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Master of Science Higher Education Administration

PROGRAM HANDBOOK 2011-2012

Greetings:

Greetings: As an Assistant Professor and Graduate Coordinator of the Higher Education Administration Master’s Degree Program, I would like to welcome you to the Higher Education Administration Program. I am very happy that you have joined us to pursue your graduate degree in Higher Education Administration. And, I look forward to working with you in the pursuit of your academic and professional goals while you are in the program. I believe that a Master’s degree in Higher Education Administration is the pre-requisite to further advancement in the field and that it opens the door to manifold professional opportunities. Your experiences in the program will be of both an academic and professional nature. From the moment you become a graduate student in the program, all faculty and staff are committed to your success in it. Our program is rigorous and as a graduate program, it is demanding. Thus, pursuing the M.S. in Higher Education Administration requires work and dedication on your part. While you are the protagonist of your graduate degree journey, we will be there to support you in your academic and professional quests. In addition, students currently enrolled in the program will also assist with your academic growth. Our students hail from all walks of life, and are employed at a variety of higher education institutions, and you will learn much from them over the next few months as you sit side-by-side in class discussing the field of higher education. Overall, your experience in the program should be rich and diverse, and you will learn from your professors as well as your peers. The Program Handbook is an essential component of your experience with the M.S. in Higher Education Administration. We have carefully developed it to help you understand the expectations, responsibilities, and demands of graduate work at Saint Cloud State in the M.S. in Higher Education Administration. The Program Handbook provides explicit details about procedures, coursework, culminating experiences, practicum, and even forms that you will need while pursuing this degree. You should consult the Program Handbook as the first source when you have questions about the program. The Program’s Handbook, along with the Program’s website (http://www.stcloudstate.edu/hied/masters/default.asp), Graduate Bulletin (http://bulletin.stcloudstate.edu/gb/), and the School of Graduate Studies website (http://www.stcloudstate.edu/graduatestudies/) should provide all the information you need to be successful in the program and achieve your goals. Although we expect you to be responsible for all program timelines and requirements, we have provided you with excellent resources to help you meet those obligations. If you have questions, there are many individuals on campus willing to assist you. Again, welcome to the M.S. in Higher Education Administration Program at Saint Cloud State University. Please, do not hesitate to contact me with questions about the program. I know you will have wonderful academic and professional experiences with us! Sincerely, Dr. Steven McCullar, Assistant Professor Higher Education Administration Graduate Coordinator St. Cloud State University’s Higher Education Administration Master of Science Program Handbook provides helpful information on degree requirements, program procedures, and resources for prospective and admitted students. This handbook is not meant to replace or duplicate the Graduate Bulletin. Students are advised to consult the Graduate Bulletin http://bulletin.stcloudstate.edu/gb/ for information not found within this handbook. St. Cloud State University reserves the right to make changes to any of the materials published in this handbook without advance notice. For further inquiries please consult the School of Graduate Studies Website: http://www.stcloudstate.edu/graduatestudies/.

Table of Contents Program Overview ........................................................................................................................ 1 Mission ........................................................................................................................................... 2 Overview ........................................................................................................................................ 2 Nondiscrimination and Diversity Statement .............................................................................. 2 Admissions ..................................................................................................................................... 3 Higher Education Administration Competencies ...................................................................... 4 Degrees and Plans Offered ........................................................................................................... 6 Course Descriptions ...................................................................................................................... 7 Model Course Sequence ............................................................................................................... 9 Program Assessment System ..................................................................................................... 11 Length of Program...................................................................................................................... 12 Advising ....................................................................................................................................... 12 Policies and Procedures .............................................................................................................. 12 Graduate Assistantships ............................................................................................................. 13 Practicum ..................................................................................................................................... 13 Culminating Experience ............................................................................................................. 14 Graduation................................................................................................................................... 15 Frequently Asked Questions ...................................................................................................... 17 Contact Information ................................................................................................................... 18 Practicum Guide ......................................................................................................................... 19 Introduction ................................................................................................................................. 20 Purpose of Practicum ................................................................................................................. 20 Selecting a Practicum ................................................................................................................. 20 Current Employment as Practicum Placement ....................................................................... 21 Establishing a Practicum............................................................................................................ 21 The Contract................................................................................................................................ 21 Example of a Student Learning Goal ........................................................................................ 22 Approval of a Practicum Site ..................................................................................................... 22 Standards for the Practicum ...................................................................................................... 22 Getting Started in a Practicum .................................................................................................. 24 Ethics and Confidentiality.......................................................................................................... 24 Attendance Policy........................................................................................................................ 24 Practicum Responsibilities ......................................................................................................... 25 Culminating Experience Guide ................................................................................................. 26 Introduction ................................................................................................................................. 27 Selecting a Topic ......................................................................................................................... 27 Registration ................................................................................................................................. 27 Your Committee .......................................................................................................................... 28 Committee Chair ................................................................................................................... 28

Selecting Committee Members ............................................................................................. 28 Understanding the Purpose of the Committee ...................................................................... 29 Working With Your Committee ........................................................................................... 29 Developing Timelines ........................................................................................................... 29 Writing Successfully ............................................................................................................. 30 Student and Faculty Thesis/Project Responsibilities ............................................................... 30 Thesis/Project Chair .............................................................................................................. 30 Committee Members ............................................................................................................. 31 Student .................................................................................................................................. 31 Department and University Procedures ................................................................................... 32 Department Procedures ......................................................................................................... 32 Summer Enrollment .............................................................................................................. 32 Original Work ....................................................................................................................... 32 University Procedures ........................................................................................................... 32 Human Subjects .................................................................................................................... 33 Eligibility .............................................................................................................................. 34 Nomination ........................................................................................................................... 34 Nomination Letter ................................................................................................................. 34 Deadline – October 1 ............................................................................................................ 34 Selection and Announcement of Award ............................................................................... 34 Midwestern Association of Graduate Schools Distinguished Thesis Award ....................... 34 Statistical Consulting and Research Support ........................................................................... 35 Frequently Asked Questions ...................................................................................................... 36 Resources ..................................................................................................................................... 38 Thesis (Plan A) ............................................................................................................................ 40 Procedures for Thesis (Plan A) .................................................................................................. 40 Proposal................................................................................................................................. 40 Thesis Preliminary Oral Exam Conference .......................................................................... 40 Thesis Final Defense ............................................................................................................. 41 Binding a Thesis ................................................................................................................... 42 Thesis Outline (Plan A) .............................................................................................................. 42 Chapter One - Introduction ................................................................................................... 42 Chapter Two - Literature Review ......................................................................................... 44 Chapter Three - Methodology............................................................................................... 45 Chapter Four - Results .......................................................................................................... 46 Chapter Five - Discussion ..................................................................................................... 46 Graduate Project/Portfolio (Plan C) ......................................................................................... 48 Procedures for Project/Portfolio (Plan C) ................................................................................ 48 Graduate Project/Portfolio (Plan C) ......................................................................................... 50 Procedures for Project/Portfolio (Plan C) ................................................................................ 51

Proposal................................................................................................................................. 51 Project/Portfolio Preliminary Conference............................................................................. 51 Final Oral Defense ................................................................................................................ 52 Graduate Project/Portfolio Outline (Plan C) ........................................................................... 52 Chapter One - Introduction ................................................................................................... 52 Chapter Two - Literature Review ......................................................................................... 53 Chapter Three - Project/Portfolio Audience and Implementation Factors ........................... 54 Chapter Four - Product.......................................................................................................... 55 Chapter Five - Discussion ..................................................................................................... 55 Graduate Project/Portfolio (Plan C) ......................................................................................... 56 Procedures for Project/Portfolio (Plan C) ................................................................................ 57 Proposal................................................................................................................................. 57 Project/Portfolio Preliminary Conference............................................................................. 57 Final Oral Defense ................................................................................................................ 58 Graduate Project/Portfolio Outline (Plan C) ........................................................................... 58 Program Forms ........................................................................................................................... 61 Application Checklist.................................................................................................................. 62 Proposed Semester Program of Graduate Study / Program Approval ................................. 63 Professional Development Plan (PDP) ...................................................................................... 65 Student Disposition Evaluation ................................................................................................. 67 Practicum Contract .................................................................................................................... 71 Professional Associations ........................................................................................................... 83 Research Resources .................................................................................................................... 85 Career Resources ........................................................................................................................ 87 Individual Study Approval Form .............................................................................................. 87

Master of Science Higher Education Administration

PROGRAM OVERVIEW

Mission

The mission of the Higher Education Administration program is to provide academic preparation and professional development to individuals who are currently in, or interested in, entry-level positions of leadership in four-year, community, and technical colleges and universities. A comprehensive program of study focuses on the preparation and development of reflective, ethical, and transformative practitioners and academicians.

Overview

The Higher Education Administration program develops higher education leaders. The program prepares students for entry-level positions in community and technical colleges, and four-year universities. Students interested in careers as future administrators receive a comprehensive program of study that explores academic affairs, student affairs, and administrative affairs. Courses offered in the program develop knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary for success in higher education. Individuals currently in, or interested in, leadership positions in higher education will find this 36-credit graduate program flexible and accommodating to their needs. Courses are primarily offered on weekends (Friday evening and all day Saturday) during the academic year. Several courses have a blended format (online and in person). We also offer online courses. In addition, courses are offered consecutively during the semester so students are able to concentrate on one academic topic at a time.

Nondiscrimination and Diversity Statement

St. Cloud State University will provide equal education and employment opportunities to all persons regardless of race, color, creed, sex, age, religion, marital status, sexual orientation, national origin, mental or physical disability, status with regard to public assistance or physical disability, or any other group or class against which discrimination is prohibited by state or federal law. The university will not tolerate any activity that constitutes illegal discrimination against any person or group. Consistent with its academic mission, the university also seeks to provide an environment that acknowledges and values diversity of all kinds, including but not limited to race, religion, and ethnicity, amongst faculty, staff, and students. Inquiries or complaints concerning the application of affirmative action, equal opportunity or Title IX (sexual harassment) at St. Cloud State University should be referred to the affirmative action officer, 320-308-5123. Inquiries about services offered to students under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 or the American’s with Disabilities Act of 1990 should be referred to Student Life and Development at 320-308-

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3111, and for faculty and staff to Human Resources at 320-308-3203. More information is available at: http://www.stcloudstate.edu/affirmativeaction Admissions

Application Process When applying to a graduate program, the School of Graduate Studies serves as a liaison between the applicant and the graduate program. Application materials can be obtained from the School of Graduate Studies Web site: http://www.stcloudstate.edu/graduatestudies. Completed application materials should be returned to the School of Graduate Studies. Once all application materials are received, they will be forwarded to the master’s program for review and an admission recommendation. Application Requirements In order to consider an applicant for admission, the School of Graduate Studies will need: U.S. Students • Completed admission packet • Application fee • Official transcripts from previous universities • Official GRE scores • Three completed recommendation forms International Students • Completed international application • Application fee • Official transcripts from previous universities • Official GRE scores • Official TOEFL or IELTS or MELAB scores • Three recommendation forms • Financial form and documentation Enrollment Requirements Prospective students should request an admission packet from the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants who meet the admission requirements of the School of Graduate Studies are forwarded to the Higher Education Administration Program for recommendation and admittance. Program recommendation is based on, but not limited to, the following requirements (requirements may be waived under certain conditions): • Minimum of 2.75 grade point average over the last two years of undergraduate education. • Verbal score of 480+ or a quantitative score of 520+ on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). • Competed School of Graduate Studies admission packet. • A one- to two-page typewritten statement describing your interest and experience in higher education leadership. 3

Higher Education Administration Competencies Adapted from Davis, J. R., 2003. Learning to lead. Westport, CT: Praeger Publishers. 1.

Leadership Knowledge of what leadership is, how it has been distinguished from administration, and the ability to develop a practical and personally useful definition of leadership.

2.

Role Discernment Appropriate attitudes about leaders and followers and the ability to serve as a courageous follower as well as a skillful leader.

3.

Institutional Development Knowledge of basic organizational theory and the ability to describe accurately the organization one serves, including mission, history, and current developments.

4.

Organizational Structure Knowledge of the key administrative offices at the institution, including staff and line functions, reporting relationships, and awareness of the opportunities and limitations of one’s own niche.

5.

Strategic Planning Ability to collaborate in program planning, including the skill to expand on ideas, keep plans realistic, use institutional goals as criteria, and build in usable assessment.

6.

Mission Awareness Awareness of what learning is and why it must be guarded as the fundamental purpose of the institution.

7.

Critical Thinking Knowledge of rational models used for problem solving and decision making, and the ability to consider legal and ethical implications.

8.

Collaboration Skill at collaboration, including serving on and working with task forces, committees, and administrative units to help them function as high-performance teams.

9.

Communication Ability to communicate effectively in a variety of forms.

10.

Conflict Management Knowledge of basic conflict resolution models and the ability to employ them effectively.

11.

Fiscal Accountability Knowledge of basic financial planning and accounting methods and the ability to use them for budget development and control.

12.

Adaptability Knowledge of change theories and skill in responding to, initiating, and managing change.

13.

Culture and Climate Awareness of what constitutes a positive work environment and the ability to work with others in creating such an environment.

14.

Professional Development Positive attitudes about personal renewal and the ability to engage in perpetual learning to become more effective as a postsecondary leader.

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Higher Education Administration Competencies Adapted from Davis, J. R. (2003). Learning to lead. Westport, CT: Praeger Publishers. Alignment of Higher Education Administration Competencies with Higher Education Administration Courses COMPETENCY

1. Knowledge of what leadership is, how it has been distinguished from administration, and the ability to develop a practical and personally useful definition of leadership. 2. Appropriate attitudes about leaders and followers and the ability to serve as a courageous follower as well as a skillful leader. 3. Knowledge of basic organizational theory and the ability to describe accurately the organization one serves, including mission, history, and current developments. 4. Knowledge of the key administrative offices at the institution, including staff and line functions, reporting relationships, and awareness of the opportunities and limitations of one’s own niche. 5. Ability to collaborate in program planning, including the skill to expand on ideas, keep plans realistic, use institutional goals as criteria, and build in usable assessment. 6. Awareness of what learning is and why it must be guarded as the fundamental purpose of the institution. 7. Knowledge of rational models used for problem solving and decision-making, and the ability to consider legal and ethical implications. 8. Skill at collaboration, including serving on and working with task forces, committees, and administrative units to help them function as high-performance teams. 9. Ability to communicate effectively in a variety of forms. 10. Knowledge of basic conflict resolution models and the ability to employ them effectively. 11. Knowledge of basic financial planning and accounting methods and the ability to use them for budget development and control. 12. Knowledge of change theories and skill in responding to, initiating, and managing change. 13. Awareness of what constitutes a positive work environment and the ability to work with others in creating such an environment. 14. Positive attitudes about personal renewal and the ability to engage in perpetual learning to become more effective as a postsecondary leader.

