “My motive is the people,” Tribble said. “As long as I know there’s a person out there in need of help, then I am willing to keep going.” One of L.U.S.T.’s goals is to stop the growing disagreements between teens at LC. Tribble said he wants to reach more

than just the people he sees in class. aging others himself. He opened up the “I want more teens to be more help- first club meeting with a story about ful toward their communities and see how people have to work for what they that others may have it worse in some want. This club is what he wants. cases,” Tribble said. “I believe that L.U.S.T.’s community I was given a gift,” Tribble said. “I believe awareness project, “I believe that that everything has a called “Warm the everything has a purpose and I believe Winter,” will begin purpose, and I believe that I have found my in December. It will purpose, here and provide warm clothes that I have found my for homeless teens. now, within L.U.S.T. purpose, here and When someone For Life.” now, within L.U.S.T. for joins the group, they Tribble also has an are introduced to interest in mentoring Life.” the other members. Xavier Tribble other teens. He has junior had previous mentor They get to know each other through experiences. a series of group “Every person I activities. There are around 38 students met felt like they could tell me anything now signed up for the club. Tribble, the and trust me,” Tribble said. “I was glad club’s president, is fond of watching that so many of my friends felt that way.” motivational speakers and also encour-

Club L.U.S.T. hopes to help depression rates, which are rising in America. Around 11 percent of adolescents have a depressive disorder by age 18, according to the National Comorbidity Survey, a nationally representative mental health survey. “Our goal is to resuscitate teens back into a better mood,” Tribble said. L.U.S.T.’s goal is to reach out to people who have no one to lean on. “My goal is to reach out to Belzer and Lawrence North to get more teens to open up,” Tribble said. “I just hope others can see the greater vision of finally not wearing a cold shell clamped together by hate or fear, and let the heat within that out. I want others to start to become more expressive and open up to people who care.” More information is available through emailing Tribble at xavier. tribble@gmail.com


12

November 22, 2013 • Cub Reporter

BLACK Friday

Features

1 3

17

2

Source/MCT Campus

Junior Summer Samuels waits in line at Saks 5th Avenue in Keystone. It’s midnight on a Thursday night. But it’s not like the other 51 Thursdays in the year; this one starts Black Friday. “I’ve gone shopping on Black Friday since I was a 1-year-old,” Samuels said. “My mom started years before me, though, so she just took me along.” Samuels and her family usually leave at 10 p.m. on Black Friday and go to wait at the Keystone Fashion Mall. “It’s a family tradition. We begin with Saks Fifth Avenue and continue throughout the whole Fashion Mall,” Samuels said. “I generally buy for myself, but sometimes my family will get things for people if they ask us to.” Black Friday, which is set on Nov. 29 this year, is traditionally the Friday after Thanksgiving. It has routinely been the biggest shopping day of the year since 2005 and is thought to be the start of the holiday shopping season. The name originates from the point where retailers turn to making a profit, or go “into the black.” Many stores open at midnight on Black Friday while other larger, more popular department stores open earlier. Stores like Macy’s, Kohl’s and Target will open at 8 p.m. the night of Thanksgiving this year, so shoppers don’t have

5

to wait at night. Black Friday “We has gotten so popular that it has order a stemmed into different sale days surplus on close to Thanksgiving. the things Small Business Saturday, we have always two days after Thanksgreat sales See related story giving, was started by American on. It helps on Page 18. Express in 2010 as an advertisour profit, ing campaign to promote small but we also businesses. Cyber Monday, the aim for it to help people get Monday after Thanksgiving, is to know us and be pleased so when online stores like Amazon they come back and tell their have really low prices. Cyber friends, therefore helping our Monday has been thought to be future profit,” said senior Alexis the online equivalent of Black Perkins, who works at Grace Friday, and it has become one Boutique. of the biggest online shopping Some people don’t enjoy days of the year. staying up late or waking up Going shopping on Black early to go shopping, but still Friday is a want to go tradition for shopping on many families “Even if you don’t have Black Friday. and individuMany of these that much money or als. While many people end up shop for others, any money at all, it’s shopping in a lot of people still fun to wait outside the middle of also shop for the day as an themselves be- the store with your alternative. cause of the low friends and ‘people “Even if prices that can you don’t have watch.’” only be found that much Daniel Johnson during that day. money or any junior Black money at all, Friday doesn’t it’s still fun to benefit only the consumers, wait outside the store with your however; it also helps businesses friends and ‘people watch,” make a large profit, as well as junior Daniel Johnson said. get ready for the holiday seaWhether you’re taking adson. Stores like Grace Boutique vantage of Macy’s door-buster in Keystone are starting to get sales or even just going to ready for the big day. Smaller Castleton Square Mall for fun, stores like this can also use Black Black Friday provides deals that Friday as a way to get the word will benefit retailers, consumout about their store and make a ers and most importantly, their bigger profit in the long run. wallets.

The night of Thanksgiving is time for most people to sleep off the huge

15

11

7

12

6

Students take advantage of low prices and holiday fun during Black Friday sales annaangrickcub@gmail.com

