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REINVENT

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WHY WE RISK EVERYTHING FROM FORAGING AND COOKING, TO CAMPING & SKYDIVING

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noun, plural of ei·dos [ahy-dee]. The distinctive and formal expression of the cognitive or intellectual character of a culture or social group. It is the essence of each thing and its primary substance.

Tova Gelfond EDITOR-IN-CHIEF/ CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Craig Rosenberg CFO

Avi Gelfond ART DIRECTOR

Jaime Lin Weinstein SENIOR EDITOR

Tian Justman FASHION DIRECTOR

Charlie Watts STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Alisa Hutchinson ASSISTANT STYLIST

Victoria Knight Borges, Ashley Brechtel, Austin Holt, Jessica Hough & Lauren Ladov CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Monica Acree, Russell Dreyer, Brett Falcon, Julia Gartland, Jamie Hopper, Jimmy Johnston, Michelle Kappeler & Nathan Stoan CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

Christina Montford, Alex Taylor and Gina Yu EDITORIAL INTERNS

Lauren Foster and J.G. Ginsburg DESIGN INTERNS

Jessica Bell FASHION INTERN

© Enlightenmint Media Group, LLC 2014. All rights reserved. No part of this magazine may be used or reproduced without the written permission of the publisher Enlightenmint Media Group. The views expressed in Eidé Magazine are those of the respective contributors and are not necessarily shared by the magazine or its staff. The registered office of Enlightenmint Media Group is at 1200 Foster Street NW, Suite 20, Atlanta, Ga 30318. All information contained in the magazine is for information only and is as far as we are aware, correct at the time of going to press. Enlightenmint Media cannot accept any responsibility for errors or inaccuracies in such information. Readers are advised to contact manufacturers and retailers directly with regard to the price of products/services referred to in this magazine. If you submit unsolicited material to us, you automatically grant Enlightenmint Media a license to publish your submission in whole, or in part, in all editions of the magazine, including licensed editions worldwide and in any physical or digital format throughout the world. Any material you submit is sent at your risk and, although every care is taken, neither Enlightenmint Media nor its employees, agents, or subcontractors shall be liable for loss or damage. Published six times a year by Enlightenmint Media Group, LLC 1200 Foster Street NW, Suite 20, Atlanta, Ga 30318


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CONTRIBUTORS JAMIE HOPPER 1 Photographer Jamie

Hopper loves capturing the effeminate softness of morning light and the whimsy in everyday moments. Splitting her time between Atlanta and the Gulf Coast, she specializes in fashion, portrait and lifestyle photography. “Meeting and documenting Angela Ward was a privilege,” she says of her work for “Roll On” in this issue. “It’s always super inspiring to meet people with a great sense of adventure and drive. She has definitely made a real impact in the community.” (jamiehopperphotography.com)

ERICA BOGART 2 Makeup artist Erica Bogart is a creative visionary with ex-

pertise in color, texture and realization. An accomplished, dedicated professional within the cosmetics industry, Bogart illuminates individual beauty with passion and perfection. Recognized for her range of style with all ethnicities, her unique creations translate effortlessly on screen, in print and on the red carpet. “The colors found in nature provided the color palette for the shoot,” Bogart says of the looks she created for this issue’s “Natural Selection.” “There’s no better source of inspiration than the natural world around us.” (ericabogart.com)

JIMMY JOHNSTON 4 Jimmy Johnston is an Atlanta-based fashion and portrait

photographer. Born and raised in Georgia, he was never quite sure what he wanted to do in life until he started taking disposable 35mm film cameras to punk and hardcore shows in his early 20s. Eventually landing at The Creative Circus learning commercial photography, Johnston realized why those 35mm disposables never quite cut it. “From shooting beauty at the Atlanta Botanical Garden for the cover, to making our own little Italy in the heart of Atlanta, I can always count on the Eidé crew to find great locations for our shoot,” he says. Plus, “learning how to make ponytails fly was more fun than I could have ever imagined,” he adds of the “Pony Tale” feature in this issue. (jimmyjohnstonphoto.com)

MONICA ACREE 5 Singapore-based photographer Monica Acree believes life

isn’t worth living without travel. In this issue, she captures one of the wonders of the ancient world which she describes as “a dream shoot location. It’s impossible to take a bad photo in Peru. There are bright colors, kind people and stimuli everywhere.”

JESSICA HOUGH 3 Born in Pittsburgh and raised across the country, Jessica

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ON THE COVER Photography by JIMMY JOHNSTON Styling by TIAN JUSTMAN Model: SOPHIA Makeup by ERICA BOGART Hair Styling by JAIME TERLECKI & RACHEL ANDREAUS (more on page 130)

REINVENT

Your Sense of Self From the brain to the body

WHY WE RISK EVERYTHING

DISCOVER

FROM FORAGING AND COOKING, TO CAMPING & SKYDIVING

Adventure

Th e

$ 6 . 9 9 U S

DISPLAY UNTIL AUG 1, 2014

Hough studied film in Chicago and is currently completing a Masters degree in New York City. An art and film enthusiast, her writing focuses on artists and designers whose work is groundbreaking, expressive, purposeful and avant-garde. Aside from writing, she finds her own creative outlet in 35mm and large format film photography in addition to aerial dance choreography. Of her piece on Smith Hanes and Alisa Barry in this issue she says: “It was a wonderful experience to speak with these two dear friends and explore how their work so beautifully complements one another’s while reflecting a unique worldview and an inspirational artistic partnership.”

S U M M E R

COFFEE TALK WITH OLIVER STRAND • MICROBIAL FASHION • DENIM ON DENIM PLAYING ROLLER DERBY • DESIGN WITH SMITH HANES & ALISA BARRY

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LETTER FROM THE

Adventure Some Some people give you the freedom to take chances. I’m lucky enough to have an arsenal of personalities who allow me to challenge all of the normalcies in my life. One such spirit is the likes of writer, editor and dear, mischievous friend Austin Holt, who is leaving the country next month to embark on a year of living with his wife in a small town in Mexico. Simply because he can. And therefore does. “What an adventure their life must be,” I wonder at least once a day since I’ve heard the news of their departure. Granted, the voice in my head has a smug little nasty tone soaked with an inflated sense of jealousy. It’s not Mexico, or the fearless attitude to leave your world behind that inspires my envy (although such things are a marvel to me, a woman who would be hard-pressed to pack up all her worldly belongings for such a stretch of time), but the simple notion of doing something because you have the ability to. This, to me, inspires greatness. I’ve asked around, trying to discover a source of the adventure-averse aspects of our lives. And mostly we don’t challenge our status quo because we genuinely believe we can’t; it’s not practical or sensible. And through the assessment of the unpre-

dictability of life, our willingness to try is diminished by the threat that we’ll fail. I’ve been told, “The people who run the world are the people who show up.” It’s not the smartest, or strongest who are top toques, but rather those who are present for their life simply by doing. We never really know the ifs in life. If we risk it all, will there be a reward? If we raise our kids with our values, will they be awesome adults one day? If we do what we love, can we make money in the process? The ability to embark on those journeys is often overshadowed by the fear that the outcome may not be what we’re hoping for. But the chances, the adventures, are at our fingertips, if we are willing to wrap around a closed fist and hold on. As if you needed another reason to stand up to the whys with the attitude of why not. Thrill-seeking isn’t relegated to the lily pads of Taiwan, architecture of Prague or tranquil beaches of Mexico, it’s found right outside your carport or bus stop. Pursuing a meaningful existence — now that’s an adventure. Because the real cliff jumping is living your life.

Tova Gelfond


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TABLE

OF CONTENTS:

16 SUMMER TARTINES

Four easy recipes by Julia Gartland.

24 VINTAGE FLAVOR

New Southern sweets with an old soul.

28 THE FERMENTATION FRONTIER

An ancient preservation method in the modern age.

36 THE MUDDY BLUES

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Denim gets dirty — it’s gonna be a mud bath.

48 WILD TASTE

Food adventurers unearth organic edibles through foraging.

52 PERUVIAN HEIGHTS

Travel photographer Monica Acree shares the spaces of Peru.

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60 HEADHUNTING IN PANAMA

A self-imposed scavenger hunt on the road of life.

66 NO TENT REQUIRED

Camping in style.

68 ROMAN HOLIDAY

An Italian-inspired adventure sets the scene for summer fashions.

82 SACRED SPACE

At home with design duo Smith Hanes and Alisa Barry.

88 CUP BY CUP

Oliver Strand on finding the comforts of home in a cup of coffee.

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90 SEEING RED

A symbolic route to personal reinvention.

96 CALCULATED RISK

Why we risk everything … or nothing.

102 ROLL ON

Marking 10 years of the Atlanta Rollergirls with Angela Ward.

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108 A BRIEF HISTORY OF SKYDIVING

Form and function at 14,000 feet.

112 MOTION PICTURE

Atlanta Ballet dancers take athletic fashions to adventurous heights.

122 BEAUTIFUL BACTERIA

Clothing crafted from microbes may be the future of the fashion industry.

124 PONY TALE

It’s more than mere style; a ponytail tells a story.

130 NATURAL SELECTION

Lustrous shades imitate colors from the jungle.

138 BAG IN BLOOM

A carryall that adds color to your summer styles.

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IN THE SPRING ISSUE OF EIDÉ MAGAZINE, INACCURATE PRICING WAS PRINTED FOR THE GLASSES FEATURED IN "FRAME UP." THE CORRECT PRICING IS AS FOLLOWS: SERAPHIN EYEWEAR, CROCUS, $280; INNOTEC EYEWEAR, 4814, $249; SERAPHIN EYEWEAR, AURORA, $265; SERAPHIN EYEWEAR, ANTOINETTE, $265.


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FOOD & BEVERAGE

SUMMER

T A R T I N E S Recipes and photos by JULIA GARTLAND

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4 ounces tomatoes on the vine 3 garlic cloves 3 tablespoons olive oil, divided 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar 1/4 cup ricotta 2 thickly cut slices sourdough bread, toasted Sea salt Freshly ground pepper

R I C O T TA & S L O W - R O A S T E D T O M AT O TA R T I N E

Preheat oven to 250 degrees. Add tomatoes to a baking sheet with 2 tablespoons of olive oil, balsamic vinegar and garlic. Bake for 1 hour. Once tomatoes have baked, drizzle toasted sourdough with olive oil. Rub roasted garlic over each piece of toast for flavor. Spread a thick layer of ricotta cheese over each and top with slow-roasted tomatoes. Season with sea salt and freshly ground pepper to taste.

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G O AT C H E E S E & W I L D B L U E B E R R Y TA R T I N E 3 ounces goat cheese 1/4 cup wild blueberry preserves 2 tablespoons clover honey 2 thickly cut slices multigrain bread, toasted Spread goat cheese evenly over toasted multigrain bread. Top with generous dollop of wild blueberry preserves. Drizzle with clover honey and serve.

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FAVA B E A N WA L N U T G R E M O L ATA Walnut Gremolata: 1/2 cup walnuts, finely chopped 2 garlic cloves, minced 2 tablespoons fresh mint, minced 1/2 teaspoon sea salt 1 lemon, zest (reserve juice) 2-3 tablespoons olive oil Freshly ground pepper Mix all ingredients together in a medium-sized mixing bowl. Use a muddler to mash and combine everything well. Set aside. 1/2 pound fava beans, shelled 2 thickly cut slices whole grain bread, toasted 1 tablespoon olive oil Blanch shelled fava beans (cook in boiling water for 1 minute, then add to ice bath to cool). Drain beans and peel opaque outer shell, then set aside. Assemble tartine. Drizzle olive oil over whole grain toasts. Spread a generous portion of gremolata over each. Top with fava beans, lemon juice, sea salt and freshly ground pepper. SUMMER 2014

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DILL CREAM CHEESE & S M O K E D S A L M O N TA R T I N E 4 ounces cream cheese 3 tablespoons fresh dill, minced 2 ounces smoked salmon, roughly chopped 1 lemon, zest and juice 2 thickly cut slices multigrain bread, toasted Sea salt In a small mixing bowl, mash together cream cheese, dill, smoked salmon and lemon zest. Spread evenly over toasted multigrain bread. Top with lemon juice and sea salt to taste.