HIED 604

HIED 614

HIED 624

HIED 634

HIED 644

HIED 654

X

X

HIED 672

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

HIED 684/699

X

X

X

HIED 694

X

X X

HIED 674/ CEEP 678

X

X

X

HIED 664

X X

X

X

X

X X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

5

X

Degrees and Plans Offered

Master of Science -- Higher Education Administration: Plan A, (36 credits) Thesis HIED 604 HIED 614 HIED 624 HIED 634 HIED 644 HIED 654 HIED 664 HIED 672 HIED 674 CEEP 678 HIED 694 HIED 699

Introduction to Higher Education Administration, 3credits Higher Education Leadership and Administration, 3 credits. Legal and Ethical Aspects of Higher Education, 3 credits. Human Resource Issues in Higher Education, 3 credits Higher Education Finance, 3 credits University-Community Relations, 3 credits Critical Issues Seminar in Higher Education, 3 credits Practicum in Higher Education Administration, 3 credits Introduction to Research in HIED, 3 credits OR Graduate Statistics, 3 credits HIED Research Methods and Design, 3 credits Thesis, 6 credits

Plan B, (36 credits) Written Comprehensive Exam HIED 604 Introduction to Higher Education Administration, 3credits HIED 614 Higher Education Leadership and Administration, 3 credits. HIED 624 Legal and Ethical Aspects of Higher Education, 3 credits. HIED 634 Human Resource Issues in Higher Education, 3 credits HIED 644 Higher Education Finance, 3 credits HIED 654 University-Community Relations, 3 credits HIED 664 Critical Issues Seminar in Higher Education, 6 credits HIED 672 Practicum in Higher Education Administration, 3 credits HIED 674 Introduction to Research in HIED, 3 credits HIED 694 HIED Research Methods and Design, 3 credits HIED 684 Written Comprehensive Examination, 3 credits Plan C, (36 credits) Project/eFolio HIED 604 HIED 614 HIED 624 HIED 634 HIED 644 HIED 654 HIED 664 HIED 672 HIED 674 HIED 694 HIED 684

Introduction to Higher Education Administration, 3credits Higher Education Leadership and Administration, 3 credits. Legal and Ethical Aspects of Higher Education, 3 credits. Human Resource Issues in Higher Education, 3 credits Higher Education Finance, 3 credits University-Community Relations, 3 credits Critical Issues Seminar in Higher Education, 6 credits Practicum in Higher Education Administration, 3 credits Introduction to Research in HIED, 3 credits HIED Research Methods and Design, 3 credits Project/eFolio Design, 3 credits

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Course Descriptions

HIED 604 Introduction to Higher Education Administration, 3 credits Overview of the program and the field of higher education, explore career options, discuss expectations of the program including thesis, written comprehensive exam, project/eFolio, and practicum, and begin work on a professional development plan (PDP). HIED 614 Higher Education Leadership and Administration, 3 credits Overview of the history of higher education, as well as leadership theories, styles, models, functions, and skills. Academic, administrative, and student affairs leadership and administration are reviewed and analyzed. (Prereq.: HIED 604) HIED 624 Legal and Ethical Aspects of Higher Education, 3 credits Legal, ethical, and social issues impacting academic, administrative, and student affairs are explored, as well as other areas of concern to leaders of higher education administration. (Prereq.: HIED 604) HIED 634 Human Resource Issues in Higher Education, 3 credits Overview of personnel functions in higher education institutions, including policies and procedures; selection, supervision, and termination; professional development; employeemanagement relations. Faculty, staff, and student diversity, and social justice, are also considered. (Prereq.: HIED 604) HIED 644 Higher Education Finance, 3 credits Overview of higher education finance including the creation of budgets, budget processes, types of costs, budget allocations, coding, and state and federal higher education funding. (Prereq.: HIED 604) HIED 654 University – Community Relations, 3 credits Students develop an understanding of internal and external university/college community relations, working with the media, public relations communication vehicles, and their own written, verbal, and interpersonal communication skills. (Prereq.: HIED 604) HIED 664 Critical Issues Seminar in Higher Education, 3-6 credits Students discuss and analyze current and critical issues impacting higher education leaders and institutions. This seminar also assists students in thesis, written comprehensive exam, and project/eFolio focus and problem development. (Prereq.: HIED 604) HIED 672 Practicum in Higher Education Administration, 3 credits A culminating experience of structured and supervised administrative projects and activities at a cooperatively selected college/university. (Prereq.: HIED 604)

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CEEP 678 Graduate Statistics, 3 credits Correlation and regression analysis, probability and sampling theory, estimating population parameters, testing hypotheses. Familiarity with descriptive statistics assumed. HIED 674 Introduction to Research in HIED, 3 credits Identification and evaluation of research in HIED; techniques and interpretation of research; problem definition in HIED; introduction to research design and reporting results; introduction to reviews of literature; identification of research problems in HIED; preparation of a plan for studying the problem. At the end of HIED 674, students will have a first chapter of their thesis or project. If working on an eFolio, at the end of the class students will have a draft of their resume/CV and two competencies with artifacts. Students working on eFolios will be ready for their preliminary defense after completing this course. (Prereq.: HIED 604) HIED 694 HIED Research Methods and Design, 3 credits Qualitative, quantitative, and mixed method research approaches and designs; data collection and analysis; preparation of HIED thesis/ written comprehensive exam/ project/eFolio proposal. Students completing this course will be ready for their preliminary oral exam (thesis, projects and eFolios). (Prereq.: HIED 604) HIED 684

Project/eFolio Design, 3 credits

A highly structured and individualized process through which the student completes and defends the project/eFolio before her/his committee. Through this experience, master's students in Higher Education Administration fulfill the Plan C requirement. (Prereq.: HIED 604) HIED 684

Written Comprehensive Exam Preparation, 3 credits

An individualized process through which the student prepares for the written exam. Through this experience, master's students in Higher Education Administration fulfill the Plan B requirement. (Prereq.: HIED 604) HIED 699

Thesis, 6 credits (Prereq.: HIED 604)

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Model Course Sequence

The following course sequence is used for illustrative purposes only. Each student should consult with her/his advisor to plan a program of study to meet individual needs. Fall 1 HIED 604 (3 credits) Introduction to Higher Education Administration HIED 624 (3 credits) Legal and Ethical Aspects of Higher Education HIED 674 (3 credits) Introduction to Research in HIED Spring 1 HIED 614 (3 credits) Higher Education Leadership and Administration HIED 664 (I) (3 credits) Critical Issues Seminar in Higher Education HIED 694 (3 credits) HIED Research Methods and Design Fall 2 HIED 672 (3 credits) Practicum in Higher Education Administration HIED 634 (3 credits) Human Resource Issues in Higher Education HIED 644 (3 credits) Higher Education Finance Spring HIED 664 (II) (3 credits) Critical Issues Seminar in Higher Education HIED 654 (3 credits) University – Community Relations Notes: HIED 664: Students working on Plan B or Plan C will need 6 credits of HIED 664, so they will need to take two sections of HIED 664. Students working on Plan A will need 3 credits of HIED 664 will take one section of HIED 664. HIED 672: Students may register for the practicum after the majority of coursework is complete, or in progress, and with the approval of their advisor and the practicum coordinator. This course is offered in the fall, but students have one academic year to complete their 100 hours. HIED 684 (3 credits) Project/eFolio Design - Plan C: Students may register for credits the semester of the preliminary oral conference or the semester of their final oral defense. The preliminary oral usually takes place during/after completion of HIED 694. The final defense takes place after completion of the project/eFolio, and at least one semester after the preliminary oral. HIED 684 (3 credits) Written Comprehensive Exam Preparation - Plan B: Students may register for credits the semester of their exam.

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HIED 699 (6 credits) Thesis - Plan A: Students may register for three (3) thesis credits during the semester of their preliminary oral and three (3) thesis credits during the semester of their final defense with approval from their advisor. The preliminary exam and final exam must be at least one semester apart.

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M. S. in Higher Education Administration Program Assessment System Admission

Prior to Practicum

Exit from Practicum

Thesis/Project/eFolio

Written Examination

Program Completion

Transition Point 1

Transition Point 2

Transition Point 3

Transition Point 4

Transition Point 4

Transition Point 5

GPA

GPA

PDP complete

Preliminary oral

(2.75 or higher)

(3.0 or higher)

(evidence-based)

(committee members - rubric)

Exam

All program requirements complete

(program of study)

GRE

(480 or higher – verbal 520 or higher – quantitative)

Writing sample – Letter of Interest (rubric)

Three letters of recommendation

All courses successfully complete or in progress Dispositions assessment

Exit interview

(student, site mentor, advisor)

(committee members - rubric)

Dispositions assessment

(student and advisor rubrics)

(student and site mentor rubric)

Competencies assessment

Competencies assessment

(student – PDP)

Final defense

All Graduate School requirements complete Participation in Graduate Hooding

(site mentor – rubric)

Transcript

(analysis if transferring credits)

Accredited UG program Follow-up survey sent at 2 and 4 years from date of graduation

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Length of Program

Each three-credit course will be completed in three weekends. Courses are offered consecutively during the semester so students are able to concentrate on one administrative topic at a time. This format allows students to take three courses per semester. •

Part-time student: six semesters taking six credits per semester.

Full-time student: four semesters taking nine credits per semester.

Each three-credit course will be completed in three weekends.

Courses are primarily offered on weekends (Friday evening and all day Saturday), during the academic year.

The practicum may be served at the individual's home institution, but not in the home department. If that is not possible or appropriate, placement will be arranged.

Students working as Graduate Assistants (GA) may require taking additional 2 credits to fulfill the credit requirement for the GA position. If the student needs to take additional courses, he/she needs to contact the M.S. program coordinator for authorization if courses are offered in another program.

Advising

Upon admittance into the Higher Education Administration Program, students are assigned a faculty advisor. It is the student’s responsibility to make an appointment and meet with the faculty advisor to plan a program of study. Throughout the duration of their graduate program, students are encouraged to meet with their advisor to discuss any questions or concerns. The advisor will serve as the chair of the student’s thesis/ written comprehensive exam/project/eFolio committee. If a student feels a change in advisor would better meet her/his interests, the student will be encouraged and supported to make the change to a more suitable advisor.

Policies and Procedures

All students will purchase and use the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, Sixth Edition (APA) for all written work in the program. The policies, procedures, and forms outlining the steps for student complaints concerning faculty and grade appeals are available for review in St. Cloud State University’s Student Handbook under the Code of Conduct section. The Code of Conduct is available at the Student Life and Development Office or can be accessed at: www.stcloudstate.edu/studenthandbook/code. 12

Graduate Assistantships (GA)

There are GA positions available annually in the Higher Education Administration Program, both full-time (20 hours/week) and part-time (10 hours/week). What are they? Graduate assistantships are academically related employment appointments reserved for students who hold a bachelor’s degree and who have been formally admitted to a graduate program. SCSU offers three basic types of assistantships: • Program assistants – duties are limited to an individual academic program or office. • Research assistants – duties include engaging in research activities connected to a department or professor. • Teaching assistants – duties include the instruction of students under the general supervision of a professor. Graduate assistantships are available during the regular academic year with a limited number available during the summer term. Who is eligible? International students and U.S. students are eligible to apply. A student must be: • Fully admitted to the School of Graduate Studies • Registered as a full-time student each term of the appointment Benefits Graduate assistants are paid a stipend (salary) for 10 or 20 hours/week. In addition to the stipend, graduate assistants are eligible for paid tuition. The University will pay for up to eight graduate credits per semester. This does not include any student fees. The University does not pay for tuition during the summer sessions. Resident rate privilege All graduate assistants, both international and U.S. citizens and residents, qualify for instate tuition rates. International students Upon receipt of a departmental letter of GA appointment, an international student can list the stipend as income on their financial certification forms.

Practicum

The Practicum in Higher Education Administration (HIED 672) is designed to be a culminating experience of structured and supervised administrative projects and activities at a cooperatively selected college/university. Students working with a site mentor are supervised by a practicum coordinator from St. Cloud State University.

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Purpose of Practicum The practicum experience will provide the student with a 100 hour exposure to an area of individual interest in Higher Education Administration and allow the student to apply her/his newly acquired knowledge in an educational field setting under supervision. Parttime work experience enables individuals to organize, synthesize, and process new information in a manner that combines the cognitive, affective, and physical domains of learning. Many learners require a period of time to practice and modify both knowledge and skills; the practicum serves this purpose. In addition to gaining insight regarding the operation of a functional area of higher education, practicum students should also gain a view of the interrelationship of associated functional areas. Professionals in higher education must be cognizant of such relationships in order to understand the nature of an institution. Finally, the practicum may serve to generate, develop, and refine skills in program development, administration, research, and other aspects of higher education. For more information regarding the practicum experience, please consult the Practicum Guide section of this handbook.

Culminating Experience

The culminating experience is a generic term referring to the final academic experience in your master’s program. In the Higher Education Administration Program, the culminating experience is one of two choices. It can be a thesis (Plan A), Written Comprehensive Exam (Plan B), or a project/eFolio (Plan C). Thesis (Plan A) A thesis involves the design and implementation of empirical (qualitative or quantitative) research. Students design an original study, obtain and/or develop data collection tools, organize and implement data collection, input and analyze the data, and write the results and conclusions of the study based on the data. A thesis contributes to the field of study – in your case, higher education administration. Written Comprehensive Exam (Plan B) The Written Comprehensive Examination (WCE) is a final exam that students can take at a specific date, pre-determined by the HIED program. This exam evaluates students’ basic knowledge about the courses offered in the M. S. in Higher Education Administration program. The exam entails working on two basic questions, and the analysis of a case study which is genuine to the field of higher education. These three items will be provided to the students during the date of the specific examination. The Written Comprehensive Examination is offered twice a year in a computer lab where students can access Microsoft Word software. Project/eFolio (Plan C) A graduate project involves the design of a product, such as a curriculum, a workshop, a handbook, a video, a website, etc. The candidate provides a rationale for the product based on a comprehensive review of the research and consultation with experts in the 14

field. The project contributes something new and/or significant to the student’s institution, and it must be based on a review of the research and/or a needs assessment. A graduate eFolio involves the design of an eFolio using the MnSCU support website. Students provide evidence of knowledge acquisition and skill development by using course work or work related artifacts. For more information regarding the culminating experience, please consult the Culminating Experience Guide section of this handbook. Graduation

Checklist for All Graduate Students • Be sure that all the courses on your Program of Study (blue form) were completed within the seven-year time limit for completion of the program. • Print your transcript online. Check your transcript to determine that all completed course work is included. If transfer credits do not appear on your transcript and they have been approved as a part of your official program, contact the School of Graduate Studies at once. • Complete all courses on your Program of Study. ALL COURSE CHANGES MUST BE APPROVED BY PETITION: verbal approval by your adviser is not sufficient. Forms are available online at http://www.stcloudstate.edu/graduatestudies/current/stuForms.asp or in the School of Graduate Studies, room AS-121 • All incomplete grades must be completed and grades submitted by the instructor. Remind your professor to submit a grade change for all incompletes or IP grades. This includes theses and projects/efolios. Check your transcript to determine if the necessary changes have been made. • A 3.0 grade point average in the major, the total program, and overall graduate courses attempted must be recorded on your transcript. Students who have not achieved the required grade point average are not eligible to take either the preliminary or final examinations. • A grade of C- or lower or a grade of “U” cannot be used toward a graduate program. • Fulfill the residence requirement. Candidates for the master’s degree must earn a minimum of 20 semester hours in on-campus classes (day and night combined). o o o

o

Courses offered at graduate study centers or through cohort groups established by the University are considered on-campus credit. Established ITV and web-based programs are also considered on-campus credit. Individual departments may establish residence policies requiring a period of full-time study. Students should consult with their adviser to determine specific departmental requirements. If student wants/needs to take additional courses outside the HIED program, he/she needs to contact the M.S. program coordinator for authorization. 15

An application for graduation is available at the following website – students must be aware of all of the deadlines for submitting graduation and commencement forms: http://www.stcloudstate.edu/graduatestudies/current/commencement.asp

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Frequently Asked Questions

When and where are classes held? Classes primarily meet every other weekend (Friday evening and all day Saturday) during the academic year. Each 3-credit course is completed in three weekends, and courses are offered consecutively so students are able to concentrate on one administrative topic at a time. There are some classes being offered online and/or on a blended format (requiring both online and in person meetings). Classes meet at St. Cloud State University unless there is a cohort in session at a site off campus. All classes are held in the Education Building at SCSU. View map at www.stcloudstate.edu/campusmap/ Do I need prerequisite courses or a degree in education to be admitted? There are no prerequisites needed to be admitted into the program, other than the Graduate School requirements. Once admitted to the program, the only prerequisite course is HIED 604 (Introduction to Higher Education Administration) which is offered in the fall. This course may only be waived by your advisor. What if I want to take a course before being formally admitted to the program? Students are allowed to complete 9 credits (3 courses) before being formally admitted to the program. Once a student has taken 9 credits s/he must be admitted into the program before registering for subsequent courses. This is a requirement of the Higher Education Administration program. How do I register for courses? For courses offered on campus, you can register online using your HuskyNet ID and password. For cohort courses offered off campus you must register through the Center for Continuing Studies (320) 308-3081. In order to register, you must have a Tech ID number. If you have not yet been admitted to the program, you can obtain your Tech ID number by completing the “Special (non-degree seeking) Student Registration Request Form” which can be found at http://www.stcloudstate.edu/registrar/students/forms/

What is the job outlook for graduates of the Higher Education Administration Program? The job outlook for graduates with a Master’s Degree in Higher Education Administration is very promising. A market analysis conducted by the Chancellor’s Office in 2006 indicated a need for 130 postsecondary administrators annually in Minnesota, and approximately 370 postsecondary administrators annually in the region (Wisconsin, Iowa, Minnesota, South Dakota, and North Dakota), projected to 2012. According to HigherEdJobs (www.higheredjobs.com), the field of higher education administration has shown a steady growth in employment rates for the last two years (2009-2011).

