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Last Updated: November 2013


Table of Contents Introduction ................................................................................................................................................... 5 Candidacy ..................................................................................................................................................... 5 Dissertation ................................................................................................................................................... 5 But First, Check the Following ..................................................................................................................... 5 University Procedures ................................................................................................................................... 6 Registration ................................................................................................................................................... 6 Ten Steps to Complete a Dissertation ........................................................................................................... 7 Selecting a Topic........................................................................................................................................... 8 Research Your Topic .................................................................................................................................... 9 Your Committee.......................................................................................................................................... 10 Committee Chair ......................................................................................................................................... 10 Selecting Committee Members ................................................................................................................... 10 Understanding the Purpose of the Committee ............................................................................................ 11 Working With Your Committee ................................................................................................................. 11 Developing Timelines ................................................................................................................................. 12 Writing Successfully ................................................................................................................................... 12 Original Work ............................................................................................................................................. 12 Statistical Consulting and Research Support .............................................................................................. 13 What to expect ........................................................................................................................................ 13 Contact Information ................................................................................................................................ 13 SPSS............................................................................................................................................................ 13 The Proposal ............................................................................................................................................... 14 Dissertation Proposal Defense .................................................................................................................... 14 Human Subjects – Institutional Review Board ........................................................................................... 15 Changes in the Research Plan/Project ......................................................................................................... 16 Dissertation Final Defense .......................................................................................................................... 16 When the Dissertation is Nearly Completed ............................................................................................... 18 Final Requirements ................................................................................................................................. 18 Application for Graduation ..................................................................................................................... 18 Dissertation Final Copy Preparation ....................................................................................................... 18 General Format ....................................................................................................................................... 18 Binding the Dissertation ............................................................................................................................. 19 Student Research Colloquium..................................................................................................................... 19 Helpful Links .............................................................................................................................................. 20 SCSU Library.......................................................................................................................................... 20 School of Graduate Studies Resources ................................................................................................... 20

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The Write Place....................................................................................................................................... 21 Contact Information. ........................................................................................................................... 21 Resources. ........................................................................................................................................... 21 Workshops. ......................................................................................................................................... 21 Institutional Review Board Process ........................................................................................................ 21 Dissertation Forms .................................................................................................................................. 22 Formatting Issues .................................................................................................................................... 22 Graduation Information .......................................................................................................................... 22 Resources .................................................................................................................................................... 23 Appendix A: Student and Dissertation Member Responsibilities............................................................... 25 Dissertation Chair ................................................................................................................................... 25 Committee Members............................................................................................................................... 26 Student .................................................................................................................................................... 27 Appendix B: Dissertation Chapter Outline ................................................................................................. 28 Chapter One – Introduction .................................................................................................................... 28 Introduction ......................................................................................................................................... 28 Purpose and Significance of the Study ............................................................................................... 28 Statement of the Problem .................................................................................................................... 28 Assumptions of the Study ................................................................................................................... 28 Description and Scope of the Research............................................................................................... 28 Research Questions ............................................................................................................................. 28 Research Hypotheses .......................................................................................................................... 28 Definition of Terms (Optional) ........................................................................................................... 29 Summary ............................................................................................................................................. 29 Chapter Two – Literature Review ........................................................................................................... 29 Introduction ......................................................................................................................................... 29 Review of the Literature ..................................................................................................................... 29 Theoretical Framework ....................................................................................................................... 29 Summary ............................................................................................................................................. 30 Chapter Three - Method .......................................................................................................................... 30 Introduction ......................................................................................................................................... 30 Role of Researcher (Optional) ............................................................................................................ 30 Research Design.................................................................................................................................. 30 Sample................................................................................................................................................. 30 Human Subject Approval – Institutional Review Board (IRB) .......................................................... 30 Instrument(s) for Data Collection ....................................................................................................... 30

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Analysis............................................................................................................................................... 31 Procedures and Timeline ..................................................................................................................... 31 Summary ............................................................................................................................................. 31 Chapter Four – Results............................................................................................................................ 31 Introduction ......................................................................................................................................... 31 Results for Each Hypothesis or Research Question ............................................................................ 31 Summary ............................................................................................................................................. 31 Chapter Five – Discussion ...................................................................................................................... 31 Introduction ......................................................................................................................................... 32 Discussion ........................................................................................................................................... 32 Limitations .......................................................................................................................................... 32 Recommendations for Research.......................................................................................................... 32 Implications for Theory ...................................................................................................................... 32 Implications for Practice ..................................................................................................................... 32 Conclusions ......................................................................................................................................... 32 References ............................................................................................................................................... 33 Appendices.............................................................................................................................................. 33 Dissertation Proposal Rubric (Transition Point 3) .................................................................................. 34 Dissertation Final Defense Rubric (Transition Point 4).......................................................................... 35

*Disclaimer– The most current edition supersedes all previous versions of SCSU’s Higher Education Administration Ed.D. Dissertation Manual. Please check the program website for the most recent version. Every effort was made to ensure that information in this Dissertation Manual was accurate at the time of publication. All policies and other information are subject to change without notice and do not constitute an irrevocable contract between any student and St. Cloud State University.

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Introduction This guide for the dissertation requirement is designed to provide information and direction for graduate students enrolled in the Doctoral Degree Program in Higher Education Administration. The purpose of the guide is to direct students toward the smooth and successful completion of their dissertation, and to assist in students' timely graduation. Candidacy After passing the qualifying exam, the student moves on to Candidacy. Students who pass the exam can register for the dissertation research course (HIED 899) and focus on their dissertation topic. Students may not schedule a Dissertation Proposal Defense until they pass the qualifying exam. After advancing to doctoral candidacy, a student must maintain continuous registration until the university confers the doctoral degree. Please refer to the continuous registration policy at http://bulletin.stcloudstate.edu/gb/policies/atoz.asp#ContinuousEnrollment Dissertation Ed.D. dissertation projects can take on a range of forms. It should involve the design and implementation of empirical research by the student which makes an original contribution to the field. The student a) designs the study, b) obtains and/or develops data collection tools, c) sets up and follows-through on the data collection procedures, d) processes and analyzes the data, and e) writes the findings, analyses, interpretations, and conclusions of the study based on the data. But First, Check the Following  Print your transcript online. Check your transcript to determine that all completed course work is included. In order for course to be listed on your transcript, you must have the courses listed and approved on your program of study form. If transfer credits do not appear on your transcript and they have been approved as a part of your official program, contact the School of Graduate Studies at once. Call 320-308-2113 or 800-369-4260 or email graduatestudies@stcloudstate.edu.  Be sure that all the courses on your approved Program of Study Form were completed within the seven-year time limit for completion of the program. The form can be found at: www.stcloudstate.edu/hied/forms.asp  ALL COURSE CHANGES TO YOUR PROGRAM OF STUDY MUST BE APPROVED BY PETITION: verbal approval by your adviser is not sufficient. Forms are available online at www.stcloudstate.edu/hied/forms.asp.  All incompletes must be completed and grades submitted by the appropriate instructors. Remind your professor to submit a grade change for all I or IP grades. Check your transcript to determine if the necessary changes have been made.  A 3.0 grade point average in the major, the total program, and overall graduate courses attempted must be recorded on your transcript. Students who have not achieved the required grade point average are not eligible to hold the dissertation proposal and dissertation final defense.  A grade of C- or lower or a grade of “U” cannot be used toward a graduate program.  All coursework completed must be at the doctoral level (700-899).  Be sure you have fulfilled the residence requirement. A minimum of 45 credits must be completed in residence at St. Cloud State University, including on-campus, off-campus, and online courses offered by St. Cloud State University.  If you have any questions about the course requirements for the degree, please contact the EdD Program Director.