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FOOD & BEVERAGE

Vintage New Southern sweets with an old soul.

F L AVO R

Story by GINA YU | Photography by MICHELLE KAPPELER

Kelly Wilder is a purist. Enamored by the classic flavor profile of a single scoop of frozen custard, she devotes much of her life to showing everyone else what is distinctive about its texture and flavor. Bringing Atlanta its first custard food truck, Vintage Frozen Custard boasts “the classic taste of yesterday” with the spirit of an old-fashioned ice cream parlor against the backdrop of an urban skyline, rather than a small-town square.

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A born foodie, Wilder’s first frozen custard experience goes back to her high school days in North Carolina.

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t was a small shop in Raleigh that was first to bring the cold treat to the state and convert her into a real “custard groupie.” With pecans and fresh bananas as her toppings of choice, the self-proclaimed custard black belt is now converting others à la toppings such as homemade coffee caramel and caramelized banana sauce. She lives a double life: a pharmaceutical marketing professional on one hand and a CFO of Vintage Frozen Custard on the other — Chief Flavor Officer that is. Her husband, Malik, left his career as a commercial real estate appraiser to allow them to pursue this frozen custard establishment together. He controls the store and food truck (aka custard truck), running the day-to-day operations of the business as the CEO, Chief Experience Officer. “He says that the work is definitely harder .... more people, laws and quality control issues to manage,” Wilder says. “But the work is far more rewarding in that he is

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committed to growing a business that is ours. Vintage is our opportunity to leave a legacy for our children and community while developing and growing a business with integrity.” And the truck gives it wings (or wheels). It’s effective and easy to test the market with. “We believed that people would love frozen custard, but the business voice in us said that we needed to validate that assumption by taking our product to the streets to see how the public would respond,” she says. With an overwhelming thumbs up from customers, the duo isn’t looking back. Proceeding with caution, they work to gauge the temperamental food scene, encouraged by the ever-growing demand for damn good custard. “The adventure lies in that this whole process feels a bit like a free-fall experience,” she says. “But … the taste buds of our fellow metro Atlantans provide the much-needed parachute to keep us pressing forward.”


What exactly is the difference between custard and other frozen desserts? Frozen custard is definitely categorized as ice cream. The three main things that make it unique are the butterfat content (must be a least 10 percent), egg yolk (at least 1.4 percent) and production process. There are many places that have frozen custard on their marquis, but not many that have invested in a specialized production process requiring a frozen custard machine that produces custard slowly and in small batches, guaranteeing daily freshness. The process reduces the amount of air (overrun), creating a thicker, silkier ice cream product. Frozen custard is also served at a slightly warmer temperature (around 18 F) so that it does not freeze your taste buds like hard-packed ice cream, and allows the flavors to develop in your mouth. Vintage Frozen Custard, 1021 Howell Mill Rd, Atlanta, GA 30318, tastevintage.com. SUMMER 2014

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FOOD & BEVERAGE

THE

FERMENTATION

FRONTIER A N A N C I E N T P R E S E R VAT I O N

METHOD IN THE MODERN AGE

Story by VICTORIA KNIGHT BORGES | Photography by CHARLIE WATTS

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t is the buttery flavor you taste in chardonnay and the smooth, herbal sensation from a fresh cup of coffee. Evolution explains it, civilization repeats it and some of the greatest chefs in the world use it. It’s fermentation, and today we’re seeing a revival of the process within the culinary world. Think Jean-Georges, David Chang and Marc Vetri, just for starters. Besides being hip chefs and masters of their trade, these guys, and so many of their peers, cure meats in-house, make cheeses from scratch or pickle their own vegetables. According to Sandor Katz, acclaimed “fermentation fetishist,” DIY food activist and author of The New York Times bestseller, “The Art of Fermentation,” the idea of preserving foods has been key to survival in the past and vital to supporting local farming in the present. Its rise in popularity is seen as a rise in healthy eating. “We’ve been seduced into conveniences,” Katz explains. “It’s not that we’re not eating fermented food, but that other people or factories are making it for us. Until 75 years ago, fermentation was practiced in every community. If you didn’t have a refriger-

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ator, fermented foods were utterly essential. But from our vantage point in the 21st century, we confuse this. We realize this food is nutritionally diminished and environmentally and economically destructive to local farming.” Produced by the metabolic process that converts sugar to acid, gas or alcohol, fermentation is used to create many of our favorite foods such as bread, cheese, wine, beer, chocolate, coffee, salami, yogurt and pickles. According to Katz, fermentation is an easy process that has huge health benefits. “I usually tell people who are new to fermentation to follow a basic sauerkraut recipe, nothing complicated,” Katz says. “Sour pickles, kosher dills — I just love the lactic acid flavor of fermentation and the macrobiotic diet has great digestive benefits.” (Note: pickling is not the same thing as fermentation, but fermentation occurs during the pickling process.) There are some kinds of fermentation that have nothing to do with making food last longer but more to do with enhancing flavor. The following simple fermentation recipes are proven by everyday foodies to be the tastiest fermented foods around.


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FERMENTED CHEESE (10 mins prep, 15 mins cooking)

1/2 gallon dated milk (at least 4 days old, but refrigerated) 3 tablespoons white distilled vinegar 2 stems of an herb of your choice (thyme, chives, etc.)

Bring milk to a boil, add vinegar. Pour the milk through a cheesecloth, drain the extra liquid. Add in your diced herb selection and refrigerate.

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FERMENTED HOT CHILI SAUCE (20 mins prep, 5-7 days fermentation)

3 pounds fresh hot chilis (jalapeĂąo, habanero or serrano) 2 teaspoons salt 2 tablespoons unrefined cane sugar 4-6 garlic cloves 1 steril mason jar A starter culture: fresh whey, raw milk yogurt or milk kefir

Separate the chilis from the stems while keeping the hearts of the chilis in tact. PurĂŠe the chili with salt, sugar, garlic and herbs to taste. Mix in your starter culture and pour the chili mix into the mason jar. Cover with a cheese cloth and let sit for 5-7 days. Once the chili is bubbly, pour by the spoonful into a sieve and squeeze out the juices into another container. Refrigerate. This should keep for a few months.

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FERMENTED EGGPLANT (20 mins prep, 4 1/2 days fermentation)

1 medium eggplant, peeled and cut into small strips 1 cup salt 1 cup distilled white vinegar 1 cup balsamic vinegar Garlic to taste 2 tablespoons black pepper 2 tablespoons red pepper flakes 1 cup olive oil 1 large deep dish pan

In deep dish pan, mix eggplant strips with salt and let sit for 24 hours to brine. Then, squeeze the eggplant to remove the water, rinse the pan and mix in white vinegar and balsamic vinegar with the freshly squeezed eggplant. Soak for 24 hours. Squeeze the eggplant to remove vinegars, rinse and wash the pan, and add another cup each of white and balsamic vinegar. Soak for 15 hours. Squeeze the eggplant one final time, add in salt, garlic, red and black pepper and stir in olive oil. Leave in fridge for 2 days. Serve with freshly baked baguette.

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SANDOR’S SPECIAL SAUERKRAUT

Vessel: 1 liter wide-mouth jar, or a larger jar or crock 2 pounds vegetables per quart (varieties of cabbage or at least 1/2 cabbage and the remainder any combination of radish, turnip, carrot, beet, kohlrabi, Jerusalem artichoke, onion, shallot, leek, garlic, greens, seaweed, peppers, etc.) 1 tablespoon salt Other seasonings as desired (caraway seeds, juniper berries, dill, hot peppers, ginger, turmeric, etc.) Chop or grate vegetables into a bowl. The purpose of this is to expose surface area in order to pull water out of the vegetables, so they can be submerged under their own juices. Salt vegetables lightly and add seasonings to taste as you chop. Sauerkraut does not require heavy salting. Squeeze salted vegetables with your hands for a few moments (or pound with a blunt tool). This bruises the vegetables, breaking down cell walls and enabling them to give up their juices. Squeeze until you can pick up a handful and when you squeeze, juice releases (as from a wet sponge). Pack salted and squeezed vegetables into your jar. Press vegetables down with force so that juice rises up and over them. Fill jar almost all the way to the top, leaving a little space for expansion. Screw on the top, but be aware that fermentation produces carbon dioxide, so pressure will build up in the jar and needs to be released daily, especially the first few days as this is when activity will be most vigorous. Rate of fermentation will be faster in a warm environment, slower in a cool one. Some people prefer their krauts

lightly fermented for just a few days; others prefer a stronger, more acidic flavor that develops over a longer time. In a cool environment, kraut can continue fermenting slowly for months. Taste at regular intervals to discover what you prefer. The most common problem that people encounter when fermenting vegetables is surface growth of yeasts and/or molds, facilitated by oxygen. If you should encounter surface growth, simply scrape off the top layer and discard. The fermented vegetables beneath will look, smell and taste fine. Enjoy your kraut! For a larger vessel, the process is exactly the same at a scale in terms of ingredients, proportions, preparation and time. The only difference is in the vessel itself. In a crock or other larger vessel, use a weight to keep the vegetables submerged. I typically use a plate that fits inside the crock and sits on the vegetables, a jug filled with water to weigh it down and a cloth over the top to keep flies away. Some crocks are designed with water locks that keep air out but allow carbon dioxide pressure inside to release.

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Muddy The

BLUES

Photography by RUSSELL DREYER Styling by TIAN JUSTMAN Art Direction by AVI GELFOND Models: MALONE G and SARAH WOODS for Click Atlanta Makeup by ERICA BOGART Hair Styling by KK SMITH for the Green Room Agency Photography Assistant: BRENDEN SAVI Assistant Stylist: ALISA HUTCHINSON Makeup Assistant: AMBER WADE Shot on location at The Goat Farm Arts Center.

Denim Shirt, $72, LOVE AND AMBITION, at loveandambition.com. White Shirt, Stylist’s Own. Shorts, $150, MIH, at mih-jeans.com. Earrings, $65, FROLICK, at bridgeboutique.com. Denim Shirt, $72, LOVE AND AMBITION, at loveandambition.com. Necklace, $25, BRIDGE, Round Ring, $70, SIBILIA, both at bridgeboutique.com. Silver Ring, $54, GIANTLION, at shopgiantlion.com.


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Overalls, Rain Boots, both Stylist’s Own. Shirt, $69, TIAN JUSTMAN, at eidemagazine.com. Necklace, $69, ROCK KANDEE, Earrings, $60, VANESSA MOONEY, both at bridgeboutique.com. Shirt, Stylist’s Own. Jeans, $88, LEVI’S, at levi.com. Earrings, $49, TIAN JUSTMAN, at eidemagazine.com.


Shirt, $68, Dress, $88, both LEVI’S, both at levi.com. Necklace, $25, BRIDGE, at bridgeboutique.com. Shoes, $55, BANGS, at bangsshoes.com.

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Dress, $350, MIH, at mihjeans.com. Earrings, $15, Necklace, $60, both BRIDGE, both at bridgeboutique.com.

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Top, Stylist’s Own. Jeans, $78, LEVI’S, at levi.com. Bracelets, $25 (each), ROCK KANDEE, all at bridgeboutique.com. Belt, $295,TIAN JUSTMAN, at eidemagazine.com.


Shirt, Stylist’s Own. Leggings, $78, LEVI’S, at levi.com. Shoes, $60, BANGS SHOES, at bangsshoes.com. Necklace, $58, ROCK KANDEE, at bridgeboutique.com.

