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ERIN JACOBSON M. INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE M. ARCHITECTURE University of Oregon, 2014


ABOUT ME As a Wyoming native, a love and respect of the natural environment was instilled in me from a young age. I carry that with me today as I strive to design projects that are both aesthetically engaging and ecologically sensitive. I live for maple doughnuts, the Sunday morning paper and fresh powder....


DESIGN THE

UNEXPECTED


SUSTAINABLE DESIGN USER EXPERIENCE branding

storytelling

touch

sight

taste

smell

CONCEPT

hearing

form

REALITY

assembly

structure function

MATERIALS

efficiency maintenance

DETAILING

healthy people, healthy spaces, healthy environment


Design is a powerful tool - at its finest, it allows us to provide users with extraordinary spatial experiences. Design should entertain, educate, and inspire others to live their best life. Design should be innovative, always pushing the boundaries of what’s possible. So let’s shake

things up and DESIGN THE UNEXPECTED.


CATENA Summer 2011 // Daniel Meyers

Designed for the Portland, Oregon Museum of Contemporary Craft ‘Catena’ offers flexibility for both users and exhibits. This piece was designed to enable the use of educational technologies, such as the i-pad, in the museum experience. Because these devices are constantly changing and evolving, Catena is a built as a support piece rather than an integrated object. The flexible configurations and user options provided by Catena will support the needs of the museum for years to come. * Design concept and modeling by Erin Jacobson. Development and construction by Erin and team members of IARC 584.


Concept Development

mock-up

construction


assembly

testing


PORTLAND MIXED HOUSING PORTLAND, OREGON Fall 2011 // Michael Fifield

“ A sustainable community needs to be structured into complete, well-connected, mixed-use neighborhoods that allow residents to work, live, play, shop, and learn within a convenient walking or transit distance... A diverse mix of housing reflecting a range of incomes, family sizes, and ages should exist.... The open space in a sustainable community should enhance habitat through urban landscape design, offering significant recreation opportunities for people of all ages, and providing places to grow food in the city. “ Brent Toderian, Mark Holland “Urban Land Green”


COURTYARD


varied street front

LOCAL

LOCAL

COLLECTOR

TOTAL UNITS: 190, -28 d.u/acre housing density in relation to street type

TOTAL PARKING: 74%


DETAILED SITE PLAN SOUTH BLOCKS

1

2

4

3

1. 5’ SIDEWALK

3. BENCH SEATING

2. WOOD DECKING

4. GRAVEL

5

5. BICYCLE PARKING


DETAILED SITE PLAN NORTH BLOCKS

7

7. COMMUNITY GARDENS 8. SHARED YARD

8


COMMUNITY GARDEN

SHARED YARD


SINGLE FAMILY HOME, ADU 1,700 SQ FT, 12 UNITS * design “option 1” shown, 4 available


UNIVERSITY OF OREGON, CHAPMAN HALL Spring 2011 // Erin Cunningham Chapman Hall is home to the Clark Honors College at the University of Oregon. As the oldest honors college in the nation, it was necessary that the renovation paid tribute to the historic presence of the college while providing for the modern needs of todays student body. This was achieved through prominent branding and universal design.


MAIN ENTRY


HISTORICAL INSPIRATION

Chapman Hall as the campus bookstore, 1950’s corridors as gathering space

BRANDING Historical photos showcasing the past life of Chapman Hall are laminated on acrylic panels - serving as wayfinding markers. Pops of yellow mark important gathering and social spaces.