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University Procedures The School of Graduate Studies is responsible for implementing university policies regarding graduate student classification, formal programs, dissertation formatting, and diplomas. This office publishes information on all graduate programs and assists individual departments in updating information on graduate degree programs. The website for the School of Graduate Studies is: www.stcloudstate.edu/graduatestudies. It is the student’s responsibility to be knowledgeable of, and to meet, the deadlines for submission of your dissertation proposal and dissertation final defense. There are no exceptions to university deadlines. Deadlines for current and future semesters are available at: www.stcloudstate.edu/graduatestudies/current/culmProject/Doctoralchecklist.asp Students are required to meet the formatting guidelines of both the university and of the department. The department adheres to the guidelines of the American Psychological Association (APA). APA style rules and guidelines are found in a reference book called, The Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (Sixth Edition). Guidelines are provided to ensure clear and consistent presentation of written material. Editorial style provides uniform use of such elements as grammar, use of tables/graphs, headings, citation of sources, presentation of statistics, fonts, etc. After you have passed your Dissertation Final Defense, you will follow additional formatting basics as required by the School of Graduate Studies. The School of Graduate Studies also has a format manual for theses and dissertations that outlines its expectations. Students should obtain “A Manual for the Preparation of Field Studies and Theses� available at the Husky Bookstore and online at: http://www.stcloudstate.edu/graduatestudies/current/culmProject/documents/ThesisManual.pdf The dissertation proposal is expected to represent a complete draft of the first three chapters for the dissertation. As such, the dissertation should follow the formatting required by the School of Graduate Studies for the completed dissertations. When a conflict exists in standards, format, or style, the manual published by the School of Graduate Studies takes precedence over The APA Manual. Registration Doctoral students must complete 12 credit hours of dissertation research to obtain the Ed.D. Degree. They do so by registering for HIED 899, which provides continuing access to university resources and guidance from the major adviser and the dissertation committee for dissertation writing, including preparation for and conduct of the Dissertation Proposal Defense and of the Final Dissertation Defense with the committee. HIED 899 - Dissertation is listed as a variable credit course in the Course Schedule each semester, and students can register for dissertation research much as they do any other course. Students must pass the qualifying exam before they can register for the dissertation research and focus on their dissertation topic. Students must register for a minimum of 1 credit of dissertation research (HIED 899 or HIED 891) during the semester in which they plan to complete the dissertation proposal and final defense meetings. Students should register for the final dissertation credits during the semester in which they plan to complete the dissertation final defense. The dissertation proposal defense and final defense cannot occur in the same semester. Students may hold their proposal and final dissertation defense meetings in the summer only with the agreement, in advance, of their chair and all committee members. In between the first and last semesters of dissertation registration, students must register for additional credit hours of dissertation research. The number of dissertation credits students register for in any term can vary from one to nine, and students can manage their use of the required hours however they would like.

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If students use all of their dissertation hours without completing the dissertation, they must register for continuous enrollment credits (HIED 891 – Enrollment Continuation). This registration is for 1 credit per semester and allows students to maintain continuous registration as required by the School of Graduate Studies. Please refer to the continuous registration policy at the School of Graduate Studies website. Students must take one credit a semester for a minimum of two of every three semesters (summer, fall, spring). The course is repeatable up to 10 credits. The satisfactory completion of the dissertation is reported with the grade of “S” (satisfactory). If all requirements have not been met by the end of the semester in which a student is registered, the grade reported is an RC (research continuing) for HIED 899 and R (registered) for HIED 891. The dissertation project must be completed within the seven-year time limit set for the completion of a doctoral degree. Note: You must be enrolled in either EDAD 899 or EDAD 891 during the semesters of your Dissertation Proposal Defense and Dissertation Final Defense meetings. Ten Steps to Complete a Dissertation The journey of your dissertation may be completed in ten steps listed below: 1. Select a Topic 2. Research Your Topic 3. Select Chair and Committee Members 4. Create a Timeline and Dissertation Deadlines 5. Write Chapters 1 Through 3 6. Conduct your Dissertation Proposal Defense 7. Obtain Institutional Review Board (IRB) Approval 8. Conduct Your Study and Analyze the Results (Chapters 4 and 5) 9. Conduct Your Final Dissertation Defense 10. Submit Dissertation for Format Review 11. Attend Graduation Ceremonies and Be Hooded Before Your Friends and Family! While these are presented as steps above, some may recur during the dissertation journey. For example, students should edit and rewrite portions of chapters 1 – 3 in preparation for their final defense, and Step 2 should be a constant activity throughout the process. However, Step 11 only happens once and at the end – Enjoy it!

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Selecting a Topic It is never too early to begin thinking about and planning for your dissertation. Some students seem to know just what they want to do from the very first day of the program, whereas others take a longer, more reflective path to determine exactly what they will do for the their dissertation. More typically, students get ideas and clues about a specific topic or project through participation in courses and/or experiences at their work site. Consider the following:      

Is there a topic that piqued your interest in a class discussion? Was there a chapter you read in a text, or perhaps a journal article, that struck a chord for you? Is there something in your work experience that you want to explore more closely? Is there a current issue affecting higher education that interests you and is related to your professional practice or intellectual endeavors? Did you write a paper for a class and the topic turned out to be quite intriguing to you? Is there a topic that, once you reviewed some literature about it, you thought that exploring it further would make a genuine contribution to the field of higher education?

These are the kind of self-signals for which you should be on the lookout. When you find something that seems particularly interesting, write it down. Maybe that idea will become the springboard for your research, or the problem you will investigate. Typically, these self-signals are broader than the research questions that make a good, focused dissertation. They are a good start but need further refinement. The best way to achieve that is to turn to the research literature on the topic you have chosen.

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Research Your Topic In order to increase your knowledge about the topic you have chosen and its theoretical framework, read as much as you can through scholarly research journals, books, or dissertations. The SCSU Library put together Course Guides at http://research.stcloudstate.edu/page.phtml?page_id=638 specifically compiled for HIED doctoral students to assist in finding resources for your field of study. Reference librarians are also available to help students locate relevant literature and build their expertise. Typically research should focus on studies published the last five or ten years, but it should also refer to landmark studies and scholarly works published prior to this time if they are significant in the development of research on the topic or in shaping the direction of your study. It may be beneficial to start with the most recent research first to help you establish what the current issues of concern are in the field. In order to save time, read abstracts or introductory chapters first to determine if the research is relevant to your study. As you review and synthesize the literature, you will discover the aspects of the issue that scholars seem to agree on (there is little need to study these further) and the aspects that are still unknown or in dispute. These unknown items can take many forms: For example, a process, trend, concept, or group that is under-researched and not well understood, theorized connections as yet unproven; a situation or population that a theory or model has not been tested on yet; a program, procedure or intervention that has not been fully tested and verified yet; or a study that has some design flaws that limit its inferential value, but that you can repair in another project. It is in areas such as these that you should be able to formulate questions that can guide dissertation research. In addition, most research articles include suggestions at the end regarding gaps in research literature and questions that need further investigation. These hints by other scholars can help students define the purpose of their study and refine their statement of the problem. In the end, the goal is to narrowly focus your research into a doable and manageable project that contributes to the further development of scholarship and effective practice in the field of higher education administration. Keep photocopies of the materials you read from books and bookmark electronic sources in a single place so you can refer back to them throughout your entire research project. Organizing your research will prevent you from becoming overwhelmed by all the information you discover. It is wise to group the literature relevant to your study systematically by similar topic, approaches, arguments, findings, or other means. This organization may prove beneficial as you develop an outline for your literature review and map the plans for your own study.

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Your Committee One of the most important considerations when beginning a dissertation project is the selection of four graduate faculty members to serve as committee members. Committee Chair The student’s advisor is the committee chair. The chair needs to be a full-time faculty member in the Higher Education Administration program. If the student, in consultation with the advisor, determines that her/his topic better matches the expertise of some other member of the program faculty, s/he should consider changing advisors or having co-chairs for the committee. The impact of changing advisors is relatively small provided it is done early in the process of designing the research project. The form for changing advisors can be found at www.stcloudstate.edu/hied/forms.asp. The student should make sure that the chair is available throughout the course of the dissertation project. Selecting Committee Members Each graduate student, after consulting their advisor, should ask three other graduate faculty members to serve on the committee, based on each member’s potential advisory value regarding the research project or method. They must be approved graduate faculty members. A listing of graduate faculty members are listed at: http://bulletin.stcloudstate.edu/faculty.asp?grad=1. If a potential committee member is not a member of the graduate faculty, the Graduate School provides a process for establishing membership. An explanation or the guidelines, process and the appropriate forms can be found at www.stcloudstate.edu/graduatestudies/current/culmProject/. This form must be completed at least 30 days prior to a proposal meeting. Once signed by your program advisor, please return the form to the Center for Doctoral Studies. This office will obtain final approval from the Program Director and the School of Graduate Studies. You will be notified once a decision is made. One committee member should be a full-time faculty member in the Higher Education Administration Program. Another committee member fills the role of an “outside reader” and must be from outside the Educational Leadership and Higher Education Department. The outside reader need not have expertise in the student’s specific topic, but should be in an area that complements the planned project or the field of higher education administration. To view a list of faculty members who have volunteered to serve as outside readers, go to: www.stcloudstate.edu/graduatestudies/current/culmProject/committee.asp. The other member can be from either inside or outside the department. If other members of the committee do not have familiarity with the planned method of the study, the student should consider choosing a member for the committee who has such knowledge and expertise. A student may also consider the membership of a higher education administrator/practitioner who might apply for membership on the graduate faculty for the purpose of serving on the committee. All members of the committee must be a doctoral faculty member at SCSU or be an “outside reader” who is a content expert eligible for temporary membership in the graduate faculty (holding a terminal degree). If a potential committee member is not a member of the graduate faculty, please complete the Dissertation Committee Member Petition at www.stcloudstate.edu/hied/forms.asp. This form must be completed at least 30 days prior to your proposal meeting. Once signatures are obtained from your program adviser and program chair, please return the form to the Center for Doctoral Studies office to process your request and obtain final approval from the School of Graduate Studies. The student must receive committee approval before undertaking the Dissertation Proposal meeting.