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Contact Information

Dr. Steven McCullar, Assistant Professor and M.S. Program Coordinator Higher Education Administration Program Education Building B250 St. Cloud State University 720 Fourth Avenue South St. Cloud, MN 56301-4498 Phone: (320) 308-4727 Fax: (320) 308-0908 E-mail: slmmccullar@stcloudstate.edu Web site: www.stcloudstate.edu/hied

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Master of Science Higher Education Administration

PRACTICUM GUIDE 19

Introduction

The Practicum in Higher Education Administration is designed to be a culminating experience of structured and supervised administrative projects and activities at a cooperatively selected college/university. Students working with a site mentor are supervised by a practicum coordinator from St. Cloud State University.

Purpose of Practicum

The Practicum experience will provide the student with a 100 hour exposure to an area of individual interest in Higher Education Administration and allow the student to apply her/his newly acquired knowledge in an educational field setting under supervision. Parttime work experience enables individuals to organize, synthesize, and process new information in a manner that combines the cognitive, affective, and physical domains of learning. Many learners require a period of time to practice and modify both knowledge and skills; the practicum serves this purpose. In addition to gaining insight regarding the operation of a functional area of higher education, practicum students should also gain a view of the interrelationship of associated functional areas. Professionals in higher education must be cognizant of such relationships in order to understand the nature of an institution. Finally, the practicum may serve to generate, develop, and refine skills in program development, administration, research, and other aspects of higher education.

Selecting a Practicum

The program is flexible regarding selection of practicum sites. We are most interested in establishing practicum sites that will provide good learning experiences for students in line with their interests and future career goals, as well as the opportunity for students to apply knowledge gained from coursework. The selection of an appropriate practicum site is important. Care should be exercised to ensure an optimal site placement, which will both inform and challenge the student’s abilities. Students should also refer to their Professional Development Plans (PDP) and Student Dispositions Assessment, and consider practicum sites and student learning goals that will help them to strengthen their areas in need of growth or improvement. The site mentor must hold a master’s degree or higher to supervise the practicum student. Students are responsible for identifying a site and site mentor at least two weeks prior to the beginning of the practicum.

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Current Employment as Practicum Placement

A student may not use her/his current position to fulfill the practicum requirement. However, a student may engage in a practicum placement in the same office/organization where s/he is employed as long as the practicum duties are different from regular employment obligations. For example, a student who is an assistant hall director in a residence hall may choose to work in the residential life office, with the director of residential life, which would be an appropriate practicum setting. It is recommended that the practicum mentor is a person other than the employee’s (student’s) supervisor.

Establishing a Practicum

The student should arrange an appointment with a potential site mentor at the practicum site in which s/he is most interested in working. The purpose of this meeting is to obtain further information about the site and the opportunity for a practicum within the office. The meeting also provides the site mentor with the opportunity to become acquainted with the student and to determine whether a mutually beneficial practicum can be arranged. Following this meeting, the student should determine an order of preference for tasks s/he would like to accomplish. This selection can be accomplished independently or following further discussion with the university practicum coordinator. Once a preferred practicum site has been decided upon, the student should re-contact the site mentor and ascertain whether s/he is willing to accept the student.

The Contract

Once a site mentor has accepted a practicum student, the two should meet to establish the specific goals, objectives, and activities of the practicum, and to complete the Memorandum of Agreement for Student Practicum Experience, including the Student Practicum Experience Agreement (see the Program Forms section of this handbook). An integral aspect of the practicum is the generation of the contract which comprises the following two elements: (1) an agreement regarding the duties, objectives, and obligations of the student, the site mentor and the practicum coordinator; and (2) the set of tasks and experiences the student will undertake in order to meet the basic objectives. The contract provides guidelines that serve as the criteria for evaluating the practicum experience, subject to approval by the student, the site mentor, and the university practicum coordinator. At mid-practicum, the student and site mentor should review the

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contract to assure that the goals will be met. If the goals will not be met, revisions should be forwarded to the university practicum coordinator for review and approval. After the site mentor and student have completed the paperwork, it is then submitted to the university practicum coordinator for review and approval. No practicum hours should be accrued without a contract that has been signed by the site mentor, student, and practicum coordinator.

Example of a Student Learning Goal

Below you will find an example of a student learning goal, including the outcome measure and action steps. This example is meant to be a guide for you as you complete the Student Learning Goals section of the Student Practicum Experience Agreement. Goal: To clearly understand the student admission process from start to finish. Outcome Measure: Define in writing, verbally, and through practice the steps necessary to receive, process, and admit three new student applicants. Action Steps: a. Review the admission process with site mentor. b. Familiarize myself with all documents involved in admissions procedure. c. Receive and process admission applications of three new college applicants.

Approval of a Practicum Site

The practicum coordinator must give final approval of the site and site mentor. Approval of a practicum site is provided in writing (signature of practicum coordinator on the contract), and by email to the student, from the practicum coordinator once the Memorandum of Agreement for Student Practicum Experience and the Student Practicum Experience Agreement forms have been submitted and reviewed.

Standards for the Practicum

1. A practicum should offer the opportunity to observe or participate in all those activities and responsibilities that are considered to be the major functions of the office in which the practicum is located.

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2. A practicum should offer the opportunity for development of skills in one or more of the following areas deemed important for functioning in higher education: •

Administration: completing administrative tasks such as budgeting, resource utilization planning, long range planning for the unit, personnel management, etc.

Assessment and Evaluation: determining the needs of particular populations, determining the effectiveness of programs, policies, or personnel, etc.

Consultation: working with students/faculty/staff on a one-to-one or group basis to enable them to overcome current problems, to prevent possible problems in the future, or to facilitate their development in specific areas.

Diversity: working with a variety of students/faculty/staff from diverse backgrounds including race, class, gender, sexual orientation, religion, and disability.

Environmental Redesign: assessing the characteristics of a particular environment and/or “fit” between students/faculty/staff and environment in order to modify the environment to better meet the needs of students.

Instruction: presenting material in a formal or informal teaching role.

Program Development: designing and developing new programs, or enhancing existing programs.

3. A student should have the opportunity to undertake at least one major independent project that will be of benefit to the site as well as a learning experience for the student. 4. Students should be encouraged to learn how various philosophical, political, and theoretical perspectives apply to the functional area in which they are working. 5. Students should be encouraged to develop their own philosophical perspective and reflect on the activities in which they are engaged. 6. Students should be encouraged to determine their particular strengths and weaknesses as well as likes and dislikes related to the particular area in which they are working. 7. The site mentor should provide meaningful work experience. 8. The site mentor should intermittently provide the practicum student with feedback as well as insight into the function of the office and/or practicum site.

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Getting Started in a Practicum

An orientation session between the student and the site mentor should be held, and the student should be provided with written materials that depict the nature and operations of the institution and specific activities and responsibilities required of the student at the practicum site. The agreement and its accompanying rights and responsibilities should be discussed fully and in specific terms with the site mentor and other relevant persons at the site. Practicum students should ask for experiences that offer the maximum benefit in terms of knowledge acquisition and skill development. It is important that practicum students be included in general staff meetings, specific committee meetings, retreats, brown bag lunches, etc. General staff meetings frequently involve the sharing of progress and problems, and the conducting of business matters. Retreats or support sessions encourage and foster personal and professional growth. Students must attend a meeting with the program’s practicum coordinator. This meeting is held early in the fall semester of each academic year.

Ethics and Confidentiality

Clear professional ethics are essential. Students should seek out and read the professional codes of ethics for their specific work site and the institutional codes of ethics contained in handbooks, catalogs, online, etc. Confidentiality is a key to free and frank discussions. Matters discussed at the practicum site will be held in confidence and will not be discussed outside of the practicum site except when necessary with the practicum coordinator. It is vital that the site mentor be aware that matters stemming from work in the practicum site may be discussed between the student and the practicum coordinator.

Attendance Policy

As the practicum is both experiential and interactive, it is important that students attend all scheduled hours and meetings at the practicum site. However, it is understood that events may occur that prevent the student from attending the practicum or a meeting. If this does occur, it is imperative that the student contact the site mentor or practicum coordinator as soon as possible.

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Practicum Responsibilities

Student is responsible for • seeking and securing a practicum site and mentor. • designing and developing at least three goals and objectives with guidance from the site mentor. • submitting all required forms to the practicum coordinator for site approval. • complying with all aspects and requirements outlined in the HIED 672 syllabus in terms of tasks/projects, promptness, time commitment, paperwork, etc. • contacting the practicum coordinator in regard to major issues at the site. Site Mentor is responsible for • meeting with the student and assisting in the development of her/his learning goals. • providing the student with an orientation session and introducing the student to others at the site. • supervising the day-to-day activities of the student, assigning work/tasks, mentoring the student, and assessing the student’s performance. • documenting any problems/concerns/issues regarding student performance and professionalism. • contacting the practicum coordinator in regard to major issues involving the student at the site. • assessing the student’s competencies and dispositions. Practicum Coordinator is responsible for • approving the practicum site. • approving the student learning goals. • visiting the practicum site, student, and mentor during the exit interview. • the overall supervision of the student, the evaluation of work, and the assessment of student performance.

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Master of Science Higher Education Administration

CULMINATING EXPERIENCE GUIDE

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Introduction

This guide for the Culminating Experience is designed to provide information and direction for graduate students enrolled in the Master of Science Degree Program in Higher Education Administration. The purpose of the guide is to direct students toward the smooth and successful completion of their culminating experience, and to assist in students' timely graduation and entrance into their chosen profession. Department and university procedures for the Thesis (Plan A), Written Comprehensive Examination (Plan B), and Project/eFolio (Plan C) are described below.

Selecting a Topic for Plan A & Plan C

It is never too early to begin thinking about and planning for your culminating experience. Some students seem to know just what they want to do from the very first day of the program, whereas others take a longer, more reflective path to determine exactly what they will do for the culmination of their master’s degree. More typically, students get ideas and clues about a specific topic or project through participation in courses and/or experiences at their practicum site. Consider the following: • • • •

Is there a topic that piqued your interest in a class discussion? Was there a chapter you read in a text, or perhaps a journal article, that struck a chord for you? Perhaps you wrote a paper for a class and the topic turned out to be quite an intriguing one for you. Did something change for you after your practicum, and you want to explore the issue more closely?

These are the kind of self-signals for which you should be on the lookout. When you find something that seems particularly interesting, write it down. Maybe that idea will become the springboard for your project/eFolio, or the problem you will investigate for your thesis research.

Registration

For a thesis (Plan A), you may register for the first 3 credits during the semester in which you plan to complete the preliminary oral examination. You may register for the final 3 thesis credits during the semester in which you plan to complete the final oral defense. The preliminary and final oral examinations must occur at least one semester apart. To register for these credits, you must complete and submit the “Individual Study Approval

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Form” which can be found at http://www.stcloudstate.edu/graduatestudies/current/stuForms.asp or in the Program Forms section of this handbook. Once the form is approved, you will be sent a course ID number by email, which will allow you to register for the course. For the Written Comprehensive Examination (Plan B), you may register for HIED 684 on the semester in which you are planning to take the exam. You will register for three credits in HIED 684. This is a pre-requisite for taking the Written Comprehensive Examination (WCE). For the project/eFolio (Plan C), you may register for HIED 684 Project/eFolio Design in the semester in which your preliminary or final oral exam is planned. To register for these credits, you must contact your advisor and the M.S. coordinator. If you register for credits during the semester of your preliminary oral exam you will be given an “IP” until your final defense is complete the following semester. The satisfactory completion of the culminating project is reported as S (satisfactory) or U (unsatisfactory). If all requirements have not been met by the end of the semester in which you were registered, the work is reported as an IP, “In Progress.” An IP grade will remain on a student’s transcript for one year, and if not completed by the end of that time it will change to a U (unsatisfactory) grade. The culminating project must be completed within the seven-year time limit set for the completion of a master’s degree.

Your Committee (Plan A & Plan C)

The most important consideration when beginning a thesis or project/eFolio is the selection of three graduate faculty members to serve as committee members. Committee Chair The student’s advisor will typically serve as the committee chair. The student should make sure that the chair is available throughout the course of the culminating experience. Selecting Committee Members Each graduate student, after consulting with her/his advisor, should ask two other graduate faculty members to serve on the committee, based on each member’s potential advisory value in the area of research. These committee members must be approved graduate faculty members. A listing of graduate faculty members is available online in the Graduate Bulletin at: http://bulletin.stcloudstate.edu/faculty.asp?grad=1. The second committee member should be a full-time faculty member in the Higher Education Administration Program. The third committee member should be from outside the department, in an area that compliments the thesis/project. This third person is called an outside reader. The outside reader need not have expertise in the student’s specific topic. However, selection of an outside reader should complement the discipline. To view

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a list of faculty members who have volunteered to serve as outside readers, go to: http://www.stcloudstate.edu/graduatestudies/current/culmProject/committee.asp In case a faculty member is not included in the graduate faculty roster, the student needs to contact the M.S. program coordinator. Understanding the Purpose of the Committee Your committee acts in the role of partner and mentor to provide knowledge and support as you begin, execute, and complete your culminating experience. Working With Your Committee The student makes all decisions in discussion with the chairperson first, including the composition of the committee, IRB forms, drafts of paper/eFolio sections, etc. In addition, dates for the preliminary and final meetings are scheduled only after the chair has reviewed and approved. The student should ask the chairperson and committee members about the logistics of the involvement of committee members. Some committee members prefer to see all drafts and be involved throughout the process, whereas other members may give early input in terms of conceptualizing the project or research design and then prefer to see only the final drafts. Students should have committee members clarify their preference at the onset of their work together. Students are advised to work closely with their chair and faculty members in HIED 674 and HIED 694 from the very beginning and throughout the entire length of the culminating experience. For example, it would be inadvisable for a student to do most of the work of a culminating activity on her/his own and then bring it to her/his chair in hopes that the chair would “sign on.� The culminating experience is intended to be a process during which the committee and student work closely throughout. Written notes of what is discussed and agreed upon in committee meetings are very helpful in keeping the chair, committee members, and student on track with timely completion of work. Procedures such as summarizing a committee meeting and then promptly providing copies of the notes to the committee can prove very helpful. Another logistical procedure the student, chair, and committee members should discuss and agree upon is the amount of time that the student must allow for the chair and committee members to read submitted written material. For example, how many days does the chair need in order to review materials for your next meeting? When the final draft is completed, how much time will committee members need before submitting their suggestions? These important procedural considerations should be clearly delineated at the onset of the culminating experience process and updated as needed. In addition, committee members should be asked if they want hard copies or electronic copies of all drafts. Developing Timelines Timelines help both students and faculty members stay focused and purposeful in relation to the timely completion of the culminating experience. Timelines help the student

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understand the sequence of activities, map out a schedule, and inform committee members when to anticipate incoming drafts of chapters to read. Students should consult with their chair to modify and/or periodically review their timeline.

Writing Successfully Some committee chairs will provide editing, formatting, spelling correction, and/or grammatical advice for students, whereas other chairs prefer to focus their attention on the content, not the structure or mechanics, of student work. Students are advised to discuss this aspect of their culminating experience with their committee chair. Sources for editing and formatting are available from St. Cloud State University’s Writing Center. Hours and location are available from their website: http://www.stcloudstate.edu/writeplace/. It is the student’s responsibility to persist with the writing and revision process until the final document is satisfactory to the chair and then each committee member.

Student and Faculty Thesis/Project/eFolio Responsibilities

Thesis/Project/eFolio Chair: It is the responsibility of the chair to: 1. Sign off on the Independent Study form for HIED 699 for 1-6 credits (Plan A), or HIED 684 for 3 credits (Plan C). 2. Assist the student in the selection of the other committee members. 3. Determine the appropriateness of the thesis/project topic selected by the student. 4. Determine the adequacy of the thesis/project/eFolio design before the student begins work. 5. Provide the student with feedback regarding when it is appropriate to schedule committee meetings. With this approval, the student will schedule the Preliminary Oral Exam and Final Oral Defense meetings, providing the date, time, and location to all members in addition to a draft of the paper. In addition, once approved the student will notify Graduate Studies as well. 6. Work effectively with the student to set realistic timelines for completion of the thesis/project. 7. Ensure that the student has obtained the required clearances from the Institutional Review Board (IRB) for research involving human subjects before the research study or project begins. 8. Review the scholarly execution of the study. 9. Assure that all of the committee members have reviewed the thesis/project/eFolio before it is typed in final form and that all the necessary changes have been incorporated. 10. See that a high standard of writing quality is maintained throughout the thesis/project/eFolio using APA writing principles. 11. Chair the preliminary and final defense of the thesis/project/eFolio and submit all required approvals and paperwork to the School of Graduate Studies.