16

4

Cub graphic/Leah Arenz

AnnaAngrick

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13

14

8

10 9

Source/www.simon.com/mall

Black Friday: Mapping your way through Castleton Square Mall 1

Macy’s

8 p.m. Thanksgiving – 9 p.m. Black Friday

10

H&M

8 p.m. Thanksgiving – 9 p.m. Black Friday

2

Charlotte Russe

8 p.m. Thanksgiving – 9 p.m. Black Friday

11

Claire’s Boutique

8 p.m. Thanksgiving – 9 p.m. Black Friday

3

Rack Room Shoes

8 p.m. Thanksgiving – 9 p.m. Black Friday

12

American Eagle Outfitters

8 p.m. Thanksgiving – 9 p.m. Black Friday

4

Von Maur

9 a.m. Black Friday – 9 p.m. Black Friday

13

Off Broadway Shoes 8 p.m. Thanksgiving –

5

JCPenney

10 a.m. Thanksgiving – 9 p.m. Saturday

14

Sears

10 a.m. Thanksgiving – 9 p.m. Saturday

6

Gamestop

8 p.m. Thanksgiving – 9 p.m. Black Friday

15

Dicks Sporting Goods

8 p.m. Thanksgiving – 9 p.m. Black Friday

7

The Finish Line

8 p.m. Thanksgiving – 9 p.m. Black Friday

16

Bath & Body Works

8 p.m. Thanksgiving – 9 p.m. Black Friday

8

Universitees

8 p.m. Thanksgiving – 9 p.m. Black Friday

17

Victoria’s Secret

8 p.m. Thanksgiving – 9 p.m. Black Friday

9

Forever 21

10 a.m. Black Friday – 9 p.m. Black Friday

18

Come visit Santa Claus

10 a.m. Black Friday – 9 p.m. Black Friday

9 p.m. Black Friday

G J M S T B A D T


12

November 22, 2013 • Cub Reporter

BLACK Friday

Features

1 3

17

2

Source/MCT Campus

Junior Summer Samuels waits in line at Saks 5th Avenue in Keystone. It’s midnight on a Thursday night. But it’s not like the other 51 Thursdays in the year; this one starts Black Friday. “I’ve gone shopping on Black Friday since I was a 1-year-old,” Samuels said. “My mom started years before me, though, so she just took me along.” Samuels and her family usually leave at 10 p.m. on Black Friday and go to wait at the Keystone Fashion Mall. “It’s a family tradition. We begin with Saks Fifth Avenue and continue throughout the whole Fashion Mall,” Samuels said. “I generally buy for myself, but sometimes my family will get things for people if they ask us to.” Black Friday, which is set on Nov. 29 this year, is traditionally the Friday after Thanksgiving. It has routinely been the biggest shopping day of the year since 2005 and is thought to be the start of the holiday shopping season. The name originates from the point where retailers turn to making a profit, or go “into the black.” Many stores open at midnight on Black Friday while other larger, more popular department stores open earlier. Stores like Macy’s, Kohl’s and Target will open at 8 p.m. the night of Thanksgiving this year, so shoppers don’t have

5

to wait at night. Black Friday “We has gotten so popular that it has order a stemmed into different sale days surplus on close to Thanksgiving. the things Small Business Saturday, we have always two days after Thanksgreat sales See related story giving, was started by American on. It helps on Page 18. Express in 2010 as an advertisour profit, ing campaign to promote small but we also businesses. Cyber Monday, the aim for it to help people get Monday after Thanksgiving, is to know us and be pleased so when online stores like Amazon they come back and tell their have really low prices. Cyber friends, therefore helping our Monday has been thought to be future profit,” said senior Alexis the online equivalent of Black Perkins, who works at Grace Friday, and it has become one Boutique. of the biggest online shopping Some people don’t enjoy days of the year. staying up late or waking up Going shopping on Black early to go shopping, but still Friday is a want to go tradition for shopping on many families “Even if you don’t have Black Friday. and individuMany of these that much money or als. While many people end up shop for others, any money at all, it’s shopping in a lot of people still fun to wait outside the middle of also shop for the day as an themselves be- the store with your alternative. cause of the low friends and ‘people “Even if prices that can you don’t have watch.’” only be found that much Daniel Johnson during that day. money or any junior Black money at all, Friday doesn’t it’s still fun to benefit only the consumers, wait outside the store with your however; it also helps businesses friends and ‘people watch,” make a large profit, as well as junior Daniel Johnson said. get ready for the holiday seaWhether you’re taking adson. Stores like Grace Boutique vantage of Macy’s door-buster in Keystone are starting to get sales or even just going to ready for the big day. Smaller Castleton Square Mall for fun, stores like this can also use Black Black Friday provides deals that Friday as a way to get the word will benefit retailers, consumout about their store and make a ers and most importantly, their bigger profit in the long run. wallets.

The night of Thanksgiving is time for most people to sleep off the huge

15

11

7

12

6

Students take advantage of low prices and holiday fun during Black Friday sales annaangrickcub@gmail.com

16

4

Cub graphic/Leah Arenz

AnnaAngrick

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13

14

8

10 9

Source/www.simon.com/mall

Black Friday: Mapping your way through Castleton Square Mall 1

Macy’s

8 p.m. Thanksgiving – 9 p.m. Black Friday

10

H&M

8 p.m. Thanksgiving – 9 p.m. Black Friday

2

Charlotte Russe

8 p.m. Thanksgiving – 9 p.m. Black Friday

11

Claire’s Boutique

8 p.m. Thanksgiving – 9 p.m. Black Friday

3

Rack Room Shoes

8 p.m. Thanksgiving – 9 p.m. Black Friday

12

American Eagle Outfitters

8 p.m. Thanksgiving – 9 p.m. Black Friday

4

Von Maur

9 a.m. Black Friday – 9 p.m. Black Friday

13

Off Broadway Shoes 8 p.m. Thanksgiving –

5

JCPenney

10 a.m. Thanksgiving – 9 p.m. Saturday

14

Sears

10 a.m. Thanksgiving – 9 p.m. Saturday

6

Gamestop

8 p.m. Thanksgiving – 9 p.m. Black Friday

15

Dicks Sporting Goods

8 p.m. Thanksgiving – 9 p.m. Black Friday

7

The Finish Line

8 p.m. Thanksgiving – 9 p.m. Black Friday

16

Bath & Body Works

8 p.m. Thanksgiving – 9 p.m. Black Friday

8

Universitees

8 p.m. Thanksgiving – 9 p.m. Black Friday

17

Victoria’s Secret

8 p.m. Thanksgiving – 9 p.m. Black Friday

9

Forever 21

10 a.m. Black Friday – 9 p.m. Black Friday

18

Come visit Santa Claus

10 a.m. Black Friday – 9 p.m. Black Friday

9 p.m. Black Friday

G J M S T B A D T


14 November 22, 2013 • Cub Reporter

Features

Binge TV watching becomes a popular trend JordanWilliams

jordanwilliamscub@gmail.com

Sophomore Sarah Neville spends a lot of her time in front of the television. She spent hours watching the Breaking Bad TV series back-to-back over fall break. It’s a term commonly known as “binge television watching.” Binge TV has grown to be a pandemic that affects many people. Binge watching is when someone watches entire seasons of a show in a short period of time, even as short as one day. Although the term is new, the idea of showing multiple episodes of one show in a limited time frame is not. TV stations have been doing this for decades with marathons. Binge watching has become increasingly popular thanks to Netflix, Hulu and other internet streaming services. Sophomore Daniel Brinker,

who likes the shows Bleach and Soul Eater, said he recommends binge watching. “I do it every weekend,” Brinker said. “You can say I’m pretty lazy.” Junior Shelby Claflin prefers watching comedy shows. “I do it when I’m bored,” she said. Not only are internet streaming services used by everyday people, but network companies have been trying to use the practice of binge watching to see what their viewers will or will not watch. MTV will be showing full seasons of shows before they air on TV via their app. Networks like MTV, which rely on young people to watch their shows, continuously try to find new ways to raise their ratings. Many other networks try to entice the viewer by putting more of their best shows online. Although people enjoy

