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EUGENE JAHNG ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO GSAPP 2017 - 2018 CMU 2012 - 2017


EUGENE JAHNG PORTFOLIO jahng.eugene@gmail.com https://eljahng.com


CONTENTS COLUMBIA GSAPP MSAAD

COLUMBIA GSAPP ELECTIVE

WILLET’S POINT ESTUARY 2018 Spring | Queens, NY

X-INFORMATION MODELING 2017 Fall | Manhattan, NY

FULBRIGHT UNIVERSITY 2017 Fall | Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

TECHNIQUES OF THE ULTRAREAL 2017 Fall | Redwood Forest, CA

COOPER HEWITT EXTENSION 2017 Summer | Manhattan, NY

CARNEGIE MELLON B.ARCH

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

BISHOPSGATE GOODSYARD 2016 Fall | London, UK

NOWON CHILDREN’S CENTER 2015 - 2016 | Seoul, South Korea

MARS REGOLITH HABITAT 2016 Spring | Meridiani Planum, Mars

JFK T4 EXPANSION 2015 Fall | Queens, NY


WILLET’S POINT ESTUARY Queens, NY 2018 Spring | Advanced Studio VI Critics | Laurie Hawkinson, Galen Pardee

Willet’s Point, also called the Iron Triangle, is an isolated area of Queens currently occupied by junkyards and automobile repair chop shops. The project establishes a connection between the neighboring environment and the site. By utilizing the nearby Flushing Bay and Creek for hydroelectric power, electricity is generated for the entire community district of Queens. The polluted river along with the sewage and greywater from surrounding districts is filtered into a wastewater treatment facility and wetlands. The purified water is collected into a reservoir at the edge of the site for rowing matches. Two boathouses mark the beginning and end of the race, while providing a public boat storage space for the rowing community.


Site Conditions | Flushing Creek + 2030 - 2100 Sea Level Rise

Private Program | Hydroelectric Power + Wastewater Treatment

Public Program | Boathouse + Waterfront Seating


Fuel Cell Power Plant

Anaerobic Digestion Chamber

Gravity Belt Thickner

Secondary Clarifier

Aeration Chamber

Primary Clarifier

Citi Field

Bleachers

Treated Water Reservoir Estuary


Generator Switchyard Substation

Secondary Reservoir

Public Wetland

Primary Boathouse Public Storage Practice Rooms

Flushing Creek

Primary Reservoir


Site Model


Boathouse Model


FULBRIGHT UNIVERSITY VIETNAM Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam 2017 Fall | Advanced Studio V Critics | Gregg Pasquarelli, Dana Getman Masterplan Partner | Qinyi Wu

In 2016, the US and Vietnam shook hands on the first Fulbright University celebrating Fulbright Scholars worldwide. The new Fulbright University in Vietnam aims for an international school environment with both American and Vietnamese cultures. Observing traditional Vietnamese houses that are raised for ventilation and shade, the university utilizes four giant columns that serve all educational classrooms and respective college programs. The residential is raised on to a flat slab covering the site allowing ample shade and sunlight to the opened ground floor below that becomes the public playing field for all students and visitors.


MASTERPLAN OCCUPANTS

PARKING FACILITY DORMS

5000 undergrad 360 grad 400 faculty 430 cars 2500 scooters 250 classrooms 60 offices 80 studio unit 150 1-bed unit 800 4-bed unit 250 2-bed apt

LIVE Residential dormitories are influenced by Vietnamese villages with individual dorms, a shared open green space, and path to other clusters of dorms. Open courtyards allow the environment to enter the residential spaces.

STUDY Columns are composed of colleges Arts + Humanities + Social Sciences, Sciences + Mathematics, Engineering + Computing. The entrance column is Administrative for all faculty and staff. Each column has a different layout tailored to its program. PLAY The entrance to the campus begins with a man-made wetland that opens to the underground parking. Beneath the residential slab the ground floor is for assembly areas and sports fields as well as flexible open spaces for students to freely utilize.