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Denim Shirt, $72, LOVE AND AMBITION, at loveandambition.com. Shorts, $58, LEVI’S, at levi.com. Shoes, $60, BANGS SHOES, at bangsshoes.com. Shirt, Overalls, Stylist’s Own. Shoes, $60, BANGS SHOES, at bangsshoes.com. Earrings, $60, VANESSA MOONEY, at bridgeboutique.com.

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FOOD & BEVERAGE

Wild Taste Food adventurers unearth organic edibles through foraging.

Story by LAUREN LADOV | Photography by CHARLIE WATTS

I

am surrounded by forest on all sides; the road from which I came seems but a distant memory. The speckled sunlight through the canopy dances over the thick groundcover, casting shadows of quaint chaos. Out of water, out of snacks, I am about to be out of my mind. This isn’t a mere visit to the country apple orchard, but it’s not an episode of “Naked and Afraid” either. Something stops me in my tracks. I fall silent, and the world about me chatters in hushed tones. The birds chirp rumors behind trees’ backs. Squirrels and chipmunks scurry in circles of love and deceit. Insects and worms crawl through the cracks and crevices of

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the forest facade. The orange creature stares back at me, trying to hide under the brush. But our eyes are locked. He can’t escape now. Watching my every step, I crouch over to my prey, swiftly. Pluck. He’s mine. “Where are all your friends?" I ask the perfect specimen. The chanterelle, a petit orange trumpet who sounds his presence each summer, keeps up a straight poker face. But I know he can’t be alone. Where there is one, there are more. My eyes sharpen with a new sense of determination. I scour the land in a 15-foot radius and spot a cluster of about 40 chanterelle mushrooms, plump from the uncommon recent rainfalls in suburban Atlanta, Ga.


Common throughout North America — around mountain ranges, mossy coniferous forests and disturbed grounds — this mushroom is a flavorful fungus — woody, earthy and sometimes peppery. Highly sought after, chanterelles can sell anywhere from $10 to $20 per pound at market price. This might partially explain the current surge of foraging throughout the United States, for plantlife far beyond the mushroom. At the end of a day of gathering, your sack could be filled with all sorts of organic lettuces, herbs and fungi that escape the organic, locally grown price tag. But the foraging craze stretches beyond a penchant for frugality. Renowned chefs throughout the country spend their time truffling through the woodlands or scavenging local parks for edibles. In fact, Southern farms are seeing an increase in chef requests for plants that are most commonly found in the wild. There are even foraging clubs sprouting up throughout major cities to service the demand. Foraging is not an exact science, so I wouldn’t advise a haphazard googling session followed by an all-you-can-grab scavenger hunt. And let’s be clear: I am by no means a foraging expert, nor even a professional, though I would call myself a student of the forest’s culinary delights. But if you are even interested in this “Survivor”-skills-turned-four-course-dinner edibles plan, we’ve amassed a starters guide for the foraging neophyte. The process can’t be learned from reading a book or sitting in a lecture, but these resources can aid in the experience. The best way to commence or improve your skills is to do it, especially with someone who is familiar with the local landscape and has foraging experience (thus, the aforementioned clubs).

THE WILDER THE SPACE, THE HEALTHIER, TASTIER AND MORE VIBRANT THE PLANT WILL BE SIMPLY BECAUSE IT GROWS IN A CLEAN CLIMATE.

Be sure to do research on the area you are foraging. The wilder the space, the healthier, tastier and more vibrant the plant will be simply because it grows in a clean climate. Spaces in higher altitudes, weeds growing at organic-styled farms or gardens, and city park trees will yield quality and safe results. Depending on where you live, plentiful foraging spaces can be scarce — especially in urban environments where the amount of cement alone precludes foraging possibilities. That does not mean edibles cannot grow in these regions. Many abandoned lots are breeding grounds for certain tasty weeds. However, due to the destruction of urban properties or mismanaged chemical use, the soil likely contains numerous heavy metals, which weeds absorb. Wild edibles can endure without the coddling of farmers who work to shelter their crops from extreme weather, insects and dry conditions. Taking so little from the soil and needing so few nutrients, these plants thrive outside of the uniformity and order of agricultural systems. Moreover, wild foods often contain more nutrients than their cultivated counterparts, precisely because they have developed such strong properties. If we nourish ourselves with such resilience, I can only hope that we, too, will develop the spirit of the wild.


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Guide Foraging to

WARNING: Do not forage contaminated grounds. This includes anywhere that may be exposed to pesticides or agricultural runoff, or next to roadways and nearby waterways downstream from industrial facilities.

WHAT TO BRING:

WHAT TO AVOID:

Pocket knife: To cut greens from their roots, choice wood or bark from a tree, or to declaw yourself from the grips of a thorn bush. Bags: If you are collecting mushrooms use a mesh bag (like one that grocery stores use to package 5 pounds of onions). Mesh bags keep mushrooms fresher and let thousands of spores fall back to the ground. The spores are microscopic. For example, the cap of each morel contains 250,000 to 500,000 spores. These spores must become airborne before settling down where there may be adequate growing condition. Plastic container or bin: Keeps greens and herbs fresher. ID book: Buy a pocket guide on wild edibles in your region. Gloves: Be smart when harvesting. Some edibles, like nettles, have stinging hairs or protective thorns. The more delicate and neat you can be with your harvest, the better the product and the safer you will be. Journal: Keep track of your secret spots, questions and observations.

Start slowly and with the familiar. I recommend berries. Mulberries and serviceberries are abundant. Often in public parks or in front of houses, city planners and landscapers choose to plant these trees not only for aesthetics, but as symbolic gestures to the community. It’s so easy to use berries — in smoothies, baked goods, jams; I’ve never heard anyone complain about an abundance of berries. You can pick these by hand, one by one, until your bags are full. If you’re going for efficiency, grab a tarp or blanket and set it underneath the tree. Shake the branches for a shower of berries to fall at your feet. Wear surgical gloves if you do not want purple hands at the end of the day. As you get more comfortable, venture into wilder spaces on searches for greens like chickweed and sorrel, dandelions

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Picking something you do not know. Picking everything in sight. Only take about 30 percent of edibles at site to ensure the species will thrive and return the next year. Trespassing. Wasting the harvest. After your forage, preserve or distribute and/or share some of your haul. Wild edibles have a short shelf life, so it may be a bit difficult to consume 5 pounds of dandelion greens yourself. Share the love or preserve. Preserving greens can be as simple as freezing leaves or making and canning pesto. Disturbing the habitat. Be careful not to litter, trample native homes or sully the space. The more respect you show your land, the more it will provide you with bounty.

and ground ivy flowers or mushrooms. Or if you are in the South, you’d do the community a favor if you harvested the wild invasive kudzu enveloping the region. Seemingly a freak of nature able to swallow a car whole, the plant is undoubtedly edible and delicious. Fresh and tender, kudzu leaves have a flavor similar to that of green beans. It’s actually a legume — a tasty fact that might make the idea of eating it easier to digest. My favorite preparation — deep fried kudzu leaves. Pick light green leaves, 2-inches in size. Create a loose batter with chilled water, flour and any desired spices. Simply heat oil in a pan. Rinse and dry kudzu leaves, then dip them in the batter. Fry battered leaves in oil quickly on both sides until brown. Drain on paper towels and munch while warm.


TRAVEL

PERUVIAN HEIGHTS Travel photographer Monica Acree shares the boundless spaces of Peru through the lens of a camera.

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he ancient wonderland of Peru is a feast for the senses. The vast mountain ranges meet neglected temples left to bake in the desert sun — a luscious inspiration of color and sensation. We take you on a journey of pixels to traverse the intricate visual delicacies of a mountainous trek through this unique landscape.

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Day one of the Salkantay Trek, an ancient footpath leading to Machu Picchu. The most physically challenging four days of my life. I stopped to take this photo only because I needed to mask my inability to SUMMER 2014

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Lake Titicaca is often considered the “largest lake in South America” and the “highest navigable lake in the world.” The lake is also home to a large population of people who live on Uros, a group of artificial islands constructed from floating reeds. The islands can be physically moved around the lake, if required.

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Trucha (“trout�) is a dish as common on Peruvian menus as pisco. Although not indigenous, it is abundant in Andean waters.

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The quintessential view of the ancient “Lost City of the Incas� nestled in front of Huayna Picchu Mountain. I was expecting Machu Picchu to be similar to Disneyland in the sense that it would be covered with tourists wearing tall white socks and jorts. And although tour buses arrive to the site every 10 minutes, I was pleasantly surprised by the absence of people. In a preservation at-

tempt, entrance is limited to 2,500 people a day. Booking in advance (often several months) is necessary. Anyone who has been to the Taj Mahal, Angkor Wat or many other sites of historical significance can attest that it is difficult to fully enjoy the experience due to the crowds. But at Machu Picchu, many tourists laid out a blanket and read a book on a quiet strip of grass for the day. SUMMER 2014

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Llamas freely roam Machu Picchu. We entertained ourselves for hours with the llamas; they have as many facial expressions as humans. We named them, we anthropomorphized their family relationships and we made them pose for hundreds of photos. They didn’t seem to mind.

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The trip was worthwhile if only to experience the local flora of South America. Who can have a bad day when surrounded by tropical flowers? SUMMER 2014

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TRAVEL

Headhunting in

PA N A M A A S E L F - I M P O S E D S C AV E N G E R H U N T

Story and photography by AUSTIN HOLT

ON THE ROAD OF LIFE.

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ne innocuous left turn later and the unkempt neighborhood becomes a shantytown. People crane their necks out of their rusted, tin-walled tenements to get a better look at the three unshowered gringos in the dirty old Toyota. Fifty feet ahead, a child rolls a literal ball of fire across the dirt road.

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“I don’t think we’re going to find him in here,” Alex says. “Well, what does the map say?” It wasn’t Surfer’s fault, either. He’d only been in Panama City a couple days longer than we had. “It says,” I repeat, “That there is a street, like, right there, two blocks ahead, to the right, that will take us back out to the main road.” I point straight ahead, past the blaze that still continues at the curbside. “Are you sure?” Surfer asks. “Positive. I was a navigator in the navy for like, four years.” He cocks his head. “No shit, really?” “Hell, no. But who wants to ask for directions?” A small stereo click as the locks shutter close. “You know, if we don’t find him, that’s cool. We can just grab a drink.” Alex leans back her seat and props her legs up on the dashboard. That was her way of saying she was hungry, and hot and wanting a beer and some street food, and didn’t want to look for the head anymore. “But it’s here, somewhere, I know it is.” Our guide dramatically raises his cupped hand toward the windshield. “In the shantytown?” Alex asks. “Nobody seems to know what the hell you’re talking about,” I say. “Are you sure you didn’t hear that there was some giant Einstein head in La Paz, or Santiago, or something?” “There was that one guy, at the restaurant. He knew what I was talking about.” “He didn’t speak a word of English, and your Spanish has not yet advanced to the point where you’re capable of asking directions to statues of famous physicists, and expecting any sort of accuracy.” It was a valiant effort, but the charm began to wear off the third time we were almost creamed by a taxi. “It’s not my fault that people here don’t know street names!” Alex seethed from the passenger seat. “Well, there’s that fucking mall,” she points to a towering white structure over a barricade of tin roof shacks. “Like for the fourth time.” I felt bad. Here we are, looking for a head, and everyone has their hopes up, and we just started chewing the guy out in his own car. For a moment, there was an uncomfortable silence. “Okay. A half hour. If it takes longer, we’ll quit, and I’ll grab the drinks.” Alex and I nod before slumping back in our seats. What if we were actually kidnapped by this vagabond from Tennessee and didn’t know it yet? What if this Einstein head thing was some perverse little game he was playing before spinning us into a back alley and selling our organs on the black market? Ah, well. As long as he was buying. “Four dollars worth of beer, huh?”

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Since we were due to leave Panama City before sunrise the next day I wanted to peel myself out of bed early and get up with the Daystar.