watching television, problems will give you a lack of exercise, can stem from watching it for which could result in not belong periods of time. ing very physically fit,” nurse “The mind needs intellectu- Marijo Trissler said. “When al stimulation for it to exercise. looking at the TV screen for When there is no stimulation, a long time, you could strain it doesn’t grow, much like the your eyes and affect your eyebody,” psychology teacher Tim sight in the future.” Barthel said. Nev“It should ille said she “When I was doing it, be done in watches TV I looked at myself and “during my moderation. Parents seem chill time, but thought, ‘You should to rely too I still do stuff. probably leave the much on TV to I still hang entertain their house.’” out with my Sarah Neville friends, and I kids.” sophomore wouldn’t say When one watches TV I’m lazy for for too long, that.” neither the body nor the brain is Sophomore Allysa Jones being intellectually stimulated, agreed. “If you binge watch a leading to stunted growth or lot, you would get lazy,” she delayed development, while said. “You still have a life other the short term side effects could than TV.” cause you to lose sleep leading Neville and Jones agreed to difficulties in school. that it’s better to watch TV in moderation. “Watching TV for too long

carry-out only

“When I was doing it (binge watching), I looked at myself and thought, ‘You should probably leave the house,’” Neville said. Not everyone is buying into the binge watching hype, however. Amazon, which has let viewers binge watch shows on Amazon Prime, will not allow viewers to binge watch their original shows. Science teacher Sarah Westerfeld doesn’t buy into the binge watching phase. “I don’t think it’s a good use of your time,” she said. Although she does have Netflix, she watches it a few times a week for only an hour or two. “There’s so much more to be able to do,” Westerfeld said. “Just to be able to enjoy the outdoors — I feel like TV just isolates you and you won’t have enough social time.” Editor’s note: Jayden Kelly contributed to this story.


Features

November 22, 2013 • Cub Reporter

10 ways to 3. Donate food

15

volunteer in your community

4. Work at the library

2. Donate clothes

5. Work at a soup kitchen

7. Work at a hospital

8. Pick up trash 9. Teach someone something

6. Volunteer at a senior center

1. Donate to the Salvation Army

10. Shovel snow or rake leaves for a neighbor Cub graphics/Leah Arenz

Giving back to the community BrittannieTravis

brittannietraviscub@gmail.com

A decade ago freshman Joseph (JoJo) Johnson and his family provided Thanksgiving dinners to the people in their community who were in need of a holiday meal. Today the Johnson family and their church will continue to help others during the Thanksgiving holidays. Philanthropy is the desire to do good to benefit humanity. Johnson is among the many teen philanthropists who are motivated to give back to their communities by providing generous donations for a good cause. “At my church there’s a little station where Mozel (Mozel Sanders Foundation Inc.) sends us a certain amount of food and we pass it out,” Johnson said.

Eddie Mathews, interactive media/ “If somebody who’s either elderly or can’t go to the church wants food deliv- advanced interactive media teacher at the McKenzie Center for Innovation ered, then we have someone who will and Technology, also spends his time prepare the meals in little to-go boxes volunteering and and have them giving back to his sent out.” community. Johnson at“... now we’re really trying to “We have a tends the Lawthing called ‘Comrence United create relationships so we munity Night’ Methodist have a year-long every month Church. approach to helping those throughout the Members of year,” Mathews his church and in need.” said. community conEddie Mathews Mathews attribute by donattends the Vineing, as well as reinteractive media teacher yard Community ceiving, food from Church (VCC) in the Mozel Sanders Castleton. Foundation Inc. “We invite families into our church (MSFI), a philanthropic organization and provide an awesome meal,” he in Indiana. The organization is best said. known for creating the annual Mozel Mathews’ church also has a proSanders Thanksgiving Dinner and has fessional chef who attends the VCC. been widely expanding for 40 years. He cooks meals each month for the The MSFI has also received statewide families, as well as contributes time to a recognition and has been presented food pantry and clothing area that the with several awards.

VCC manages. In addition, the VCC provides tutoring services to help the kids from the neighborhood, which Mathews’ wife supervises. On Wednesdays, the VCC has a bilingual Bible study that the fluent Spanish-speaking women started. “We used to deliver Thanksgiving dinners to those in need, and that’s great, but now we’re really trying to create relationships so we have a year-long approach to helping those in need,” Mathews said. Mathews and his church plan to combine their Thanksgiving and Christmas events, bringing their neighborhood closer. The Thanksgiving/ Christmas event will include a jazz band, a big dinner, photos with Santa and maybe some gifts. “We’re just trying to help the poor (spiritually, materially and relationally), and share the love of God,” Mathews said. “We attempt to do this by creating lasting relationships.”


16 November

22, 2013 • Cub Reporter

Features

LC/LN students to host ‘Night with the Stars’ KatieBillman

katiebillmancub@gmail.com

The Lawrence Township School Student Foundation will host its annual Night with the Stars event 6-9 p.m. Dec. 6 in the LC fieldhouse. The student foundation is a group of students from both LC and LN that raise money to benefit the township. “The student foundation is an important organization because it brings students together from seemingly rival high schools to work together for a common good,” foundation adviser Kris Rollison said. The event is thought to be a “kids’ night out” open to all elementary school students in Lawrence Township where they can watch a movie, play games or make a craft, and eat with “star” athletes, artists and musicians from both high schools. Last year the event brought in 70 kids and raised more than $800. The money

went toward funding tutoring hours at both LC and LN’s My Achievement Centers (MACs), but the student foundation hasn’t yet decided where the money will go this year. The organization’s main fundraising events include a Night with the Stars and their spare change collection called “Change for Change.” “A Night with the Stars is important for younger kids because it lets them spend time with young adults who have excelled both in the classroom as well as in extracurricular activities,” senior Will Gordon said. “This influence gives the kids a good example to follow, which helps develop them into great individuals.” The first child’s admission is $15; admission for additional siblings is $5 each. More information and recommended online registration is available at http://ltsstudentfoundation.webs.com/a-nightwith-the-stars.