FORMATION

Individual Houses/Units

Shared Open Space

Circulation Villages/Dorms


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LIVE Units form a cluster, and clusters form a neighborhood. Each floor displays different layouts of dorms, creating unique patterns of perforation conditions through each neighborhood. Every cluster surrounds a central green space with openings that reach from the ground floor to the roof to allow private yet shared courtyards within each cluster of units.


Ground Floor Assembly Space


Residential Shared Space


Physical Model


COOPER HEWITT MUSEUM EXTENSION Manhattan, NY 2017 Summer | Advanced Studio VI Critic | Mark Rakatansky

The Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum explores artifacts and items ranging from prosthetic limbs to patterned wallpapers, all with the theme of design. Focusing on artifacts related to tools and users, the museum extension flips the existing roof of the museum, reversing the role of the viewer and the designer. Artifacts are categorized by the body part they are associated with and are placed within various wall types to subjugate the viewer to the position required to view the object. To encourage the idea of design an additional makerspace is added above the design library connected to the extension.


Artifact Transformation


Museum Transformation


FLAT WALL Brain/Body Artifacts

NO WALL Arm Artifacts

INCLINED OUT WALL 1 Face Artifacts

INCLINED OUT WALL 2 Leg/Feet Artifacts

INCLINED IN WALL Hand Artifacts


USER The extension explores the idea of guests as the ‘users’ who have entered to ‘use’ the artifacts on display. The relationship between guests and displays should be active, where users can understand by doing, not seeing. Each display requires the user to ‘act,’ otherwise the artifacts themselves cannot be seen.


Inclined Out Wall Displays


JFK AIRPORT TERMINAL 4 EXPANSION Queens, NY 2015 Fall | Advanced Synthesis Options Studio I Critic | Hal Hayes

The project is an extension of the existing Concourse A in Terminal 4 of the JFK Airport in New York. As a Delta Airlines exclusive concourse it becomes the international concourse for Delta Airlines. The concourse is composed of multiple concrete shells that extend from the ground floor and rest on top of each other. A waffle grid structure was used in order for the concrete structure to extend 44ft with trusses connecting from the sides of the shells for additional support. The shells alternate between two shapes, one extending out and forming the gatehouse. Throwing homage to the TWA, large sculptural columns support the extended wings while a glass sterile corridor connects the arriving travelers and direct them towards Concourse A.


GROUND FLOOR LEVEL apron / baggage handling


3RD FLOOR LEVEL sterile corridor

4TH FLOOR LEVEL Delta Skyclub

2ND FLOOR LEVEL main concourse


CONCOURSE The concourse is highest on the node connecting to the existing concourse and slopes down gradually until it reaches the ground level, where a Jitney stop exists on the apron for travelers to quickly move between Terminals. Retail and restaurants line the North of the concourse, leaving the covered South for service and bathrooms.


Concourse Section

Gatehouse Section


BISHOPSGATE GOODSYARD DEVELOPMENT London, UK 2016 Fall | Advanced Synthesis Options Studio III Critic | Jonathan Kline Partner | Fah Kanjanavanit

The Bishopsgate Housing proposal creates a sense of neighborhood within the Bishopsgate Goodsyard community. The ground level creates a retail street from Shoreditch High Street to Brick Lane. It also responds to the historical context of the site by celebrating the remaining listed arches as entrances, spatial divider, and retail space. The second layer is the park, which is an extension of Principal place plaza. The third is a walkway that connects the community together through amenities and park space. The project focuses on the Eastern end of the site with the Artist Housing and Co-living Housing. The buildings are designed from the unit scale and each facade translates the program within the building.


MASTERPLAN The program is organized responding to the immediate context. The main offices and co-work buildings are located towards the Bishopsgate development and the residential towards Bethnal Green/Brick Lane. The built program is pushed to the boundary of the site, wrapping around the open space. In this open space, a layering of different public and commercial spaces are placed for the city to engage with.