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here’s something very relaxing about watching the first hit of daylight begin to paint the skyline. We were staying in Casco Viejo, an old colonial neighborhood on the outskirts of the capital, and at the tip of this neighborhood’s peninsula some six blocks away was a nice vantage point to get a view of downtown from afar. I dug out a fresh T-shirt and a Fatboy bottle of water and walked out the door of our hostel, memories of the night before creeping back into my head as I stopped by a giant wastebin filled with empty cans. All’s quiet, and I didn’t end up in a Panamanian jail, so all and all, a successful first night in the country. Outside, light begins to fill the hollowed out shells, peppering this district’s

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streets. Fans of 24-hour news’ golden age will remember the invasion of Panama in 1989. This beautiful, three-century-old part of town got hit the hardest. It’s pulled itself back together, especially through the boom times, and has actually become quite the little touristy cultural district. But in any given row of colonial townhomes, one is going to be missing a wall and a ceiling. The unofficial memorials are left to their own devices, fragments of staircase being held together by long, snaking vines, surrounded by neglected layers of moisture and moss. Occasionally, shards of brick and mortar, flecked with faded specks of paint, will crumble to the sidewalk. Next door, a bistro, and then a massage parlor. At the waterfront, Panama City shines brightly — a new metropolis built by a people who were proud of the con-

trol they now had over their future. The canal was given to Panama at the turn of the century, allowing the city to flourish as a commercial mecca. But as the rich keep getting richer, so do the poor, poorer. Our taxi ride in the day before had taken us on elevated highway systems with views of billboard-sporting, 35-story glass and steel supertowers lording over the slums that have formed at their base. Ham-fisted. Panama is a city thrilled by its new wealth that wants to grow as fast as it possibly can. I remembered something about the security guard from the night before, in front of the hostel. The illuminated skyline was visible through the tunnel of street, and he was telling me about how much Panama had changed. Seven beers and the onset of dehydration make me susceptible to new friendships,


so I interjected with short, unslurred affirmatives as he told me about how he and his brother used to come up here to look at the city, and how none of those buildings were there, and how poor they were. I smoked a cigarette, trying to keep up with his pigeon English, mustering only periodic affirmatives in Spanish. Si. Si. Oh, si … He was skeptical, and he had been there his whole life; I was drunk, and was willing to take his word for it. I walked back up the hill to the hostel, a bright, eccentric little place called Luna’s Castle. A few puffy-eyed messes were already shambling about, woken prematurely by the heat, nursing cups of coffee. That backpacker couple from Switzerland or Sweden. That college girl from Washington. That dreadlocked woman, topless and curled up in the corner, nibbling on a banana and some Cheerios. No one seems

to notice. The expat dude who said “fuck it,” and has just been wandering around for a few years. All had fallen victim to the honor fridge of Balboa. I found Alex in the kitchen. She was talking to that surfer dude from Tennessee

an engineering firm that he had built from the ground up. So, he decided to buy a shitty old Toyota and drive down to Argentina to visit a flautist he had met in the States. He only had one more day in Panama City, too, before he had his car shipped to Columbia.

The unofficial memorials are left to their own devices, fragments of staircase being held together by long, snaking vines, surrounded by neglected layers of moisture and moss. who was making pancakes. The surfer dude wasn’t actually a surfer at all, which is probably for the best, as he would have a hard time at it in Tennessee. Turns out the surfer thing was just natural nonchalance and a tan, combined with not getting his hair cut for a long time. At 28, he had already sold off

They said that they had worked up an agenda for the day. He seemed like an entertaining guy to spend the day with. We would hit up the fish market for some post-pancake breakfast ceviché; check out the canal; maybe go for a bike ride. Then, we were going to find Einstein’s head. SUMMER 2014

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Turns out, if you’re ever in Panama in search of Einstein’s six-foot-tall concrete cranium, you’ll find it in a traffic circle next to an apartment building and a Subway.

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e parked the car and cautiously approached it. Weathered and moss eaten, the stolid glare from Einstein’s bulbous façade still stared stalwartly ahead, daring those fearful travelers who had been through shitty traffic, and feral dogs, and rushed bathroom breaks, to find it before sundown. It had been a long journey to get to where we were standing. The historic charm of Casco Viejo, the last stronghold of the old Panama, gave way to a new Panama, one where the dreams of tomorrow are being yielded. “You think it’s really Einstein?” Surfer asks. We appraised it for a minute. “What do you mean?” Alex returns. “I mean, it could be some Hispanic dude. I dunno. The mayor, or something.” “Albert Einstein was a Hispanic mayor,” I chime in. “But I don’t see a sign, or anything. Maybe Panama City had a mayor who looked a lot like Albert Einstein, but, you know, darker. Which wouldn’t show up in the concrete.” Maybe it used to be painted, or something. “There should be a sign somewhere,” Alex says. I didn’t care if it was Einstein or a mayor, or whomever. We had found this random head in the middle of Panama City with Surfer Tennessee in his crappy old green Toyota. And I think we all felt proud of that. Like we had achieved something stupid and wonderful. I like to think, for a moment, that there was a sense of human decency that went into making that selfie we got with the head. Here we were, three people on the road of life, our paths crossing briefly for one hung-over, self-imposed scavenger hunt. It occurred to me that we would probably never see Surfer again after we parted ways the next day. He was going to Argentina to see about having sex with a flautist. And I was beginning to smell pork being grilled somewhere. We left Albert behind in the fading light of the setting sun to go get some street food and chill out next to the honor fridge back at the hostel.

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TRAVEL

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Story by CHRISTINA MONTFORD and TOVA GELFOND

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Photo courtesy of Georgia Department of Natural Resources

W E ’ R E A S O C I E T Y T H AT WA N T S C R U S T L E S S B R E A D. FAT L E S S P E A N U T B U T T E R . L I N E L E S S E N T E R TA I N M E N T.

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e want the toned body without the situps and hi-res downloads without the buffering. We are a firstworld-problems collective of hypocritical oaths. So it’s perfectly reasonable to have the camping without the bug spray, tents, lantern or mud. We will glamp, my dear friends. We will glamp, indeed. Glamping, the self-proclaimed “glamourous camping” experience, is a real thing. It’s not something Ron Swanson would approve of, but it has taken root in the once-rustic home for wilderness admirers — and it’s thriving. Hundreds of real estate and travel developers around the world are throwing money into these new luxury camping destinations, and people are coming out in droves.

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While the camping purist finds the act of associating air conditioning and luxuriously cooked entreés with the word camping distasteful, it can be argued this method of camp-meets-resort destination allows the wilderness-averse a chance to commune with nature on their terms. This experience might be cutting-edge to “The Real Housewives” crowd, but glamping originated overseas decades ago with impressive digs in Africa and Thailand. Today, with hundreds of sites in the United States alone, you can go as bare bones or as Marie Antoinette as you’d like, and venture almost anywhere in the world. Most destinations boast lodgings resembling fivestar hotel rooms rather than rudimentary tents. And yes, you can have your tent air conditioned.

IT’S NOT SOMETHING RON SWANSON WOULD APPROVE OF, BUT IT HAS TAKEN ROOT IN THE ONCERUSTIC HOME FOR WILDERNESS ADMIRERS


Photos courtesy of Glamping Hub

“IN A CABIN OR HOTEL-STYLE LODGE ROOM YOU CAN HAVE THE COMFORT OF HOME, YET BEAUTIFUL PARK SCENERY AND RECREATION RIGHT OUTSIDE YOUR DOOR.”

Websites such as Glamping Hub and Cool Camping are designed specifically to help you sort through the thousands of glamping sites to find one ideal for your optimum level of glam and the size of your wallet. “You get all the positives and none of the negatives, such as sleeping on the ground and being stuck in the rain, when you go glamping,” says co-founder of Glamping Hub, Ruben Martinez. The lavish Clayoquot Wilderness Resort on Vancouver Island, for instance, has cabins equipped with remote-controlled propane fireplaces, composting toilets and oil lamps — all yours if you have a spare $4,474 laying around for a three-night stay. These types of destinations are a perfectly luxe place for first-time campers or the high-maintenance traveler with a penchant for the outdoors. It’s simply not your daddy’s campgrounds. And now a new wave of consumer is buying into the glamping world: festivalgoers. In the warmer months, 20-somethings shed their winter skins and Netflix-induced comas, and trek to venue after venue during festival season. From March to late September, three-day music festivals pop up all around the country hosting an opportunity to sleep under the stars with thousands of like-listening folks. Traditionally hardcore music festival attendees go rustic for the duration of the event and camp out in two-person tents with no electricity, adjacent to abysmal port-a-potties.

Recently, festivals like Bonnaroo, CounterPoint and TomorrowWorld have begun to offer attendees a glamping option starting upwards of $800. For just a few hundred dollars more than a general ticket, you can have a safe that locks, hot showers, a place to charge your phone and a bed to rest your head at the end of a day of raging and body bumping in a sea of sweaty peers. What would Woodstock-goers think? Though naysayers hold that glamping cannot compare to camping — that you don’t get that same woodsy feel or outdoor experience — there’s no reason to pick one over the other (except maybe price). Glamping in yurts, a portable dwelling or hut, “is the perfect compromise for couples where one loves to camp but the other does not,” says Kim Hatcher, public affairs coordinator for Georgia State Parks and Historic Sites. “In a cabin or hotel-style lodge room you can have the comfort of home, yet beautiful park scenery and recreation right outside your door.” Even the most hardcore traditionalist would find it difficult not to enjoy the indulgent mixture of nature and comfort that glamping offers. “People go glamping because no two glamp sites are exactly the same,” Martinez says. “And after they enjoy one site they can move on to the next — there is always another adventure waiting.”

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ROMAN H

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Photography by JIMMY JOHNSTON Styling by TIAN JUSTMAN Art Direction by AVI GELFOND Creative Direction by TOVA GELFOND Models: BELLA CURRIE and MATT FELLMAN for Factor Atlanta Makeup by NOORFACE Hair Styling by JAIME TERLECKI and CASARA SCHIFF for b. You Blowdry and Beauty Bar Assistant Stylist: ALISA HUTCHINSON Production Assistance by CURTIS CARTER and JAIME LIN WEINSTEIN

Shot on location at Bar Amalfi, Bottega Luisa, Café Intermezzo, Millennium Gate, Paolo’s Gelato and Summerour Studio. Vespa courtesy of Marietta Sportscar, home of Vespa Marietta.

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Sleeveless Jacket, $1395, Top, $595, both GIAMBATTISTA VALLI, Pants, $198, JOIE, all at Saks Fifth Avenue. Stingray Bag, price upon request, CHANEL, at bellabag.com. Yellow Ring, $50, White Ring, $36, both ASHLEY BUCHANAN, Bracelet, $10, ERICA WEINER, all at Young Blood Boutique. Jacket, $349, Cardigan, $99, Shirt, $79, Pants, $149, Tie, $65, Belt, $49, all SUIT SUPPLY, all at Suit Supply.


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Dress, $350, TORY BURCH, at Saks Fifth Avenue. Leather Bag, price upon request, HERMES, at bellabag.com. Short Necklace, $69, Long Necklace, $89, both BETSY & IYA, both at Young Blood Boutique.


Dress, $550, ABBEY GLASS, at Ampersand. Earrings, $67, ERICA WEINER, Necklace, $90, MOLLY M, both at Young Blood Boutique. Sunglasses, $85, TUMBLEWEEDS HANDCRAFT, at eidemagazine.com. (Following page) Jacket, $349, Cardigan, $99, Shirt, $79, Pants, $149, Tie, $65, Belt, $49, all SUIT SUPPLY, all at Suit Supply. SUMMER 2014

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Dress, $415, MEGAN HUNTZ, at Ampersand. Earrings, $32, CRAFTS AND LOVE, Necklace, $70, SEAWORTHY, both at Young Blood Boutique.

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Dress, $1495, DOLCE & GABBANA, at Saks Fifth Avenue. Shot on location at Millenium Gate, www.thegateatlanta.com.

Shirt, $129, Pants, $189, Belt, $49, Bow Tie, $65, all SUIT SUPPLY, all at Suit Supply.