Elementary school kids play games at last year’s Night with the Stars.“A Night with the Stars gives the younger grades a chance to hang out with the older ‘stars’ of both high schools,” adviser Kris Rollison said. Courtesy photo/Sally Gordon

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A+E

November 22, 2013 • Cub Reporter

A+E

17

Trends are changing, the popcorn’s popping and yesterday’s ‘in’ is tomorrow’s ‘out.’ Don’t worry, we’ll help you keep up.

Slaves, willing to risk their lives for freedom, become

Runaways

AnnaZanoni

annazanonicub@gmail.com “Doesn’t matter if you get lost or tired. You may even have to leave someone behind… but you gots to keep goin’. Keep goin’ ‘til you’re free.” A free black woman spoke to us as we warmed up around a small fire. “Use the North Star right off the Drinking Gourd — you’re going to follow that right along to freedom,” she said. The Drinking Gourd, or the Big Dipper, reached toward the North Star. Our natural beacon to freedom. Our group couldn’t stay in one place for long for fear a slave catcher would get us. Before we went deeper into the woods the woman added, “It won’t be easy remembering those you left behind, but put them in your heart so they can take the journey with you.” “Follow the North Star” is an Underground Railroad simulation that has been at Conner Prairie in Fishers for more than 16 years. Before I started my experience as an 1830s runaway slave, I asked a few to share predictions of what Follow the North Star would be like. “Inspiring, scary, breathtaking, epic, educational” were their replies. Indeed, Follow the North Star did not disappoint. “What are you darkies doing walking at night? You were

With their new owner screaming, ‘Don’t you look at no white master,” runaway slaves keep their eyes down for fear of getting into trouble. Conner Prairie’s popular interac-

tive program gives participants a glimpse of what it might have been like to be a runaway slave in the 1830s. Courtesy photos/Conner Prairie

making so much noise a deaf the honest, hardworking white man could hear ya!” man. We all kept our eyes on A white man wielding a the ground to avoid making rifle walked in the middle of eye contact. Looking at a white our path. In the distance gunman was a challenge. shots popped off. “Don’t you We eventually escaped look at me! Move!” he said. from the angry stranger and Quickly I raked the sky for wound up on the doorstep of a glimpse of the North Star but a family of free blacks - the the clouds were heavy. “Heads Quarts. “Indiana has a law that down!” the says only colstranger ored folk have yelled. I only to pay for free saw darkness. papers. These He lined papers are us up in front $500,” Shirley of a small fire Quart said. and paced “Now I ask, back and even with my forth, yelling hard work… in the faces of do you think A free black woman provides guidance several until I earn $500 he was blue in to the runaway slaves. in one year? the face. He went on to blame Two? Never.” None of us were us ‘darkies’ for everything that walking around with $500 for had gone wrong in his life. slave papers, either. So our Because we worked for free, he journey to freedom had to couldn’t find a job. We stole all continue. the opportunities from under Once we left the Quarts

a Conner Prairie employee said we had reached the end of our journey. She pointed at people in our group and stated our fates: “Wounded, taken in by Quakers…Caught and branded for running away…. Didn’t make it…Left behind...” Only a handful of us made it to freedom. “I honestly don’t know of any (programs) that are quite like Follow the North Star,” said Rosie Arnold, the education programs manager at Conner Prairie. “But there are other museums around the country that have seen what we’ve done and tried to do similar immersion programs.” Our group swapped experiences. “After we got dropped off in the woods I felt like nobody cared about me,” one said. “Whenever I saw someone I thought — maybe I can run. Should I run? Are they going to help me, or should I hide?” Another added, “One man

Things To Know Date: Nov. 22-23 Time: staggered times beginning at 6:30 p.m. Place: Conner Prairie Interactive History Park 13400 Allisonville Road Fishers Phone 317.776.6006

Admission Cost: $20 called us ‘mud’— he didn’t even recognize us as humans. I felt humiliated.” Arnold said, “Whether we want to admit it or not, this is a very important part of (American) heritage that we are still dealing with. You can make so many ties to bullying in schools and how we treat people on a daily basis.” Conner Prairie’s logo for Follow the North Star sums up the experience best: “You’ll walk away with a lot to think about.”


18

November 22, 2013 • Cub Reporter

California band is ethereal, upbeat LoganYoung

loganyoungcub@gmail.com

Ethereal. Dreamy. Upbeat. Those are three great adjectives to describe California band Burnt Ones. Their most recent album, You’ll Never Walk Alone Again, was released June 18 by Burger Records. Burger Records is an independent record label based in Fullerton, Calif., since 2007. Burnt Ones are now in San Francisco, but they were based right here in Indianapolis. They always come back to their hometown of Indy to see friends and perform at local venues. Vocalist and front man Mark Tester can be spotted at events of Indy’s local music scene, such as the annual Cataracts Music Fest, originally held in the houses and front yards of local Fountain Square residents. This year it was held in Garfield Park, south of the city. It is a day-long music festival booked with four stages and a group or musician playing at every hour. Even if indie or dream pop tunes aren’t typically your cup of tea, most who are introduced seem to love them. There’s just something about their reverbed vocals and catchy guitar melodies that reel you in. The sounds are very laid-back and easy to listen to. Burnt Ones incorporate ‘70s rock and roll with an upbeat pop sound that is something like you’ve never heard before. You’ll Never Walk Alone Again has short and catchy songs that blend into each other as they start and end, as well as an angsty twist that laces the teen poppy sound. For instance, the lyrics “Tell all your friends that this is the end, of all these stupid trends…” is the opener of the album in the first song, “Glitter Death.”

You’ll Never Walk Alone Again

Artist: Burnt Ones Album: You’ll Never Walk Alone Again Genre: Garage Rock Song Suggestion: “Glitter Death” Rating: 5 out of 5 Similar Artists: T-Rex, Vacation

A+E

Shopping Black Friday on Monday Thanksgiving break is just around the corner, and with that comes Black Friday, the biggest shopping day of the year. Sometimes the more I think about Black Friday, the more I think about all the crowds, waiting in the cold for stores to open, the sales that aren’t really that great... It makes me want to stay home and sleep off that Thanksgiving dinner more and more. Thankfully, a virtual Black Friday exists for people like me who just want to sleep in and online shop, the Monday after Black Friday, Cyber Monday. Cyber Monday is when all the big online shops like Amazon have big sales, and a lot of retailers promote Cyber Monday more than Black Friday because of recent violence that has come with the deals and doorbusters many big department stores have. And anyway, with all

by Anna Angrick

the discount codes you can find online and free shipping for most of the sales, you could probably get most things cheaper online than in stores. I especially enjoy online shopping because I’m able to shop at places I’d never be able to shop at here in Indiana. Stores like American Apparel and Brandy Melville are at least three hours away from Indianapolis, but I’m

What’s H t in Indy

Wicked: The Musical

Broadway has come to Indy. The melodious musical with more than 50 major awards, including a Grammy and three Tony Awards, has been called back to the box office. Wicked will be performed at the Old National Centre Nov. 23-Dec. 1 at various times. Tickets are $40 to $173. For more information call 800-793-7469 or go to www.ticketmaster.com.