Park Level / Walkway Level

Ground Level


Brick Lane

Museum Gallery

Co-Living Housing

Artist Housing


Residential Shared Space

Public Shared Space


MARS REGOLITH HABITAT Meridiani Planum, Mars 2016 Spring | Advanced Synthesis Options Studio II Critic | Christina Ciardullo

Mars Habitat is a finalist for the Mars City Design competition and currently being 3D printed as a prototype in the Mojave Desert. Taking place on the Meridiani Planum near the equator of Mars, the project takes inspiration from termite mounds and its construction process. To avoid transporting construction materials from Earth, the project uses the Martian regolith and the sulfur abundant in the Martian soil to make sulfur concrete which can be used to 3D print the structure. The process utilizes Minibuilder robots developed by the Institute of Advanced Architecture of Catalonia in Barcelona to 3D print the walls and foundation of the mounds. An Extrusion robot is used to extrude silicon for re-bar, as well as making silicon optical fibers to be used with the sulfur concrete to produce translucent concrete for daylighting.


FOUNDATION

LAYERING

CEILING

FINISH

Excavation robots arrive and begin digging out regolith for foundation of the building Foundation robots begin mixing Martian soil with melted sulfur for sulfur concrete

Wall robots grip to ends of the walls to print along the edges to finish dome Vacuum robots print additional layer on the exterior of the walls for structure Optical fibers added to concrete mix for transparency along walls

3D printing robots use silicon to make fiberglass rebar for re Wall robots begin making walls around excavated site by lay

PCTFE coating added to interior of walls for pressure barrier ECLSS racks brought in for habitation


einforcement yering concrete

r

LAYERING

3D printing robots further lay out rebar along walls Wall robots continue layering walls higher

LAYERING

Second floor built on top of first by adding further layers of concrete


Living Layer

Foundation Layer

SECTION DETAIL


PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE Seoul, South Korea 2016 Summer | Keunbo Yang & Partners Nowon Children’s Center

The competition for a Children’s Center in the city of Nowon in South Korea requested in addition to a children’s center, a library, book cafe, youth classrooms, and offices. Openings in the continuous roof that reaches the ground allow daylight into the children’s library, along with rotated louvers attached to the main facade. A patterned solar panel system composes the roof, saving energy costs and teaching children about sustainability.


X4

X5

2500.00

Y3

Book Cafe

27.00 (±0.00)

( 30m2 )

UP

ADA Elevator

Y3

26.00 (-1.00)

Track Field

8800.00

Y2

Therapy Room 2 ADA Elevator

( 16.7m2 )

UP

Conference Room

Y3

( 89m2 )

2490.00

Y2 Y1

( 73m2 ) ( 16.5m2 )

Office

Examination Room ( 16.5m2 )

Examination Room

Y2 Y1

2490.00

Y2

( 16.5m2 )

Y1

3rd Floor Plan 2016. 06. 27. KYP 3rd Floor Plan 2016. 06. 27. KYP

( 24m2 )

Group Classroom ( 24m2 )

X3 6520.00

X2

X4

2500.00

X3 6520.00

X5 5030.00

X5

X4

2500.00

5030.00

Site Line

Outdoor Unit Installation (Exterior)

Outdoor Unit Installation (Exterior)

Conference Room

( 84m2 )

( 16.5m2 )

( 89m2 )

8800.00

8800.00

Y4

( 16.7m2 )

Protection Office Conference Room

X2

1800.00

Site Line

DN UP

ADA Elevator

Y3

DN

( 73m2 ) Therapy Room Therapy ( 17m2 ) Room 2

EPS Room

2490.00

Y2 Y1

X1

Protection Office

Office

Y1

X1

Y5Y4

( 17m2 )

PS

Group Classroom

( 29m2 )

X5 5030.00

Youth Classroom

( 104m2 )