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Shirt, $525, Pants, $575, both MAXMARA, both at Saks Fifth Avenue. Leather Bucket Bag, price upon request, CHANEL, at bellabag.com. Necklace, $118, YOUNG FRANKK, at eidemagazine.com. Shirt, $129, Pants, $189, Belt, $49, all SUIT SUPPLY, all at Suit Supply.

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DESIGN

SACRED SPACE Story by JESSICA HOUGH | Photography by BRETT FALCON

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n the last 10 years Atlanta’s food scene has without a doubt blossomed into one of the most unique in the country, with new inspirations, techniques and tastes. Two of its unsung heroes are the designer-artist-entrepreneur duo Alisa Barry and Smith Hanes. Barry is an author, visual artist and the owner and creative director of Bella Cucina, where she creates simple yet sophisticated artisan foods concepted with an eye for presentation and refinement.

Her husband, Hanes, is the interior designer who created the ambiance of restaurants such as JCT Kitchen & Bar, No. 246 and The Optimist (ranked No. 7 on Bon Appetit’s list of America’s Best New Restaurants for 2013) with two more — a French-Indonesian bistro and a Chinese restaurant for Guy Wong — on the way. It is safe to say that if Atlanta cuisine were to have two champions for its aesthetics, they would be this power couple.

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Near the top of the deck was one that simply states, “Find your sacred space.”

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came to know Hanes and Barry somewhat accidentally, and in the course of our odd friendship, have seen that what is most salient in their art and design work is their love of sharing their experience and unique point of view with others. The first time my partner and I were invited to dinner at their house, we nearly missed the quiet home built in 1911 nestled inconspicuously on the side of one of the busiest midtown thoroughfares in Atlanta. We were told not to come to the front door (because, as I would later discover, the porch is so old that they didn’t want us to fall through), but rather through their petite modern garden in the back. Inside their home, where the noise of the city mysteriously disappears, the ambiance reflects the blending of one of Atlanta’s best interior designers and the European sophistication that inspires Barry’s creations. And yet, it is warm, inviting and entirely lived-in. The color palette is soft and muted, and the textures and furnishings are organic — a unique blending of modern, minimalist and rustic.

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Each object has a history and personality — from the original finish on the foyer walls to pantry doors Barry brought back from a trip to Italy — and helps create a space brimming with character and curiosity. Built into these objects are also the couple’s memories and shared stories: Barry would later tell me that her kitchen, all white and featuring salvaged subway tile from Berkeley, was Hanes’ greatest gift to her. Reflecting the way that the couple both lives and shares their creativity, we dined upstairs in Barry’s studio at a farm table next to her inspiration board and among her latest artistic explora-

tions. For both Hanes and Barry, art and space are inseparable, and beauty exists through presentation.

Before leaving, Barry gave me a set of contemplation cards that are part of her latest work with inspirational, creative words and ensōs (in Zen Buddhism, hand-drawn circles expressing a moment when the mind is enlightened and free

to create). Near the top of the deck was one that simply states, “Find your sacred space.” Hanes and Barry’s home, as they would later tell me when I visited again for the interview, is exactly this: “To me, it’s our own special oasis,” Barry says. Everything in the space breathes a unique kind of collaboration of tastes and histories. The two artists are deeply connected, but their work is also very separate. Rather than explicit collaboration, which has only happened with Bella Cucina and not with their individual projects, Hanes and Barry have the luxury of using each other’s artistic mind to bounce off ideas.

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When I arrived at their home, the couple was already excitedly discussing website layout and potential collaborators for Hanes’ upcoming furniture line, Bethlehem Black.

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lisa has always been that one that I go to whenever I need someone to really check me or tell me what’s working or not working because she has seen all of my work. I don’t work with anyone who has seen everything like Alisa has,” Hanes tells me. Meanwhile, Barry describes how appreciative she is of Hanes’ special ability to creatively consult through conversation. They are both beautifully humble in the face of the other’s work, despite each of their impressive portfolios. The creative process for Hanes and Barry is divergent, but also weaves together at these points of inspiration. For both, the process is also highly visual. Hanes tells me that the pin boards in his studio (located at the industrial-chic Atlanta arts center, King Plow) are just like Barry’s pin board in her upstairs studio at the home. The visual journey of creative discovery is, for Barry, the thrill: “The adventure is finding out what wants to be expressed. Whether it’s for a project at work or in life, it’s about either starting with an idea and letting it be expressed or seeing the

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expression and what it turns into.” Hanes chimes in to explain that with design, you never know the end result and often, it’s better than you ever could have imagined. “It’s all about the alchemy of collaboration,” Barry adds. And that collaboration is in each other and with their colleagues, but also with the Atlanta community. Hanes and Barry have lived in the city for over 20 years now, and have watched its creative communities be born and then come of age. Despite their healthy dose of international travel and projects in New York and California, they hold a deep love for their city and the innovation it fosters, such as young, local artists. Their work has grown and changed as Atlanta has, Hanes says. The couple somehow manages to be the perfect blend of global and local, constantly changing and innovating while staying true to each of their individual aesthetics. Hanes and Barry are extraordinarily generous with their knowledge, resources and input, pushing their own and others’ creative boundaries. They are partners in design-crime whose adventure is their art, is their love, is their life.


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SOCIETY

Cup Cup by

Story by GINA YU

Oliver Strand on finding the comforts of home in a cup of coffee.

His dad sprinkled sugar on buttered popcorn, and they boiled cans of sweetened condensed milk to make manjar (known as dulce de leche). His parents had little patience for processed, Americanized food. Not for the Whole Foods’ organic-seeking status quo, but because, “we were poor immigrants,” he says. Born in Chile and raised in Los Angeles, 88

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renowned food writer Oliver Strand’s cross-cultural roots have weighed heavily on his palate. A taste maven (and coffee connoisseur) for The New York Times, Vogue, Travel + Leisure and more, Strand’s reflections on food — and coffee — go beyond mere taste, encompassing the social, environmental and contextual values that influence the modern consumer.


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Culinary traditions, carried like heirlooms from region to generation, leave breadcrumbs of indigenous flavor combinations in their wake.

he adventure, you see, is the hunt for the familiar and ancient through the modern and contrastive. “When you find yourself living in a culture that’s not your own you soften the blow by seeking out familiar flavors, and are open to new flavors because everything is new,” he says. Hence the drives to Redondo Beach to eat crab and mussels, attempting to get as close as possible to the seafood fare of Chile. “Then we would go get chicken and waffles in Crenshaw, because it was so weird and good,” Strand explains. Growing up, he hated the standard American foods — tuna fish sandwiches, potato salad, grilled cheese with Kraft singles. To Strand, great food was about beef stewed with spices, heavy on the cumin. It’s about the distinctive and satisfying: beefy, spicy, salty, sweet, all wrapped in a flaky crust of an empanada. It’s about the machas a la parmesana — fresh clams shucked and roasted with a touch of farmer’s cheese and maybe a sprinkling of minced parsley. The sense of adventure that food imparts is still very real years later, just different. The 1970s and ’80s were a time of risk for ambitious foodies. “You found out about these places by word of mouth, or by stopping and trying the food,” he says. “Today everybody is adventurous, and every adventure is safe, because you can download the menu and Street View the restaurant before you decide to go.” There’s still risk, but Strand’s not so sure as many people are taking it. “In the mid-’90s, one of my roommates,

who was Swiss, biked with his brother from Basel to Istanbul,” he says. “Their trip was largely personal, and internal. I suppose they took photos, but what I remember are the stories — when you came back, you were a storyteller.” These days, an adventure looks a lot more like: post, pin and gram. It’s packaged. “There’s less synthesis when you’re posting snapshots with pretty washes and pithy introductions, then checking the comments to see who’s paying attention,” Strand says. And then there’s coffee. Strand began writing about food for The New York Times in 2005. It was a time when coffee was a topic that he could cover just as he did any other food. Starting initially without an intention of turning it into a focus, he soon realized that he had much to learn. “It took me a couple of years to log the miles and get me to the point at which I could trust my taste buds, my journalistic instinct,” he says. He focused on coffee when he realized that nobody else was. “I fully expected a scrum of other journalists to tackle me, but so far few others have specialized in coffee,” he says. That said, he recognizes that the level of coffee coverage has improved dramatically. Instead of printing what is told, people are asking more questions. More people have a baseline of information. That doesn’t mean it’s good, though. “If I see ‘java,’ ‘cup of joe’ or ‘buzz’ I put that article in the same virtual wastepaper basket where I keep the

food articles with ‘chow,’ ‘gourmet’ and ‘yummy.’” The world of coffee is still one of business. Every roaster will say that they are unique; that they are rare in sourcing the best products; that they truly understand flavor and process. “It’s helpful to be able to listen to the patter, taste a coffee, tell that it’s past crop (and tastes old),” Strand says. “Then be able to ask direct questions about when it was harvested, and analyze the coffee based on objective considerations, not subjective preferences. “When you show up in a new town and head out to a coffee spot recommended by friends or over Twitter, there’s still a rawness, a slight worry that things will go wrong — which is what makes it so satisfying when it’s

“IT TOOK ME A COUPLE OF YEARS TO LOG THE MILES AND GET ME TO THE POINT AT WHICH I COULD TRUST MY TASTE BUDS, MY JOURNALISTIC INSTINCT,” good. You’re up early in an unfamiliar place, taking public transportation you don’t quite understand or driving on streets you don’t know, heading to a place that might make a kind of coffee you like or that might be popular because Yelp is for idiots. When everything lines up and the coffee is beautiful, it will set a tone for the rest of the day — a magic coffee in a strange city will make you feel like a part of that city. It will change your mood.” SUMMER 2014

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Story by JAIME LIN WEINSTEIN

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SOCIETY

Long, blonde hair with bangs was never as popular as when Miley Cyrus appeared on television screens as Hannah Montana back in 2006.

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ver four seasons, tween-age girls everywhere were longing for a life as the character that propelled Cyrus to fame, hair included. But a year after the series’ finale she traded those long, golden locks for a peroxide pixie reminiscent of an edgy, punk rock singer circa 1974 rather than a 2000-something teenage pop princess. The fresh cut seemed to be a physical declaration of a new Miley — one that represented a depar-

ture from her Disney-era TV persona and an entry into a burgeoning adulthood. The 20-year-old Cyrus was, admittedly, in a much different place in life than she was at 14 with newfound celebrity. And while critics were quick to express their disdain for the new ’do, Cyrus’ own position on her hair seemed to go beyond mere physical approval. “Never felt more me in my whole life,” Cyrus tweeted post-chop.

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Call me conservative, but I’ve never altered my hair more than a few inches or a couple of shades on the color spectrum. Granted, my hair is excessively curly, with limited styling options (no one wants to see a curly-haired girl with bangs or with a crop that ends up looking much too similar to the cut of a 12-year-old-boy at his Bar Mitzvah). But at the ripe age of 28, I’m getting uncomfortably close to 30. And I’m craving a change. At the height of what I’ve deemed my “growing up” period — not that I intend to ever stop growing psychologically — I have come to feel as though my sense of self has become increasingly conflicted. On the one hand, I have (finally) answered many of the questions that have long loomed over my head, and any 20-something’s head for that matter, like what I want to do when I grow up. But I’m still unsure of who I want to be. And at the same time, I feel like I’m both nowhere near, and nowhere near ready, to be that (as yet undefined) person. It’s a strange feeling to tread the line between adolescent and adult at 28. You can tell me that I still have time, that age is just a number, that 40 is the new 30, that at least I look young, and that in this age of economic insecurity 20-somethings across the nation are delaying adulthood. But it won’t change the fact that 30 seems to hold a place as some sort of milestone in life — a mid-way marker of accomplishment — and in some ways, I’m already behind my peers. The average marrying age for women in the Unites States is 26.9, and the average age for having babies? Even younger, at 25 (though women’s magazines and the wealth of celebrities with child well into their 40s would have you believe otherwise). Ultimately, I don’t feel like an almost-30-year-old adult. And I don’t want to be one. So I’m rebelling against growing up. And while my friends are getting engaged and married and even creating new life, I’m dying my hair red. Not auburn red. Or strawberry-blonde red. But red, red. Shock value red.

