Page 1

BRANDON BOYD GOTYE

Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

1


eiamagazine.com

EIA EXCLUSIVE

Info@eiamagazine.com - Creative Director / Jennifer Vitalia Editor@eiamagazine.com - Staff Writer/ Editor / Carl Stoffers Press@eiamagzine.com - Jesse Starrick / Advertising (917) 410-7630

Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

2


48

BRANDON BOYD

36 GOTYE

20 ORANGE COUNTY CHOPPERS Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

3


ART. COM Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

4


Resist no more. Vegas Pro 11. The forward-thinking design and cutting-edge features of Vegas™ Pro by Sony have long challenged the status quo of most editing applications. Today, change is the new normal, and the award-winning capabilities of Vegas Pro are becoming the new standard. Vegas Pro 11 is a unique and dynamic NLE, with built-in stereoscopic 3D editing, a 5.1 digital audio workstation, and the ability to ingest, edit, and deliver content in nearly every format imaginable. You’ll produce video and audio more efficiently than with any other application. Now with GPU-accelerated performance and support for industry-standard plug-ins, Vegas Pro 11 is completely irresistible. Visit sonycreativesoftware.com/vegaspro11 to learn more about Vegas Pro 11.

Copyright Š2012. Sony Creative Software Inc. All rights reserved. “SONY� and “make.believe� are trademarks of Sony Corporation. Sony VAIO L Series sold separately. Eiamagazine.com no. 6 5 EIAMAGAZINE.COM       | NO. 5 | 2  Ž


Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

6


Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

7


Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

8


Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

9


exhale

heartache Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

10


Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

11


Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

12


Francis Lane

francislanefrancislane.tumblr.com

Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

13


Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

14


Body shadows Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

15


David Naman shoots to create something special and unique for each subject and situation. His desire and passion to explore, learn and better himself is apparent in his work. He thinks of himself as a photographic interpreter of beauty, with an eye for the details that turn a simple photo into a story. David has no time to stop self-educating, experimenting, studying, and practicing are his primary enjoyments in life. The results speak for themselves with images that capture each unique body, highlighting the curves and individuality of each subject and exploring the dynamic Eiamagazine.com

interplay between the two. Nudes and nature scenes feature strongly in photos natural lighting, unusual shaping and all kinds of weather inspire him. Don’t expect David’s work to fade away any time soon. His thirst for new adventures in photography drives him throughout daily life. New challenges, new subjects, and new scenery are too inspiring for him to turn away from. Put down the camera? Settle for less than extraordinary? Not going to happen. Keep your eyes open for his new work and expect to be challenged and thrilled with what you find! no. 6

16


hypnoticphoto.ca

Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

17


Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

18


John Ruby

johnrubyart.com

19

no. 6

Eiamagazine.com


Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

20


Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

21


OCC At what age did you find a love for the design of bikes? I was in my mid-20s when I discovered how much I loved motorcycles. Would you say a bike is the ultimate sculpture? Yes, especially choppers. The true meaning of a chopper as a motorcycle is the ultimate sculpture – taking an original motorcycle and, as I like to do, chopping it up, making some changes, and rebuilding it from scratch, taking my own liberties in creating an all new bike. Your bikes can make the hearts of motorcycle riders, as well as nonriders, race. What do you think causes that rush? It’s definitely the sound of the bike - the louder, the better – and probably the intimidation factor, too. And of course, speed is appealing.

Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

22


qA &

This is your passion in life. Was there ever a time where you felt you were in

over your head, but knew that building the bikes was what you had to do no matter what? What would you say to anyone pursuing his or her dreams? Yes, this is my absolute passion, and most definitely there were times when I was in over my head when I first started. However, I stuck to my dream of building bikes and that’s what I would tell people to do – stick with it. If you’re passionate enough about it, you’ll get there.

You have lived your dream, and yet give back to many charities, which defines one’s character. Why do you think this is so important in life? It’s important to give back. I believe that you can’t keep it if you don’t give it away. Being able to reach out to those less fortunate is really a gift. I don’t see it as an obligation, but as a chance to do something special for someone whose life is a lot tougher. Most people think of bike riders as tough, mean, and rough, which is usually the opposite of reality. Most riders are extremely friendly and creative, and they live on the side of life that can only be felt by the freedom of an open road and the love of design for bikes. Do you think that stereotype will ever change? How do you feel about it? I’m not sure if that stereotype will ever change, but I do agree that most bikers go against that typical label and do so much for others.

Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

23


t.v. Killed the Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

24


radio

Carol Brown

carolbrownphotography.com

25

no. 6

Eiamagazine.com


Ian James Carr www.ianjamescarr.com

Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

26


Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

27


Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

28


“Hammers are the New black!� Ian James Carr

Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

29


Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

30


Debbi Saccomanno Chan (Sosum)

Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

31


Joi loves to photograph identity, which she sees as a combination of a person and mask, of human and disguise. Her brain keeps working, long after what she’s seen, heard, or felt has gone away. The result is a photograph that helps cross the bridge between Joi’s imagination and real life. They range from pastel thoughts, lacelined ideas, and chiffoncovered faces, and are never limited to what is in front of her. joiong.com

Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

32


Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

33


ELIORA BOUSQUET e-bousquet.com Born in Angoulême in 1970, Eliora Bousquet is a French professional painter living in Paris. Eliora began painting at age seven, having always had a passion for colors and trying to use them as words to communicate,. That passion was driven by the works of romantic poets like Baudelaire, de Banville, de Lamartine, Hugo, Keats and William Blake, among others. The symbolic association of words and colors in their clever use of metaphors and other surrealistic images fascinated her. At first, inspiration drawn from such expressions drove Eliora to write poetry. Then, it began to feed her imagination, convincing her that painting, which allows the use of the widest possible choice of colors and shades, is not only an art form, but a language in itself, an art form that grants complete freedom of expression. “My paintings seek to convey both an energetic, instinctive, spontaneous, almost automatic style, with emphasis on movement and gestures and sensitivity, emotion, awe, and reflection. Shadows are virtually absent, as I like to think of light as omnipresent, emanating from all things at all times, a supreme force in the universe. Symbolism is widely used in the names of my paintings, as well as in the shapes and colors chosen. All of my paintings are conceived around a theme, and comprise specific collections. Thus, much like for trilogies, one can only fully understand one painting once they have explored the entire collection, as each painting refers to and inspires others. Each painting tells a story, and the beholder must find the key to its enigma and its particular message, which can generally be extracted from the name of the painting. As André Gide said, ‘let beauty be in the eye of the beholder, rather than that which is beheld.’

Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

34


Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

35


Gotye Someone you know? Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

36


Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

37


EIA: Your hit record “Somebody That I Used To Know” has millions of views on YouTube and is heard on radio stations worldwide. How does it feel? G: It feels unreal. And I mean that in the ecstatic Aussie slang-y way, and also in the sense of “not real”. EIA “Gotye” is your stage name. What does that stand for? G: It doesn’t really stand for anything, acronym-styley. But for a few years Google’s top serach results would return many an entry for “Game Of The Year Edition” versions of various shoot-em-up computer games. Now I am nahhhmmbaaa waahhn! Whooohahaaahaaa! But seriously. It’s my Belgian birthname, Wouter, translated into French (“Gaultier”), and then mangled into my own (confusing?) spelling. My mum used to call me Gaultier every so often when I was a kid. EIA: Some people are under the impression that you are an overnight success, but you’ve been singing for decades. How does it feel to finally get the recognition that you deserve? G: I feel like I’ve only just started to become a half-decent singer in the last few years. Drums are my first instrument. Producing records and experimenting in the studio is something I’ve been doing for over 15 years. In terms of recognition and success, plenty of other people work just as hard and are more talented than I am, so I feel grateful that my persistence combined with a lot of luck have led to many great opportunities over the years. EIA: A number of prominent and well known DJs have remixed the hit record “Somebody That I Used to Know.” Have you listened to any of them? Do any stick out as favorites in your mind? G: I’ve listened to plenty. For starters, there are 10 official remixes from artists as diverse as Bibio, Faux Pas, Tiësto and AdRock that are worth checking out (probably not in one sitting!). M-Phazes’ mix is a fave of mine. Then there are what seems like hundreds of unofficial remixes of the song floating around online. Some are actually very good, many are not. EIA: You worked with the talented artist Emma Hack (also featured in this issue) in producing the concept for your music video. What was that experience like? G: It was fun and creatively rewarding, even if physically challenging. Emma slapped me around a bit (kidding!). No, the physical challenge of standing supremely still for many hours at a time while being bodypainted and photographed was a tough one, but Emma’s humour and easygoing approach made it enjoyable.

Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

38


EIA: Art and music go hand-in-hand and are rooted in passion. What was it like to see your video come to life both musically and artistically? G: I got a strong sense of what we were aiming for from Natasha Pincus’ treatment, and to see all the elements come together and result in a powerful video was thrilling to be a part of. The film clip really keeps pace with the song beautifully and enhances certain aspects of the arrangement in a way that not many clips manage EIA: In other interviews you’ve done, you’ve made mention of “texture” in your music. That is very interesting, because “texture” is a fundamental with respect to art. Can you elaborate on this for our readers? G: Sometimes it’s the pure texture of a short sample of sound that starts off a song for me. Or the collision of textures that wouldn’t appear to have been meant for each other. The texture of recordings has a huge bearing on the emotional response requested from the listener. While I acknowledge I’m subject to a certain level of technolust for its own sake (gadgets!), a big part of the draw for me is the potential for novel or idiosyncratic textures to be coaxed out of, or controlled with, this technology. It’s like accessing the fabric of other worlds. EIA: What advice would you offer to anyone pursuing their dreams, whether it is art, music, or other creative endeavors? G: [Insert Nike’s slogan here]

Photo by James Bryans. character design by Duncan Irving. artwork by Brendan Cook. Teeshirt“McHeartney” by Faux Pas Top Photo by: Brenner Liana, Bottom Photo by Warwick Baker. Artwork by Wally

Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

39


Emma Hack

The artist behind the painting of Gotye’s Somebody I used to know, and many other body paintings that your eyes will take a double look at.

How long have you been an artist? All my life! This is my fifth year exhibiting in I don’t sketch generally, I work straight to commercial galleries. canvas - I don’t like putting restrictions on the flow of where I want something to go. With Did you attend college for art, or undertake any formal art my most recent collection, I did photograph studies? the painting as I went - flipping the image in No, I wasn’t aware of my gift and actually Photoshop to make sure composition of the studied make-up artistry when finishing school. ‘mirror’ effect made sense - this was much Body painting was suggested by my make-up more involved than usual. teacher at the time, Bill Peacock, he noticed I was creating illusion with face painting and You are the artist behind Gotye’s “Somebody I Used to Know” told me to start carrying it onto the human video, which has over 200 million views on YouTube alone. How did form. I entered a fantasy make-up competition you come up with the concept for this video? Natasha Pincus, the director/producer, and won! contacted me as she wanted to blend Wally You use the term wallpaper where you use the human form and (Gotye) into a wall and I had been creating a wall to create a beautiful piece. How do you come up with your this work for many years. The design is actually one of Wally’s father’s works from the 80’s, a concepts? Do you plan them out or paint freely? In the early 2000’s a friend suggested I look at sketch as such. I worked closely with Wally on the work of Verushka. She had blended herself reconfiguring it slightly to work best for the into rustic walls and natural backgrounds. ‘blend.’ He is an artist in all aspects of the I loved the illusion, but didn’t know how to word, so he understood the process. relate it to my work until I saw the wallpaper designs of the late Florence Broadhurst. It was Would you say music and art have a relationship together that an instantaneous connection, so I grabbed many seem to over look? some off cuts and started painting my models Very much so, both create emotion and into them – it worked as very strong work from are important in our lives. I have recently created a portrait of Wally in which a short the beginning in 2005. film was made based on this question, it is I am not a planner - usually I start a collection very beautiful! It’s funny as well, I married a with one idea, paint that, and then continue talented composer and sound engineer the remainder based on the one before. That apparently sound and vision go well together! way, the work slowly evolves throughout the collection - I can pick the moments where Your art in the video captures the audience, how does that make things really worked and I continued that you feel as an artist? It’s unusual to think it was the art, to be throughout a collection. honest. For me, it is very hard to judge, but I’m The wallpapers were difficult, as I would never flattered nonetheless. I think maybe it was the know how it would look and the size it would song that draws the viewer to the clip, and be until I had it hung and my model was there then they are fascinated by the camouflage in position. I would move the background aspects and how the story moves you, around to suit where I wanted it to sit on the accompanied by the visual aspect. form. Now I paint my own backgrounds prior, and I can judge where I want the design to sit on the body and work my design and where things fall based on that. Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