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Understanding the Purpose of the Committee Your committee acts in the role of reviewer, partner and mentor to provide knowledge and support as you begin, execute, and complete your dissertation. A student should discuss with her/his advisor the expected role and contribution for each member of the committee. A student will need to meet with the committee at least twice in two separate semesters, once for a proposal defense and again for a final defense of the completed project. Working With Your Committee The student makes all decisions in discussion with the chairperson first, including the composition of the committee, IRB forms, drafts of chapters, etc. In addition, dates for the dissertation proposal and dissertation final defense meetings are scheduled only after the chair has reviewed and approved the working draft of the proposal or dissertation. Appendix A presents lists of responsibilities for the committee chair, committee members, and the student throughout the dissertation process. The student should ask the chairperson and committee members about the logistics of the involvement of committee members. Some committee members prefer to see all drafts and be involved throughout the process, whereas other members may give early input in terms of conceptualizing the project or research design and then prefer to see only the final drafts. Students should have committee members clarify their preference at the outset of their work together. Students are advised to work closely with their chair from the very beginning and throughout the entire length of the dissertation. They may also want to seek advice about methods for their study while taking HIED 808 (Quantitative Methods) and HIED 809 (Qualitative Methods). It would not be advisable for a student to do most of the work of a proposal on her/his own and then take it to her/his chair in hopes that the chair would “sign on.� The dissertation project is intended to be a process during which the advisor and student work closely throughout. Another logistical procedure the student, chair, and committee members should discuss and agree upon is the amount of time that the student must allow for the chair and committee members to read submitted written material. For example, how many days or weeks does the chair need in order to review materials for your next meeting? When the final draft is completed, how much time will committee members need to prepare for the final defense? These important procedural considerations should be clearly delineated at the outset of the dissertation process and updated as needed. Keep in mind that the needed time many also change with the rhythms and workload of the semester. In addition, committee members should be asked if they want hard copies or electronic copies of all drafts.

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Developing Timelines Timelines help both students and faculty members stay focused and purposeful in relation to the timely completion of the dissertation. Timelines help the student understand the sequence of activities, map out a schedule, and inform committee members when to anticipate incoming drafts of chapters to read. Students should consult with their chair to modify and/or periodically review their timeline. One way to put together a timeline is to select a date by which you want to be done with the dissertation process. You can then work backward from that point. You may want to consider using an Assignment Calculator at http://libdata.stcloudstate.edu/assignmentcalc/ provided by the SCSU library or a Dissertation Calculator at https://www.lib.umn.edu/help/disscalc/index.phtml such as the one at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities. The Dissertation Proposal Defense is conducted at least one semester prior to the Dissertation Final Defense. The Dissertation Final Defense must be completed at least seven weeks prior to graduation. The format review is submitted to the School of Graduate Studies at least a month prior to graduation with the final formatted and approved copy for binding submitted at least two days prior to graduation. Doctoral students will obtain their official diploma at the commencement ceremony. Therefore, the Dissertation Deadlines found at www.stcloudstate.edu/graduatestudies/current/culmProject/Doctoralchecklist.asp#timeline established by the School of Graduate Studies must be adhered to. Writing Successfully Some committee chairs will provide editing, formatting, spelling correction, and/or grammatical advice for students, whereas other chairs prefer to focus their attention on the content rather than the structure or mechanics of student work. Students are advised to discuss this aspect of their dissertation with their committee chair. Resources and consultation for editing and formatting are available from SCSU’s WritePlace. Services, hours and location are available from their website: www.stcloudstate.edu/writeplace/. Some students find it helpful to engage someone to provide editorial assistance with their dissertation writing. It is the student’s responsibility to persist with the writing and revision process until the final document is satisfactory to the chair and, then, each committee member. Original Work Students are required to complete an individual project. If two students pursue a similar topic, it must be clear that the “products,” are separate and unique, ensuring each person’s work is original.

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Statistical Consulting and Research Support If you are looking for help in drawing on the power of statistics to support your research, the Statistical Consulting & Research Support Office may be able to help you. Staff members will help you design a survey to collect the information you need, you make the research decisions, and they will do the computer work for you. What to expect Visit the Statistical Consulting & Research Support office (MC-204) before you design and write your survey. Staff members will help focus your research and help develop an effective method for finding answers.       

After completing your survey take the completed forms and your data to the Statistical Consulting Office. (Please make an appointment first.) Staff can also help you develop web-based surveys. They have experience in creating web products and will help you draw upon the unique aspects of this growing information gathering process. Based upon your discussion in the survey planning process and on the questions you want answered, the staff will design a series of computer programs to analyze your data. They even do the data entry for you! This step can take up two weeks. The size of your project and the work the staff has scheduled before yours arrives will influence how long you have to wait for results. The staff will run your data, analyze, and assemble the results. When completed you can return to the office to have the results explained. They will help you to interpret your results. You have the opportunity to return to discuss drawing further information from your data. The staff will perform follow-up analysis upon your request.

Contact Information Statistical Consulting & Research Support is located in MC 204. Office hours are weekdays between 8:00 am and 4:30 pm. You can contact them at 308-4709 or statspss@stcloudstate.edu.

SPSS For those conducting quantitative research, SPSS is available through the SCSU Virtual Lab. Just log into the Virtual Lab using your SCSU username and password. The first time you log into the system, you may be asked to install some software. Once the system comes up, click on the Campus Lab Desktop. Once the desktop comes up, select the Start button, choose All Programs, choose the SPSS Inc. Folder, and select the PASW Statistics 18 (or other version) software. You can then run a tutorial by selecting which tutorial you wish to take or you can start using SPSS and incorporate your data and analyze reports. You may also purchase the software for approximately $100 from the SCSU Computer Store.

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The Proposal The next step in the thesis process is the development of a dissertation proposal. The proposal is required for the dissertation proposal defense with your committee. A student will work with his/her committee chair on the proposal prior to disseminating to other committee members. Appendix A presents lists of responsibilities for the committee chair, committee members, and the student throughout the dissertation process. A dissertation proposal is a comprehensive presentation of the plan for the dissertation project. It should include an introduction, the main research problem, research questions/hypotheses, a review of relevant literature, and the proposed methodology. It should also include a proposed timeline for the project. Proposals for the dissertation proposal defense are expected to represent a largely complete draft of the first three chapters for the dissertation. As such, the proposal should follow the formatting required by the School of Graduate Studies for completed dissertations. It is important that the details of the research plan be specified and approved in the proposal before the data are collected. A suggested outline for the chapters of a dissertation is presented in Appendix B. Dissertation Proposal Defense Once the proposal has been prepared and approved by the chair, students must arrange for a dissertation proposal defense meeting. A rubric for the dissertation proposal and dissertation final defense is included in Appendix C. The purpose of the dissertation proposal defense is to elicit committee members’ input and insight related to the research problem and the proposed method of inquiry in order to improve the plan for the research and enhance the likelihood of success. Students should be prepared to be open minded about receiving suggestions and criticisms, and be prepared to accept changes that are reasonable and promise to add value to the study. However, students do not have to accept all suggestions made by committee members. Sometimes, a polite, “That is not the focus of my study” can be an appropriate response. It is recommended that the proposal defense take place during the fall term of year three of the cohort schedule. The dissertation proposal conference must occur at least one semester prior to the final dissertation defense. These conferences are not typically scheduled during final examination week or during the summer. The student will register for credits of HIED 899 (Dissertation Research) during the semester of the dissertation proposal defense meeting.

Students need to complete the Doctoral Dissertation Meeting Form at www.stcloudstate.edu/hied/forms.asp and materials requested in order to obtain final meeting approval from the School of Graduate Studies. In addition, all committee members must be approved by the School of Graduate Studies. Outside committee members can be considered for approval through the Dissertation Committee Member Petition at www.stcloudstate.edu/hied/forms.asp form no later than thirty (30) days prior to your meeting. Upon approval of the School of Graduate Studies, the Dissertation Proposal meeting will be scheduled and the student will be notified. A meeting space on the SCSU campus will be reserved for you with a PC computer or laptop and a projector screen. Typically, the meeting is scheduled in the Center for Doctoral Studies conference room (B121). Students must complete a petition www.stcloudstate.edu/hied/forms.asp for a meeting offcampus, online, or via phone no later than thirty (30) days prior to your meeting. Each committee member must also receive a copy of the proposal, preferably at least two weeks prior to the proposal defense meeting. Students should ask their committee members whether they prefer a paper or electronic copy of the proposal. It is the student’s responsibility to deliver a copy it to all committee members in the formats

