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ON RECENT ADVANCES IN ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH RESEARCH

SEPTEMBER 16-19, 2012

Marriott Hotel Jackson, Mississippi, USA


Table of Contents 1.

Jackson State University ...................................................................... 2

2.

Greetings............................................................................................ 3-11 President, Jackson State University .................................................................... 3 Governor, State of Mississippi ............................................................................. 4 Mayor, City of Jackson .......................................................................................... 5 Provost & VP of Academic Affairs ...................................................................... 6 Vice President of Research .................................................................................... 7 Symposium Chair ................................................................................................... 8 Jackson Convention & Visitors Bureau .............................................................. 9

3.

RCMI-Center for Environmental Health ....................................... 10

4.

Profiles of Invited Speakers & Oral Presentations ...................... 12

5.

Program ................................................................................................. 36

6.

Distinguished Lectures ................................................................. 48-49

7.

List of Oral Presentations .................................................................. 50

8.

List of Posters – Session A [Students] ............................................ 57

9.

List of Posters – Session B [Faculty/Scientists] ............................. 76

10. List of Participants ................................................................................. i 11. Participant Information .................................................................. xvii 12.

Program Committee ............................................................................ xx

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http://ww ww.jsum ms.edu   


JACKSON STATE UNIVERSITY JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 39217 OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT

(601) 979-2323 FAX NO. (601) 979-2948

September 16, 2012 On behalf of Jackson State University, I am delighted to extend a warm welcome to all participants of the Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research scheduled for September 16 through 19, 2012 at the Marriott Hotel in Jackson, Mississippi. We are happy to have you in Jackson for this conference series which brings together environmental scientists, engineers, and public health specialists to help address the major environmental and human health challenges of the 21st century. Building upon the success of the 2011 conference that attracted more than 200 participants, the Ninth International Symposium will serve as a forum for interdisciplinary communication among environmental and biomedical scientists interested in bringing about global solutions to complex societal issues. The Symposium will provide an excellent opportunity to share new knowledge and discuss the latest advancements in environmental health research. I commend the JSU College of Science, Engineering and Technology for bringing together a vast array of world experts to network and share innovative ideas and to discuss strategic ways to address global environmental health challenges. Special thanks are extended to all our sponsors (National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities [NIMHD] at the National Institutes of Health [NIH]; U.S. Department of Education Title III Program; and Jackson State University) for their valuable contributions to this important activity. The Symposium is content-rich, and promises to be informative and enjoyable. We have planned an outstanding program featuring distinguished speakers, platform and poster presentations, and scientific workshops. Thank you for your support as we continue to address global environmental and human health challenges. By working together as a team on this important endeavor, we will make a substantial contribution to improving environmental quality and saving lives. Best wishes for a very successful symposium. Sincerely,

Jackson State University 3


STATE OF MISSISSIPPI OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR

September 16, 2012 PHIL BRYANT GOVERNOR

Dear Friends: As Governor of the State of Mississippi, it is my pleasure to welcome you to the Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research at Jackson State University and to the City of Jackson, and the State of Mississippi. I hope you will find this opportunity to be both productive and enjoyable. During your stay in Jackson, I hope you will take time to enjoy our fine Mississippi cuisine, visit any of our museums, or participate in any of our numerous cultural and entertainment events. There is something for everyone to enjoy in this great city. Again, welcome to the Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research, and have a wonderful experience!

Sincerely,

Phil Bryant

POST OFFICE BOX 139 • JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI 39205 • TELEPHONE: (601) 359-3150 • FAX: (601) 359-3741 • ww.governorbryant.com

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219 South President Street Post Office Box 17 Jackson, Mississippi, 39205-0017 Telephone 601-960-1084 Facsimile 601-960-2193

Office of the Mayor Harvey Johnson Jr.,

September 16, 2012 Greetings: On behalf of the citizens of Jackson, I welcome you to Jackson State University's Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research. As Mayor, I am pleased that you chose Jackson to host this very special and worthwhile event. I commend Jackson State and the other sponsors for addressing such important issues. The sustainability of our environment is critical to our overall health and survival, and that is why I am pleased that so many scientists and experts have decided to meet in order to discuss the latest advancements in environmental health research. For those of you who are visiting, I hope you are able to get out and visit some of our exciting attractions, and partake of some of the exquisite food prepared by our many restaurants. Jackson is an exciting place, and it is getting better all the time. We have venues that offer both entertaining and educational activities, including: The Mississippi Museum of Art, Smith Robertson Museum and Cultural Center, Russell C. Davis Planetarium, Mississippi Museum of Natural Science and many others. The guide for Jackson's Civil Rights Movement Driving Tour is available, and we also have a self-guided walking tour to acquaint you with many of our downtown attractions. For a detailed listing, you may visit our website, www.city.jackson.ms.us and click on “Visitors�. I know you will experience true southern hospitality from our citizens, and I trust your stay will be a pleasant one. Please feel free to come again, and encourage others to visit Jackson. Sincerely,