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Committee Members: It is the responsibility of the committee members to: 1. Attend and participate in preliminary and final oral exam. 2. Check the adequacy of the thesis/project/eFolio design before the study begins through participation in the Preliminary Oral Exam. 3. Review the scholarly execution of the study. 4. See that a high standard of scholarship and writing quality are maintained throughout the thesis/project/eFolio. 5. Review and comment on the thesis/project/eFolio before it is completed in final form. 6. Complete all paperwork associated with the thesis/project/eFolio. Student: It is the responsibility of the student to: 1. Constitute a committee of three appropriate graduate faculty members willing to act as supervising faculty on the thesis/project/eFolio – two from the program (including your chair) and one from outside the department. 2. Provide the chair and committee members accurate contact information for all members and update any changes, such as phone numbers and email addresses as necessary. 3. Decide, in consultation with the committee chair, an appropriate and worthy topic for research study or project. 4. Call the committee meetings for the Preliminary Oral Exam and Final Oral Defense, only after approval from the chair, providing the date, time, and location to all members, including the School of Graduate Studies, and submitting all drafts and final documents to the committee and School of Graduate Studies. 5. Determine, in consultation with the committee, roles of the committee members, needs of the committee in working through the approval process, and the timelines and deadlines for submitting written work for approval. 6. Understand that re-writes will probably be necessary and that the guidance of the committee is to be taken seriously if the work is to be satisfactorily completed. 7. Obtain editorial help if necessary to meet the standards of the University and the HIED program for quality and presentation of the information in the thesis/project/eFolio in APA format. 8. Adhere to the appropriate style manual determined by the program (APA) and to the thesis/project/eFolio guidelines outlined by the School of Graduate Studies Manual. 9. Defend the thesis/project/eFolio; understand that final acceptance of the thesis/project/eFolio is determined by the student’s faculty committee, and the School of Graduate Studies.

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Department and University Procedures

Department Procedures You must register for HIED 699 credits the semester in which you are working on your thesis and HIED 684 in either the semester of your preliminary or final defense. In the case of the Written Comprehensive Examination (WCE), students need to register for HIED 684 on the semester in which they are taking the exam. If you are interested in taking the WCE, you need to contact the M.S. program coordinator for dates and times. Summer Enrollment Students should not begin their culminating experience in the summer. Students may complete a graduate project or thesis in the summer only with the agreement, in advance, of their chair and committee members; most faculty members do not work with students on culminating activities during the summer. Original Work Students are required to conduct and complete an individual project, eFolio, thesis, or to take and pass the Written Comprehensive Examination. If two students pursue a similar topic, it must be clear that the “products,” or the hypotheses/research questions, are separate and unique, ensuring that each person’s work is indeed original. University Procedures The School of Graduate Studies is responsible for implementing university policies regarding graduate student classification, formal programs, culminating experiences, and diplomas. This office publishes information on all graduate programs and assists individual departments in updating information on graduate degree programs. The website for the School of Graduate Studies is: http://www.stcloudstate.edu/graduatestudies. It is the student’s responsibility to be knowledgeable of, and to meet, the deadlines for submission of your culminating activity. There are no exceptions to university deadlines. Updated deadlines are available at: http://www.stcloudstate.edu/graduatestudies/current/culmProject/ Students should obtain “A Manual for the Preparation of Field Studies and Theses” available at the Husky Bookstore and online at: http://www.stcloudstate.edu/graduatestudies/current/culmProject/documents/ThesisManu al.pdf. Students are required to meet the formatting guidelines of both the university and of the department, which adheres to the guidelines of the American Psychological Association (APA). APA style rules and guidelines are found in a reference book called, “The Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (Sixth Edition).” Guidelines are provided to ensure clear and consistent presentation of written material.

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Editorial style provides uniform use of such elements as grammar, use of tables/graphs, headings, citation of sources, presentation of statistics, fonts, etc. When a conflict exists in standards, format, or style, the manual published by the School of Graduate Studies takes precedence over any other manual approved for department use. Human Subjects – Institutional Review Board All planned research involving human subjects must receive approval from St. Cloud State University’s Institutional Review Board (IRB) for the Protection of Human Subjects prior to commencing the thesis or project. All students and faculty conducting research that involves the participation of humans or animals must complete an application form and submit it to the Office of Sponsored Programs. Students do not submit this form until their project/thesis has been approved by their committee at the preliminary oral exam and only after approval from the chair. An application is available at: http://www.stcloudstate.edu/osp/irb/documents/IRBApplicationpdf.pdf Official protocol forms, as well as copies of federal guidelines for both human and animal-related research, are available from: http://www.stcloudstate.edu/osp/policies/ The Human Subjects Committee convenes biweekly. Applications must be submitted at least two (2) weeks before a meeting to be considered for full review. Approvals from participating schools or organizations must be obtained on letterhead prior to submitting a completed proposal. Methodology must be specific and clearly written, so that the Human Subjects Committee can approve the research in a timely fashion. Expedited Review is usually completed within 5 to 10 working days after applications have been submitted. Procedures and templates for Informed Consent are available at: http://www.stcloudstate.edu/osp/forms/documents/InformedConsent.doc.

Distinguished Master’s Thesis Award

St. Cloud State University Distinguished Master’s Thesis Award and Midwestern Association of Graduate Schools (MAGS) Distinguished Thesis Award Nomination http://www.stcloudstate.edu/graduatestudies/current/awards.asp Each year the Faculty Association Graduate Committee and the School of Graduate Studies recognize one outstanding thesis completed during the last academic year or summer with the SCSU Distinguished Master’s Thesis Award. This thesis is then submitted by St. Cloud State University as its nominee for the Midwestern Association of Graduate Schools (MAGS) Distinguished Thesis Award. Each master’s program with a thesis option is encouraged to select and submit one outstanding thesis. The thesis and letter of support from the department must be submitted by October 1. The School of Graduate Studies forwards the theses and letters

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of support to the chairperson of the SCSU Distinguished Master’s Thesis Award Committee. The committee then selects the SCSU Distinguished Master’s Thesis. The individual whose thesis is selected receives a framed certificate and an award of $200.00 in a joint presentation by faculty representatives, the President, and the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies. Eligibility Master’s degree-seeking candidates who completed a thesis during the last academic year or summer will be eligible to be nominated. Starred papers and creative works cannot be considered for this award. Nomination Each program may submit one nomination with a supporting letter of not more than two pages from the thesis adviser. Nomination Letter The thesis adviser should briefly address the following: • •

the originality and importance of the research the potential for significant contribution to the field

Deadline – October 1 Submit nomination materials to: Linda Krueger, School of Graduate Studies 121 Administrative Services Building 720 Fourth Avenue South St. Cloud, MN 56301-4498 Telephone: 320.308.2113 Fax: 320.308.5371 Selection and Announcement of Award The School of Graduate Studies forwards the theses and letters of support to the chairperson of the St. Cloud State University Distinguished Master’s Thesis Award Committee. The committee then selects the SCSU Distinguished Master’s Thesis. SCSU’s Outstanding Thesis is then submitted to the Midwestern Association of Graduate Schools for consideration in their annual competition. The SCSU award recipient will be announced November 15. The individual whose thesis is selected will receive a nomination for the MAGS Distinguished Thesis Award, a framed certificate, and an award of $200 in a joint presentation by faculty representatives, the President, and the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies. Midwestern Association of Graduate Schools (MAGS) Distinguished Thesis Award For a number of years the Midwestern Association of Graduate Schools (MAGS) has recognized scholarship and research at the master’s level through the MAGS Distinguished Thesis Award.

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Each university in the Midwest is allowed to submit one thesis. From these, the MAGS award is selected. If selected by MAGS, the student receives a $500 honorarium from MAGS and travel expenses to attend the annual MAGS conference. Student Research Colloquium

St. Cloud State University's annual campus-wide Student Research Colloquium (SRC) promotes research, scholarship. and creative work in collaboration with faculty as a vital component of higher education. Faculty, graduate students, and undergraduate students from St. Cloud State University and regional universities are encouraged to participate. Industry sponsors are also invited to attend. The goal of the SRC is to bring together students, faculty, and members of the community involved in scholarly and artistic activities – this event typically occurs every April, and students are able to give paper presentations, poster presentations, or performance or creative works. Students work with a faculty member on all aspects of their presentation for the SRC. For more information and deadlines www.stcloudstate.edu/src. Statistical Consulting and Research Support

If you are looking for help in drawing on the power of statistics to support your research, the Statistical Consulting & Research Support office in St. Cloud State University’s Learning Resources & Technology Services may be able to help you. Staff members will help you design a survey to collect the information you need, and will do the computer work for you. You make the research decisions, and they do the computer work. Here's what to expect Visit the Statistical Consulting & Research Support office (MC 204) before you design and write your survey. Staff members will help focus your research and help develop an effective method for finding answers. • •

• •

After completing your survey bring the completed forms and your data to the Statistical Consulting Office. (Please make an appointment first.) Based upon your discussion in the survey planning process and on the questions you want answered, the staff will design a series of computer programs to analyze your data. They even do the data entry for you! o This step can take up to two weeks. The size of your project and the work the staff has scheduled before yours arrives will influence how long you have to wait for results. The staff will run your data, analyze, and assemble the results. When completed you can return to the office to have the results explained. They will help you to interpret your results.

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You have the opportunity to return to discuss drawing further information from your data. The staff will perform follow-up analysis upon your request.

Internet Staff can also help you develop web-based surveys. They have experience in creating web products and will help you draw upon the unique aspects of this growing information gathering process. . Contact Information Statistical Consulting & Research Support is located in room Miller Center 204. Office hours are weekdays between 8:00 am and 4:30 pm. The telephone number to call is 3084709. The e-mail address is statspss@stcloudstate.edu .

Frequently Asked Question What is a culminating experience? The culminating experience is a generic term referring to the final academic experience in your master’s program. In the Higher Education Administration Program the culminating experience is one of three choices. It can be a thesis (Plan A), a written comprehensive exam (Plan B), or a project/eFolio (Plan C). What is a thesis? (Plan A) A thesis involves the design and implementation of empirical (qualitative or quantitative) research. Students design an original study, obtain and/or develop data collection tools, organize and implement data collection, input and analyze the data, and write the results and conclusions of the study based on the data. A thesis contributes to the field of study – in your case, higher education administration. What is a written comprehensive examination? (Plan B) The Written Comprehensive Examination (WCE) is a final exam that students can take at a specific date, pre-determined by the HIED program. This exam evaluates students’ basic knowledge about the courses offered in the M. S. in Higher Education Administration program. The exam entails working on two basic questions, and the analysis of a case study which is genuine to the field of higher education. These three items will be provided to the students during the date of the specific examination. The Written Comprehensive Examination is offered twice a year in a computer lab where students can access Microsoft Word software. What is a graduate project/eFolio? (Plan C) A graduate project involves the design of a product, such as a curriculum, a workshop, a handbook, a video, a website, etc. The candidate provides a rationale for the product based on a comprehensive review of the research and consultation with experts in the field. The project must contribute something new and/or significant to the institution, and it must be based on a review of the research and a needs assessment. A graduate eFolio is

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an electronic document that provides evidence to your committee that you have mastered the HIED leadership competencies and dispositions. What are the differences between the Thesis (Plan A), the Written Comprehensive Exam (Plan B), and the Project/eFolio (Plan C)? Generally speaking, the thesis makes a contribution to your field (Higher Education Administration). The project makes a contribution to your institution. Thus, the project must be related to an expressed institutional need. The project expectation is equivalent to the thesis, in terms of rigor and scholarship. The eFolio is evidence-based. The Written Comprehensive Examination is an exam that can only be taken twice. It does not require any explicit contribution to either the field or an institution of HIED. This exam’s purpose is to assess the student’s knowledge acquired through the M.S. coursework. Can my project be a product of my practicum experience? Students are able to connect their project to their practicum, if approved by their advisor, but it is not a requirement and not always advisable. If there is a major/significant project that you started during your practicum, you may be able to continue working on it for your project. When should I begin my culminating experience? As mentioned, it’s never too early to begin thinking about and planning your culminating project. Officially, students begin the process by enrolling in HIED 674 (Introduction to Research), in the fall semester, and then HIED 694 (HIED Research Methods and Design) in the spring semester. Students working on Plan A, the thesis, may register for 3 credits of HIED 699 when they are ready to complete the preliminary oral defense of the proposal. At least one semester later, students may register for HIED 699 (3 credits) and complete the final defense. Students working on Plan C, the project/eFolio, will enroll in HIED 684 Project/eFolio Design for 3 credits either during the semester or their preliminary exam (usually during or after HIED 694) or during the semester of their final oral exam. Students may complete their thesis or project/eFolio in the summer semester only with the agreement of their chair and committee members. How do I register for my thesis credits (HIED 699)? How do I register for my project/eFolio credits (HIED 684)? How do I register for my Written Comprehensive Examination credits (HIED 684)? You may register for 3 thesis credits (HIED 699) during the semester that you hold your preliminary oral examination. You may register for the final 3 thesis credits during the semester that you complete your final oral examination. Your preliminary and final oral examinations must occur at least one semester apart. To register for these credits, you must complete and submit the “Individual Study Approval Form” which can be found at http://www.stcloudstate.edu/graduatestudies/current/stuForms.asp or in the Program Forms section of this handbook. Once the form is approved, you will be sent a course ID number by email, which will allow you to register for the course.

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You may register for your 3 project/eFolio credits (HIED 684) after completing your research courses and during the semester of your preliminary oral examination or final defense. To register for these credits, you must complete and submit the “Individual Study Approval Form” which can be found at http://www.stcloudstate.edu/graduatestudies/current/stuForms.asp or in the Program Forms section of this handbook. Once the form is approved, you will be sent a course ID number by email, which will allow you to register for the course. You may register for your 3 Written Comprehensive Examination credits (HIED 684) during the last semester of your coursework. You need to request authorization from your advisor and the M.S. coordinator.

Resources

The following are examples of books providing valuable information and guidance for preparing and completing your thesis/project. This is not meant to be an exhaustive list, simply a starting point. American Psychological Association. (2009). Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. Bui, Y. N. (2009). How to write a master’s thesis. San Francisco: Sage Publications. Cone, J. D., & Foster, S. L. (1993). Dissertations and theses from start to finish: Psychology and related fields. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association. Irby, B. J., & Lunenburg. F. (2007) Writing a successful thesis or dissertation: Tips and strategies for students in the social and behavioral sciences. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press. Leedy, P. D., & Ormrod, J. E.(2001). Practical research: Planning and design (7th ed.). New York: Merrill/Prentice Hall. Madsen, D. (1992). Successful dissertations and theses: A guide to graduate student research from proposal to completion (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

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Murray, R. (2006). How to write a thesis. Philadelphia, PA: Open University Press. Pyrczak, F. (2000). Completing your thesis or dissertation. Los Angeles, CA: Pyrczak Publishing.

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Thesis (Plan A)

What is a thesis? A thesis involves the design and implementation of empirical research by the student. The student designs the study, obtains and/or develops data collection tools, sets up and follows-through on the data collection process, processes and analyzes the data, and writes the results and conclusions of the study based on the data. How does a thesis differ from a project/eFolio (Plan C) and Written Comprehensive Examination (Plan B)? A thesis is an empirical study and makes a contribution to the student’s field – in this case, higher education administration. A graduate project involves the design of a product, such as a curriculum, workshop, or video and makes a contribution to the student’s institution. A graduate eFolio is an evidence-based format for providing evidence of mastery of competencies and dispositions. For further details, see the Project/eFolio (Plan C) section of this guide. The Written Comprehensive Examination is an exam that can only be taken twice. It does not require any explicit contribution to either the field or an institution of HIED. This exam’s purpose is to assess the students’ knowledge acquired through the M.S. coursework. . For further details, see the Written Comprehensive Examination (Plan B) section of this guide.