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they prefer. Deadlines found at www.stcloudstate.edu/graduatestudies/current/culmProject/Doctoralchecklist.asp#timeline established by the School of Graduate Studies must be adhered to. The dissertation proposal defense is considered a working meeting and is not open to the public. The meeting usually lasts 1½ to 2 hours. Typically, the student is asked to make a brief presentation to highlight the key points of the proposal. However, students should keep in mind that all members of the committee will have read the proposal recently, so the presentation can be relatively brief (about 15 minutes). It is common (but not required unless your chair says so) for students to use presentation software during their presentations. These presentations can be displayed on the TV monitor in the room. Following the presentation, committee members will ask questions and make comments regarding various elements the proposal. Written notes of what is discussed and agreed upon in the proposal defense are very helpful in keeping the chair, committee members, and student on track with timely completion of the proposal and dissertation study. A student may continue with the dissertation project when each committee member approves the proposed project by signing and returning the Report of Preliminary Evaluation Committee form to the Center for Doctoral Studies office. If a student does not pass the proposal defense, she/he may revise the proposal and arrange for another meeting of the committee. A student may have up to three attempts to defend a proposal. If the third attempt at a proposal defense is not successful, the student will be withdrawn from the EdD program. Human Subjects – Institutional Review Board All planned research involving human subjects must receive approval from St. Cloud State University’s Institutional Review Board (IRB) for the Protection of Human Subjects prior to commencing the dissertation project. All students and faculty conducting research that involves the participation of humans or animals must complete an application form and submit it to the Office of Sponsored Programs. Students do not submit this form until their project/thesis has been approved by their committee at the dissertation proposal exam and only after approval from the chair. An application is available at: www.stcloudstate.edu/irb/application/default.asp Official protocol forms, as well as copies of federal guidelines for both human and animal-related research, are available from: www.stcloudstate.edu/osp/policies/ The IRB requires that all applicants complete a set of online training modules before their applications will be considered. Information about that training is available at: www.stcloudstate.edu/irb/training/default.asp The application can be found at: www.stcloudstate.edu/irb/application/default.asp The Human Subjects Committee convenes biweekly. Applications must be submitted at least two (2) weeks before a meeting to be considered for full review. Approvals from participating institutions or organizations must be obtained on letterhead prior to submitting a completed proposal. Methodology must be specific and clearly written, so that the Human Subjects Committee can approve the research in a timely fashion. Expedited Review is usually completed within 5 to 10 working days after applications have been submitted. Procedures and templates for Informed Consent are available at: www.stcloudstate.edu/osp/forms/documents/InformedConsent.doc.

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Changes in the Research Plan/Project It is anticipated that the research design may need to be modified over the course of the project. Revisions to the proposal are not necessary under such circumstances. However, if the committee chair determines that major changes in the research design are necessary or if a new topic is selected, the student must submit a new proposal and repeat the dissertation proposal defense as described above. If changes to the procedures of the research project effect the experiences of the research subjects, for example, changes to a questionnaire or changes in the criteria for participation, those changes must be reported to the IRB. Dissertation Final Defense When the dissertation is complete, including chapters on research findings and conclusions, significance and implications, and the student has the approval of his/her committee chair, a student is ready for a dissertation final defense. Appendix A presents lists of responsibilities for the committee chair, committee members, and the student throughout the dissertation process. A dissertation final defense meeting is required of all students and is given orally. The student’s advisor presides over the defense meeting. The dissertation defense is not a perfunctory event. It is a formal occasion for discussion, dialogue, and defense of the project the students has completed. A rubric for the dissertation proposal and the dissertation final defense is included in Appendix C. The student will register for credits of HIED 899 (Dissertation Research) or HIED 891 (Continuous Enrollment) during the semester of the dissertation proposal defense meeting. The Dissertation Final Defense cannot be held in the same semester as the Dissertation Proposal meeting. The Dissertation Final Defense must be scheduled a minimum of seven weeks prior to the end of the term in which the student wishes to graduate. Students need to complete the Doctoral Dissertation Meeting Form at www.stcloudstate.edu/hied/forms.asp and materials requested in order to obtain final meeting approval from the School of Graduate Studies. In addition, all committee members must be approved by the School of Graduate Studies. Any new outside committee members can be considered for approval through the Dissertation Committee Member Petition at www.stcloudstate.edu/hied/forms.asp form no later than thirty (30) days prior to your meeting. Upon approval of the School of Graduate Studies, the Dissertation Proposal meeting will be scheduled and the student will be notified. A meeting space on the SCSU campus will be reserved for you with a PC computer or laptop and a projector screen. Typically, the meeting is scheduled in a classroom in the Education Building. Bring a flash drive with your power point presentation. This presentation can be displayed on the TV monitor in the room. Please complete a Petition form for a meeting off-campus, online, or via phone no later than thirty (30) days prior to your meeting. The student’s dissertation proposal is considered a well-worked draft of the first three chapters of the completed dissertation. Often, only modest changes are needed in those chapters to prepare them for the dissertation final defense. The review of the literature in chapter two should be updated to reflect any research studies reviewed or published since the dissertation proposal conference. Further, the method chapter should be revised to change verbs from the future tense to the past tense and to insure the chapter describes the procedures as they were actually undertaken.

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The dissertation final defense should be scheduled well in advance of the commencement date to allow for reviewing and binding before the end of the semester. Deadlines found at www.stcloudstate.edu/graduatestudies/current/culmProject/Doctoralchecklist.asp#timeline established by the School of Graduate Studies must be adhered to. It is the student’s responsibility to schedule the dissertation final defense with their committee members and reserve a room. Membership consists of the same committee that served on the dissertation proposal defense, unless the committee membership is altered in the interim. To schedule your final defense meeting, please complete the Dissertation Meeting Form found at www.stcloudstate.edu/hied/forms.asp and return it to the Center for Doctoral Studies. Please contact the Center for Doctoral Studies office manager if you need assistance (phone: 320-308-4220). Once the office manager notifies you of meeting approval and room reservations, it is your responsibility to notify you committee members of the meeting place. Your advisor will receive paperwork that all committee members sign upon approval of your dissertation final defense. The dissertation final defense is open to the public and notice of the meeting will be emailed to students in the program, posted on the program’s website, posted on the Center for Doctoral Studies bulletin board, and e-mailed to the School of Education listserv. If a student wishes they may invite their family and friends to attend the defense. Only members of the dissertation committee are allowed to comment or pose questions during the defense. The specific format and requirements of the dissertation final defense vary according to the nature of the project. Generally, at least two weeks prior to the final defense the student must distribute a final draft copy of the dissertation to each member of his/her committee. It is the student’s responsibility to deliver a copy it to all committee members in the formats they prefer. Much like the proposal defense meeting, final dissertation defense meetings usually lasts 1½ to 2 hours. Typically, the student makes a brief presentation focusing on the findings, implications and significance of the dissertation research. It is common (but not required unless your chair says so) for students to use presentation software during their presentations. All members of the dissertation committee are afforded the opportunity to ask questions and make comments regarding the dissertation and research project. Once questions and comments are exhausted, the student and all observers will leave the room while the committee deliberates. The committee will vote to approve, approve with revisions, or reject. A majority vote of the final evaluation committee is required to pass the final defense. If the student is determined to have passed the defense, the committee signs the appropriate forms and the chair returns it to the Center for Doctoral Studies. A candidate who fails the dissertation final defense in the first attempt may, with the approval of the advisor, attempt a second defense of the dissertation, but the candidate may not undertake a second final defense during the same semester in which the original defense was failed. A third chance to pass the dissertation final defense is not permitted. Once the student passes the dissertation final defense, a grade of “S” is recorded for an approved dissertation and will be reflected in every term that the student registered for HIED 899. One complete copy of the work must be submitted along with an approval page signed by all committee members, to the School of Graduate Studies for format review prior to submission for binding. This is not a final copy.

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After approval by your committee and the format reviewer, submit a minimum of three final copies of your dissertation by the appropriate deadline (see above).  Signatures of committee members are required on each approval page.  The dissertation is then registered in the School of Graduate Studies for binding and fee payment.  Two additional signed copies of the abstract are required for further distribution by the School of Graduate Studies.

When the Dissertation is Nearly Completed Final Requirements There are several requirements the student needs to complete during the semester they wish to graduate. Following is a guide to help you through these requirements. Application for Graduation A candidate for the Ed.D. degree shall file an application for graduation accompanied by a $20 non-refundable fee. This application is submitted to the School of Graduate Studies at the beginning of the semester in which the student and advisor anticipate that the dissertation will be completed. Deadline dates for application for graduation are available at: www.stcloudstate.edu/graduatestudies/current/commencement.asp Dissertation Final Copy Preparation If you plan to use someone with expertise in the preparation of your dissertation which meets the requirements for SCSU, that person should be contacted well in advance of completion of your work. If you need information or names of individuals who can assist with the preparation of your final copy, please contact the School of Graduate Studies at 308-2113. General Format Most dissertations are divided into three major sections: (1) the introductory materials, (2) the text or main body of materials, and (3) references and/or related materials. The organization of the introductory materials follows: 1. Blank page 2. Title page 3. Approval page 4. Abstract 5. Preface and/or acknowledgment (optional) 6. A quoted statement significant to the paper or a short poem but not recognized as an acknowledgment (optional) 7. Table of contents 8. List of tables (only when tables are used in the body of the paper) 9. List of figures (only when figures are used in the body of the paper) The Graduate School’s “A Manual for the Preparation of Field Studies and Theses” is at: www.stcloudstate.edu/graduatestudies/current/culmProject/documents/ThesisManual.pdf. The online formatting presentation can be found at: http://media4.stcloudstate.edu/p59619529/?launcher=false&fcsContent=true&pbMode=normal If you have questions regarding this process, please contact Ann Anderson in the School of Graduate Studies at 320-308-2113.