1800.00

Therapy Room

Site Line

Site Line

Sprinkler Pump

X4

( 104m2 )

Multi-purpose Room

X5

PS

EPS Room

( 29m2 ) Children’s Center

( 36m2 )

5030.00

2500.00

Group Classroom

Multi-purpose Room

Y5

X3 6520.00

( 36m2 )

( 7.8m2 )

Children’s Center

2100.00

X2

Youth Classroom

조리실

( 11.6m2 )

Group Classroom

2nd Floor Plan 2016. 06. 27. KYP 2nd Floor Plan 2016. 06. 27. KYP

8800.00

Sprinkler Pump

X4

2500.00

( 57m2 )

Conference Room

( 84m2 )

8800.00

2100.00 3800.00 2100.00

Y4 Y3 Y3

3800.00

Y5Y4

Y5

X1 1800.00

25.70

3800.00 2100.00

X3 6520.00

26.90

Multi-purpose Room

조리실

ADA Elevator( 7.8m2 )

( 11.6m2 )

( 22m2 )

3800.00

X2

25.70

( 57m2 )

( 93m2 )

Y2

X1 1800.00

26.90

Multi-purpose Room

Youth Center

2490.00

( 11.5m2 )

Y1

Shop

( 93m2 )

2490.00

Y2 2490.00 2490.00

Y2 Y1

( 11.5m2 ) UP

Y1

UP

Shop

1st Floor Plan 2016. 06. 27. KYP 1st Floor Plan 2016. 06. 27. KYP

DN

Children’s Center Office

( 22m2 )

( 168m2 )

Youth Center

ADA Elevator

Children’s Center Office

8800.00

Children’s Library

PS

Sprinkler Pump EPS Room

2490.00

8800.00

( 168m2 )

8800.00

Track Field

X5 5030.00

EPS Room

UP

Children’s Library 26.00 (-1.00)

X4

2500.00

UP

UP

ADA Elevator

6520.00

DN

( 30m2 )

Y4

DN

Book Cafe

27.00 (±0.00)

DN

Site Line

EPS Room

X5 5030.00

PS

Sprinkler Pump

DN

ADA Bathrooms

26.90

X3

1800.00

DN

PS

X2

X1

UP

EPS Room

Sprinkler Pump

X4

2500.00

UP

X5

Entrance

Site Line

ADA Bathrooms

Site Line

PS

5030.00

Y5Y4

2100.00

Sprinkler Pump

6520.00

26.90

X4

2500.00

Y5

X3 6520.00

Site Line

Y4

3800.00 2100.00

Y3

Y3

X2

X3

1800.00

UP

3800.00

Y5Y4

Y5

X1 1800.00

X2

X1

UP

5030.00

Entrance

2100.00

X3 6520.00

2100.00 3800.00

X2

3800.00

X1 1800.00

4th Floor Plan 2016. 06. 27. KYP 4th Floor Plan 2016. 06. 27. KYP


X-INFORMATION MODELING Manhattan, NY 2017 Fall | GSAPP Tech Elective Critic | Lucien Wilson Partner | Fah Kanjanavanit

To explore different methods of analysis and optimal massing, the Mercedes House was chosen as precedent for its unique shape and conditions. Taking note of its courtyards and stepping terraces towards the river, 60 variations of the massing were tested: varying step widths for single or double loaded corridors, reversed peaks with views towards the city, and 5 different footprints from the typical courtyard to zigzags. Design Explorer was used to analyze the degree of shadows into both courtyards and percentage of views towards the river. After optimization, the C-shaped typical courtyard was found to have best overall performance while the original footprint performed worst in all categories, however proved best for the surrounding neighborhood.