Procedures for Thesis (Plan A)

Proposal The first step in the thesis process is the development of a proposal. A proposal is a comprehensive outline of what the thesis will look like. It should include an introduction and hypotheses or research questions, literature review, and proposed methodology (Chapters 1, 2, and 3). It should also include a proposed timeline. The proposal is required for the thesis preliminary conference with your committee. A student will work with his/her committee chair on the proposal prior to disseminating to other committee members. Thesis Preliminary Oral Exam Conference Once the proposal has been prepared and approved by the chair, students must arrange for a preliminary oral exam conference. This preliminary conference may be scheduled after the student has been fully accepted into a graduate program, if the graduate grade point average is at least 3.0, and after the student’s program of study has been approved by the graduate dean. The student may need to contact Ann Anderson at aeanderson@stcloudstate.edu to verify preliminary conference eligibility. It is recommended that the preliminary oral exam take place at the conclusion of HIED 694. The preliminary oral exam conference must occur at least one semester prior to the final defense. These conferences are not typically scheduled during final examination

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week or during the summer. The student will register for 3 credits of HIED 699 (Thesis) during the semester of the preliminary oral exam. It is the student’s responsibility to schedule committee members for a preliminary conference and to ensure a room is reserved in the Education Building with assistance from the department secretary (Phone: 320-308-3131). At least two weeks prior to the preliminary conference, one copy of the proposal is submitted to Ann Anderson in the School of Graduate Studies along with the date, time, and location of the preliminary conference and a list of the committee chair and members. Once the School of Graduate Studies reviews this information and the thesis proposal, the appropriate paperwork is sent to the thesis committee chair. Each committee member must also receive a copy of the proposal at least one week prior to the preliminary conference. Students should ask their committee members whether they prefer a paper or electronic copy of the proposal. The School of Graduate Studies will independently distribute a report of preliminary evaluation to the student’s committee chair. A student may continue with Plan A when each committee member approves the proposed project by signing and returning the preliminary evaluation report to Ann Anderson in the School of Graduate Studies. Thesis Final Defense When the thesis is complete including Chapters 1 through 5, and the student has the approval of his/her committee chair, the student is ready for a final oral examination. A final oral defense is required of all students whose Plan A programs of study require the completion of a thesis. Students who have earned less than a 3.0 grade point average in the major, over their entire program, and in all graduate credits earned are not permitted to complete the final oral examination. It is the student’s responsibility to schedule the Final Oral Defense with their committee members. The final defense cannot be held in the same semester as the preliminary oral. The final defense generally is not scheduled during final examination week or during the summer. Once scheduled, the student must notify the School of Graduate Studies to allow the paperwork for the conference to be prepared. Send these final conference details via E-mail to Ann Anderson at aeanderson@stcloudstate.edu. •

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The final defense is conducted by the thesis committee, consisting of three members. Membership consists of the same committee that served on the preliminary exam conference. A majority vote of the final evaluation committee is required to pass the final defense. The committee will vote to approve, approve with revisions, or reject. A candidate who fails the final oral defense in the first attempt may, with the approval of the advisor, take the examination a second time, but the candidate may not retake the final oral defense during the same semester in which the original defense was failed. A third chance to pass the defense is not permitted. The specific requirements vary according to the nature of the project submitted.

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Once you pass your final oral defense, remind your advisor to submit a grade/change of grade for the thesis. A mark of “S” is recorded for an approved thesis. One complete copy of the work must be submitted to the School of Graduate Studies for format review prior to submission for binding. This is not a final copy. It is recommended that the student submit the work to the School of Graduate Studies at least three weeks before the submission of the culminating project deadline to allow time for form and style corrections. For the deadline, go to http://www.stcloudstate.edu/graduatestudies/current/culmProject/

Binding a Thesis Once the student has successfully passed the final evaluation conference, made corrections required by her/his committee, and received approval through the School of Graduate Studies, the thesis is ready for binding. Each approval page must be signed by the committee members and the abstracts must be signed by the committee chairperson. • Three copies of the thesis must be prepared on a minimum of 20-pound, 100 percent cotton paper and submitted to the School of Graduate Studies for binding by the appropriate deadline. For the deadline, go to http://www.stcloudstate.edu/graduatestudies/current/culmProject/ • The copies will be bound in black buckram covers with gold lettering on the front and spine. • If a student desires a personal bound copy of the culminating project, one additional copy must be submitted for binding with the abstract for a total of four copies. • The student is responsible for the binding fee plus a one-time microfilm fee. Payment should be made by personal check to SCSU and submitted in the School of Graduate Studies. • In addition to the abstracts submitted with each thesis, two additional signed copies of the abstract should be submitted to the School of Graduate Studies. • There are several individuals on and off campus who assist with thesis formatting for a nominal fee. Theses are approved, bound, and placed on file as described in “A Manual for the Preparation of Field Studies and Theses.”

Thesis Outline (Plan A)

Chapter One – Introduction 1. Introduction The purpose of this section is to provide a context that supports the rationale for the proposed study. The introduction is supposed to lead the reader into understanding or concluding that this is an issue that needs to be formally studied.

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2. Statement of the Problem This section provides a clear statement of the research problem and why it needs to be addressed. It also explains what you intend to do, describing the who, what, when, where, how, and why of the study. The statement of the problem should lead the reader into the next section. 3. Purpose of the Study This section addresses the importance and significance of the study and how the results may benefit the field. This section also clearly states that the purpose of the thesis is to examine a specific research question(s) and to test certain hypotheses (in the case of a quantitative study) or to explore certain themes related to the research questions (in the case of a qualitative study). 4. Objectives for the Study This section is typically a numbered list of short term projects or tasks that need to be done to complete your study. It may include items such as securing participation, seeking permission, developing questionnaires, securing technology, training research assistants, or developing materials. 5. Assumptions of the Study This section describes the things that you have assumed to be true for the study. It typically consists of items in a numbered list. Assumptions may include things such as honesty in responses, representative sample, or global postulates (claims about your field that most or all would assert to be true, i.e. “High quality teaching leads to improved student learning”). 6. Delimitations In this section, you will set the parameters for your study and tell the reader what variables you included and what variables you did not include. The delimitations typically are stated in a numbered list. Note: This differs from the limitations section that is included in chapter five of your thesis. Limitations, or problems you encountered as you carried out the study, should not be included in chapter one. 7. Research Questions This section lists your research questions which are the questions that will drive your study. You will answer these questions at the conclusion of your study. Also remember that the data you collect must provide the answers to these questions. Typically, you will have two to three research questions. Avoid “yes” or “no” response-type questions. 8. Research Hypotheses This section is not needed in a qualitative study or in a quantitative study using only descriptive statistics (i.e. percents, means, modes, median, ranges, frequencies). Hypotheses are typically written as null hypotheses, stating that there will be no difference or effect. For example, “Females and males will not differ in their desire to advance to a higher administrative position.”

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9. Definition of Terms This section provides definitions of critical terms or concepts specific to your study. These definitions should be based on scholarly research and other scholarly work. The sources should be cited using APA format. When scholars define a term in different ways, include a brief discussion of the different perspectives, indicate which definition will be adopted in the thesis study, and why. 10. Summary This section summarizes chapter one, provides a paragraph or two indicating how the thesis is organized, and provides a bridging statement to chapter two. Chapter Two – Literature Review 1. Introduction The purpose of the review of the literature is to explore research on the issues that are relevant to the proposed project. Begin chapter two with a brief description of your study. Also, describe the sources you used including the databases and search engines. Next, list and preview the critical issues, in the order in which they will be discussed in the review. The subheadings of the subsequent sections of the review should reflect the critical issues identified. 2. Review of the Research on Issues Relevant to the Study As the student reviews the research on each issue, s/he should: • Use the most recent version of APA style for formatting prose and citations. The student should obtain the latest edition of the APA style manual. In addition to discussing the major findings of the studies, the student should also include pertinent information about how each study was conducted, such as the number of subject/participants, relevant characteristics of the subjects, types of instruments and/or methods used (e.g., not necessarily the specific names of the tests or instruments, but whether they were interviewed, responded to questionnaires, tested, observed, etc.). The synopsis should also mention any major weaknesses in the study design. 3. Synthesis of the Review of the Research This section synthesizes the major findings of the research as it relates to the proposed study. Does the research you have just reviewed: • support the development of the proposed thesis? • indicate how your study should be designed and/or implemented? • identify other studies that are similar to the proposed study? If so, how would the proposed study differ from or improve upon existing similar studies? 4. Summary This section summarizes chapter two and provides a bridging statement to chapter three.

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Chapter Three - Methodology 1. Introduction Present the research design for the proposed study, restate the hypotheses or research question(s), and briefly delineate the organization of this chapter. This chapter specifically describes how you plan to conduct the study. Remember anyone should be able to read chapter three and replicate your study without ever speaking to you- it should be that detailed and focused. 2. Participants Describe the population or sample of the study, including a description of how many participated (you may want to talk about the number of surveys sent out versus the response rate, for example), all other relevant descriptors (typically including age, ethnicity, gender, psychological condition, etc.), how participants were selected (random, intact group, etc.), and if they were grouped in any way. 3. Human Subject Approval – Institutional Review Board (IRB) This section outlines how the rights of human subjects will be protected throughout the study. For more information http://www.stcloudstate.edu/osp/irb/default.asp 4. Instrument(s) All instruments, tools, or methods used to gather data must be described here, including the psychometric characteristics of the tests (e.g., validity and reliability indicators), how the tool was developed, or how the instrument will be designed or piloted. If a qualitative technique is to be used, such as interviews, observations or videotaping, what protocols will be applied? What type of information regarding procedures, ethics, and confidentiality are participants and/or others given? 5. Research Design Describe the research design. If the study is an experimental or quasi-experimental study, what research design will be used? What are the comparison groups? How does the design address each of the hypotheses? If it is a qualitative study, what research design will be used? What methods will be used to establish reliability and validity (e.g., triangulation)? 6. Procedures The student should provide an outline of all procedures involved in the proposed research. Describe the logistics and the timeline for this study. How/when the participants will be contacted and/or selected. When and how will the data be collected, processed, and analyzed? 7. Summary This section summarizes chapter three and provides a bridging statement to chapter four.

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Chapter Four – Results 1. Introduction Reiterate the hypotheses and research question(s). Describe the organization of the chapter, which, in effect, is how the data will be discussed. 2. Results for each hypothesis or research question Restate each hypothesis. Discuss how each was tested by describing the method of analysis. Discuss whether or not the results support the hypothesis. Do not inject your opinion or explanation of the results. Commentary should be provided in chapter five. Restate each research question. Discuss how you organized the narrative information for interpretation and the outcomes. 3. Synthesis Quantitative: Discuss your findings as a whole and synthesize the results. What were your major findings? How many of the hypotheses were validated? Were there any contradictory results, or any unexpected or confusing results? Overall, what conclusion(s) can you draw from the data regarding the research question? Qualitative: Synthesis discussion of qualitative research should be inductive in nature and interpretive. The purpose is to assist the reader in gaining a fuller understanding of the phenomenon, context, or culture studied. You might examine aspects of the outcomes, categorize your findings with previous studies, and/or identify the aspects of a particular phenomenon that need further investigation. 4. Summary This section summarizes chapter four and provides a bridging statement to chapter five. Chapter Five – Discussion 1. Introduction Summarize the preceding four chapters, starting with the purpose of the thesis. State findings from the data you collected and analyzed. You may use this summary as your abstract, although some students prefer to write an elaborated summary. State the organization of the chapter as a bridge to the discussion. 2. Discussion and Conclusions Discuss the results in light of the review of the research and your own research findings. In this section you may inject your opinions as supported by the data and/or review of the research. Point out new findings that are supported by your data and findings that contradict or expand upon existing research studies. Overall, what conclusion(s) can you reach from your research? In this section, you have the opportunity to write from your own voice. Reflect on what you have learned.

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3. Limitations List any problems you encountered in your study that you had not anticipated, i.e. low survey return rate. This section may be formatted in a numbered list. Then make recommendations for further research based upon the limitations. 4. Recommendations Based on your review of literature and study, what recommendations would you make to the field? How may practitioners use the results of your study to improve their practice? 5. Future Research Identify future research indicated by your thesis study, and point to new avenues of further research – what subsequent questions arose from your study. 6. Summary Briefly summarize chapter five. References Provide a complete list of all the items cited in the thesis. Do not include items that were reviewed but not cited in the body of the thesis. Appendix(es) Each appendix should be listed A, B, C‌. Include the original of your approved Human Subjects Protocol, as well as other items, such as survey instrument, raw data, and participants’ verbatim comments. Items should be in the order they are presented in the body of your thesis.

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Graduate Written Comprehensive Examination (Plan B)

What is a written comprehensive exam? The Written Comprehensive Examination (WCE) is a final exam that students can take at a specific date, pre-determined by the HIED program. This exam evaluates student’s basic knowledge about the courses offered in the M. S. in Higher Education Administration program. The exam entails working on two basic questions, and the analysis of a case study which is genuine to the field of higher education. These three items will be provided to the students during the date of the specific examination. The Written Comprehensive Examination is offered in a computer lab where students can access Microsoft Word software. Internet access is not allowed during the examination. How does a Written Comprehensive Examination differ from a thesis/project/eFolio? The Written Comprehensive Examination does not require any explicit contribution to either the field or an institution of HIED. The exam’s purpose is to assess the student’s knowledge acquired through the M.S. coursework. A thesis makes a contribution to your field (Higher Education Administration). The project makes a contribution to your institution. Thus, the project must be related to an expressed institutional need. The eFolio is evidence-based. Procedures for Written Comprehensive Examination (Plan B)

General instructions • At the beginning of the semester in which the student will be finishing coursework, he/she must communicate his/her choice and decision to take the exam to the program coordinator and academic advisor, and submit a written application. •

The written comprehensive exam is administered each semester. The date of exam is determined by program faculty.

The written comprehensive exam can be taken twice. Students are allowed to retake the exam once after they failed the first time.

Students who have special needs should notify the program coordinator at least two weeks before the date of exam.

The written comprehensive exam will be offered in a computer lab where students can access Microsoft Word software. Internet access will not be allowed during the examination.

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On the date of the exam • The student should arrive at the test site at least ten minutes before the exam to make preparations. The student is responsible for any consequence caused by check-in and unexcused lateness. •

The student has four hours to complete the written comprehensive exam.

The exam consists of three essay questions and one case study. The student will choose two of the three questions to respond to. The case study is pre-selected by the program faculty. All students respond to the case study.

The exam is individual work, so the student may not engage in a conversation or any other form of communication with other students during the exam.

The exam is proctored by program faculty. Students are not allowed to use other materials when working on the essay questions and case study. Answers must adhere to the highest standards of academic honesty.

The student will work on a computer in the SOE computer lab. She/he is expected to submit a hard copy of the exam upon completion. A printer will be available in the exam room.

The answers should follow the Sixth Edition of APA Guidelines. The answer to each question and case study should be between three and six pages in length, doubled- spaced, in twelve point font, and in Arial, Calibri, or Times New Roman.

Students should cite studies and literature to support their assertions. However, some imprecision in citation (author names, dates of publication) will not decrease students evaluations. There is also no expectation that written answers will include a reference section.

Students must be sure to include name, date, and page numbers on each page of the exam.

After the exam • Following successful completion of the comprehensive exam. The signed form will be sent to the program coordinator, who will transmit the form to the Office of Graduate Studies. •

Students will be notified of the result within three weeks after the exam.

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If you want to switch to Plan B (from Plan A or C) •

Communicate with your program advisor and M.S. coordinator about your decision to change your program of study to Plan B.

Print out and fill in the form “Change of Graduate Program,” available at: http://www.stcloudstate.edu/graduatestudies/current/stuForms.asp

Send form “Change of Graduate Program” via ground mail to: School of Graduate Studies St. Cloud State University 121 Administrative Services Building 720 Fourth Avenue South St. Cloud, MN 56301‐4498 Or, fax the form to: 320.308.5371

Register for HIED 684 in order to graduate in Plan B. This will occur in the semester in which you are taking the Written Comprehensive Examination (WCE).

Take two offerings of HIED 664.

Be sure to schedule to take the WCE when it is being offered. You will receive a message from the M.S. coordinator at least one month before the scheduled date of the WCE.

Be sure to be included in the list of students taking the WCE.

Graduate Project (Plan C)

What is a graduate project? In a graduate project, the candidate provides a rationale for a specific product that is based on a comprehensive review of the research and consultation with experts in the field. This product takes a wide variety of forms, such as a curriculum, a workshop or program, a guidebook, a video, a website, etc. The project must: 1) relate directly to the candidate’s program; 2) contribute something new and/or significant to the student’s institution, and 3) be based on a review of the research and, if appropriate, a needs assessment.

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How does a graduate project differ from a thesis? A project, although just as rigorous, contributes to the student’s institution and is more locally focused. In a thesis, the candidate designs a research study, collects and analyzes the data, and discusses the results. In other words, the candidate conducts an empirical study of topic. A thesis contributes to the field (Higher Education Administration). For further details, please see the thesis section of this guide.