The Hunger Games’ Catching Fire movie

The second edition to The Hunger Games triology is playing in theaters today. Katniss and Petta are targeted by the society after their victory in the 74th Hunger Games. The movie stars Jennifer Lawrence and Josh Hutcherson. Tickets at the AMC movie theater in Castleton vary as well as times. For the trailer and times go to www.amc.com Source/ www.amazon.com

Own That Look

able to buy from them at home on my computer. There are also a lot of online-only shops that stock brands like Jeffrey Campbell and UNIF that you wouldn’t be able to find in stores elsewhere. My favorites are online shops based in Japan and Korea like sheinside.com and Rome.com, where they sell a bunch of cute clothes (and sometimes knock off versions of really pricey items) for very cheap, and most of the time they have free shipping. Even if you aren’t a big clothes shopper on Black Friday, Amazon and other similar websites have huge sales on electronics, household items and other gifts you’re looking to give on Christmas. So if you’re too tired to go Black Friday shopping like I am, just spend a day online shopping. Whether you’re buying for yourself or others, sometimes we all just need some retail therapy.

Information compiled by Brittannie Travis

Colts vs.Titans

Courtesy photo/Indianapolis Downtown, Inc.

The Indianapolis Colts will take on the Tennessee Titans at Lucas Oil Stadium for game No. 13 in the Colts season. The Colts are 6-2 and the Titans 3-5. Tickets begin at $52. The game begins at 1 p.m. Dec. 1 and will be aired on CBS. Listen to the game on Sirius XM Radio. For more information, go to www.colts.com or www.ticketmaster.com

Indy’s Circle of Lights tree-lighting ceremony

Justin Timberlake: The 20/20 Experience Tour

Indy’s annual Circle of Lights Tree Lighting ceremony will flip the switch for the new holiday season. The 242-foot display contains 4,784 lights and 52 garlands. The Circle of Lights is presented by the Contractors of Quality Connection and Electrical Workers of IBEW. The magic begins 6-8 p.m. Nov. 29 at the Soldiers and Sailors Monument downtown. For more information go to www.visitindy.com.

Grammy and Emmy Award winner Justin Timberlake is returning with his recent album and tour. Timberlake’s tour will be taking over Indy on Dec. 11 at Bankers Life Fieldhouse. The concert will begin at 8 p.m. VIP packages are offered. Tickets prices are based on seating. Buy tickets now; seats are almost sold out. For more information go to www. ticketmaster.com or www. justintimberlake.com


A+E

November 22, 2013 • Cub Reporter

Cool Hand Luke is strikingly, admirably hot to the touch

oners. This respect is subsequently cemented when Jackson makes a spur-of-the-moment bet that he can eat 50 eggs in an hour… and wins. While Jackson’s optimism leads him to be idolized by his By Ali Duff fellow prisoners (to whom he is a beacon of hope), it also leads to his being targeted by the Captain (the “What we’ve got here is a warden of the prison), who sees failure to communicate.” The line him as a threat to the strict regime is definitely recognizable, whether of the prison, but for Jackson, a you have seen Stuart Rosenberg’s threat is exactly what he wants to 1967 film Cool Hand Luke or not. be. The film takes place in the ‘40s Besides Newman’s terrific and stars Paul Newman as the performance as lead character Jackson, brilliant of Lucas Jackacting was also son. Jackson, a given by George Availability: Available for rental war veteran, is and viewing on Netflix Kennedy as sentenced to two Dragline, Strother years in a Florida Rating: R Martin as the prison after being Captain and caught removing Running Time: 126 minutes Joy Harmon as the heads from Lucille. parking meters Rosenberg went to great one night while drunk. Initially, lengths to internalize the condihe clashes with the leader of the tions of a chain gang in his actors, prisoners, Dragline, but after including banning wives from the Jackson displays his unfailing grit set and ordering actress Joy Harand determination, he successfully mon to remain away from the rest earns the respect of the other pris-

Retro Reels

Cool Hand Luke

Source/www.entertainment.time.com Luke Jackson (Paul Newman) attempts to flee from the law in Cool Hand Luke.

of the cast until her scenes were shot. To get the actors further in tune to the lives of chain gang members, the cast actually blacktopped an entire 1 mile stretch of the highway for the country. But another aspect of the film that needed some acclimating was the setting. At Rosenberg’s request, a Southern prison camp was built near Stockton, Calif., especially for the movie. The music in Cool Hand Luke was composed by Lalo Schifrin, who based his score on popular music and jazz. The score heavily utilizes guitars, banjos, violins, flutes and harmonicas, creating a diverse array of musical tones, settings and moods.

Starstruck will leave readers seeing stars

trudges on through life with her best friends Bri and Deb. Labeled jordanwilliamscub@gmail.com as a social outcast to everyone but her friends, Marsha prefers to stay Starstruck is a fantasy book, quiet and out of the picture while released earlier this year, about a crushing on guys. small town girl While hoping named Marsha that her sophoTruitt who finds more year goes that life is about better than the to get a bit more previous nine interesting. years as the class Based in dork, Marsha fictional farm hears about a town Jewel, Ind., new, attractive Marsha is used to quarterback in the dull and quiet town named Rigel life she has. With Stuart. At first she her real parents thinks Rigel is just dying when she another guy, but was just a baby that’s only until and her adoptive she meets him. parents dying a Soon, strange few years later, Source/www.amazon.com things start hapshe is being raised pening to Marsha and from then by her adoptive father’s brother on her life is never the same. and his wife. A brilliant masterpiece of Marsha, although smart, JordanWilliams

Starstruck Author: Brenda Hiatt

Special Cost (on Kindle): $2.99 (to Nov. 29 only) Length: 328 pages Genre: Fantasy

fantasy and reality, Starstruck is a complete page-turner with unbelievable characters and even more unbelievable events. The book is a must-read for anybody who likes the fantasy genre. Starstruck is just one of many books by local author Brenda Hiatt, like Rogue’s Honor and Christmas Bride. Starstruck, Hiatt’s 17th novel, is also the first book in a four-part series. Despite being Hiatt’s first science fiction novel, Starstruck will captivate and intrigue readers with its illustrious writing and quick banter about a nerdy girl who is more than she seems.