40


Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

41


What is “Art” to you? Art is in everything I see, it’s what makes me happy, feel, and reminds me the world is beautiful, even in its ugly moments. Do you ever have an “Artist Block?” And, if so, how do you tap back into your creativity? Of course, all the time, although I don’t create full time. I create up to 3 collections a year in short bursts, and I have to fully commit to the work and not do anything to distract me. It’s hard when life is busy around me, that’s when the blocks come. The more I can make my art full time, the fewer blocks I have. I try to plan to create after I have travelled or holidayed, that is when my mind is free to focus and create with ideas bursting. My next collection will be created in September on my return from Spain. I am very excited, as I know the ideas will be plentiful and I will be rested enough to focus completely. What is your definition of success as an artist? Success is being content with what you have created. It is hard as an artist because you always want to change something and essentially I only have 8-15 hrs to create what I want, as the body has restrictions energy wise. I guess you are also successful if people hang your work and you are able to survive from creating your art! www.emmahackartist.com

Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

42


Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

43


Hope is an artist, born and raised in southern Louisiana. Her Cajun heritage of 'Joie de Vivre' (Joy of Life) is reflected in her paintings. An early interest in art led to years studying painting techniques as well as art history. She found her place working as a contemporary artist striving to achieve the middle ground between abstraction and realism, although often going directly to creating abstracts. Her use of color and texture strives to evoke a feel. Over the years, she's worked in oils and acrylics and have come to use acrylics exclusively. She has participated in many group exhibitions as well as solo shows. Most recently showing, for the early part of 2012, at the Southern Nevada Museum of Fine Art in Las Vegas. As part of her inclusion into the International Contemporary Masters Vol. 5, she will be @ Art Scope in Miami December 2012. "I often can be found in my studio working on many pieces simultaneously. My medium of choice - acrylics - is due to the fast drying time; it keeps up with my pace. There is simply so much beauty here in Bayou country, the landscape, the people, the overall attitude. All of this serves as a constant inspiration to me, that I'm driven to work fast to capture my ideas." www.Hopehebert.com

Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

44


Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

45


Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

46


Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

47


Brandon Boyd Brandon Boyd does not like to be “Googled” and prefers to be called at his mother’s house While at a sorbet party. Good thing for EIA, we like sorbet, and who can resist a party with artists and creative people at it, anyway?

Setting: Imagine, if you will, a Non-Google, Sorbet Party with conversations, rather than questions, being fired off. The walls are painted with flowing artwork - no creative blocks here. In the next room you can actually pick up a paintbrush and paint the ocean. As it comes to life, you surf with Brandon as your mind wanders off to the unknown, and you engage in an intellectual conversation about art and life. Attire: relaxed and judgment free. Maybe a rock star, or maybe just an extremely creative person, who’s outlet has been through a little box that most of us hear our music from. Known as the lead singer of Incubus, Brandon Boyd is one of us, an artist, as we create whatever our mind wanders off to. Visually, Brandon’s artwork is as expressive as his lungs are with music. It opens the mind and looks into the soul for questions, inspiration, and a connection to life that all artists live for.

Eiamagazine.com

Photos Courtsey: BrandonBoyd

no. 6

48


Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

49


Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

50


J: This sorbet is damn good. Brandon: Isn’t it? I made it actually! With fruit from trees that grow in Narnia, bottled dolphin farts and the tears of failed bloggers. Mmmmm, magical. J: I never knew dolphin farts and tears of failed bloggers would taste so good. What is your favorite medium to work with? Brandon: I enjoy using words today. Maybe because I’ve been writing songs recently. But I enjoy ink pens and bottled ink with water colors here and there. It’s nice to have a plethora of choices in my tool box so I can switch gears on a whim! J: Do you listen to your own music while you create? And if not, who gets your creativity flowing? How do you escape or, rather, come back? Brandon: I have not really tried painting to our music, no. I think I would be stolen out of that necessary single mindedness that art likes to endeavor. When I hear music that we or I have made, it’s hard (if not downright impossible) to be at all objective. But I do love drawing to classical East Indian music as well as merely leaving my window open and listening to the sounds of wherever I am. There is a melange of sounds just waiting to coalesce into one white noise-kind of fun for your experience. That is inspiring! Try it in a crowded restaurant. Close your eyes and don’t concentrate on any one voice, silverware clinking, or chair squeak. Listen to it all like a symphony. It creates a kind of hum that I find very inspiring. There is magic in that everyday occurrence! J: How do you know you are ready to sit down and create something? Do you get the artistic itch? Brandon: How do you know when you are ready to seduce someone? Or be seduced. But let us not equate having an itch with sex. J: hmmm...yeah, I agree... (stops and thinks... takes a spoonful of sorbet). You have traveled worldwide, is there one place that you tap into the inspiration best? Brandon: There’s no place like home. But I have also found many inspiring strolls through the East Village in New York City, a really cold and deserted street that led to a mini mall in Fargo, ND, walking the foot bridge and admiring the albino alligators in Myrtle Beach, SC, and the 15 minute walk that takes you around the entire island of Tavarua in Fiji. I like walking. J: You had a fear of releasing your solo album. Did you have any fear in releasing your artwork to the world? Brandon: I do, yes. That is ONE of the many reasons I continue to pursue music, art and all things expressive. I like to walk towards things that frighten me, physically, emotionally and intellectually. There is a lot of information in our fears, the kind of information that has the potential to teach us BIG things. In comfort there is... well, comfort. And that is attractive for a time. But comfort breeds complacency! And therein we don’t learn much at all. See where I’m going with this? (Smiles and winks...) J: I see and than I blink.

Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

51


J: How would you explain the spiritual and mental mind rumbles that an artist like yourself goes through while creating a piece? How does it feel in the end? Is it even explainable? As artists we are always searching for answers. Brandon: I like this question! J: I do too!

Brandon: I think those are the pangs of being in process. It’s beautiful, scary, whimsical and weird. Like standing on the edge of a volcano and pissing into the crater; it’s dangerous, smells bad and probably isn’t the smartest thing you’ve ever done, but man, what a story it’ll be! J: What is you favorite piece of artwork that you have produced? Brandon: To date? Jeez. I don’t know, actually. I don’t think I have one. Let’s just say I haven’t done it yet. J: You are a vegan (Kudos to that!), surfer, songwriter, singer, and creative artist who opens minds that are closed to the importance of protecting the oceans. Is that what makes artwork “good” in your opinion, to open minds? Brandon: I am not a Vegan, actually. But I have a life long allergy to dairy so milk has been almost entirely absent thus far. I eat almost entirely Vegan, but every once in a while I see a lil cute furry thing and have to put it in my belly. Sorry lil’ dudes. But I digress! I think the potential to open minds is a delightful byproduct of ART, but not it’s purpose. Not in my opinion, that is. I find that the act and process of being creative is the most triumphantly poignant aspect of ART! To BE creative is to commune with Others, with All, with Source. Almost God-like, if you need that kind of language to describe... J: Who is your favorite artist and why? Brandon:I don’t have one. Sorry. I’m not cooperating, am I? J: (Laughs) It’s not an interrogation, all answers are acceptable. Brandon: I have recently been very attracted to, and inspired by, Transcendentalist literature - Emerson and Thoreau in particular. I read some of their works in school but it didn’t hit like it has been recently. It reads like long form poetry! Gorgeous. Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

52


Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

53


Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

54


Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

55


Jennifer: You created two books of your artwork. Are you planning on producing more? Brandon: Yes! I am in the editing phase of Book #3! I’ll keep you posted, I promise. Jennifer: What are your future goals as an artist? Brandon: I want to be free. I want to stand still like the hummingbird. I want to travel without moving. These are present goals. I don’t know about this whole “future” thing, it sounds daunting.

Favorite Book: Bandon: One?! Are you insane? Jennifer: Maybe a little? All creativity comes from a spark of insanity, I think. Brandon: Ummm, ‘The Old Man and the Sea’ by Ernest Hemingway. Favorite Song: Brandon: You’re killing me with this whole One thing. ‘Suzanne’ by Leonard Cohen Jennifer: oops sorry! Favorite Place: Brandon: Here-Now Favorite Food: Brandon: Figs, Black Licorice, and Kale. Not together.

Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

56


Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

57


Massimo Margagnoni

www.massimomargagnoni.it

Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

58


Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

59


Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

60


Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

61


Christie Schneider www.girloncanvas.com

Sabine Blodorn www.sabineblodorn/localartist

Silvana LaCreta Ravena www.silvanaravena.com

Fumino Hora www.fuminoart.com

Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

62


William T. Rohe wtrohe-art.eu

Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

63


Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

64


Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

65


Eiamagazine.com

no. 6

66

EIA Magazine | Issue 6  

EIA Magazine Interviews: Brandon Boyd, Gotye, and Paul Sr from Orange County Choppers. Everything Is Art.