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nyone who has ever heard someone utter the words “It’s just hair,” after a disastrous cut or a bad dye job knows the inexplicable importance these strands hold within the female psyche. There is a relationship here. And we probably spend more hours grooming it, and more money on stylists to cut it and products to care for it, than we do on most other things in our lives. Hair provides a sense of self, of security, and when changed, it can even provide a physical, tangible means of expressing the change in who we are on the inside.

It isn’t a new concept, of course. Hair has long been a symbol of transformation; just think of the 1920s. In a decade defined by rebellion — when bootleggers were smuggling alcohol and jazz “threatened” old cultural values — ladies represented newfound freedoms with new hairdos. Females said goodbye to their long Victorian locks and welcomed shorter hairstyles — along with political equality (the right to vote) and a new gender role (working women). It was a liberating reaction to a reserved era that projected the free-spirited attitude of a new generation. SUMMER 2014

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y own hair journey began in the stylish Dyer & Posta Salon at the hands of co-owner Stephen Posta. Armed with inspiration photos featuring Florence Welch, Karen Elson and my girl crush of late, American fashion model Natalie Westling (who, ironically, gained notoriety this year after dying her hair red and appearing in a Marc Jacobs ad alongside Miley Cyrus), I was ready to embark on a self-defined, self-image escapade. And hoped that my hair would soon project on the outside what I felt on the inside. Why suffer the pains of explicating my pseudo-adult status in life when my hair can do it for me? Initially desiring a semi-permanent dye job, when Posta tells me I won’t achieve the color I want unless I go permanent, I say “what the hell?” without hesitation and we dive in, headfirst. As Posta and his assistant begin to apply the color, I ask if other women often come in looking for a change in their hair to mimic a change in their lives. “All the time,” they respond simultaneously. “It’s either the salon or the car lot,” Posta remarks, referring to the male stereotype of preferring to combat any life crisis with a sports car, rather than a makeover. Maybe it’s a confidence thing then, more than an identity one. And if the salon/car postulate holds true, then we can assume that many women value looks, while men value money. And within each lies our confidence — one that exists, of course, amidst a comparative analysis of where we rank for those values when compared to our contemporaries. There’s actually a psychological doctrine that defines this: the social comparison theory. First proposed by American psychologist Leon Festinger in 1954, social comparison theory posits that it is a basic human drive to want to evaluate our abilities, and we often do so by comparing ourselves to others — whether that be within the domain of beauty, wealth, intelligence or success. We then use these assessments to define ourselves, and to determine our own worth based on how we measure up to our peers. (There’s a reason why, for women, there’s absolutely nothing better than the prom queen showing up at the 10-year high school reunion 75 pounds heavier.) So it would make sense that anyone engaged in social comparison who finds themself to be worse off than others would experience a shortage of self-assurance. And they would be questioning their station in life, and seeking a way to enhance it. But confidence was never a quality that thwarted me. I’ve always been well aware of my virtues and where they lie on the peer-to-peer spectrum. Until now, I realize, as a flood of questions enter my mind: Why are all of my friends finding their life mates and I have yet to? Would I feel more successful among others my age had I forgone my yearnings for a creative career and gone to law school as planned? Would I face less financial pressure?

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After a mere three hours, two rounds of dying, and countless times nervously pleading not to let my hair turn out burgundy, I emerged a bona fide redhead. It took some adjustment, but by the time I was in the car riding home from the salon I was in love. The color was beautiful — a vibrant, multifaceted red with tangerine highlights that appears natural, yet clearly not biologically given, somehow at once. Plus, I think the hue suits my complexion. Friends are quick to ask how I like the new hair, but there’s a different question I am trying to answer: how do I feel? Far from the “life-changing” romanticism my editor assumed, it turns out. She had imagined the attention-calling color might somehow make up for my otherwise reserved persona and typically understated apparel: crewneck sweaters, skinny jeans; preferably black. As if I might suddenly assume the “fiery” spirit often attributed to natural-born redheads. I’d like to think I’ve simply settled into an occupation of observation. A plus, for one who writes for a living. Though I’d be remiss to say that I never fall victim to a hot temper, or mischief, or the occasional bold fashion choice. Truth be told, I don’t feel much different. My hair, you see, was always a source of attention. I’ve rarely gone a day in my life without receiving at least one compliment on my hair. In the South, where blonde, straight hair runs rampant, it’s unusual to see a girl with free-flowing curls. And that hasn’t changed. But now I question if they’re commenting on the curls or the color — or both. I even often forget I have red hair until I walk past my own image reflected in a mirror or the scarlet strands fall in my face. I am pleasantly surprised, though, when reminded of the new, vibrant color. But those questions of confidence are still left unanswered.

WHY SUFFER THE PAINS OF EXPLICATING MY PSEUDO-ADULT STATUS IN LIFE WHEN MY HAIR CAN DO IT FOR ME?

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ying my hair red was meant to be a declaration of preserving my youth. But the experience has felt very grown up. I didn’t just run out to the local CVS and buy a box of red dye on a whim. I researched redheads, analyzed color options and made an appointment to have the color done by a trained expert. I made a calculated decision, I assessed the details of the desire, I acted on it and am now owning it. And despite neon red strands now flanking my face, I know that the outside isn’t really going to define who I truly am on the inside. I’ve still got to figure that out for myself. Isn’t that what adults always tell their kids, that it’s what’s on the inside that really matters? Maybe my red hair is representing exactly who I am on the inside then: a late 20-something trying not to age, while inescapably growing up, all at the same time.

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SOCIETY

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Why we risk everything ... or nothing.

Story by TOVA GELFOND and JAIME LIN WEINSTEIN

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Adventure makes us salivate in a first-class-international kind of way. The word “risk” sounds far less predictable; too impulsive. But the heart’s already fluttering merely with the idea of taking on the unknown and visiting places unseen. Even the timid heart. Probably from a romantic notion fashioned from long nights of reading Jacques Cousteau or “Eat Pray Love.” But adventure is all dressed up as risk wearing a fancy hat. A wolf in sheep’s clothing of libido-inspiring, pulse-pounding precarious chance. The first discoverers who embarked across the Atlantic didn’t know where they’d end up, and we praise them. Perhaps it’s the spontaneity that takes our breath away or the Pirates of the Caribbean rugged sense of living life by the elements. But even for the control-freak jetsetter, adventure is about seeking out what is unknown; filling in the blanks. And a risk by any other name is risk. Maybe not the going-to-war kind, or even the gambling-your-fortune kind, but a risk nonetheless, and we’ll take it. Yet, the understanding of why we’re so interested in putting our lives on the line is another thing entirely. For one, our caveman history went a little something like this: we risk, we eat; we don’t risk, we starve. The survival DNA inside our basic instincts promises that if we go outside the cave with a stick and a rock, we’re better off chancing it against a wild boar. But we’re more advanced than our survivalist ancestors, and our quest for knowledge has provided us with reasons behind the risk.

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PHYSICAL REACTIONS You’re about to plummet down a ski slope, or up the ante in your poker game, and you can feel it. That rippling flap of sensation; it’s just the beginning. Fight or flight reactions are about to happen — a prehistoric response that outmaneuvers your logic. Your brain’s amygdala picks up on the hazard now in scope. The body folds in a heightened sense of fluttering symptoms: Your blood pressure increases, heart pounding faster with anticipation. Your lips dry out as anxiety triggers your brain’s hypothalamus to kick out waves of hormones that pump adrenaline from the pituitary gland. You get that flipping feeling in your stomach,

like butterflies — the result of your blood racing, driving it away from your center. Soon your cortisol levels spike from the kidneys. Your pupils dilate, the brain’s way to prepare you to see oncoming peril. As your senses sharpen, your immune system gets ready for ninja action by releasing glucose supplies which rush to your muscles. In short, the rush of a risk helps you see better and makes you feel more alert, stronger and energized — as long as you can get past those stomach flips. It feels like love, because it’s not far off. The exhilaration offers a similar chemical and physical reaction — and let’s not forget that love is risky business, is it not?

FALL IN LOVE WITH RISK Did you know that adrenaline can impact the way you feel about someone? It’s called misattribution of emotion or arousal. If you meet someone during highrisk activities (rock climbing, walking across a high bridge, running, anything that gets your adrenaline

pumping) you will misattribute that rush of adrenaline and subsequent excitement to the person, instead of the activity. You will develop deeper feelings for your new companion faster than on an otherwise boring day, plus find them more attractive.

IT’S ALL IN YOUR HEAD The desire to base jump or roller coaster ride can be chalked up to chemicals. Feel-good chemicals. The neurotransmitter dopamine gives you the warm and fuzzies when you party with friends, buy nice things, enjoy a good meal and do exhilaratingly risky activities. The daredevil saturates his or her life with these exciting exploits because a thrill-seeking brain doesn’t have as many dopamine-inhibiting receptors. When you splurge on something, the reward you feel is really those pleasure chemicals saying, “oh yeah, this is awesome.” And when perilous ventures release higher doses of dopamine, you feel high on life. Scientists have often wondered if risk taking is a result of a disruption in the thought process regarding the risky activity, or if the person simply perceives the task to be less of a risk than it actually is. A study

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conducted at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena tested the brain’s value-based decision-making regions and the control we have based on the interpretation of gambling. By taking pictures of the brain while giving subjects gambling tasks, they were able to hone in on the brain areas activated by reward and risk. The findings pointed to the ventromedial prefrontal cortex — a network including the orbitofrontal and frontopolar cortex. Impulse control is governed by these two brain networks working in tandem, giving you the ability to weigh out positive choices. If either of the networks in your brain is not working properly, then you’ll still have an interest in impulsive behavior, but lack the inhibitions to deter you from taking the risks.


Teens are always getting into trouble, though there’s probably more to blame than partying shenanigans. The areas of the brain that control behavior, namely impulse, have not fully matured. Up until the age of 25, the brain will develop more or less from back to front in an unbalanced fashion. The back of the brain controls motivation, emotion and coordination, developing first. Then the prefrontal cortex evolves, which commands impulses and reasoning. A Yale School of Medicine study discovered that

AGE MATTERS

during teenagehood, chemicals released during new experiences flood the brain at a higher frequency, creating the desire to do them again. Developmentally it’s an overall good thing. Teenagers need to adapt to their environments, do new tasks and learn new abilities so they’ll be independent in the future — the whole preparing to leave the nest thing. But this can offer a challenge with detrimental, adrenaline-pumping activities like drugs. As you age, the risk-taking can lessen as fully developed thought processes slow down the impulse to try exciting things.

NOT EVERYONE’S A JUMPER In the late ’80s, The New York Times tackled the inclination to ride roller coasters, hit ski slopes and try other thrill-seeking diversions. They found that some people are just hardwired to crave the feeling that dangerous behavior provides. The chemical flux that perilous activities bring is exhilarating to the adrenaline junkie. Once the danger is conquered, a feeling of relief washes over the subject with satisfaction and excitement. It takes a dopamine-craving personality to want to repeat this sensation. Since then, new research has led us to predict certain personality traits based on dopamine function and the genes that control those predispositions. Like most things, your genes might be telling your body to enjoy new things and go after the adventure. University of Amsterdam researchers determined that extroverted people have an enhanced sensitivity to rewards

based on how their brains react to dopamine. When compared to introverted personality types, extroverts had intensified responses when their risks resulted in rewards in both the amygdala and nucleus accumbens regions of the brain. Essentially, outgoing people register the positives from their risk-taking activity with higher intensity, making it more appealing to take on risky behavior again. Furthermore, a study published in the Journal of Neuroscience found that in the workplace, hard workers had the highest levels of dopamine in the areas of the brain related to motivation and reward. And it’s the slackers who had higher reactions in the areas related to risk perception. The go-getters were the ones focused on the reward, making them work harder; while the loafers were preoccupied with the toll their work might take on them.