Procedures for Project (Plan C)

Proposal The first step in the project process is the development of a proposal. A proposal is an outline of what the project will look like. It should include an introduction, literature review, and proposed methodology (Chapters 1, 2, and 3). It should also include a proposed timeline. The proposal is required for the preliminary conference with your committee. Project Preliminary Conference Once the proposal has been prepared and approved by the committee chair, students must arrange for a preliminary oral exam conference. This preliminary conference may be scheduled after the student has been fully accepted into a graduate program, if the graduate grade point average is at least 3.0, and after the student’s program of study has been approved by the graduate dean. The student may need to contact Ann Anderson at aeanderson@stcloudstate.edu to verify preliminary conference eligibility. It is recommended that the preliminary oral exam take place at the conclusion of HIED 694. The preliminary oral exam must occur at least one semester prior to the final defense. These conferences are not typically scheduled during final examination week or during the summer. It is the student’s responsibility to schedule committee members for a preliminary conference and to ensure a room is reserved in the Education Building with assistance from the department secretary (Phone: 320-308-3131). At least two weeks prior to the preliminary conference, one copy of the proposal is submitted to Ann Anderson in the School of Graduate Studies along with the date, time, and location of the preliminary conference and a list of the committee chair and members. Once the School of Graduate Studies reviews this information and the proposal, the appropriate paperwork is sent to the project committee chair. Each committee member must also receive a copy of the proposal at least one week prior to the preliminary conference. Students should ask their committee members whether they prefer a paper or electronic copy of the proposal. The School of Graduate Studies will independently distribute a report of preliminary evaluation to the student’s committee chair. A student may continue with Plan C when each committee member approves the proposed project by signing and returning the preliminary evaluation report to the School of Graduate Studies.

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Final Oral Defense When the project is complete and approved by the committee chair, the student is ready for a final oral defense. A final oral defense is required of all students whose Plan C programs of study require the completion of a project. Students who have earned less than a 3.0 grade point average in the major, over their entire program, and in all graduate credits earned are not permitted to complete the final oral examination. The student must prepare a summary of the materials to be included in the project. If the material is a single comprehensive project, the summary should be in the form of an abstract. The project (chapters 1-5 and the product) must be submitted to the committee chair at least two weeks prior to the date set for the final defense. The department may exercise its option to retain any or all materials prepared for the professional project. Students will register for HIED 684 Project/eFolio Design in the semester in which the preliminary or final oral exam is planned. It is the student’s responsibility to schedule the final oral defense with their committee members once given approval by the committee chair. The final oral cannot be held in the same semester as the preliminary oral. Final orals generally are not scheduled during the final examination week or during the summer. Once scheduled, the student must notify the School of Graduate Studies to allow the paperwork for the conference to be prepared. Send these final conference details by E-mail to Ann Anderson in Graduate Studies aeanderson@stcloudstate.edu. •

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The final defense is conducted by the committee, consisting of three members. Membership consists of the same committee that served on the preliminary exam conference. A majority vote of the final evaluation committee is required to pass the final defense. A candidate who fails the final oral defense in the first attempt may, with the approval of the advisor, take the examination a second time, but the candidate may not retake the final oral defense during the same semester in which the defense was failed. A third chance to pass the defense is not permitted. The specific requirements vary according to the nature of the project submitted. Once you pass your final oral defense, remind your advisor to submit a grade/change of grade for the project/eFolio. A mark of “S” is recorded for an approved project/eFolio. The School of Graduate Studies does not bind projects (Plan C).

Graduate Project Outline (Plan C)

Chapter One - Introduction

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1. Introduction The purpose of this section is to provide a context that supports the rationale for the proposed project. The introduction is intended to lead the reader into an understanding that there is a specific need or problem that should be addressed. 2. Statement of Need/Problem This section states what is needed and why. Be sure to state credible reasons and/or cite literature to support the statement of need. 3. Purpose of Graduate Project This is the most important section of the project. Everything - the research you review, your creative process in developing the project, the project itself - should be connected to and a result of your identified purpose. This section states succinctly your purpose in creating this graduate project. This section should also include a brief description of the proposed project. 4. Definition of Terms This section provides definitions of critical terms or concepts specific to your project. These definitions should be based on scholarly research and other scholarly work. The sources should be cited using APA format. If scholars define a term in different ways, include a brief discussion of the different perspectives, and indicate which definition will be adopted in the project and the rationale. 5. Summary The final section summarizes chapter one, provides a description of how the graduate project is organized, and provides a bridge to the review of the literature and the remainder of the graduate project. Chapter Two - Literature Review 1. Introduction The purpose of the literature review is to explore research on issues that are relevant to the proposed project. Briefly list and preview the critical issues in the order in which they will be discussed in the review. The subheadings of the subsequent sections of the review should reflect the project. 2. Literature Review Review the research on each issue. In this process, you should: • Use the most recent version of the APA style manual for formatting the prose and citing sources. Citations must be accurate and must indicate when you paraphrase and when you use a direct quote. • In addition to discussing the major findings of relevant studies, the student should cite pertinent information about how the study was conducted. Include number of participants in the study, the characteristics of participants, and what types of instruments and methods were used (e.g., not the specific names of tests or other instruments, but whether they were interviewed, responded to questionnaires, tested,

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observed, etc.). The synopsis should also mention any major weaknesses in the study design. 3. Synthesis of Literature Review Synthesize major findings of the research related to your proposed project and discuss whether the research: • supports the development of the proposed project • indicates how the project should be structured and implemented • includes evaluations of products that are similar to the proposed project and how the proposed project differs from, or improves upon, existing similar products or projects 4. Summary The final section of the second chapter summarizes the review of literature and provides a bridge to chapter three. Chapter Three – Project Audience and Implementation Factors 1. Introduction Indicate that this graduate project presents a product or project that, according to the research, or institution, is needed. Briefly delineate the organization of the chapter. 2. Development of Project Describe your process (or method) in developing the project. How was the project developed (e.g., how was the handbook designed)? What steps did you take from initially deciding you wanted to develop a particular project to its final creation? 3. Intended Audience Identify the target population for the product or project. Describe the relevant demographics of the intended group (e.g., age, gender, ethnicity or race, language proficiency, etc.). Also describe any relevant conditions (e.g., persons of a specific ethnicity, persons in a specific career or decision-point in their lives, etc.). If relevant, discuss the group or type of person for whom the project would be inappropriate. 4. Personal Qualifications Describe your qualifications for developing this product. Detail the training and experiences that qualify you to develop such a product or complete this project. Describe other important skills needed, in addition to professional training, licenses, and degrees, such as proficiency in a language other than English. For example, “Employed in the academic affairs office for 10 years, my duties and responsibilities include working with and orienting new adjunct faculty….” 5. Environment and Equipment Describe the attributes of the physical space in which the product or process is to be used or take place (e.g., a quiet room) or special equipment needed (e.g., PowerPoint projector). For example, “The handbook will be available in the online environment

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only…the following software and technological requirements to access and utilize the interactive elements of the handbook follow:...” 6. Project Outline Provide an outline of the content, activities, and procedures that comprise the proposed project. For example, “The handbook will include 12 sections, each reviewing….” 7. Human Subjects Approval – Institutional Review Board (IRB) If the project needs approval from the Institutional Review Board, supply these documents. This section outlines how the rights of human subjects will be protected, if appropriate. For more information http://www.stcloudstate.edu/osp/irb/default.asp 8. Summary The final section summarizes chapter three and provides a bridge to chapter four. Chapter Four – Product 1. Introduction Reiterate the statement of need and the purpose of the project. Describe the organization of the chapter contents. 2. Product Chapter four consists of a fully developed product or the product may be placed in the appendix. If the product is placed in the appendix, an executive summary will be placed in this chapter. For example, a fully developed curriculum, handbook, workshop, or video. 3. Summary This section summarizes chapter four and provides a bridge to chapter five. Chapter Five – Discussion 1. Introduction Summarize the preceding four chapters, starting with the purpose of the project. You may use this summary as your abstract, although some students prefer to write an elaborated summary here. State the organization of the chapter as a bridge to the discussion. 2. Evaluation Some chairs may want you to evaluate your project by sharing it with individuals who may use the product once it is complete. This could be accomplished in a variety of ways. You could assemble a panel of three or more individuals to examine and evaluate the project, or you could conduct an evaluation in which you collect data showing the project’s effectiveness. In the next two sections, you have the opportunity to write from your own voice and reflect on what you have learned.

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3. Discussion and Conclusions Discuss your project and the results of your evaluation. Did you make changes in your project or product based upon the comments of the individuals you shared the product with? Why or why not? Draw conclusions from your work. For example, based upon your knowledge of the field, you may conclude that adjuncts need certain types of information presented to them in particular ways depending on their field, whether or not classes to be taught are fully online, blended, or on campus. 4. Future Work/Research Identify what work needs to be done in the future. How are you going to use your project? For example, you may want to do one of the following: • Offer a class that incorporates the product • Design an evaluation instrument for participant feedback • Conduct a study to determine the effectiveness of the product • Develop a curriculum and publish it • Determine if your workshop design could be used in other academic environments • Identify research questions, through your literature review, that need to be answered and discuss how you would answer these questions 5. Summary Briefly summarize the contents of chapter five. References Provide a complete list of all the items cited in the project. Do not include items that were reviewed but not cited in the body of the project. Appendix(es) Each appendix should be listed A, B, C…. Include the original of your approved Human Subjects Protocol if appropriate, as well as other items. Items should be in the order they are presented in the body of your project/eFolio. Graduate eFolio (Plan C)

What is a graduate eFolio? In a graduate eFolio, the candidate provides evidence to his/her committee that s/he has mastered the Higher Education Administration competencies and dispositions, in addition to providing other pertinent documents for review and assessment. The eFolio is created and submitted using an electronic platform provided by the MnSCU system http://www.efoliominnesota.com/. How does a graduate eFolio differ from a graduate project? An eFolio, although just as rigorous, provides specific documentation related to the student’s work in and out of the classroom, over the time spent in the Higher Education

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Administration program – it is evidence-based. The artifacts presented in the eFolio are related to student’s graduate coursework and the student’s full- or part-time work while enrolled in the program. Service projects are also appropriate for the eFolio. Procedures for eFolio (Plan C)

Proposal The first step in the eFolio process is the development of a proposal. A proposal is an outline of what the eFolio will look like. It should include the design of the eFolio, the major links of the outline, at least two-three completed competencies and proposed artifacts, and other documents ready for the committee to view. The student will work closely with his/her committee chair on the proposal. The proposal is required for the preliminary conference with your committee. All committee members will be send the eFolio website. eFolio Preliminary Conference Once the proposal has been prepared and approved by the committee chair, students must arrange for a preliminary oral exam conference. This preliminary conference may be scheduled after the student has been fully accepted into a graduate program, if the graduate grade point average is at least 3.0, and after the student’s program of study has been approved by the graduate dean. The student may need to contact Ann Anderson at aeanderson@stcloudstate.edu to verify preliminary conference eligibility. It is recommended that the preliminary oral exam take place at the conclusion of HIED 694. The preliminary oral exam conference must occur at least one semester prior to the final defense. These conferences are not typically scheduled during final examination week or during the summer. It is the student’s responsibility to schedule committee members for a preliminary conference and to ensure a room is reserved in the Education Building with assistance from the department secretary (Phone: 320-308-3131). At least two weeks prior to the preliminary conference, the student should contact Ann Anderson in the School of Graduate Studies aeanderson@stcloudstate.edu to submit the date, time, and location of the preliminary conference and a list of the committee chair and members. Once the School of Graduate Studies reviews this information and the eFolio outline, the appropriate paperwork is sent to the thesis committee chair. Each committee member must also receive the eFolio proposal at least one week prior to the preliminary conference - students send the eFolio address (hotlink) to the committee members. The School of Graduate Studies will independently distribute a report of preliminary evaluation to the student’s committee chair. A student may continue with Plan C when each committee member approves the proposed project by signing and returning the preliminary evaluation report to Ann Anderson in the School of Graduate Studies.

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eFolio Final Oral Defense When the eFolio is complete and approved by the chair, the student is ready for a final oral defense. A final oral defense is required of all students whose Plan C programs of study require the completion of an eFolio. Students who have earned less than a 3.0 grade point average in the major, over their entire program, and in all graduate credits earned, are not permitted to complete the final oral examination. The website of the completed eFolio must be submitted to the committee chair at least two weeks prior to the date set for the final defense. The department may exercise its option to retain any or all materials prepared for the professional eFolio. Students will register for HIED 684 Project/ eFolio Design in the semester in which the preliminary or final oral exam is planned. If the student registers for HIED 684 for the preliminary oral exam, an IP will be given that semester, until the completion of the final oral defense, at which time the grade will be changed. It is the student’s responsibility to schedule the final oral defense with their committee members. The final oral cannot be held in the same semester as the preliminary oral. Final orals generally are not scheduled during the final examination week or during the summer. Once scheduled, the student must notify the School of Graduate Studies to allow the paperwork for the conference to be prepared. Send these final conference details via E-mail to Ann Anderson at aeanderson@stcloudstate.edu. •

• •

The final defense is conducted by the committee, consisting of three members. Membership consists of the same committee that served on the preliminary exam conference. A majority vote of the final evaluation committee is required to pass the final defense. A candidate who fails the final oral defense in the first attempt may, with the approval of the advisor, take the examination a second time, but the candidate may not retake the final oral defense during the same semester in which the defense was failed. A third chance to pass the defense is not permitted. The specific requirements vary according to the nature of the project submitted. Once you pass your final oral defense, remind your advisor to submit a grade/change of grade for the eFolio if necessary.

Graduate eFolio Outline (Plan C)

Students will concentrate on the HIED competencies and dispositions as they develop their eFolio. Students completing the eFolio must include all of the following sections in the eFolio. Once the final oral defense is complete, according to MnSCU, students will have access to their eFolio for one year, free of charge, and may alter it they wish during that year. To extend access to the site a nominal fee is charged by MnSCU. The eFolio is particularly useful as graduates of the Higher Education Administration seek new or first positions in the field.

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Section 1:

Updated resume – this allows the committee to view the student’s past and current educational, professional, and service activities and achievements. An updated resume also allows students to immediately apply for new positions once their graduate degree is conferred.

Section 2:

Leadership competencies – the list that contains all fourteen leadership competencies must be uploaded to this section – students will use the list found in this Program Handbook. Matrix of alignment between competencies and courses – the matrix must be uploaded to this section to provide the committee with an overview of how the courses are aligned with the competencies – students will use the matrix found in this Program Handbook.

Section 3:

Leadership Philosophy Paper – The student will write a 7-10 page double-spaced paper, in APA format using references, presenting his/her philosophy/framing of issues of leadership for a 21st century college/university administrator. The student is expected to provide a synopsis of critical readings and analysis of relevant literature.

Section 4:

Individual competency overviews and artifacts – Each of the fourteen competencies will be presented on a separate link (webpage). For each competency the student will include: •

A one page overview of the competency including assessment of personal growth in the competency (review your PDP), beginning with a theoretical framework and ending with application to practice. This overview should contain a reference section and should be written using APA format.

Two - three artifacts that provide evidence that demonstrates progress within/towards the competency. The artifacts should be original work done by the student (if the student co-authored an artifact s/he should explain his/her part in the artifact). Artifacts can be taken from graduate course work, the student’s full-time or part-time work while enrolled in the program, or applicable service conducted from the time the student entered the program.

Section 5:

Reflection Paper – The student will write a 3-5 page double-spaced paper, in APA format using references, presenting a critical reflection on his/her engagement in the program and courses, connections to personal growth, reflection on HIED dispositions, and next steps (educational and professional).

Section 6:

Practicum: The student will include the information about his/her practicum site, goals, projects worked on, and reflections.

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Section 7:

Other documents, artifacts, etc. – The student may include in this section anything else s/he would like the committee to review that is related to the educational or professional field of higher education. For example, the student could include a complete list of references cited in the eFolio, or an award that the student received while in the program.

Section 8:

eFolio rubric – The student should include the eFolio rubric in this section. The eFolio rubric will be obtained from the committee chair.

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Master of Science Higher Education Administration

PROGRAM FORMS 61

St. Cloud State University Master of Science in Higher Education Administration Application Checklist Step 1

Application Process ___ Submit application materials to the School of Graduate Studies ___ Application ___ Essay ___ GRE score ___ Three (3) letters of recommendation ___ Transcripts (undergraduate and graduate) ___ Application fee ___ TOEFL score (if applicable)

Step 2

Candidate Review Process ___ Application file is forwarded from the Graduate Studies Office to the Higher Education Administration program ___ Application file reviewed by HIED faculty

Step 3

Candidate Selection Process ___ Completed application materials and documents submitted ___ Transcript analysis (if requesting transfer credit) ___ Interview (optional) ___ Decision by HIED faculty ___ Applicant admitted, provisionally admitted, or rejected

Step 4

Notification Process ___ Letter sent to applicant from Graduate Studies Office stating accepted, provisional, or rejected ___ Letter sent to applicant indicating program advisor ___ Welcome letter sent from HIED graduate coordinator ___ Student assigned a faculty advisor

Step 5

Implementation Process ___ Course schedule ___ Course registration ___ Program of study (blue form)

School of Graduate Studies: Higher Education Administration Program:

http://www.stcloudstate.edu/graduatestudies http://www.stcloudstate.edu/hied

Revised 3/08

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PROPOSED SEMESTER PROGRAM OF GRADUATE STUDY MASTER OF SCIENCE: Higher Education Administration Plan A _____ Plan C _____ Plan A or C, 36 Cr. Dept. I.