19

Mind the App by Chad Sharp

So sick and tired of mobile Skyward

Many students use the Skyward website to check their grades on their computers, but unbeknownst to most, a mobile app exists for iPhone and Android. Personally, I use this quite often to make sure my grades are on track and that I have no missing assignments. I have tested this app on an iPhone 4S running iOS 7, an iPhone 5 running iOS 6 and an HTC One running Android 4.3.1 Jelly Bean. Appearance: 3/10 This app is ugly. The user interface (UI) is clunky and the color scheme is just awful. It gives off an almost Windows 95-esque look. Several UI elements could be improved with the use of rounded edges so as not to make it look so square. Features 7/10 This app is meant to show your grades, and that is exactly what it does. I do wish, however, that it would display other factors besides just the assignment letter grades. The Skyward website presents you with a whole host of information such as how much the assignment was worth, how many points you received and the class average, high and low. I would love it if this extra Cost: Free information could be implemented within Rating: 15/30 the app. It is great to Platforms: iOS, Android know that I got an “A” on an assignment but it would be helpful to know whether that assignment was worth 5 points or 50 points. Usability 5/10 There is one particular part of this app that really bugs me. In order to check your grade you have to click through several menus. It makes the whole experience slow and unappealing. The placement of the back button on the iOS version is also problematic. The iOS user is accustomed to pressing the back arrow in the upper left corner of the screen to go to the preceding menu. This is not the case in the Skyward app. Pressing the arrow takes the user all the way back to the account selection menu. This is extraordinarily frustrating, as it forces the user to navigate through the app’s many confusing menus to arrive at their intended destination. This issue is not present in the Android app because of the physical back button on the phone. Overall, the Skyward mobile app is a necessary evil. While checking grades isn’t a pleasant experience for many students (myself included), the Skyward app only exacerbates this annoyance.

Skyward


e

20 November 22, 2013 • Cub Reporter

Sports

SPORTS

Scores, matches, games, meets and touchdowns. The Lawrence Central Bears are back and with a vengeance.

Bears ousted by Warriors gled to move the ball and score points. Once Haas got injured, jacobhelmuscub@gmail.com the Bears averaged only 11.1 Coming off a state cham- points per game. The lack of scoring made pionship the season before, the defense stay on the field the football team was edged most of the game, causing them in the first round of sectionals to fatigue and against Wargive up 28.7 ren Central, “I saw our guys points per 14-0. The loss game. come out and play to the WarThe move riors was with tons of to the MIC LC’s second intensity....” was a struggle against them for the Bears, in a span of Jed Richman as they lost three weeks. head coach to perennial The loss powers Ben dropped the Davis, Carmel, Center Grove Bears’ final record to 3-7. After and Warren Central by a comthe Bears lost starting quarbined score of 163-39. terback junior Brian Haas for LC looked like it was pickthe season after a win against ing up right where they left off Lawrence North, LC strug-

JacobHelmus

last season when they started out 3-0, including a win against Louisville Trinity, which was ranked nationally. That was the last taste of victory LC would get, however, going on a seven game losing streak to end the season. Although this season was not what the Bears expected, first year head coach Jed Richman saw some positive things in his inaugural season at LC. “Our team played with a lot of energy. I saw our guys come out and play with tons of intensity and effort every game,” Richman said. The Bears will have a longer offseason than usual, which they will certainly use to their advantage for their second season in the MIC.

Junior linebacker Darrin Kirkland makes a tackle in a game against Warren Central with many other Bears in pursuit. Kirkland is a highly touted junior who is being recruited by major colleges. Cub photo/Michael Rice

Football on Thanksgiving: a tradition

DrewNixon

drewnixoncub@gmail.com People celebrate this wonderful season of giving with the game of football that brings pleasure and waves of joy to the hearts of millions of football fanatics who are driven crazy by the football mania during the festive season. Thanksgiving Day football, once a tradition among colleges and high schools, has pretty much faded away into extinction. However, the annual tradition still lives in the National Football League in Dallas, home of the Dallas Cowboys, and Detroit, home of the Detroit Lions. Dating all the way back to 1920, there have been professional football games on Thanksgiving every year. The first NFL game on Thanksgiving was in 1934 when the Detroit Lions played the Chicago Bears and lost 19-

On the Spot

by Drew Nixon

16. The Lions have played every Thanksgiving since. The Cowboys have been playing in Thanksgiving games since 1966 and have not appeared in only two Thanksgiving games, 1975 and 1977, since then. Tom Brady is one of thousands of players who have experienced playing in a Thanksgiving Day game. The Patriots played — and won ��� on Thanksgiving in 2010 and 2012. Before the game in 2010 against the Lions, Brady had

some childhood memories to a good football team in a game fall back on as he answered me- that they (Lions) have always played pretty well in,” Brady dia questions. “We all do, don’t we? That said. Also, Patriots head coach was always a great day. We used to have our own football Bill Belichick answered quesgame on Thanksgiving Day tions about the game, the prepin the neighborhood and then aration the team does before the usually [it was] always at our game, and how unique playing house and my mom would on Thanksgiving is. “We’re just trying to scramcook. Yeah, great memories of sitting around watching foot- ble together here. I think this game is very unique. It’s unlike ball all day,” Brady said. any other game Brady also you’ll play for answered a a number of question about “I can’t wait to years. Just the holding off his embrace another short preparathoughts of tion, how quick Thanksgiving year of Thanksgiving the turnaround until after the football.” is, basically no game. “Yeah, you practice. [Then have to. We’ll have a little break we’ll] just tee up and be ready after Thanksgiving, so what- to go on Thursday. So, it’s very ever is going on we can kind of unique and different for the put if off for a few more days. players, the coaches – it’s just There’s one thing on our mind different. It’s always good to and that’s getting ready to play play on Thanksgiving. I think

it’s a great part of the holiday. It’s good to be a part of it. So, we’re all looking forward to the game, but it’s a tough one to get ready for,” Belichick said. I too, embrace the tradition of games on Thanksgiving by watching all the games, not to mention having a great meal too. Although the games are just the same as any other game during the season, the games on Thanksgiving have a greater level of hype. Other Thanksgiving festivities such as the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade add to the thrill of the holiday. The NFL games on Thanksgiving are a great tradition that have been played for some 79 years. And as Thanksgiving approaches, I can’t wait to enjoy another year of Thanksgiving football. Editors’ note: The New England Patriots contributed the quotes from Bill Belichick and Tom Brady to this story.