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Binding the Dissertation Once the student has successfully passed the final dissertation defense, made corrections required by her/his committee, and received approval through the School of Graduate Studies, the dissertation is ready for binding. Each approval page must be signed by the committee members and the abstracts must be signed by the committee chairperson.    

Three copies of the dissertation must be prepared on a minimum of 20-pound, 100 percent cotton paper and submitted to the School of Graduate Studies for binding by the appropriate deadline. For the deadline, go to www.stcloudstate.edu/graduatestudies/current/culmProject/ The copies will be bound in black buckram covers with gold lettering on the front and spine. If a student desires a personal bound copy of the dissertation, one additional copy must be submitted for binding with the abstract, for a total of four copies. The student is responsible for the binding fee of $10 per copy plus a one-time $10 microfilm fee. Please make check payable to St. Cloud State University. Submit payment to the School of Graduate Studies. If you wish to use a credit card you must contact Ann E. Anderson at 320.308.2114 or aeanderson@stcloudstate.edu to enter charges before payment can be made.

Dissertations are approved, bound, and placed on file as described in “A Manual for the Preparation of Field Studies and Theses.” Student Research Colloquium St. Cloud State University's annual campus-wide Student Research Colloquium (SRC) promotes research, scholarship, and creative work in collaboration with faculty as a vital component of higher education. Faculty, graduate students, and undergraduate students from St. Cloud State University and regional universities are encouraged to participate. Industry sponsors are also invited to attend. The goal of the SRC is to bring together students, faculty, and members of the community involved in scholarly and artistic activities – this event typically occurs every April, and students are able to give paper presentations, poster presentations, or performance or creative works. Students work with a faculty member on all aspects of their presentation for the SRC. Information and deadlines are available at www.stcloudstate.edu/src.

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Helpful Links Academic Calendar http://bulletin.stcloudstate.edu/gb/calendar.asp Multicultural Resource Center www.stcloudstate.edu/mrc Student Research Colloquium www.stcloudstate.edu/src Statistical Consulting Center http://huskynet.stcloudstate.edu/departments/ims/statconsulting.asp SCSU Library The SCSU Library provides students with research resources that can be accessed off-campus. There are helpful research assistance resources available on online. 

Library 101

 

Interlibrary Loan

  

Off-Campus Proxy Access RefWorks Basics Managing your research references Locate Scholarly Journal Articles Find Resources and Services for Graduate Students

APA Citation Style

Plagiarism Tools Scholarly Journals versus Popular Materials Guide

School of Graduate Studies Resources The School of Graduate Studies gathers and provides information about workshops or online training recordings available on campus to help you successfully complete the dissertation. This includes workshops and online training recordings such as:             

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Library Orientation and RefWorks Statistics and the Culminating Project Human Subjects and the IRB Process Formatting Assistance Writing the Literature Review Getting Started and Staying Motivated Statistics and Survey Design A Manual for the Preparation of Field Studies and Theses Culminating Project Deadlines

List of Graduate Faculty Members List of Outside Readers Timeline and Deadlines for the Doctoral Dissertation Culminating Doctoral Project Policies


The Write Place Many new graduate students have some anxiety about writing or feel unsure about writing papers again. The Write Place offers tutors for individual assistance and topical workshops. It is also a great resource for you as you complete your proposals and dissertations. They also make online appointments for those of you who are at a distance. Contact Information. Phone: 320-308-2031 Email: writeplace@stcloudstate.edu Website: http://www.stcloudstate.edu/writeplace/about.asp Online Appointments Location: Building 51, Room 117 Resources. The Write Place also provides several online resources such as:

      

APA Electronic Material Citations (updated version) Cohesion and Transitions Academic vs. Business/Technical Writing How to Expand Your Writing: NEW Word Handout Numbers (How to use in writing MLA Style) NEW PowerPoint Writing Paragraphs: PowerPoint APA Flowchart for In-text Citations and Reference Page NEW PDF Handout

Workshops. The Write Place also provides several workshops such as:

     

Tips for Improving your Academic Tone Academic Tone and Diction Troublesome Grammar Effective Paragraphing APA Format Writing the Literature Review

Institutional Review Board Process IRB Application Form www.stcloudstate.edu/osp/irb/irbapplication.asp IRB Online Training Modules www.stcloudstate.edu/osp/irb/IRBTraining.asp Institutional Review Board Scheduled Meetings www.stcloudstate.edu/irb/default.asp Protocol Forms for Federal Guidelines for Humans and Animal-Related Research www.stcloudstate.edu/osp/policies/ Frequently Asked Questions www.stcloudstate.edu/irb/faq/default.asp

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Dissertation Forms Higher Education Administration Student Handbook www.stcloudstate.edu/hied/forms.asp Program of Study Form www.stcloudstate.edu/hied/forms.asp Dissertation Meeting Request www.stcloudstate.edu/hied/forms.asp Dissertation Committee Member Petition www.stcloudstate.edu/hied/forms.asp Change of Adviser www.stcloudstate.edu/hied/forms.asp Online Transcripts www.stcloudstate.edu/registrar/students/transcripts.asp#unofficial Leave of Absence “Stop Out� Request www.stcloudstate.edu/hied/forms.asp Petition Form www.stcloudstate.edu/hied/forms.asp Formatting Issues APA Official Website www.apa.org APA Guidelines at Purdue http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/13 Formatting Basics Demonstration by School of Graduate Studies http://media4.stcloudstate.edu/p59619529/?launcher=false&fcsContent=true&pbMode=normal Manual for the Preparation of Theses www.stcloudstate.edu/graduatestudies/current/culmProject/documents/ThesisManual.pdf Graduation Information Graduation Information www.stcloudstate.edu/graduatestudies/current/commencement.asp

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Resources The following are examples of books providing valuable information and guidance for preparing and completing your thesis/project. This is not meant to be an exhaustive list, simply a starting point. American Psychological Association. (2010). Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. Balian, E. S. (1994). The Graduate Research Guidebook: A Practical Approach to Doctoral/Masters Research. (3rd ed.). Lanham, MD: University Press of America. Becker, H. (1986). Writing for Social Scientists: How to Start and Finish Your Thesis, Book, or Article. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press. Bolker, J. (1998). Writing Your Dissertation in Fifteen Minutes a Day: A Guide to Starting, Revising, and Finishing Your Doctoral Thesis. New York: Henry Holt and Company. Brause, R. (2000). Writing Your Doctoral Dissertation: Invisible Rules for Success. London: Falmer Press. Cone, J. D., & Foster, S. L. (1993). Dissertations and Theses from Start to Finish: Psychology and Related Fields. Washington, D.C.: American Psychological Association. Hauppage, New York: Barron’s Educational Series. Ernst, M. O. (1981). A Guide through the Dissertation Process. New York: Edwin Mellen Press. Fisher, E. & Holtom, D. (1999). Enjoy Writing Your Science Thesis or Dissertation!: A Step by Step Guide to Planning and Writing Dissertations and Theses for Undergraduate and Graduate Science Students. London: Imperial College Press. Fitzpatrick, J., Secrist, J., & Wright, D. J. (1998). Secrets for a Successful Dissertation. Thousand Oaks, CA:SAGE Publications. Gardner, D. C., & Beatty, G. C. (1980). Dissertation Proposal Guidebook: How to Prepare a Research Proposal and Get It Accepted. Springfield, Ill.: Charles C Thomas Publisher, Ltd. Glatthorn, A. A. (1998). Writing the Winning Dissertation: A Step-by-Step Guide. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press. Higgins, R. (1996). Approaches to Research: A Handbook for Those Writing a Dissertation. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers. Irby, B. J., & Lunenburg. F. (2007) Writing a successful thesis or dissertation: Tips and strategies for students in the social and behavioral sciences. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press. Leedy, P. D., & Ormrod, J. E. (2001). Practical research: Planning and design (7th ed.). New York: Merrill/Prentice Hall. Locke, L. F., Spirduso, W.W., Silverman, S. J.. (2000). Proposals That Work: A Guide for Planning Dissertations and Grant Proposals. (4th ed). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