BUILDING IS ONE BLOCK 32 Stories

UNITS STEP DOWN EAST - WEST 864 Units

SUNLIGHT INTO COURTYARD North courtyard shadowed by residential building

GROSS FLOOR AREA 700,000 sqft

CORE AREA 30,500 sqft

TWO OPEN COURTYARDS North / South

VIEW TO HUDSON RIVER Massing terraces down to river maximize views

BUILDING EFFICIENCY 669,500 sqft | 95%


Step Width

Original Massing

Peak Orientation

Building Footprint


Design Explorer | Best Daylight

Design Explorer | Best Views


ORIGINAL FOOTPRINT

Worst daylight into courtyard Lowest views to river

LINEAR

Overall low performance Lower daylight and viewing performance

ZIG-ZAG

Highest views to river Lower daylight performance

REVERSE FOOTPRINT

Second best daylight into courtyard Average viewing performance

TYPICAL COURTYARD

Best daylight into courtyard Second highest views to the river Best overall performance


TECHNIQUES OF THE ULTRAREAL Redwood Forest, CA 2017 Fall | GSAPP Graphic Elective Critics | Joseph Brennan, Phillip Crupi Partners | Fah Kanjanavanit Michael Wang, Qinyi Wu

Techniques of the Ultrareal explore the rendering advancements in 3DS Max to create lifelike representations of the imagined world. A connected treehouse structure within a forest was envisioned with atmosphere being the most significant aspect of the image. The story follows the idea of abandonment, to nature taking its course and taking over, and finally the rediscovery of the campsite for shelter. The images are purposely left unoccupied by any figures.


TREEHOUSE The design of the treehouses came from simple modern treehouse structures centered on single tree trunks supported by beams. Wooden panels with large openings were used to blend into the environment. The structure of the treehouse allows the tree trunk to enter the center of the house and exit through the roof. Bare wooden walls and few furniture pieces decorate the room to further the idea of abandonment.


EUGENE JAHNG jahng.eugene@gmail.com 650-319-5412 529 W 111 ST #25 New York, NY 10025 https://eljahng.com

SKILLS DIGITAL

Rhinoceros 3D | V-Ray Grasshopper | Autodesk 3DS MAX | Revit AutoCAD 3D Adobe Photoshop | Illustrator InDesign | Microsoft Suite

MANUAL

Hand Sketching | Rendering Laser Cutting | 3D Printing CNC Routing Woodshop Model Making

LANGUAGE

English (fluent) Korean (fluent) Chinese (intermediate)

EDUCATION Columbia University GSAPP | New York, NY | 2017 - 2018 Master of Science in Advanced Architectural Design Carnegie Mellon University | Pittsburgh, PA | 2012 - 2017 Bachelor of Architecture University and College Honors, Commencement 2017 Dean’s List, Fall 2012 - Spring 2017 Fourth Year Design Awards, Spring 2016 EXPERIENCE KEUNBO YANG & Partners | Seoul, South Korea | June - August 2016 SUMMER ARCHITECTURE INTERN Nowon Children’s Center Competition | Built 2017 Made 3D interior and exterior computer models for renders and diagrams Modeled solar panel patterns and contacted firms for fabrication Hanwool Library Competition Made 3D exterior models and diagrams for competition entry Produced plans and managed graphic layouts Yangnam Mixed-Use Development Competition | 2nd Place Assisted 3D rendering and environment graphics for renders SAMOO Architects & Engineering | Seoul, South Korea | July - August 2015 SUSTAINABLE DESIGN DEPARTMENT INTERN Sustainability Guidebook Designed vector art for Guidebook used for certification Organized information and research for graphic layouts Department Office Work Created presentations and research for conferences JUNGLIM Architecture Co., Ltd | Seoul, South Korea | June - July 2015 MIXED-USE DESIGN DEPARTMENT INTERN Shinsegae Ansung Department Store Made site and existing conditions models Translated documents and contracts for foreign collaborators Produced and organized schematic drawings for presentation meetings AWARDS Mars City Design Finalist, Architecture Category, Spring 2016


Architecture Portfolio  

Architecture Portfolio 2018

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Architecture Portfolio 2018

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