Sports

November 22, 2013 • Cub Reporter

21

Volleyball falls to Cathedral

TajhanaeGillard

tajhanaegillardcub@gmail.com

The volleyball team finished their season in a playoff match against the Cathedral Fighting Irish at Arsenal Tech last month. After advancing to the second round of the sectional tournament, defeating Arsenal Tech, the Bears just couldn’t finish against the highly ranked Fighting Irish. Though this was a seasonending loss the Bears didn’t hang their heads. The game plan is not to rebuild the team but to reload. Rather than recruiting new players, the Bears have been working hard with their junior varsity squad to prepare them to play at the varsity level all season long. Now that the girls have grown accustomed to the new head coach as well as each other, they look to reload with

talent, as the Bears say goodbye to four seniors, two of which, Leah Frischmann and Katie Billman, have been four year varsity players. “This season was very humbling knowing it was my last time ever playing with LC. I had to play every game knowing it was my last. It was hard to adjust to a new coaching staff but it’s the closest we have ever been as a team,” Frischmann said. “Overall I am happy seeing how far the program has come the past four years.” Frischmann, along with the three other seniors, will be tough to replace, but coach Kyla Montgomery is confident in her returning players to develop quickly and be a force to be reckoned with next season. They plan to improve their 13-19 record from this season with the help of Montgomery, who currently has the second best single-season record.

Senior defensive specialist Katie Billman comes up with a dig in a match against Lawrence North. The Bears lost that match in three games, their second defeat against the Wildcats in a row. Billman was one of four seniors on the team this year; she played on the varsity team for all four seasons. Cub photo/Michael Rice

Lawrence places 62nd in state rence got a 16:29 at the state meet two week before. molliloftuscub@gmail.com He placed 166 out of more Junior Darin Lawrence than 300 runners in the Nike placed 62nd out of 210 high Cross Nationals meet. “I felt like I did really well. school runners in the IHSAA It was really muddy, though,” state meet on Oct. 2. “Out of three years of run- Lawrence said. Along with the muddy conning I have ditions, there made it three were multiple times,” Law- “I am happy with gusts of strong rence said. my place because I winds that Lawrence slowed Lawwas the only made it to state and rence down, fall athlete it was a good experileading to a from any team ence.” time of 17:50. to make it to Darrin Lawrence “I might be state this year. junior in the Indy All“I’m happy with my Star meet in place because I Ohio dependmade it and it was a good expe- ing on how I do next year,” he rience,” Lawrence said. said. On Nov. 16 Lawrence ran The All-Star meet is where in the Nike Cross Nationals the top seniors in the state repmeet in Terre Haute. In order resent Indiana in an all-Midto qualify for this race, his time west meet. “I really improved and had to be under 16:30. Law-

MolliLoftus

gained a lot of leadership over the season because I knew how much my team needed me,” Lawrence said. Lawrence is taking two weeks off and then will start to prepare for track season. Senior Vencent Hill and sophomore Drew Lukens also ran in the Nike Cross Nationals open race. Along with a good performance in state and nationals, Lawrence broke through the school’s all-time leaderboard this season, currently sitting at sixth and 21st in the state for this season. “It’s cool to be a part of school history, and I am looking to get better next year,” Lawrence said. “It means a lot to me, but I will not be sixth for long.” Lawrence will have tough work getting to the top as Nick Middleton currently is first with a time of 15:10, set in 1992.

Junior Darrin Lawrence placed 62nd out of 210 runners in the state championship race held at the Lavern Gibson course in Terre Haute. Lawrence finished with a time of 16:29. Courtesy photo/Mark Tomilin


22 November 22, 2013 • Cub Reporter

Sports

Clockwise, from above: Senior Brandon Lee takes on a blocker against Louisville Trinity early in the season. Lee and the defense led the Bears to a 17-13 victory over the Shamrocks. Cub photo/Michael Rice Lee and his family pose for pictures seconds after he announced his choice to further his football career at the University of Missouri. Cub photo/Michael Rice Senior offensive lineman and Ball state commit Kevin Willis protects his quarterback from a Pike defensive lineman. Cub photo/Amanda Boyce

A dream accomplished JacobHelmus

jacobhelmuscub@gmail.com

High school athletes, no matter what sport, typically dream of making it to the next level. Along with winning a state championship, being able to play a sport in college is the pinnacle of their sport that they have worked so hard at for pretty much their entire lives. For senior Brandon Lee, the dream became a reality when he announced his choice to play football at the University of Missouri next fall. He chose to become a Tiger over three other schools: Virginia Tech, California and Louisville. Lee is a four-star recruit

and ranked the 16th best outside linebacker in the country, according to ESPN. “They (Missouri) hit on all points, being in the SEC (Southeastern Conference,) the best conference there is,” Lee said. “I like the way head coach Gary Pinkel coaches and I connected with everyone there.” The recruiting process is a difficult one for most athletes, one that can drag on a long time, so finally making that commitment was special for Lee. “It was the toughest decision I have ever had to make in my life,” Lee said. Along with Lee, another LC football player, senior offensive lineman Kevin Willis,

committed to a college. He will season with 9-2 and 9-1 records, be a Ball State Cardinal next respectively. year. He chose Ball State over These two players aren’t the Indiana, Kent only LC products who will State, Toledo, “LC has always done compete at the and Miami of college level. Ohio. anything they could Junior baseball “I chose to help me and the player Jarrett Ball State beMontgomery cause it’s close baseball team get will play at to home, but better...” Florida State not too close. Jarrett Montgomery in 2015, and I felt like the junior sophomore coaching staff basketball at Ball State made me feel more at home and player Kyle Guy already has I already felt welcome there not multiple Division One offers. Many of these players only from the coaches but also the players as well,” Willis said. would not have been able to get Ball State and Missouri to where they are now without have been having an excellent the help from LC’s first class

athletic facilities. “LC has always done anything they could to help me and the baseball team to get better. Whether it is letting us go inside in the winter to throw a bullpen or hitting in the cages, my coaches are always there to support me. We also have one of the nicest fields in the state so that’s a plus,” Montgomery said. Now that the goal of playing in college has been accomplished for these athletes, their sights are on the ultimate goal, playing professionally. “I am super proud to be a Seminole, but the ultimate goal is getting to the MLB,” Montgomery said.