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Madsen, D. (1992). Successful Dissertations and Theses: A Guide to Graduate Student Research from Proposal to Completion. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass Publishers. Mauch, J. E., & Park, N. (2003). Guide to the Successful Thesis and Dissertation: A Handbook for Students and Faculty. (5th ed.). New York, NY: M. Dekker. Meloy, J. M. (1994). Writing the Qualitative Dissertation: Understanding by Doing. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Newman, I. (1997). Theses and Dissertations: A Guide to Writing in the Social and Physical Sciences. Lanham, MD: University Press of America. Nickerson, E. T. (1993). The Dissertation Handbook: A Guide to Successful Dissertations. (2nd ed.). Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Company. Piantanida, M., & Garman, N. B. (1999). The Qualitative Dissertation: A Guide for Students and Faculty. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press. Preece, R.( 1994). Starting Research: An Introduction to Academic Research and Dissertation Writing. London: Pinter Publishers, Ltd. Pyrczak, F. (2000). Completing your thesis or dissertation. Los Angeles, CA: Pyrczak Publishing. Rudestam, K. E., & Newton, R. R. (2001). Surviving Your Dissertation: A Comprehensive Guide to Content and Process. (2nd.ed.). Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications. Simon, M. K., & Bruce, F. J. (1998). The Dissertation Cookbook from Soup to Nuts: A Practical Guide to Help You Start and Complete Your Dissertation or Research Project. (2nd ed.). Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt. Sternberg, D. (1981). How to Complete and Survive Your Doctoral Dissertation. New York: St. Martin’s Griffin. Teitelbaum, H. (1998). How to Write a Thesis. (4th ed.). New York: Macmillan. Thomas, R. M., & Brubaker, D. L. (2000). Theses and Dissertations: A Guide to Planning, Research, and Writing. Westport, CT: Bergin and Garvey. Van Wagenen, K. (1990). Writing a Thesis: Substance and Style. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall. Webster, W. G. (1998). Developing & Writing Your Thesis, Dissertation or Project: A Book of Sound Advice about Conceptualizing, Organizing, Developing and Finalizing Your Terminal Graduate Research. San Ramon, CA: Academic Scholarwrite. Zerubavel, E. (1999). The Clockwork Muse. A Practical Guide to Writing Theses, Dissertations, and Books. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

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Appendix A: Student and Dissertation Member Responsibilities Dissertation Chair It is the responsibility of the chair to:             

  

  

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Determine the appropriateness of the topic selected by the student. Determine the adequacy of the project design before the student begins work. Assist the student in the selection of other committee members and provide guidance on the Graduate School requirements for an outside reader eligibility. To determine the readiness of a student to conduct a dissertation proposal and final defense and to provide the student with feedback and approval regarding when it is appropriate to schedule committee meetings and forward a draft of the dissertation to committee members. To advise the student on the completion of appropriate paperwork to meet program and Graduate School requirements to attain approval for dissertation proposal and final defense meetings. To advise the student on the protocols and process to ensure the students are adequately prepared for the dissertation proposal and final defense meetings. Work effectively with the student to set realistic timelines for completion of the dissertation and to provide guidance on the program and Graduate School deadlines. Review, approve, and sign the student’s Institutional Review Board (IRB) application. Ensure that the student has obtained the required clearances from the Institutional Review Board (IRB) for research involving human subjects before the research study or project begins. To be accessible to students for dialogue and formal meetings throughout the dissertation process, review the study, and provide timely and thorough guidance to a student on the various elements necessary for the planning and execution of a scholarly dissertation study. Inform students and assure that all procedures and continuous enrollment are carried out fairly and according to the guidelines of the doctoral program and Graduate School. To attain and maintain graduate faculty status and human subjects research certification. Review the student’s work, evaluate, and make a final determination of the acceptability of the dissertation study assuring it meets a high standard of quality of originality, significance, research, analysis, accuracy, and overall scholarship. Provide guidance and ensure that a high standard of writing quality is maintained throughout the project using APA writing principles. Chair the dissertation proposal and final defense meetings and submit all required paperwork to the Center for Doctoral Studies once the proposal is approved. Review the final format of the dissertation and ensure all necessary changes have been incorporated before providing final approval.

To ensure that the grade on the dissertation courses are properly recorded. A mark of “RC” (research continuing) is recorded for 899 until approval of the dissertation final defense. A mark of “R” (registered) is recorded for 891 until approval of the dissertation final defense. Upon approval of the dissertation final defense, the grade changes to an “S”. To be present at graduation to hood the student unless alternative arrangements are made. Follow all program and University dissertation policies and procedures. There may be additional responsibilities not listed above.


Committee Members It is the responsibility of the committee members to:  

 

    

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Attend and participate in the dissertation proposal and dissertation final defense meetings.

In collaboration with the dissertation chair, to provide timely and thorough guidance to a student on the various elements necessary for planning and execution of a scholarly dissertation study. (i.e. topic selection, appropriateness, and academic value) Review the student’s work, evaluate, and make a determination of the acceptability of the dissertation study assuring it meets a high standard of quality of originality, significance, research, analysis, accuracy, and overall scholarship. Hold a terminal degree and attain and maintain graduate faculty status and human subjects research certification. Provide guidance and ensure that a high standard of writing quality is maintained throughout the project using APA writing principles.

Complete all paperwork associated with the dissertation proposal and final defense. In collaboration with the dissertation chair, a committee methodologist guides and assists the student in the selection of methods (quantitative, qualitative, mixed methods) and/or procedures and appropriate software to collect and analyze data. The outside reader is typically someone outside the university or in another department that serves as a content expert which complements the program discipline or may provide expertise in the student’s research topic. Follow all program and University dissertation policies and procedures. There may be additional responsibilities not listed above.


Student It is the responsibility of the student to:          

      

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Select an adviser and committee members meeting program and Graduate School requirements. Work with the chair to develop realistic timelines for completion of the dissertation and abide by all program and Graduate School deadlines. Obtain editorial help if necessary to meet the standards of the program and University for quality and presentation of the dissertation. Ensure that a high standard of writing quality is maintained throughout the project using APA writing principles and to adhere to the guidelines outlined by this program manual and the School of Graduate Studies Thesis/Dissertation Manual. Uphold the ethical and scholarly standards of research, including the protection of human subjects and the probation against plagiarism. Complete and submit all required forms appropriately and on time. Decide, in consultation with the committee chair, an appropriate and worthy topic for research study or project that meets a high standard of quality for originality, significance, research, analysis, accuracy, and overall scholarship. After approval from the chair, schedule the dissertation proposal and final defense committee meetings, providing the date, time, and location to all members. After approval from the chair, the student will complete the appropriate paperwork within appropriate deadlines to meet program and Graduate School requirements to attain approval for dissertation proposal and final defense meetings. Work with adviser and committee members to schedule consultation and dissertation proposal and final defense meeting times. Consider the availability of the committee members you choose. Be sure they will be available to meet or converse when you need and can respond in a timely manner. Many committee members are not available during the summer. Determine in consultation with the committee the roles and needs of the committee members in working through the approval process and the timelines and deadlines for submitting written work for approval. Understand that re-writes will probably be necessary and that the guidance of the committee is to be taken seriously if the work is to be satisfactorily completed and approved. Provide the chair, committee members, and Center for Doctoral Studies accurate contact information (i.e. e-mail, phone) and provide updates as necessary. Complete the Institutional Review Board (IRB) application, training, and other requirements and attain IRB approval prior to conducting the research study. Propose and defend the dissertation; understand that final acceptance of the dissertation is determined by the student’s committee and the School of Graduate Studies. Follow all program and University dissertation policies and procedures including continuous enrollment. There may be additional responsibilities as determined by the student’s dissertation chair.


Appendix B: Dissertation Chapter Outline Dissertations in the social sciences typically contain five chapters as outlined below. However, this is common practice rather than a requirement. The outline below is merely a suggestion. If the student and advisor think a different array of chapters fits a project better, they should seek the approval of the committee for their proposed presentation of the project and results. Chapter One – Introduction Introduction The purpose of this section is to provide a context in which the problem exists and that supports the rationale for the proposed study. Purpose and Significance of the Study This section also clearly states that the purpose of the study is to examine specific research questions and to test certain hypotheses (in the case of a quantitative study) or to explore certain themes related to the research questions (in the case of a qualitative study). This section addresses the importance and significance of the study and how the results may benefit the field. Statement of the Problem This section provides a clear statement of the research problem and why it needs to be addressed. It is supposed to lead the reader into understanding or concluding that this is an issue that needs to be formally studied. Assumptions of the Study This section describes the things that you have assumed to be true for the study. Assumptions may include things such as honesty in interview responses, representative sample, or global postulates (claims about your field that most or all would assert to be true, e.g. “High quality teaching leads to improved student learning”). Description and Scope of the Research This section tells what your study will do to address the problem. This section identifies and briefly introduces the conceptual framework for the study. How is this problem framed and discussed in the research literature? What theories and concepts are used to guide the discussion? Which of these theories will form the backbone of your study and why did you choose it? This section also explains what you intend to do, describing the who, what, when, where, and how of the study. But address all these matters in a summary fashion in Chapter 1, knowing that you will present fuller descriptions of the literature in Chapter 2 and of the research method in Chapter 3. Research Questions This section lists your research questions, which are the questions that will drive your study. You will answer these questions at the conclusion of your study. Also remember that the data you collect must provide the evidence to justify answers to these questions. Typically, you will have two to three research questions. Avoid “yes” or “no” response-type questions. Research Hypotheses This section is not needed in qualitative studies or in quantitative studies using a correlation design or only descriptive statistics (i.e., percents, means, modes, median, ranges, and frequencies). For quantitative experimental and theory testing designs, hypotheses are typically written as null hypotheses, stating that there will be no difference or effect. For example, “Females and males will not differ in their desire to advance to a higher administrative position.”