Number

Course Title

Instructor

Sem../Yr

Credits Grade

Administrative Core: Plan A and C, 21 Cr. HIED 604

Introduction to Higher Education Admin.

______________________

_______

___3___ ______

HIED 614

Higher Education Leadership & Admin.

______________________

_______

___3___ ______

HIED 624

Legal & Ethical Aspects of Higher Ed.

______________________

_______

___3___ ______

HIED 634

Human Resource Issues in Higher Ed.

______________________

_______

___3___ ______

HIED 644

Higher Education Finance

______________________

_______

___3___ ______

HIED 654

University-Community Relations

______________________

_______

___3___ ______

HIED 664

Critical Issues Seminar in Higher Ed.

______________________

_______

___3-6___

__

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Total Credits in Administrative Core ___________ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ II.

Research: Plan A, 12 Cr.; Plan C, 9 Cr. CEEP 678

Introduction to Graduate Statistics (Plan A only)

______________________

_______

___3___ ______

HIED 674

Introduction to Research in HIED

_____________________

_______

___3___ ______

HIED 694

HIED Research Methods and Design

______________________

_______

___3___ ______

HIED 699

Thesis

______________________

_______

___6___ ______

HIED 684

Project/eFolio Design

______________________

_______

___3___ ______

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Total Credits in Research ______________ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ III. Practicum: Required for Plan A and C HIED 672 ______ ______

Practicum in Higher Education Admin.

______________________

_______

___3___ ______

______________________________________

______________________

_______

_______ ______

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Total Credits in Practicum_______________ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Total Credits in Program: __________ ____________________________________________________ Signature of Applicant

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS: 1. Credit limitation on transfer and extension credits (combined)--10 credits. 2. Credit limitation on workshops--Plan A, 4 credits; Plan C, 10 credits. 3. Required: one-half of minimum requirements for the program must be completed in 600-level courses.

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ST. CLOUD STATE UNIVERSITY Application for Semester Program Approval: Master of Science

Major: Higher Education Administration

Tech ID Number _____ _______________________________________________ Name

___________________________________________________________

Date _______________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________

Home Telephone ____________________________________________

___________________________________________________________

Business Telephone __________________________________________

Mailing Address

City

State

Zip

Current

Name of Undergraduate

Position Held________________________________________________________

College or University__________________________________________________

School _____________________________________________________________ Request transfer of the following courses: (Official transcripts of all transfer credits which have been completed are required to be in the Graduate Studies Office before program can be approved.) Dept. and Course No.

Name of Course Transferred

College or University

Sem./Qtr. Hours

Grade

Date Taken

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________ __________________________________ (Not to be filled in by applicant) All deficiencies related to this student's admission to graduate study have been removed. I approve the program outlined in this application

_________________________________________________ Signature of Adviser

_________________________________________________________________________________________________ The program outlined in this application complies with the minimum course requirements of the university for the Master of Science degree in this major field. _________________________________________________ Signature of Graduate Dean Student Notified: __________________

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Higher Education Administration - Professional Development Plan Name______________________________________________________________________________Date Developed________________________________________ Educational Goal(s)________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Professional Goal(s)________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Rating Scale:

1 – no knowledge or experience of the competency 2 – some knowledge or experience of the competency 3 – understand and can practice basic competency majority of the time

Competency #1. Knowledge of what leadership is, how it has been distinguished from administration, and the ability to develop a practical and personally useful definition of leadership. #2. Appropriate attitudes about leaders and followers and the ability to serve as a courageous follower as well as a skillful leader. #3. Knowledge of basic organizational theory and the ability to describe accurately the organization one serves, including mission, history, and current developments. #4. Knowledge of the key administrative offices at the institution, including staff and line functions, reporting relationships, and awareness of the opportunities and limitations of one’s own niche. #5. Ability to collaborate in program planning, including the skill to expand on ideas, keep plans realistic, use institutional goals as criteria, and build in usable assessment. #6. Awareness of what learning is and why it must be guarded as the fundamental purpose of the institution. # 7. Knowledge of rational models used for problem solving and decision making, and the ability to consider legal and ethical implications.

Current level of competence

4 – very successful, consistently practices and models the competency 5 – competency is mastered Proposed action

Evidence of achievement

.

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#8. Skill at collaboration, including serving on and working with task forces, committees, and administrative units to help them function as highperformance teams. #9. Ability to communicate effectively in a variety of forms – written, verbal, interpersonal, electronic, etc. #10. Knowledge of basic conflict resolution models and the ability to employ them effectively. #11. Knowledge of basic financial planning and accounting methods and the ability to use them for budget development and control. #12. Knowledge of change theories and skill in responding to, initiating, and managing change. #13. Awareness of what constitutes a positive work environment and the ability to work with others in creating such an environment. #14. Positive attitudes about personal renewal and the ability to engage in perpetual learning to become more effective as a postsecondary leader.

••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• Date of review:____________________Comments:______________________________________________________________________________________________ Date of review:____________________Comments:______________________________________________________________________________________________ Date of review:____________________Comments:______________________________________________________________________________________________ Date of review:____________________Comments:______________________________________________________________________________________________

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St. Cloud State University College of Education Higher Education Administration Program – M.S.

Student Dispositions Assessment Date: ____________________________________ Student: __________________________________ Evaluator: _________________________________ □ Prior to Practicum Assessment

□ Exit from Practicum Assessment

I nstructions: For each disposition, check the box that best describes the student’s level of performance. Please refer to the Rubric for the Assessment of Dispositions for specific elements for each level of performance. The evaluator is required to make comments explaining any disposition at the “Area of Need” level. Disposition

Area of Need

Area of Competence

Area of Strength

Maintains confidentiality of records, correspondence, and conversations Exhibits sound judgment and follows applicable legal and ethical guidelines Displays trustworthiness and honesty Demonstrates initiative, resourcefulness, creativity, and vision Demonstrates adaptability Displays commitment to the program and the field Provides, receives, and uses constructive feedback Displays the ability to work with diverse individuals Recognizes the impact of decisions on others Uses a communication style appropriate to the setting and audience Displays appropriate positive attitude and affect Performs reflection independently and accurately Demonstrates appropriate maturity, self-monitoring, and control of emotions and behavior

Comments:

_________________________________ __________ _________________________________ __________ Evaluator’s Signature Date Student’s Signature Date □ Additional comments attached

(Signature acknowledges review of form, not necessarily agreement)

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Rubric for the Assessment of Dispositions Disposition

Area of Need

Area of Competence

Area of Strength

Maintains confidentiality of records, correspondence, and conversations

Does not maintain confidentiality of records; participates in gossip about students, faculty, or staff; does not respect confidentiality of professional correspondence or conversations; does not use discretion when discussing problems.

Maintains confidentiality of records, professional correspondence, and conversations; refrains from gossiping; uses discretion when discussing problems.

Maintains confidentiality of records, professional correspondence, and conversations; does not tolerate gossiping or abuses of confidentiality by others; uses discretion when discussing problems.

Exhibits sound judgment and follows applicable legal and ethical guidelines

Makes hasty and unsupported decisions; is not aware of legal and ethical guidelines or does not adhere to them in decision making; does not consider context, history, and institutional values in decision making process.

Makes conscientious and defensible decisions; is knowledgeable of legal and ethical guidelines and applies them to decision making when appropriate; considers context, history, and institutional values in decision making process.

Consistently makes sound and defensible decisions; continually aware and knowledgeable of legal and ethical guidelines and applies them to decision making process; strives to improve decision making knowledge and skills; consistently evaluates context, history, and institutional values in decision making process.

Displays trustworthiness and honesty

Does not follow through on promises; takes credit for others’ ideas and work; lacks integrity.

Follows through on promises; does not take credit for others’ ideas or work; exhibits integrity.

Consistently follows through on promises and goes beyond expectations; does not take credit for others’ ideas or work and acknowledges the contributions of others; exhibits a high level of integrity.

Demonstrates initiative, resourcefulness, creativity, and vision

Relies upon others to prod into action; does not seek out alternative solutions to problems; does not demonstrate a vision or plan for actions.

Exhibits self-motivation; seeks out alternative solutions to problems; demonstrates a vision or plan for actions.

Consistently exhibits selfmotivation and embraces new experiences; seeks out alternative and creative solutions to problems; consistently demonstrates a vision or plan for action.

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Rubric for the assessment of Dispositions Disposition

Area of Need

Area of Competence

Area of Strength

Demonstrates adaptability

Has difficulty responding to change or unplanned situations; does not seek or implement solutions; gets flustered or frustrated in stressful situations.

Responds appropriately to change or unplanned situations; seeks out and implements appropriate solutions; remains calm in stressful situations.

Responds positively to change and embraces unplanned situations; actively pursues and implements appropriate solutions, taking into consideration all sides of the problem; remains calm, clearheaded, and unflappable in stressful situations.

Displays commitment to the program and the field

Needs prodding to complete tasks; not consistently present and/or prepared for all learning experiences; does not appear to value learning experiences and active engagement; does not appear to enjoy the work and frequently complains.

Consistently self-motivated to work and can be expected to complete tasks successfully; arrives on time to class and meetings, attentive and prepared; values learning experiences and active engagement; appears to enjoy the work most of the time, few complaints.

Exceedingly hard working and consistently pushes to produce the very best work; consistently arrives on time to class and meetings, attentive, engaged, and prepared; consistently demonstrates an eagerness about learning experiences through active engagement; enthusiasm is clearly communicated to others.

Provides, receives, and uses constructive feedback

Is not receptive to constructive comments and shows no sign of implementing changes; does not provide appropriate feedback to others.

Is receptive to constructive comments and implements changes; provides appropriate feedback to others.

Is receptive to constructive comments, implements changes, and seeks feedback from others; provides insightful and appropriate feedback to others.

Displays the ability to work with diverse individuals

Expresses an inability or unwillingness to work with some people; avoids collaboration.

Works harmoniously and effectively with diverse individuals; often collaborates.

Displays the ability to work with diverse individuals and may seek opportunities to include or show appreciation for those excluded; frequently collaborates.

Recognizes the impact of decisions on others

Implements decisions without considering the impacts to other departments, students, or staff; does not seek input from stakeholders.

Implements decisions after considering the impacts to other departments, students, or staff; may not recognize all impacts; seeks input from stakeholders.

Consistently implements decisions after all impacts to other departments, students, or staff have been considered; consistently seeks input from stakeholders.

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Rubric for the assessment of Dispositions Disposition

Area of Need

Area of Competence

Area of Strength

Uses a communication style appropriate to the setting and audience

Interactions with peers, colleagues, or authority figures are at times negative, demeaning, sarcastic, combative, or inappropriate; inconsistently employs unbiased language.

Interactions with peers, colleagues, or authority figures are appropriate and positive; employs unbiased language.

Interactions with peers, colleagues, or authority figures are appropriate, positive, and respectful of differing opinions; consistently employs unbiased language.

Displays appropriate positive attitude and affect

Displays a negative, unproductive attitude about self, others, and the future; focuses on the negatives without recognizing other factors or ways to improve.

Displays a positive, productive attitude about self, others, and the future; looks for ways to improve situations rather than focusing on the negatives.

Displays an optimistic, positive, and productive attitude about self, others, and future; continually looking for ways to improve situations.

Performs personal reflection independently and accurately

Reflection occurs only when prompted or not at all; tends to be superficial or inaccurate; can provide few suggestions for improvement.

Reflection occurs regularly and accurately; can occasionally provide specific examples of strengths and areas of improvement.

Reflection occurs independently and is accurate, insightful and productive; includes specific examples of strengths and areas of improvement.

Demonstrates appropriate maturity, self-monitoring, and control of emotions and behavior

At times visibly demonstrates a lack of maturity and emotional control; may become upset, use put-downs, or display anger; focuses on blaming others rather than seeking solutions.

Models appropriate emotional and behavioral responses.

Models appropriate emotional and behavioral responses in difficult situations.

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STATE OF MINNESOTA MINNESOTA STATE COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES ST. CLOUD STATE UNIVERSITY MEMORANDUM OF AGREEMENT FOR STUDENT PRACTICUM EXPERIENCE HIGHER EDUCATION ADMINISTRATION PROGRAM This Agreement is made between the State of Minnesota acting through its Board of Trustees of the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities, on behalf of St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, Minnesota (“the University”) and (“the Site Mentor/Practicum Site”). This Agreement, and any written changes and additions to it, shall be interpreted according to the Laws of the State of Minnesota. The purpose of this Memorandum of Agreement is to outline the terms of the practicum experience for the student of the University and to identify the responsibilities of the University and the Site Mentor/ Practicum Site. A. THE PARTIES UNDERSTAND THAT: 1. The University has a Higher Education Administration Program (the “Program”) for qualified students enrolled in the University; and 2. The University has been given authority to enter into Agreements regarding academic programs; and 3. The Site Mentor/Practicum Site has facilities for providing a suitable practicum experience that meets the educational needs of students enrolled in the Program of the University; and 4. It is in the general interest of the Site Mentor to provide a Practicum Site where University students can learn and develop skills and qualifications needed to achieve the student’s occupational goals and satisfy the Program requirements while assisting in the development of higher education administrators; and 5. The University and the Site Mentor want to cooperate to furnish a practicum experience at the site for students of the University enrolled in the Program. B. RESPONSIBILITES OF EACH PARTY 1. The University agrees to: a. make arrangements with the Site Mentor for a practicum experience that will support the student’s occupational goals and meet any applicable Program requirements. b. receive periodic reports from the student, discuss the student’s performance and progress with the student and the Site Mentor as needed, and make a visit to the practicum site at the end of the practicum experience. c. discuss with the Site Mentor any problems or concerns arising from the student’s participation. d. notify the Site Mentor in the event the student is no longer enrolled in the Program at the University. e. assist in the evaluation of the student’s performance in the practicum experience.

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2. The Site Mentor/Practicum Site agrees to: a. cooperate with the University in providing a mutually agreeable practicum experience at the practicum site that supports the student’s educational and occupational goals. b. collaborate with the student to create a statement of the student’s learning goals and objectives to be accomplished through the practicum experience, a list of activities specific to meeting the determined goals and objectives, and a work schedule including days, times, and special dates/events. c. provide an orientation to the practicum setting and to the organizational environment. d. provide regular supervision meetings with the practicum student in order to enhance and support student learning. e. provide the student with appropriate work space. f. develop projects for the practicum experience with the student. g. provide specific duties for the practicum student. h. provide information and resources as appropriate to help the student complete the practicum experience in a successful manner. i. make suggestions for reading related to the practicum area. j. provide a statement on professional ethics and confidentiality for the student as it pertains to the practicum site and encourage the student to be ethical at all times. k. consult with the University about any difficulties arising at the practicum site that may affect the student’s participation. l. notify the student and University if the Practicum Site does not cover the student for professional errors and omissions so the student is able to procure such coverage. m. assist in the evaluation of the student’s performance, including the completion of a dispositions assessment, competencies assessment, and participation in an exit interview with the student and the practicum coordinator at the end of the practicum experience. 3. LIABILITY Each party agrees that it will be responsible for its own acts and the results thereof to the extent authorized by law and shall not be responsible for the acts of the other party and the results thereof. The University’s liability shall be governed by the provisions of the Minnesota Tort Claims Act, Minnesota Statues, Section 3.732 et seq., and other applicable law. 4. TERM OF AGREEMENT This Agreement is in effect from , 2 , or when fully executed, and shall remain in effect until , 2 . This Agreement may be terminated by giving at least seven (7) days advance oral notice to the other parties, with a follow up letter confirming termination delivered to the other party on or before the actual termination date, including reason(s) for termination. 5. FINANCIAL CONSIDERATION a. The University and the Site Mentor/Practicum Site each agree to bear their own costs associated with this Agreement and that no payment is required by either the University or the Site Mentor/Practicum Site to the other party. b. The Site Mentor/Practicum Site is not required to reimburse the University faculty or students for any services rendered to the Practicum Site or its customers pursuant to this Agreement.