Sports

November 22, 2013 • Cub Reporter

23

Bears have high expectations DrewNixon

drewnixoncub@gmail.com

The boys basketball team tips off their 2013-14 season at the Black Friday Shootout against Griffith at Bowman Academy. The Bears went 1011 last year and finished third in Conference Indiana with a 4-3 conference record. The 2013 season ended with a loss to Arsenal Tech in sectionals 62-43. The Bears lost guards Davonte Harris and Alan Willis, along with forwards Davonte Brent and Taylor Chilton, to graduation. Head coach J.R. Shelt talked about their schedule and the change to the MIC (Metropolitan Interscholastic Conference). “There isn’t much change to the conference because we have played most of the schools

in the MIC,” Shelt said. change to the schedule, the Pike and Lawrence North early part of it may be dauntare a couple of big games ing with perennial powers Pike, the Bears will have early in Carmel and Lawrence North all the season, along with their looming within two weeks of home opener each other. against Car“We need mel on Dec. to take it one “There isn’t much 7. The game game at a time change to the conagainst Pike is and put all of ference because we on Dec. 20 at our energy Pike and the into each and played most of the game against every game,” schools anyway.” LN is on Dec. Shelt said. J.R. Shelt 11 at home. The Bears head coach Shelt said have been the team is practicing young but the the past two chemistry is good among the weeks in preparation for their players. Shelt said he expects se- season opener. nior point guard Devin Heath“I would still like to see Granger and sophomores Kyle more vocal leadership, alGuy and Nash Griffin to lead though Devin has been a good the team as well as produce. example for the players to folAlthough there isn’t much low,” Shelt said.

Sophomore forward Nash Griffin practices a jump shot in a drill during a practice. Griffin was second on the team last year in 3-point percentage, shooting 35 percent from beyond the arc. Cub photo/Michael Rice

Winter athletes ready to go Wrestlers eager to get on the mat

JacobHelmus

jacobhelmuscub@gmail.com

The wrestling team will take the mat this season with a much different look to their team. The Bears had seniors Riley Newkirk, Scott Swingle, Sam Torres, Joe Smedley and Max Brutus graduate; all had made a deep run in the state tournament last year. This season the Bears look to be a young team, but their senior leadership will still be present. “I’m looking forward to see what we can do out there. It will be a fun season for me and hopefully the team,” senior Elias Pecina said. The Bears took a big hit before the season even started when senior Quentin Rabin,

a semi-state qualifier last year, said he would not be wrestling this year. Rabin wanted to be on the mat this year, but due to a recently found heart condition, he is no longer able to compete in athletic activities. “We both just sat and cried together. You hate to see something like this happen to a great kid such as Quentin.,” head coach Tom Corbett said. The Bears will start the season at the Hamilton Heights invite at 9 a.m. Saturday.

Tucker looks to lead Lady Bears DrewNixon

drewnixoncub@gmail.com

The girls basketball team’s regular season is under way as they tipped off last Friday against Northwest. Assistant coach Michael Fox said the

team has grown from their coaching change, as John Albers stopped coaching after last season. Physical education teacher Stephanie Keller is the new head coach. “As a whole, our team has grown from a coaching change. Our team chemistry is going in the right direction,” Fox said. Fox said the coaching staff agrees that the expectations for this season are high. He said that since they are in the Metropolitan Interscholastic Conference (MIC), their schedule will be extremely hard, but the girls will continue to prepare for the challenge. The staff also agrees that the team chemistry between the girls is heading in the right direction. “We will give it our all every night,” Fox said. The coaches said the Bears will look to be led by senior Kyra Tucker and sophomore Jasmine Shelt, who will be their go-to scorers. Two key games pop out in the coaching staff’s mind that

are important on the schedule. Those games are against Ben Davis on Dec. 10 in county and the Breast Cancer Awareness game against Lawrence North on Jan. 16. The Bears got off to a good start this season by defeating the Northwest Space Pioneers 57-12.

Swimmers embrace no shaving TajhanaeGillard

tajhanaegillardcub@gmail.com

For both of the swim teams, the quickly spreading trend of no shave November began in October. It is a rule of the team demanding that the swimmers have to stop shaving Oct. 28 — in other words the official start of the season. The swimmers are not allowed to shave until the first round of sectionals because the hair creates drag in the water and when they

shave before sectionals their time improves drastically. This might be an awkward situation for many of the newcomers on the team but for the seniors this it is nothing new. “You get used to it after a while. Most of us just wear sweatpants all the time,” said senior April Eales. The team has been conditioning since late in the fall season. They practiced both in and out of the water throughout the week, after school, in preparation for their first meet hosted by Franklin Central. Both teams return key swimmers from last year. On the girls side, the Lady Bears will be led by seniors Bailey Garey and Eales. On the boys side, sophomore Spencer Ball and juniors James Chi and Alec Tuhill look to pace the Bears. The boys team looks to be young but nonetheless talented. The first dual meet for both teams will be Dec. 3 in a meet against Metropolitan Interscholastic Conference foe Pike.


24

November 22, 2013 • Cub Reporter

Engineering ChadSharp chadsharpcub@gmail.com Ailerons, engines, lift, drag, thrust. These are but a few of the things that whirl about Garrett Schneider's mind. Schneider is the only sophomore in the senior level aerospace engineering class at the McKenzie Center for Innovation and Technology (MCIT). Garrett’s passion for engineering is not new, however. It began at a very young age. “My first erector set really got me into engineering,” Schneider said. “I got it for Christmas when I was 8 years old. It was the first thing I opened. After I built all of the things in the instruction booklet, I just started building things on my own.” Schneider is also a member of MCIT robotics team, 1024 Kilobytes.

Student Profile

Characters? We got ‘em!

his

FUTURE

“My first erector set really got me into engineering... After I built all of the things in the instruction booklet, I just started building things on my own.”

Garret Schneider sophomore

The team is working on a disc-throwing robot. They use this robot to compete in state and national competitions. Schieder uses robotics to satisfy his interest in the mechanical side of engineering while using aerospace to satisfy his need to design. “I fell in love with airplanes the first time I flew. When you take off, you get pushed back in your seat and then there is that moment when the plane actually gets off the ground. It’s shocking. It’s amazing that such a heavy machine can get into the air,” he said. In the future, Schneider plans to work at Boeing where he wants to design a commercial airplane that travels faster than the speed of sound. “I really do see a growing demand and interest in air travel,” Schneider said.

Cub photo/Amanda Boyce


Cub Reporter Issue 3