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Definition of Terms (Optional) This section defines each expression or term used in a precise way for your study or that might not be well understood by the readers. These definitions should be based on scholarly research or other scholarly work. They should be defined both conceptually and in terms of how they will be measured. When a definition can be defined in different ways, indicate the definition that will be adopted for the study and why. Summary This section summarizes chapter one, provides a paragraph or two indicating how the dissertation is organized, and provides a bridging statement to chapter two. Chapter Two – Literature Review Introduction The purpose of the literature review is to explore research on the issues that are relevant to the proposed study. Begin chapter two with a brief description of your study. Next, list the critical topics/issues in the order in which they will be discussed in the review. This should include information on the theoretical/conceptual framework for your study and studies that have used your specific data collection mechanism (e.g., questionnaire). The subheadings of the subsequent sections of the review should reflect the critical topics/issues identified. Review of the Literature Organize and present the literature or sets of literatures that have a bearing on your study, including critical issues for the problem and the research done to build a conceptual framework for understanding and studying the problem. It is particularly important that the literature review is built primarily around literature that reports the results of empirical studies, although it is also important to refer to foundational and conceptual pieces about the topic. In addition to discussing the major findings of the studies, the student should also include pertinent information about how each study was conducted, such as the number of subject/participants, relevant characteristics of the subjects, types of instruments and/or methods used (e.g., not necessarily the specific names of the tests or instruments, but whether they were interviewed, responded to questionnaires, tested, observed, etc.). The synopsis should also mention any major weaknesses in study design. The review should also attempt to represent the range of literature on the topic, including the disputes in the field and perspectives that represent conflicting views of the issues. The literature review should be an effort to synthesize the literature to demonstrate the development of thought about the topic in the field. It is not enough to present a list of studies with evaluative comments on each one. The review should look across sources to identify general trends in the literature and discuss. The synthesis should seriously critique the literature looking for gaps, contradictions and criticisms of the studies you have. As the student reviews the research on each issue, s/he should use the most recent version of APA Manual for formatting citations. Add appropriate subheadings, as needed, based on your literature review. Theoretical Framework

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In this section, please provide a brief summary about the research and theories pertinent to your research study. Summary This section summarizes chapter two, relating the review to your purpose statement and study, and providing a bridge to the presentation on method in chapter three.

Chapter Three - Method This chapter specifically describes how you plan to conduct the study. Remember anyone should be able to read chapter three and repeat your study without ever speaking to you- it should be that detailed and focused. Introduction Restate the hypotheses or research question(s) and present in broad terms the research design for the proposed study. Explicitly address why the design is appropriate for the research questions driving the study. Briefly delineate the organization of this chapter. Role of Researcher (Optional) Content will be added later. Research Design Describe the research design. If the study is an experimental or quasi-experimental study, what research design will be used? What are the comparison groups? How does the design address each of the hypotheses? If it is a qualitative study, what research design will be used? How do the design and instruments address the research questions? In both quantitative and qualitative studies, what methods will be used to overcome research problems and establish validity/credibility? ADD OPERATIONAL TERMS? Sample Describe the population and/or sample of the study, including a description of how many participated (you may want to talk about the number of surveys sent out versus the response rate, for example), all other relevant descriptors (typically including age, ethnicity, gender, psychological condition, etc.), how participants were selected (random, intact group, etc.), and if they were grouped in any way. Human Subject Approval – Institutional Review Board (IRB) This section outlines how the rights of human subjects will be protected throughout the study. For more information http://www.stcloudstate.edu/irb/process/default.asp Instrument(s) for Data Collection All instruments, tools, or methods used to gather data must be described here. For quantitative studies, include the psychometric characteristics of the tests (e.g., validity and reliability indicators), how the tool was developed, or how the instrument will be designed and piloted. For qualitative studies, describe the technique is to be used, such as interviews, observations, or videotaping, and what protocols or interview guides will be applied? For all studies, what type of information regarding procedures, ethics, and confidentiality are participants and/or others given?

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Analysis Describe the procedures that will be used to analyze the data collected during the research For a quantitative study, state explicitly what statistical procedures will be used for each research question, why those are appropriate for your study and type of data, what p-value will be used to determine significance, etc. For a qualitative study, describe how the data will be coded and compiled, and how it will be integrated into themes or interpretations. Procedures and Timeline This section is particularly for dissertation proposals. The student should provide an outline of all procedures involved in the proposed research. Describe the logistics and the timeline for this study. How/when the participants will be selected and contacted. When and how will the data be collected, processed, and analyzed? The dissertation timeline calculator discussed earlier in this Handbook may be helpful while writing this section. For the final dissertation, this section can be ignored, but the relevant information (e.g., when data was conducted) should be included in the textual description of the study methods. Summary This section summarizes chapter three and provides a bridging statement to chapter four. Chapter Four – Results Introduction Reiterate the research problem and the hypotheses and research question(s). Describe the organization of the chapter, which, in effect, is how the data will be discussed. Results for Each Hypothesis or Research Question Quantitative: Restate each hypothesis. Discuss how each was tested by describing the method of analysis. Discuss whether or not the results support the hypothesis. Do not inject your opinion or explanation of the results. Commentary should be provided in Chapter 5. Qualitative: Restate each research question. Present the relevant data for each question and discuss how you organized the narrative information for interpretation and the outcomes. Quantitative: Discuss your findings as a whole and synthesize the results. What were your major findings? What correlations were found and how strong are they, or how many of the hypotheses were validated? Were there any contradictory results, or any unexpected or confusing results? Overall, what conclusion(s) can you draw from the data regarding the research question? Qualitative: The synthesis discussion of qualitative research should be inductive in nature and interpretive. The purpose is to assist the reader in gaining a fuller understanding of the phenomenon, context, or culture studied. You might examine aspects of the outcomes, categorize your findings with previous studies, and/or identify the aspects of a particular phenomenon that need further investigation. Summary This section summarizes chapter four and provides a bridging statement to chapter five. Chapter Five – Discussion

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Introduction Summarize the preceding four chapters, starting with the purpose of the study. State findings from the data you collected and analyzed. State the organization of the chapter as a bridge to the discussion. Discussion Discuss the results in light of the review of the research and your own research findings. In this section you should present your interpretations of the findings and why they are important. You may also inject your opinions as supported by the data and/or review of the research. Point out new findings that are supported by your data and findings that contradict or expand upon existing research studies. Limitations List problems you encountered in your study that you had not anticipated, i.e., low survey return rate. Then make recommendations for further research based upon the limitations. Recommendations for Research Identify future research topics that were indicated by your study, and point to new avenues for further research – what subsequent questions arose from your study? What can be done in further research studies to build on what you found? Implications for Theory Explore what your research project and conclusions indicate about the conceptual framework you have used in your study. In what ways have your findings supported the theory or concepts you have studied? Do your findings suggest the need to amend some aspect of the theory or model, and/or do your findings contradict some major component of the theory and the research literature? Implications for Practice Based on your review of literature and study, what recommendations would you make to the field? How may practitioners use the results of your study to improve their practice? 23 Conclusions Briefly, summarize chapter five. Overall, what conclusion(s) can you reach from your research? In this section, you have the opportunity to write from your own voice. Reflect on what you have learned.

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References Provide a complete list of all the items cited in the dissertation. Do not include items that were reviewed but not cited in the body of the dissertation. Appendices Each appendix should be listed A, B, C, ... Include the original of your approved Human Subjects approval notice, as well as other items, such as a survey instrument or interview guide. Items should be in the order they are first referred to in the body of your dissertation.

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Higher Education Administration, Ed.D. Dissertation Proposal Rubric (Transition Point 3) Candidate:

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_________________ ________ Evaluator:

Criteria Topic: Identifies , describes and defines a significant HIED research or research application topic of appropriate scope and depth Prefatory Material: Provides an abstract; table of contents, and a list of tables and figures (if relevant to the proposal) Introduction: Introduces the topic and provides a rationale for the selection of topic; provide a clear statement of the problem; outlines the scope and rationale for the study; presents the research question(s); establishes a clear connection between the problem and the research question; and defines relevant conceptual framework Literature Review: Presents an up-to-date, research based, systematic, thorough review of literature relevant to the problem that includes scholarly sources and discussion. Methods: Selects, defines, and describes appropriate research methods, including data collection procedures and data analyses.