Knoll modular furniture set, 1950’s

‘Alphabet’ by Alexander Girard, 1952

lecture hall


‘Caper Chair’ Herman Miller

‘Pennyfields Chair’ Alex Whitney

Ground Floor Plan N.T.S

‘Intrigue’ modular lounge system, O.F.S

‘Sumner’ Pendant

‘Aeros’ Pendant - Rejuvenation Lighting & House Parts


CRAFTY WONDERLAND Spring 2012 // Jenna Fribley * ARCHIVED

Crafty Wonderland started in 2006 as a monthly gathering of Portland artisans to sell their goods to the public. The fairs were so successful that a small retail shop was later established in downtown Portland. This proposed design is based on the true notion of a wonderland; with an organic floor plan and an etherial atmosphere that encourages patrons to ‘discover’ the treasures located in each cove. A monochromatic material palette develops a rich layering of textures that offset the brightly colored products including yarn, ceramics, jewelry, prints, and clothing.


Amy Olson

Anderson Soap Company

MussyandBirds

Curious

Portfolio -

Mary Kate McDevit


PITCH TABLE

URCHIN POUF

JULES CHAIR

PS SVINGA


TILLY JANE A-FRAME

MT. HOOD NATIONAL FOREST, OREGON Fall 2012 // Mark Donofrio * ARCHIVED

Built in 1939 by the Conservation Core, the Tilly Jane A-frame has served for decades as a warming hut to devoted backcountry recreationalists. Unfortunately, over the years, the shelter has fallen into disrepair, limiting the use of the cabin. Extensive research was conducted on the building and historical construction methods, aiding in the development of a detailed digital model. This was used as the framework to understand the implications regarding rehabilitation of and addition to the building. The end result is a design that adds much needed space and light while preserving the original character of Tilly Jane. *Registered as a National Parks Service rehabilitation project


EXISTING CONDITIONS

East Elevation

Transverse Section


First Floor Plan, N.TS

Longitudinal Section

Second Floor Plan, N.TS


PROPOSED DESIGN

NORTH Elevation

South Elevation

First Floor Plan, N.T.S

Arno B. Cammerer, Director East Elevation National Parks Service, 1949


Second Floor Plan, N.T.S

Transverse Section

Longitudinal Section


heavy timber

columnar basalt

cedar shakes

vertical lap board

“In any area in which the preservation of Nature is a primary purpose, every modification of the natural landscape, whether it be by construction of a road or erection of a shelter is an intrusion. A basic objective of those who are entrusted with development of such areas for the human uses for which they are established, is, it seems to me, to hold these intrusions to a minimum and so to design them that besides being attractive to look upon, they appear to and be a part of their setting.�

Arno B. Cammerer, Director National Parks Service, 1949


Abutment Detail, at Existing Footings *Abutment Detail proposed by FFA architects, re-drawn by Erin Jacobson


Roof Eave Detail, at North Addition, N.T.S


Clerestory Detail, at North Addition, n.t.s


RE-THINKING CONCRETE TERM PROJECT: ARCH 610

“Molecular Innovation in Concrete and Polymers� Spring 2013 // Erin Moore Concrete and Polymers are some of the most heavily used materials in the building industry - however, their life cycle costs are enormous. Professor Julie Hack of the Green Chemistry Department and Professor Erin Moore of Architecture collaborated in teaching students how innovation can happen when approaching the problems of material carbon footprints from a molecular level. Utilizing fundamentals of chemistry, students then developed their own innovations responding to issues in architecture, the environment and society.


Re-thinking concrete

Can bamboo be paired with concrete to create a more efficient and sustainable building product?

- cement - H2O - aggregate - steel (rebar)

LABOR

MATERIAL

P

CONCRETE CONSTRUCTION IS INTENSIVE -

BLE

M

RO

building formwork laying rebar tying rebar pouring concrete

MONEY ENERGY - CO2 emissions

TIME


MATERIAL INEFFICIENCY slab construction

SO

LUTI

ON

Concrete is strong in compression, but poor in tension, resulting in ‘wasted’ material that must be made up for with steel rebar. What if we only utilized concrete where it is structurally necessary?

Bamboo to the rescue? Recently, researchers have been experimenting with bamboo fibers as a substitute for steel in concrete, known as Fiber Reinforced concrete.

Current research is testing the addition of fibers to the concrete mixture. However, time intensive formwork is still required...

