Page 9

“The idea that children’s educational experience will be enhanced by imposing a 10% reduction on the time they spend in class is frankly absurd.”

EIS Stands Firm Against Cuts to the Pupil Week

T

achieve such targets? Clearly not - teachers will simply be exhorted to ‘work harder’ until they drop. It is a huge miscalculation, also, on the part of some self-billed leadership organisations to think that the removal of NCCT (non class contact time) staffing needs might somehow create additional management time. If it was standardised across the country, it Fewer teachers will mean fewer could lead to more than 2,000 posts being promoted posts and almost certainly lost. lead to even more class “It is a huge miscalculation commitment for DHTs and Whilst it seems that most HTs. to think that the removal of the political The EIS represents more parties are vying of NCCT (non class contact promoted staff, including with each other heads and deputes, than time) staffing needs might to claim they any other Scottish union and somehow create additional is well aware of the workload understand the importance of pressure on promoted management time” maintaining members but our response teacher numbers to ensure the delivery of to this is to argue collectively on behalf a quality educational experience for our of all staff for an end to the cuts and for young people, some local representatives additional resources. of those same parties seem reluctant We have called, by way of an example, to put into practice those aims. Cutting for a national staffing standard to be teacher posts is the wrong policy. introduced, including specific entitlement to Excessive workload is already a major management time for promoted posts. concern for teachers, for example – would Cutting the pupil week is wrong there be a 10% cut in the expectations educationally, as well. The idea that heaped upon schools and staff to match children’s educational experience will be the reduction in the time available to enhanced by imposing a 10% reduction HE EIS will continue to vigorously oppose proposals, in any local authority area, to cut the length of the primary school week. This is first and foremost an austerity driven, cost-cutting proposal designed to reduce the number of teachers employed in our Primary schools.

on the time they spend in class is frankly absurd. The reduction amounts to a loss of teaching and learning time equivalent to nearly 20 days per session – or around 7 months of education lost over a child’s primary life! International comparisons with some, carefully selected, countries, such as Finland, are disingenuous as they fail to take into account the extensive childcare and after school wrap around services which such countries run, at a considerable expense. In summary, the EIS is committed to opposing any plans to cut the pupil week. We will work tirelessly with parents and local campaign groups to challenge such proposals, as we have done previously in Renfrewshire and West Dunbartonshire and as we have been doing in Falkirk recently. We have raised with Scottish Government the need to regulate in this area to safeguard educational provisions across the country and to ensure that a post code lottery does not arise. The EIS is committed to taking whatever action is necessary to defend the education service, to safeguard our members’ jobs, and to ensure that the quality of Scottish Education is not sacrificed on the altar of austerity.

www.eis.org.uk

9

Profile for EIS SEJ

Scottish Education Journal  

The latest edition of the Scottish Education Journal, April 2015

Scottish Education Journal  

The latest edition of the Scottish Education Journal, April 2015

Profile for eis-sej
Advertisement