Mechanics: Uses correct spelling, grammar, punctuation, sentence structure, and vocabulary; editing and citations conform to APA guidelines. Oral Presentation: Demonstrates professional demeanor, confidence, and poise; answers questions clearly; uses scholarly terms; is open to feedback and suggestions; is respectful to committee members. Total Score: _____/35 Comments

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____________________________________________ Date:

__________________

Unsatisfactory (0-1) Topic is not clearly defined or it was too broad or too narrow; topic is not relevant to HIED; proposal does not demonstrate the topic’s interest to the candidate or potential contributions to the field Abstract is not provided or is outside the range of 350-700 words; table of contents is omitted or inaccurate; lists of tables or figures (if used) are omitted or inaccurate

Satisfactory (2-3) Scope is sufficient and feasible given timelines; topic is reasonably relevant to HIED; proposal demonstrates interest to the candidate and potential for contributions to the field.

Topic is ill-defined; research problem or problem statement is not clearly articulated; purpose or rationale for the study are ill-defined or does not match the problem or research question; research question(s) are not clearly articulated or do not relate to the problem; definitions of concepts or theoretical framework was omitted, incomplete, or inaccurate.

Topic is generally well-defined; statement of the problem is clear; research delimitations and rationale are sufficiently outlined and connected to the problem and the research question; all or nearly all relevant concepts are defined with sufficient clarity and accuracy.

Many sources are old or are opinion pieces that don’t reflect the research-based progress in the field; review strays from the topic or ignores key points; sub-topics are disjointed or the overall flow is difficult to follow. Does not provide rationale for the method chosen; methods or procedures were not relevant to the research question or purpose of the study; threats to validity (internal and external) are not clearly articulated; applications are poorly connected or ill-defined. Proposal contains many or major errors in spelling, grammar, punctuation, sentence structure, or vocabulary use that greatly diminished readability; many or major errors in formatting to APA standards. Candidate is late or allows devices to interfere with exam; grows flustered or hostile; does not answer questions or relies heavily on notes; uses unscholarly terms; resists feedback or suggestions; uses disrespectful language or gestures.

Review of literature is complete; most sources are of scholarly/research nature reflecting current thinking on the topic in the field; review is generally well-organized, relevant to the problem, and adequately addresses the study. Provides a clear rationale for the methods chosen; methods and procedures suit the research; threats to validity (internal and external) and applications of the research are adequately described and discussed.

Sources are of high research quality and scholarly nature; sources include latest publications; review is comprehensive, pertinent, and extremely wellorganized; review insightfully addresses the study.

Proposal contains occasional errors in spelling, grammar, punctuation, sentence structure, or vocabulary use that does not interfere significantly with readability; only minor errors in formatting to APA standards Candidate is on-time and attentive; maintains composure; answers most questions independently; usually uses scholarly terms; willingly engages in discussions about feedback or guidance; uses respectful language and gestures.

Proposal contains few or no errors in punctuation, spelling, grammar, sentence structure or vocabulary use; precisely follows APA guidelines.

Abstract adequately addresses the research within 350-700 words; accurate table of contents is complete: accurate lists of tables or figures (if used) are provided)

Exemplary (4-5) Scope is unquestionably feasible given timelines; topic is highly relevant to HIED; proposal demonstrates significant interest of the candidate and potential for significant contributions to the field. Abstract provides a crisp, complete 350-700 word summary of the research; the table of contents, and titles and subheadings are complete and accurate; lists of tables or figures (if used) are complete and accurate Topic is concisely described, contextualized, and includes multiple perspectives; statement of the problem is apt and precise; delimitations and rationale are extremely well presented and strongly linked to the problem and research question; all key concepts are clearly and precisely defined and articulated.

Provides a clear and full developed rationale for the methods chosen; methods and procedures precisely suited the research; threats to internal and external validity and applications of the research were coherently and fully described and discussed.

Candidate is on-time and fully attentive; appears confident, poised, and enthusiastic; answers complex questions independently; uses scholarly language consistently; actively seeks and discusses feedback and suggestions; uses respectful language and gestures.

Score _________ Comments

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Higher Education Administration, Ed.D. Dissertation Final Defense Rubric (Transition Point 4) Candidate:___________________________________________________________ Evaluator: _______________________________________________________Date:_______________________ Directions: Score each of the six criteria separately, using a rating scale of 0-4 = Unsatisfactory, 5-8 = Satisfactory with Revisions, or 9-11= Exemplary. Criteria Unsatisfactory Satisfactory with Revisions Exemplary (0-4) (5-8) (9-11) Candidate provided an inaccurate or Candidate obviously understood the results, Candidate accurately and fully described Results: Candidate provided an in-depth description of incomplete description of results; did not including data collection and statistical analyses, but results; accurately and completely described the results, including data collection and accurately or adequately describe data had difficulty conveying the information clearly or data collection and statistical analyses; and statistical analyses; and answered the research collection or statistical analyses; or did not had some difficulty answering the research precisely answered the research question(s). question(s). answer the research question(s). question(s). Synthesis: Candidate tied the results and conclusions of the study to the research question, review of literature, and purpose of the study; and clearly articulated the study’s benefit to the field.

Reporting of results was inconsistent with the research question(s), review of literature, or purpose of the study; conclusions did not reflect the research question(s), review of literature, purpose of the study; or benefits to the field were simplistic, irrelevant, or not discussed.

Reporting of results and conclusions were generally consistent with the research question(s), review of literature, and purpose of the study but ideas need further development; and discussion of benefit to the field may have missed or required further development of one or two significant points.

Reporting of results and conclusions were seemingly inevitable relative to the research question(s), review of literature, and purpose of the study; and benefit to the field went beyond the obvious, and was articulated with great profundity and clarity.

Conclusions: Candidate provided a complete, accurate summary and interpretation of findings, and aptly discussed limitations, applications, alternate interpretations, recommendations for future research, and individual bias.

Candidate reached unsupported or erroneous conclusions; provided an incomplete or inaccurate summary and interpretation of results; did not provide a meaningful discussion of limitations, applications, alternate interpretations, recommendations for future research, or individual bias.

Candidate may have made minor conclusive errors; or made minor errors in interpreting and discussing limitations, applications, alternate interpretations, recommendations for future research, and individual bias.

Candidate provided a complete, precise summary and interpretation of findings, and provided highly insightful discussion or limitations, applications, alternate interpretations, recommendations for future research, and individual bias.

Mechanics: Used correct spelling, grammar, punctuation, sentence structure, and vocabulary; and edited according to APA guidelines.

Dissertation contained numerous editing errors that greatly diminished readability; or required substantial revision.

Dissertation may have contained minor errors in spelling, grammar, punctuation, vocabulary use, or format that required further editing.

Dissertation required cosmetic or no further editing. Dissertation “looks publishable.�

Professionalism: Demonstrated professional demeanor, confidence, and poise; answered questions clearly; used scholarly terms; was open to feedback and suggestions; and was respectful to committee members.

Candidate may have been late or allowed devices to interfere with exam, grew flustered or hostile, did not answer questions or relied heavily on notes, used unscholarly terms, resisted or dismissed feedback or suggestions, or used disrespectful language or gestures.

Candidate was on time and engaged, but may have quivered, appeared overly passive, or showed other signs of distress, answered most questions adequately, generally used scholarly terms, accepted feedback and suggestions, and used respectful language and gestures.

Candidate was on-time and fully engaged; appeared confident, poised, and enthusiastic; answered complex questions independently; used scholarly language consistently, actively sought and discussed feedback and suggestions; and used respectful language and gestures.

Oral Presentation: Candidate presented the research topic, literature, methods, results, conclusions, limitations, and implications in a clear, organized manner.

Candidate relied heavily on notes, omitted significant elements of the dissertation, needed to be asked to clarify information multiple times, lost place several times, or presented information haphazardly.

Candidate may have relied on notes several times, omitted a significant element of the dissertation, or was occasionally unclear or disorganized.

Candidate rarely or never needed to access notes, included all significant elements of the dissertation, and conveyed information clearly and in a logical, easy-to-follow manner.

Total Score: _____ /66 Comments:

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www.stcloudstate.edu/HIED

*Disclaimer– The most current edition supersedes all previous versions of SCSU’s Higher Education Administration Ed.D. Dissertation Manual. Please check the program website for the most recent version. Every effort was made to ensure that information in this Dissertation Manual was accurate at the time of publication. All policies and other information are subject to change without notice and do not constitute an irrevocable contract between any student and St. Cloud State University. St. Cloud State University values diversity of all kinds, including but not limited to race, religion and ethnicity (full statement at bulletin.StCloudState.edu/ugb/generalinfo/nondiscrimination.html). TTY: 1-800-627-3529. SCSU is an affirmative action/equal opportunity educator and employer. This material can be made available in an alternative format. Contact the department/agency listed above.

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HIED Dissertation Manual EdD  

HIED Dissertation Manual EdD

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