Bamboo

Steel

Fb = 7.6 - 27

Fb = 14

Ft = 14.8 - 38 Ft = 16 * kN/cm2


N

INN

IO

OVA T

Could we develop a product that replaces both rebar and formwork? Thereby,

reducing concrete material use AND improving the carbon footprint of concrete ?

1

- MACHINE - MATERIAL press

hydrolic lever

bamboo resin block porous plate

bamboo resin

compression mold


Ba P

O4

ter las

The addition of plaster to the matrix will help provide a coefficient of thermal psu m expansion similar to that of concrete. Gy This ensures the two material layers (concrete & bamboo resin) will adjust in tandem, reducing the potential for cracking. Gypsum is also a natural fire retardant. This should help to counteract the flammability of the polyethylene. The Plaster could be sourced as waste product from cement plants.

m

o Fiber o b

CaS

thylene ye

2

CH 2 = C H

Forms of 4’ x 8’ will be produced by the compression mold, allowing for easy handling and shipping.

cycled Po re l


unlimited molds

CUSTOM FABRICATION

G

B

IN CK

SLA T S OI

DE

J concrete infill bamboo resin

B

L FF A W

LA ES


NS

LIM

IO

ITA T

- The proposed system is produced in sheets, which will result in a series of joints between sheets. How can this joint become a point of strength, rather than weakness in the structural system?

*

‘key-joints’ are used for precast concrete sections. Could a similar approach be applied? Is this another starting point for innovation in the construction process?

-Bamboo is hydrophillic. Polyethylene is hydrophobic. This can cause problems in the binding of the matrix.

*

Researchers have found some success by charging the particles prior to mixing.


OREGON MUSEUM OF ECOLOGY AND CONSERVATION 419 N.E 10th Street . Portland, Oregon

Master of Interior Architecture Thesis, 2012-2013 Professor Alison Snyder // Professor Linda Zimmer


‘ We are involved now in a profound failure of imagination. Most of us cannot imagine the wheat beyond the bread, or the farmer beyond the wheat, or the farm beyond the farmer, or the history beyond the farm. Most people cannot imagine the forest and forest economy that produced their houses and furniture and paper, or the landscapes, the streams, and the weather that fill their pitchers and bathtubs and swimming pools with water. Most people appear to assume that when they have paid their money for those things, they have entirely met their obligation.’ ‘In the Presence of Fear’, Wendell Berry


Oregon’s fertile soil and superlative trees provided the motivation for the first settlers, & continued wise resource use is essential for continued community value. To achieve this, ecological literacy must be a part of a citizen’s lifetime learning experience. OMEC provides a unique opportunity for supplemental education needed by children and the continuing educational of adults. * Excerpt from Proposal Abstract Three exhibits, “This is Oregon”, “Altered Landscapes”, and “H2Oh!” were designed for the museum. Each includes aspects of interactive design including motion activated light, sound and noise. This reinforces a central component of the storyline - that humans have a direct relationship with nature.


-

building documentation ‘as built’ drawings code research programming


THE BISON BUILDING

-

N.E Glisan Street

Built in 1941, the Bison Building once housed workers and machinery for the fabrication and assembly of ships. During the war, the Bison Building was part of a neighborhood of factories that worked together to manufacture up to one ship per day. The building boasts heavy timber framing, over 3,000 panes of glass and the original hoists, boiler, and security safe.

N.E Flanders Street

419 N.E 10th Ave. Portland, Oregon

FOOTPRINT: 200’ x 232’ GROSS sq. ft: 50,318 1st STORY = 45,840 sq. ft 2nd STORY = 4,478 sq. ft. * The site is currently zoned as IG-1, The proposed project is A-3. N.E 10th Street


- schematic design


SCHEME 1: mortise and tenon

SCHEME 2: woven journey

SCHEME 3: wandering exploration

Scheme development: exploring spatial possibilities in relationship to the bay structure and double height central core.