A QUICK CURE FOR SWEAT Adventures can offer you another side effect: sweat. If you’re in need of emergency deodorant on the go, here’s a tip — use instant hand sanitizer. The alcohol

will kill the bacteria, eliminating body odor. Want to go the natural route? You can also replace your powder fresh stick with a quick rub of coconut oil. SUMMER 2014

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RISK BEHAVIOR FACTORS Birth Order: First-borns tend to be more riskaverse, especially in monetary decisions. Last-born siblings are bigger risk takers, preferring to gamble for a higher reward rather than wait for a potentially larger rate of return. Gender: Men are more likely to enjoy taking risks than women, an evolutionary result of having been the hunters and explorers in early human history. Behavioral Reinforcement: Society often praises risk takers. Our admiration for racecar drivers

and storm chasers, for example, can influence one’s decision to pursue such high risk behavior. Children: We are wired to care for our children, so our personal threshold for risk increases when our children are at risk. Similarly, we perceive the same risk to be greater when it affects our children as compared to when it affects ourselves. Perceived Discrimination: People who experience rejection from someone of another race show greater sensitivity to rewards, leading them to engage in riskier behavior.

BIG BUSINESS GAMBLES DYSON An engineer with an idea for a different kind of vacuum, James Dyson spent over five years building over 5,000 prototypes — and accumulated around $4 million in debt. With three mortgages on his home, failure would have meant the loss of all possessions to the bank. Turned out he was able to repay the bank a mere four to five months after selling his first product (and now boasts an estimated net worth of $1.6 billion). FEDEX Three years after founding FedEx in 1971, Frederick W. Smith’s business was on the verge of bankruptcy due to rapidly rising fuel costs. With $5,000 left to its name, Smith flew to Las Vegas and played blackjack with the remaining funds, parlaying the money into $32,000 over one weekend — enough to keep the business afloat. HUSTLER Featuring nude hostess dancers, Larry Flynt’s Hustler Clubs were grossing hundreds of thousands of dollars each year. But after the 1973 oil crisis Flynt was facing bankruptcy, so he started pornographic magazine Hustler. The magazine brought millions of readers, and a bunch of lawsuits for obscenity charges (plus a gunshot from an anti-pornography crusader). But the Supreme Court decided Hustler’s indecency was lawful, and Flynt is extremely successful today (albeit, paraplegic). PANDORA Back in 2001, music streaming service Pandora was out out of money. Instead of simply throwing in the towel, founder Tim Westergren and his employees decided to defer salaries — ultimately deferring around $1.5 million over two years between 50 people — a practice that happens to be illegal in California where the company is based. They were rescued by an investment in 2004.

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RISK STATISTICS HIGHEST

BASE JUMP:

2,717

feet

Jumpers Fred Fugen and Vince Reffet added a temporary platform at the peak of the Burj Khalifa — the tallest building in the world — in order to break the record of a 2010 plunge from a lower point on the same building.

FASTEST

CAR: 270.49 mph The Venom GT broke the world record in February 2014, formerly held by the Bugatti Veyron SuperSport, though only independently verified. It has yet to be officially recognized by the Guinness Book of World Records.

around

HIGHEST VALUED PIECE OF ART EVER STOLEN:

$200

million

Taken in one of the most famous art heists in history, Johannes Vermeer’s “The Concert” was one of 13 paintings stolen from the Isabelle Stewart Gardener Museum in Boston in 1990.

DEEPEST OCEAN DIVE:

35,797 feet

In 1960, two men — Don Walsh and Jacques Piccard — manned the Trieste deep sea submersible reaching the “Challenger Deep,” the deepest known point in the Earth’s oceans (in the Pacific ocean near Guam).

AMERICA’S

DEADLIEST

JOB:

Logging Workers

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ National Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries, logging has the highest fatality rate in the United States with 127.8 fatal work injuries per 100,000 full-time workers. The dangers? Falling trees, tree cutting equipment and dangerous terrain.

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ROOLNL

Story by CHRISTINA MONTFORD | Photography by JAMIE HOPPER

Marking 10 years of the Atlanta Rollergirls with Angela Ward, aka “Tanya Hyde.”


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ell all your belongings. Move to Budapest. Leave Budapest and relocate to the South where you know next to no one. Start a “bitching knitting” group. Create the first roller derby league in Atlanta. That’s what you’d have to do to emulate Atlanta Rollergirls founder Angela Ward. It’s that simple. Maybe simple isn’t the word for it, but she makes it look that way. Not more than 5 feet 3 inches with short, curly hair, Ward is a closer clone of your mom’s quirky best friend than a raging, body-checking, one-woman scoring machine. She’s upbeat with soft, kind eyes, which might be why she was so le-

thal to her competitors in her heydey. After moving from Budapest to Atlanta 10 years ago, Ward founded the Atlanta Rollergirls out of a pure interest in the sport. She wanted to play, and no one in the city was offering her the chance. So without ever having played, or even knowing the rules, Ward formed the Rollergirls. Today, the Atlanta Rollergirls has seven teams, some of which compete internationally. We recently sat down with Angela Ward to find out more about her life, passion and how she is singlehandedly breaking down the term “bitch on wheels.”

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Eidé Magazine: What were you doing before you started the Atlanta Rollergirls? Angela Ward: The first thing that I started in Atlanta was the “Stitch ’n Bitch” knitting group, so that was my first foray into starting things. But I just have had a regular job the whole time. I had a contract position that was recently cut off. I was a business analyst and before that I did web development at Cartoon Network, and when I started the Rollergirls I was a web developer at The Weather Channel. EM: So how do you go from web developing, to bitching ’n stitching, to roller derby?

AW: In the beginning it had more of a crazy, fun draw andpeople were into the campy aspect of roller derby in the ’70s and early ’80s. There was a lot of wrestling type moves in the beginning and I think that was also kind of a draw. But as we came together as a group (we, meaning the derby association), there’s been more of a push for the athleticism than the spectacle, but there’s still some of the spectacle. We still have funny names and things like that, but it’s definitely grown into more of a sport and we instill that in our Atlanta players.

EM: You didn’t have any experience?

EM: Were you nervous to start a league?

AW: None. I don’t think I’d had a pair of roller skates on for 20 years.

AW: I think I must have had some nervousness but I don’t think it was a lot. By that point ... I realized if you are enthusiastic about something and you have passion and you are persistent, you can make anything happen. So for me it was more about deciding what I was going to do and following through. Sometimes it was just me. One skater skating around, and I still practiced. And then we started getting this regular group who came every Sunday who really wanted to see this thing through.

AW: Yeah we kind of learned as we went. We got a lot of information from other groups that were starting as well, and that’s been the fun thing about roller derby, that we’ve sort of been figuring it out as we’ve gone along — not just us but leagues all over the country, and now the world. There were just a few leagues at the time and those helped us get started, and then those leagues got together and decided to form an association to help define rules and set standards so that we could play each other. EM: How old is the league? AW: This is our 10th year. I can’t believe it’s been this long.

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AW: We have seven different teams here, four of which are home teams that play against one another, and we have three travel teams separated by skill. There are thousands of leagues all over the world. We have played leagues from Los Angeles, New York, London and Montreal. EM: What do you think caused this resurgence of people wanting to be a part of roller derby?

AW: It was just a hobby. I wanted to learn how to knit and once I learned I found out about these other groups knitting around the country and I thought that would be a good way to meet people. It worked, and after doing that for a couple years I had a friend who was getting into the roller derby scene in Austin where there was kind of a resurgence of roller derby. She was into it and I was reading her blog and I thought “that looks like a lot of fun” and I looked up roller derby in Atlanta and there was none. For some crazy reason I was like “I’ll start one.”

EM: So you started the league before you learned how to play?

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EM: How many teams do you play against?

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EM: What did your family and friends think? AW: My mom was really worried about my teeth. That was her big concern. But my teeth have been great. My husband was a little more hesitant ’cause I like to try a lot of different things ... But after I told him I really needed his support he was fine and very supportive.


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EM: How did the public receive you? AW: Our first bout was incredible. It was so new and different and a lot of people who had heard of roller derby were interested in the beginning. It slowed down just a hair, but then picked back up and it’s been pretty nonstop ever since. We get a lot of new skaters. Currently we have a sticker that says “I’m new to roller derby” so if it’s your first time at a game we will give you a sticker and there are still a lot of people wearing those stickers to this day. EM: How did you come up with your alter ego Tanya Hyde? AW: Actually a friend of mine came up with it, a guy I used to work with. I have always had a large bottom, so tanning your hide to me was perfect. It’s funny because I’ll answer to Tanya more than I will Angela. Only my parents and my husband call me Angela.

EM: What do you think you’ve gained from this whole experience? AW: I have gained immeasurable confidence. I’ve gained a family that is just an entire world of people from all over the planet. I know I can always count on them and the sisters that I’ve made here at the Atlanta Rollergirls. EM: What’s next? AW: My biggest project right now is the Atlanta Derby Brats which is an organization for girls ages 7 to 17. We aim to teach the confidence that we’ve all gained from the sport and give it to those girls. I think roller derby is awesome and it’s something that everyone should try even if it’s not at a competitive level. You meet a lot of amazing people that you would never otherwise be exposed to.

VOTED ONE OF THE

TO P 1 0 0 S A LO N S IN THE U.S.

WWW. DY ER A N D P OSTA .COM

770. 51 4.1 6 20 600 CHASTA IN R D. SU IT E 3 12 KEN N ESAW, G A 3 01 4 4


SOCIETY

A BRIEF HISTORY

of

Skydiving Form and function at 14,000 feet.

Story by ASHLEY BRECHTEL

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t some point in time, long before the existence of airplanes, someone looked up high and thought, I wonder how I can jump from there and not die? Perhaps they were gazing at a mountain or simply imagining beyond the clouds. Either way, adventurous minds were thinking beyond the realm of possibility. We know that this mode of thinking dates back to 1485, when Leonardo da Vinci sketched a contraption that featured a square wooden frame in the shape of a pyramid — the origin of the modern parachute. Not surprising, as da Vinci probably did an original sketch for most things we use today. But the sport as we know it largely began in France in the late 18th century, when André-Jacques Garnerin performed display jumps from hot air balloons. His version of the parachute was umbrella-shaped and attached to a basket. He would rise to approximately 3,000 feet before severing the rope that connected his parachute to the balloon, and sail down to earth. While his landings were reportedly rough, it didn’t deter him from planning his next jump. The sport was then tempered by war. During the first World War, parachuting was very primitive and dangerous, but its potential was apparent, leading Major E. L. Hoffman of the Army Air Service on a mission to develop an even better parachute. He assembled a team to help combine the best of multiple parachute designs. On that team was Leslie Irvin, a California stunt man who made his first parachute jump at 14. Your move, Nik Wallenda. This team came up with Airplane Parachute Type-A which featured three elements: (1) storing the parachute in a soft pack to be worn on one’s back, (2) a ripcord for manually deploying the parachute and (3) a pilot chute that draws the main canopy from the pack. Irvin tested the design in 1919, becoming the first person to perform a premeditated freefall parachute descent. The jump was successful and paved the way for adrenaline junkies the world over. By 1957, the first commercial skydiving schools were established and the trend began in force, with people across the world putting their lives on the line for the thrill of jumping out of an airplane.

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Skydiving Timeline

9 0 B .C .

Famous Chinese historian Si Ma Chian writes about a legend where Emperor Shun survives a fall using a parachute.

1485

Leonardo da Vinci sketches what many believe to be the origin of the modern day parachute.

1797

André-Jacques Garnerin ushers in the sport of skydiving by jumping from hot air balloons in France.

1913

Tiny Broadwick becomes the first woman to jump from a plane.