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6. CHANGES OR ADDITIONS TO THE AGREEMENT

Any changes or additions to this Agreement must be in writing and signed by authorized representatives of each party. 7. ASSIGNMENT Neither the University nor the Site Mentor/Practicum Site shall assign or transfer any rights or obligations under this agreement without first obtaining the written consent of the other party. 8. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) COMPLIANCE The Site Mentor/Practicum Site agrees that in fulfilling the duties of this Agreement, the Site Mentor/Practicum Site is responsible for complying with the Americans with Disabilities Act, 42 U.S.C. Chapter 12101, et seq., and any regulations promulgated to the Act. The University IS NOT responsible for issues or challenges related to compliance with the ADA beyond its own routine use of facilities, services, or other areas covered by the ADA. 9. MINNESOTA GOVERNMENT DATA PRACTICES ACT The State of Minnesota has laws (the Minnesota Government Data Practices Act, Minnesota Statutes Chapter 13 (“the Act)) that classify the University’s written and electronic information as public, private, or confidential. Except as otherwise provided in law or University policy, data on students is private and may not be shared with any other party. If the Site Mentor/Practicum Site receives a request from a third party for any data provided to the Site Mentor/Practicum Site by the University, the Site Mentor/Practicum Site agrees to immediately notify the University. The University will give the Site Mentor/Practicum Site instructions concerning the release of the data to the requesting party before the data is released and the Site Mentor/Practicum Site agrees to follow those instructions. 10. STUDENT PRACTICUM EXPERIENCE AGREEMENT The student assigned to a practicum experience at the Practicum Site shall be required to sign a Student Practicum Experience Agreement (attached to this Agreement and made part of it) before the student begins the practicum experience at the Practicum Site. In signing this Memorandum of Agreement, we agree to work together to assist the student in learning and/or applying the tasks and skills identified. We understand that the Student Goals can be modified or dissolved at any time upon the mutual agreement of the Site Mentor and the University. PRACTICUM SITE

ST. CLOUD STATE UNIVERSITY

________________________________________ Site Mentor

_______________________________________ Practicum Coordinator

Title: ___________________________________

Title: __________________________________

Date: ___________________________________

Date: __________________________________

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STUDENT PRACTICUM EXPERIENCE AGREEMENT Practicum Student Name: Telephone: Email: Practicum Semester: ************************************************************************************* Site Mentor Name: Site Mentor Title: Site Location: Site Address: Site Mentor’s Phone Number: Site Mentor’s Email: Best means by which to reach the Site Mentor: Best time to reach the Site Mentor: Description of the Site: Description of Placement Activities and Opportunities:

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STUDENT PRACTICUM EXPERIENCE AGREEMENT

Practicum Student Name: Practicum Site: Using your Professional Development Plan and Disposition Assessment as guides, develop three learning goals for the practicum experience. Make them specific, measurable, action-oriented, realistic, and timely. For each one, include an outcome measure and a list of action steps or objectives with timelines for completion. 1. Goal:

Outcome Measure:

Action Steps:

2. Goal:

Outcome Measure:

Action Steps:

3. Goal:

Outcome Measure:

Action Steps:

Comments:

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STUDENT PRACTICUM EXPERIENCE AGREEMENT In exchange for the opportunity to participate in the practicum experience at the Practicum Site, the Student agrees to: 1. Keep regular attendance and be on time. The student will promptly notify the Site Mentor if unable to report. The student’s placement will automatically terminate if the student terminates her/his enrollment in the Program or is no longer enrolled as a student at the University; and 2. Be present at the approved Practicum Site on the dates and for the number of hours agreed upon totaling 100 hours of work experience; and 3. Demonstrate honesty, confidentiality, courtesy, a cooperative attitude, and a willingness to learn; and 4. Act responsibly at all times and adhere to all University policies governing the practicum experience; and 5. Furnish the Practicum Coordinator with all necessary information and complete all necessary reports. Submitting falsified reports is cause for immediate expulsion from the Program; and 6. Conform to all rules, regulations, and policies including health, safety, and work environment of the Practicum Site, follow all instructions given by the Practicum Site, and always conduct self in a safe manner; and 7. Consult with the Practicum Coordinator about any difficulties arising at the Practicum Site; and 8. Not terminate her/his participation in the practicum experience at the Practicum Site without first consulting with the Practicum Coordinator. The Student also understands and agrees that: 1. Placement and participation in this practicum experience is not employment with the University or Practicum Site; and 2. The student is not covered by the University worker’s compensation coverage; and 3. The student will not receive any money or compensation or benefits of any kind from the University in exchange for her/his participation in the practicum experience other than three credits if the student completes 100 hours in a satisfactory manner. The student also understands that the Practicum Sites does not promise or guarantee any future employment for the student. The student understands that s/he is responsible for providing her/his own health insurance and for any and all medical expenses incurred by her/him related to any injury, loss, or illness sustained by her/him while participating in the practicum experience at the Practicum Site. _____________________________________________________________________________________ Student Signature Date _____________________________________________________________________________________ Site Mentor Signature Date _____________________________________________________________________________________ Practicum Coordinator Signature Date

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Online Student Resources American Indian Center: www.stcloudstate.edu/aic AIC provides educational, social, and cultural programming for American Indian students. St. Cloud State University 720 Fourth Avenue South St. Cloud, Minnesota 56301-4498 (320) 308-5449 Athletic Facilities: www.stcloudstate.edu/campusrec/ Campus Recreation offers many programs and special events, there is “something for everyone.� S102 Halenbeck Hall St. Cloud State University 720 Fourth Avenue South St. Cloud, Minnesota 56301-4498 (320) 308-3325 Bookstore: www.husky.bkstr.com/ Find all of your books, apparel, computer products and supplies here. Centennial Hall 720 4th Ave South St. Cloud, MN 56301-4498 (320) 308-1489 Campus Card: http://www.stcloudstate.edu/campuscard/ This is your official ID card. Learn how to make deposits and where it is accepted both on and off campus. Campus Card Office Atwood Memorial Center 720 4th Avenue South St. Cloud, MN 56301-4498 (320) 308-1683 Career Services: www.stcloudstate.edu/careerservices/ Provides quality services and career resources directed toward developing prospective students through alumni to manage their career exploration, direction and networking and transition to the world of work. 215 Centennial Hall St. Cloud State University 720 Fourth Avenue South St. Cloud, Minnesota 56301-4498 (320) 308-2151 Child Care Center: www.stcloudstate.edu/childcare/ Lindgren Child Care Center provides infant, toddler, and preschool-aged care to the children of SCSU students, staff, and faculty. 122 Engineering and Computing Center St. Cloud State University 720 Fourth Avenue South St. Cloud, Minnesota 56301-4498 (320) 308-3296

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Computer Labs: http://huskynet.stcloudstate.edu/computers/ Locate, view, and reserve open computer seats. 108 James W. Miller Learning Resources Center St. Cloud State University 720 Fourth Avenue South St. Cloud, Minnesota 56301-4498 (320) 308-2077 Counseling and Psychological Services: www.stcloudstate.edu/counseling/ The center assists students with personal and career concerns through individual and group counseling, testing, psychological consultation, crisis intervention, and outreach activities. 103 Stewart Hall St. Cloud State University 720 Fourth Avenue South St. Cloud, Minnesota 56301-4498 (320) 308-3171 Escort Service: http://www.stcloudstate.edu/publicsafety/campus_safety/escorts An on-campus (walking) escort service is provided by Public Safety for members of the University community. Escorts may be requested by calling 308-3333. Public Safety St. Cloud State University 720 Fourth Avenue South St. Cloud, Minnesota 56301-4498 (320) 308-3453 Financial Aid: www.stcloudstate.edu/financialaid/ The Financial Aid office is here to help with the financial aid process to fund your education at SCSU. 106 Administrative Services St. Cloud State University 720 Fourth Avenue South St. Cloud, Minnesota 56301-4498 (320) 308-2047 Graduate Studies: www.stcloudstate.edu/graduatestudies/ Find useful up-to-date information for graduate students, including student forms, orientation, the graduate handbook, graduation requirements, and other policies and procedures to aid in student’s graduate education. 121 Administrative Services St. Cloud State University 720 Fourth Avenue South St. Cloud, Minnesota 56301-4498 (320) 308-2113 Health Services: www.stcloudstate.edu/healthservices/ Supports student academic success and personal development through quality medical care and education. Health Center St. Cloud State University 720 Fourth Avenue South St. Cloud, Minnesota 56301-4498 (320) 308-3191

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HuskyNet ID: http://huskynet.stcloudstate.edu/ This is your access to technology resources at St. Cloud State University. Learn how to activate and use you HuskyNet ID. 108 James W. Miller Learning Resources Center St. Cloud State University 720 Fourth Avenue South St. Cloud, Minnesota 56301-4498 (320) 308-2077 International Students: www.stcloudstate.edu/internationalstudents/ Provides information, assistance, guidance, and support to all international students and scholars at St. Cloud State University. 101 Lawrence Hall St. Cloud State University 720 Fourth Avenue South St. Cloud, Minnesota 56301-4498 (320) 308-4287 Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender Services: www.stcloudstate.edu/lgbt/ Provides education, advocacy, resources, referrals, and safe spaces for Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, Transsexual, Queer, Questioning, Intersex, and Allied students, faculty, and staff. B105 Atwood Memorial Center St. Cloud State University 720 Fourth Avenue South St. Cloud, Minnesota 56301-4498 (320) 308-5166 Library: http://lrts.stcloudstate.edu/library/ Integrates information and technology resources to provide a wide range of state-of-the-art services for a diverse group of patrons. James W. Miller Learning Resources Center St. Cloud State University 720 Fourth Avenue South St. Cloud, Minnesota 56301-4498 (320) 308-2084 Multicultural Student Services: www.stcloudstate.edu/mss/ Provides comprehensive services by giving academic assistance, encouraging personal development, and offering multicultural programming. 106 Atwood Memorial Center St. Cloud State University 720 Fourth Avenue South St. Cloud, Minnesota 56301-4498 (320) 308-3003

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Office of Sponsored Programs: www.stcloudstate.edu/osp/default.asp Provides information pertinent to grant opportunities, student research colloquium, and the IRB for research assignments. 210 Administrative Services St. Cloud State University 720 Fourth Avenue South St. Cloud, Minnesota 56301-4498 (320) 308-4932 Parking: www.stcloudstate.edu/parking/ Parking regulations for on-campus parking. Permit applications available for download. Public Safety St. Cloud State University 720 Fourth Avenue South St. Cloud, Minnesota 56301-4498 (320) 308-3453 Public Safety: www.stcloudstate.edu/publicsafety/ Provides the safest and most stable environment possible in which education may be pursued without the fear or presence of crime or violence.

St. Cloud State University 525 4th Avenue South St. Cloud, MN 56301 (320) 308-3453 Records and Registration: www.stcloudstate.edu/registrar/ Your source for information about student records, enrollment and degree verifications, diplomas, course schedules, course registration, transfer credit evaluation, and veterans educational benefits. 118 Administrative Services St. Cloud State University 720 Fourth Avenue South St. Cloud, Minnesota 56301-4498 (320) 308-2111 Student Disability Services: www.stcloudstate.edu/sds/ Provides access to academic programming and advocacy for students with disabilities in the pursuit of educational goals. 202 Centennial Hall St. Cloud State University 720 Fourth Avenue South St. Cloud, Minnesota 56301-4498 (320) 308-4080 Student Handbook: www.stcloudstate.edu/studenthandbook/ Provides information for current students on code of conduct, student services, policies and regulations. 160 Atwood Memorial Center St. Cloud State University 720 Fourth Avenue South St. Cloud, Minnesota 56301-4498 (320) 308-3111

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Student Life and Development: www.stcloudstate.edu/studentlife/ Programs and services designed to complement and enhance the academic mission of the University and provide venues to address the educational, social, cultural, and recreational needs of our students. 160 Atwood Memorial Center St. Cloud State University 720 Fourth Avenue South St. Cloud, Minnesota 56301-4498 (320) 308-3111 Student Union: www.stcloudstate.edu/atwood/ “The Gathering Place of Campus.” Connect with other students. Find food, coffee, copies, banking, and much more. 110 Atwood Memorial Center St. Cloud State University 720 Fourth Avenue South St. Cloud, Minnesota 56301-4498 (320) 308-4636 Veterans’ Resources: www.stcloudstate.edu/veterans/ Designed to help you understand the resources available to you at our university. 129 Atwood Memorial Center St. Cloud State University 720 Fourth Avenue South St. Cloud, Minnesota 56301-4498 (320) 308-2185 Women’s Center: www.stcloudstate.edu/womenscenter/ Promotes women and responds to issues affecting the status of women on campus and in the larger society. Services are free and open to students, staff, faculty, and community members. Women's Center St. Cloud State University 720 Fourth Avenue South St. Cloud, Minnesota 56301-4498 (320) 308-4958 Writing Center: www.stcloudstate.edu/writeplace/ In a supportive atmosphere, tutors provide strategies and information that can enable writers to achieve their academic success. 118 Riverview St. Cloud State University 720 Fourth Avenue South St. Cloud, Minnesota 56301-4498 (320) 308-2031

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Professional Associations (This is not an exhaustive list)

American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education (AACTE) www.aacte.org American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) www.aacc.nche.edu American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU) www.aascu.org American Association of University Professors (AAUP) www.aaup.org American Association of University Women (AAUW) www.aauw.org American College Personnel Association (ACPA) www.myacpa.org American Council on Education (ACE) www.acenet.edu American Indian Higher Education Consortium (AIHEC) www.aihec.org Association for the Study of Higher Education (ASHE) www.ashe.ws Association of American Colleges and Universities (AACU) www.aacu.org Association of American Universities (AAU) www.aau.edu Association of College Administration Professionals (ACAP) www.acap.org Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges (AGB) www.agb.org Council of Graduate Schools (CGS) www.cgsnet.org

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Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA) www.chea.org Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities (HACU) www.hacu.net/hacu/Default_EN.asp Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HCBU) www.edonline.com/cq/hbcu Minnesota Association of Financial Aid Administrators (MAFAA) www.mafaa.org Minnesota Association of College and University Business Officers (NACUBO) www.nacubo.org Minnesota College Personnel Association (MCPA) http://www.mcpa4you.org/ National Association of State Universities and Land-Grant Colleges (NASULGC) https://www.aplu.org/ National Association of Student Affairs Professionals (NASAP) www.nasap.net National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators (NASFAA) www.nasfaa.org/Home.asp National Association of Student Personnel Administrators (NASPA) www.naspa.org National Association of System Heads (NASH) www.nashonline.org National Student Employment Association (NSEA) www.nsea.info

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Research Resources (This is not an exhaustive list)

American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education (AACTE) www.aacte.org American Educational Research Association (AERA) www.aera.net Association of Higher Education Facilities Officers www.appa.org Association of American Universities (AAU) www.aau.edu

Chronicle of Higher Education www.chronicle.com College Times http://www.nytimesincollege.com/ Council on Law in Higher Education (CLHE) www.clhe.org ERIC Clearinghouse on Higher Education (ERIC) http://www.eric.ed.gov/ Higher Education Research Institute (HERI) www.gseis.ucla.edu/heri/index.php Higher Education Resource Hub www.higher-ed.org Information for Financial Aid Professionals http://www.ifap.ed.gov/ifap/ Institute for Higher Education Policy (IHEP) www.ihep.org Metronet www.metrolibraries.net/library-wire/overview.html Minnesota Office of Higher Education www.ohe.state.mn.us

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National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) www.nces.ed.gov National Center for Higher Education Management Systems (NCHEMS) www.nchems.org National Center for Postsecondary Improvement (NCPI) www.stanford.edu/group/ncpi National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education www.highereducation.org National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) http://nsse.iub.edu/index.cfm Center for the Study of Higher Education – Penn State www.ed.psu.edu/cshe/index.html National Center for Higher Education Management Systems Information Center www.higheredinfo.org Office of Postsecondary Education www.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ope/index.html State Higher Education Executive Officers (SHEEO) www.sheeo.org The Journal of Higher Education www.jstor.org/journals/00221546.html U.S. Department of Education www.ed.gov U.S. Higher Education List www.utexas.edu/world/univ University Business www.universitybusiness.com University Planning & Analysis www2.acs.ncsu.edu/UPA Women in Higher Education www.wihe.com

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Career Resources (This is not an exhaustive list)

Academic360.com www.academic360.com Chronicle Careers www.chronicle.com/jobs Higher Education Resource Hub www.higher-ed.org HigherEdJobs.com www.higheredjobs.com InsideHigherEd.com http://www.insidehighered.com/ Minnesota Careers www.iseek.org/mncareers/index.html StudentAffairs.com www.studentaffairs.com U.S. Higher Education List www.utexas.edu/world/univ

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HIED Master's Handbook