SCHEME 3: wandering exploration

Storyline Development: translating content into spatial narrative.

Exhibit Development: developing “This is Oregon� exhibit -abstracting landscapes into built form.


Exhibit Development: exploring flexible space arrangements for “altered landscapes exhibit�.


- design development


MAIN ENTRY


Klamath Mountains

Classrooms

Pacific P acific Northern Basin

N.E Flanders Street

Willamett

Pacific acific Coast

Entry Cafe Gift Shop

N.E 10th Street FIRST FLOOR PLAN Scale: 1/32” = 1’ - 0”

N.E Glisan Street

LOADING STORAGE WORKSHOP


Administration

Altered ed Landscapes H2OH!

SECOND FLOOR PLAN Scale: 1/32” = 1’ - 0”


This is

OREGON INSPIRED BY THE COLLABORATIVE MEDIA PROJECT OF JULIAN BIALOWAS AND SHWOOD EYEWEAR - “THIS IS OREGON” LEADS VISITORS ON A JOURNEY ACROSS THE STATE OF OREGON THROUGH SIX MAJOR ECOREGIONS, INCLUDING THE:: - NOTHERN BASIN - KLAMATH MOUNTAINS - WILLAMETTE VALLEY

- CASCADES - COAST RANGE - PACIFIC

AN IMMERSIVE ENVIRONMENT OF TOUCH, SOUND, AND LIGHT ENGAGE THE SENSES, PROVIDING A UNIQUE EXPERIENCE. IN ADDITION TO LEARNING THE FUNDAMENTALS OF OREGON ECOLOGY, VISITORS WILL BE INSPIRED TO “GET UP, GO OUT, AND START EXPLORING!” *photos from “This is Oregon” media project.


WILLAMETTE VALLEY


KLAMATH MOUNTAINS


NORTHERN BASIN


- Altered Landscapes Exhibit - H2Oh! Exhibit


FOCUSED ON THE EVER CHANGING SCENERY AROUND US, “ALTERED LANDSCAPES” SHOWCASES PHOTOGRAPHY FROM AROUND THE WORLD. CONTENT IS FOCUSED ON ECOLOGICAL CHANGE OCCURRING AT MICRO AND MACRO SCALES, REMINDING VISITORS THAT ONE CAN NOT ALWAYS SEE THE IMPACT OF ECOLOGICAL SHIFT FROM ONE PERSPECTIVE. THE PHOTOGRAPHY ILLUSTRATES CHANGE FROM BOTH NATURAL AND HUMAN OCCURRENCES, HIGHLIGHTING THE INTERSECTION BETWEEN THE TWO.

Robert Adams, Burning Oil Sludge, Boulder County, Colorado, 1974. Gelatin Silverprint, 5 x 7 inches Carol Franc Buck Collection

*inspired by the exhibition and permanent collection “The Altered Landscape” of the Nevade Museum of Art

David Maisel, Terminal Mirage 13 (Ed. 4/5), 2003, printed 2007 Dye Coupler Print, 48 x 48 inches Carol Franc Buck Collection


WATER IS THE WORLD’S MOST PRECIOUS RESOURCE - HUMANS AND THE ECOSYSTEMS IN WHICH THEY LIVE ARE DEPENDANT UPON IT FOR SURVIVAL. ALTHOUGH IT MAKES UP OVER 70% OF THE EARTH, ONLY 4 PERCENT IS FRESHWATER. “H2OH” BEGINS BY INTRODUCING VISITORS TO THE SCIENCE OF WATER BY ILLUSTRATING THE DIFFERENT PHASESGAS, LIQUID, AND SOLID. TOUCH SCREEN CUBES PROVIDE ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ON CURRENT ISSUES AROUND THE GLOBE, INCLUDING: DROUGHT, FRESHWATER RESOURCES, AND IRRIGATION PRACTICES.


CLASSROOMS



Erin Jacobson, Portfolio