1914-1918 1919 1950’s 1957

Parachutes are introduced during WWI as rescue devices for observation balloon pilots. Airplane Parachute Type-A is successfully tested by Leslie Irvin. Raymond Young coins the term “skydiving.” First commercial skydiving schools begin to appear.

2000

British skydiver Adrian Nicholas successfully tests da Vinci’s original parachute design by jumping 10,000 feet from a hot air balloon.

2002

Erin Hogan becomes the world’s youngest skydiver when she jumps tandem at age 7.

2004

Frank Moody becomes the oldest skydiver to jump tandem at age 101.

2012

Felix Baumgartner performs the highest parachute jump along with the fastest freefall, breaking the sound barrier by jumping from 127,852 feet.

Sure, deciding to exit a perfectly good airplane as it soars thousands of feet in the air may seem reckless and dangerous, but it’s surprisingly safe.

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or the approximately two million jumpers who take the leap each year, only about 35 deaths are reported. Human error, not faulty gear, is the biggest culprit, meaning that the more training and practice one receives, the lower the odds of encountering danger. Ironic, considering the fact that not much training is required for a tandem jump. Dennis Trisch has accompanied hundreds of people on their first jumps and explains that, “To skydive tandem all you need to do is show up and follow a five-minute briefing from the instructor where they tell you to arch your body, where to put your legs and hands; then they handle the rest.” A mere 15-to-20-minute plane ride later and you’re freefalling from 14,000 feet in the air. You’ll fall for about 45 to 60 seconds before the parachute is deployed (thank you, da Vinci). After that, you spend between four to six minutes under the parachute’s canopy floating back to the earth. Most likely, you’ll experience a smooth landing by sliding across the ground. Yay

for gravity! Altogether, the fall lasts about five minutes. If your experience is anything like Kiana Tennyson’s first jump, you’ll fall in love. “I ended up being peer pressured into going on a group tandem trip, [but] I walked in and was immediately captivated by the scene. The women all seemed like badasses, and I was simply in awe.” One year later, Kiana has made over 100 jumps and is now trained to jump on her own. She even packs her own parachute, a far cry from the girl who had to be coaxed into her first leap. It’s people like Kiana that fuel instructors. Watching others fall in love with skydiving is what it’s all about says Ray McCormick, a certified tandem instructor who has been skydiving since 2006. “I do this to try and bring people into the sport first and foremost.” Skydiving has come such a long way over the years and can cater to anyone’s desire. You may want to jump once just to say you’ve done it, or you can turn it into a bona fide hobby; it’s certainly within the realm of possibilities.

In fact, the sky’s the limit. 110

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AT L A N TA B A L L E T ’ S T H O M PA N TO A N D B E N S TO N E TA K E AT H L E T I C FA S H I O N S TO ADVENTUROUS HEIGHTS.

M OT I O N P I C T U R E

Photography by NATHAN STOAN Styling by ALISA HUTCHINSON Art Direction by AVI GELFOND Creative Direction by TOVA GELFOND Models: THOM PANTO and BEN STONE for Atlanta Ballet Makeup by DENA M. WHITAKER Hair Styling by CASARA SCHIFF and RACHEL ANDRAUS for b. You Blowdry and Beauty Bar Photography Assistant: MICHELLE KAPPELER

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t’s all about lines — in design and in ballet. The shapes, the movement must prevail. All athletes need cloth to match their grit; the very fiber of self-confidence that suits up the modern-day gladiator with breathable mesh instead of metal-buckled capes. And ballet offers its own trials — giant leaps through the air, graceful spins mid-elevation — all in the name of art. “Lines are really what we care about in the ballet community,” says Aussie-born Atlanta Ballet dancer Ben Stone. “The key word for dancers is ‘comfortable’ … which is not always a word connected with fashion. We dance with mirrors in the room every day; we are conscious about doing something that’s aesthetically pleasing.” Not an easy task. Male dancers can burn through four full sweatsuits in one day of training. Jersey doesn’t do the job; bulky sweatpants won’t suffice. The wrong athletic fashions, no matter how right they appear, can never work if they hide the expression. Light, airy, breathing and resilient, the clothing has an adventurous life of its own — an experience filled with body expressions on the stage of life. And for the statuesque Thomas Panto, a 6 foot 4 inch dancer at Atlanta Ballet, “the fit can’t cover up those lines. My job is to look elegant and beautiful. The right clothing moves so well and shows your personality.” New advancements in athletic wear now lend themselves to the plight of the yogi, runner, basketball star, football jock and stage-front dancer alike with as much flexibility in their threads as an arabesque — an approach to workout gear that leaps from the page.

Jacket, $108, Shirt, $54, Shorts, $58, all LULULEMON, all at lululemon.com. Shoes, $110, THE NORTH FACE, at thenorthface.com. SUMMER 2014

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Jacket, $118, Shirt, $58, Shorts, $72, all LULULEMON, all at lululemon.com. Shoes, $110, THE NORTH FACE, at thenorthface.com.

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Pullover, $120, Pants, $90, Shoes, $130, all THE NORTH FACE, all at thenorthface.com. SUMMER 2014

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Shirt, $58, Shorts, $64, both LULULEMON, both at lululemon.com. Shoes, $130, THE NORTH FACE, at thenorthface.com.

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Shirt, $55, Shorts, $65, Shoes, $110, all THE NORTH FACE, all at thenorthface.com. SUMMER 2014

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Vest, $65, Shirt, $25, Pants, $70, Shoes $130, all THE NORTH FACE, all at thenorthface.com.

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Jacket, $130, Shirt, $35, Shorts, $40, Shoes, $130, all THE NORTH FACE, all at thenorthface.com.

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Tank, $48, Shorts, $64, both LULULEMON, both at lululemon.com. Shoes, $110, THE NORTH FACE, at thenorthface.com. SUMMER 2014

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FA S H I O N

Photo © Copyright M J Richardson

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Beautiful Bacteria Story by JAIME LIN WEINSTEIN

Clothing crafted from microbes may prove to be the future of the fashion industry.

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espite the ubiquitous visuals of stunning, silk gowns flowing down runways or studded, leather jackets featured in the latest editorial spreads, the origins of these garments bear little resemblance to the end product ready for wear. The beauty of fashion, you see, is often born from something less traditionally beautiful. Silk, for instance, comes from insect larvae; leather, from cattle hide. Perhaps, then, it’s not so strange to imagine fabric made from bacteria. A new breed of textiles is emerging thanks to fashion visionaries like Suzanne Lee, founder of design consultancy BioCouture and former research fellow at the School of Fashion & Textiles at Central Saint Martin’s College of Art & Design — one that is biologically derived from living organisms (bacteria, yeast, fungi, etc.) — and offering a potential alternative to our wasteful wearing ways. Lee uses a fermentation method enacted by a symbiotic mix of yeast, bacteria and sweetened green tea. As the bacteria digest sugar, they produce fibers that eventually form thin sheets of bacterial cellulose that can be molded into the shapes of jackets, dresses, even shoes. As the sheets dry, overlapping edges fuse together to create seams, and once the moisture has evaporated the result resembles a leather-like material, ready to be bleached or stained.

Cellulose, it turns out, is the most abundant renewable resource on the planet, and exists in fibers we already use to make clothing materials, like cotton. With a 90-percent cellulose content, cotton is almost pure cellulose. But “traditional production of natural [fibers] like cotton can be wasteful and energy inefficient since the plant has to be broken down to extract the cellulose [fiber] and the remainder discarded … bioengineered materials will offer a sustainable alternative,” Lee explains in her 2007 book “Fashioning the Future: Tomorrow’s Wardrobe.” What’s more? Bioengineered materials would be biodegradable, recyclable and compostable. “In the future, we might compost our wardrobes and grow something new, or, at the very least, return it to the store for recycling.” It’s not quite “ready-to-wear” yet. If the material gets wet, it absorbs the liquid and resorts back to its gooey, malleable origins. But water-repellent cultures and other solutions are already in the works. Essentially, biotechnology could be transforming fashion in the very near future, and bio-manufactured materials could be making their debut in clothing stores in the next two to three years. And bacteria will join the ranks of breeders of fashion beauty. We just might have to get over any qualms about wearing living organisms first.

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Pony Tale Photography by JIMMY JOHNSTON Styling by CHRISTONYA KINSEY Model: KYRA SAFFRAN Makeup and Hair Styling by KATIE VIA BALLARD for Make Up For Ever

It’s more than mere style; a ponytail tells a story — where you’ve been and where you are headed are murmured through its nature. A messy pull-back claims you kicked ass at your Pure Barre class, and an adorned style with bejeweled twist ties insists you’re ready to go out. Sleek and flipped, wavy and tousled; it’s out of your face, but still on your mind. In a moment’s notice, you’re ready to go (and with a spritz of dry shampoo, you’re ready for two days). Never too needy, a ponytail is the summer’s most productive friend.

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Bracelet (worn as hair accessory), CHARLOTTE RUSSE, at Charlotte Russe. Necklace, NEW YORK & COMPANY, at New York & Company.

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Ring (worn as hair accessory), JULES REID, at julesreid.com. Necklace, HIGH GLOSS, at highglosshouston.com

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Hair Accessory, Stylist’s Own. Necklace, VERSONA ACCESSORIES, at Versona Accessories.


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eidé 6 ISSUES $35 DOLLARS EIDEMAGAZINE.COM/SHOP/SUBSCRIPTION


Bracelet (worn as hair accessory), NEW YORK & COMPANY, at New York & Company. Necklace, ANNA & AVA, at Dillard’s.

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Photography by JIMMY JOHNSTON Styling by TIAN JUSTMAN Model: CHRISTINA V. and SOPHIA for Factor Atlanta Makeup by ERICA BOGART for Urban Decay Hair Styling by RACHEL ANDREAUS and JAIME TERLECKI for b. You Blowdry and Beauty Bar Assistant Stylist: ALISA HUTCHINSON Fashion Intern: JESSICA BELL Makeup Assistant: AMBER WADE Production Assistance by JAIME LIN WEINSTEIN Shot on location at the Atlanta Botanical Garden. All jewelry vintage and availabe at Miz Scarletts.

NATURAL

SELECTION L U S T R O U S S H A D E S I M I TAT E COLORS FROM THE JUNGLE.

Blending in isn’t as bleak as vanishing into thin air. The intermixing can be a merger of color and space, if the background is far from the tedious eggshell of an office. Take a vibrant tropical island or rainforest, for example. Think of the bright blues, feminine pink, neon orange and hot yellows painted through the backdrop of a lush, equatorial canopy — pigments that can brighten any face if they dare to match the setting. Summer is a time to take on the surroundings; blend in and be bold.

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SPOTTED BEGONIA ( B E G O N I A M AC U L ATA )

Earrings, $1200.


GOLDEN-FURRED PITCHER-PLANT (NEPENTHES PILOSA)

Brooch (worn as hair clip), $200.


S C A R L E T S TA R (G U Z M A N I A L U N G U L ATA )

Necklace, $2400. SUMMER 2014

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Earrings, $400.

RED HELICONIA ( H E L I C O N I A S T R I C TA )

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HANGING FERN (NEPHROLEPIS PENDULA)

Earrings, $300.


PHILIPPINE ORCHID (MEDINILLA MAGNIFICA)

Necklace, $2200. SUMMER 2014

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bag in

bloom

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NIGHTINGALE BAG IN ROSES C A M O U F L A G E , $ 2 , 6 9 0 , G I V E N C H Y, AT B A R N E YS N E W YO R K .

Bordering the line between sexy and sensible, the Givenchy Roses Camouflage Nightingale Bag elevates the traditional tote to an accessory born for adventure. Think of it as the perfect travel companion — one that just happens to come flight-ready with zip fastening and a detachable shoulder strap. And now that summer has arrived, a touch of florals offers a sweet balance to a wanderlust wardrobe of denim and solid tees.



THE ADVENTURE ISSUE