Mayor, City of Jackson

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Greetings from the Provost & Vice-President of Academic Affairs September 16, 2012 I am very delighted to extend warm greetings to all participants of the Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research. Welcome to Jackson State University (JSU) and the beautiful city of Jackson. This symposium is built upon the overwhelming success of the eight previous conferences that were hosted by JSU and cosponsored by the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), RCMI-Center for Environmental Health, the U.S. Department of Education Title III Graduate Education Program, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the JSU Division of Research and Federal Relations, and the JSU Division of the Provost and Vice President of Academic Affairs. The Ninth International Symposium aims to provide participants great opportunities to gain new knowledge of local, regional and global environmental issues as they relate to quality of life and human health. It also serves as a forum for interdisciplinary communication among environmental scientists, health professionals and policy makers interested in advancing the scientific basis of environmental health issues. I would like to express my sincere appreciation to all the symposium sponsors and to the College of Science, Engineering and Technology for the hard work in organizing this international conference for the ninth time. The Symposium program includes platform presentations and distinguished lectures by internationally-known experts, as well as poster presentations on recent developments in relevant areas of environmental research and public health. I encourage you to take advantage of this premier event in all the benefits that it has to offer. Again, welcome to Jackson State University and very best wishes for a productive conference. Sincerely,

Mark G. Hardy, Ph.D. Provost & Vice President of Academic Affairs Jackson State University

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Greetings from the Vice-President of Research & Federal Relations September 16, 2012 Dear Colleagues, Students, and Friends: I am pleased to welcome you to the Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research. I hope that you will find time to network with colleagues and take full advantage of the opportunities before you. The Symposium promises to be enjoyable, informative and rich in content. The program is comprised of scientific sessions and poster presentations. During the three-day conference, more than 200 persons are expected to participate. The presentations are represented by seven subdisciplines in the environmental health-related research areas: New Frontiers in Environmental Health Research; Environmental Toxicology and Health Risk Assessment; Nanoscience, Nanotechnology and Nanotoxicology; Emerging Topics in Computational Biology and Environmental Modeling; Health Disparities and Environmental Security; Medical Geology and Human Health; and Natural Resources Damage Assessment and Management. Words of appreciation are extended to the Planning Committee for all of their hard work in organizing and managing this symposium. Special thanks are also extended to all the professional agencies, academic institutions and scientific societies, as well as the funding agencies whose contributions have made this event possible and contributed to its success. I look forward to a productive symposium. Sincerely,

Felix A. Okojie, Ed.D., MPH, CRA Vice President for Research and Federal Relations Jackson State University 7


Greetings from the Symposium Chair September 16, 2012 Dear Colleagues: It is an honor and a great pleasure to welcome you to the Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research being held at the Marriott Hotel in Jackson, Mississippi, USA, from September 16 to 19, 2012. This important event will be the Ninth World Congress held in Jackson, MS, USA, on important issues related to environmental quality and human health. This symposium is a contribution to global research and education in the exciting field of Environmental Science and Public Health. Its overarching objective is to continue to promote interdisciplinary discussions and international scientific collaborations, as well as to increase awareness of important environmental and public health issues facing our state, nation, and the global community. This year, we are expecting colleagues from 20 different countries, representing all five continents. The scientific program is composed of seven plenary sessions where oral/platform presentations will be given by 45 invited speakers. In addition, there will be two poster sessions - one for faculty and professional scientists, and one for students - with more than 160 abstracts. Both plenary lectures and poster presentations will deal with many crucial issues, such as environmental toxicology and health risk assessment; nanoscience, nanotechnology and nanotoxicology; emerging issues in computational biology and environmental modeling; environmental geology and human health; new frontiers in environmental health research; natural resources damage assessment and management; and health disparities and environmental security. As in previous years, we are very excited about this international symposium, and believe that it provides a strong forum to communicate the latest advances in scientific research and new developments on issues related to environmental quality and human health. We would like to express our sincere appreciation to all the participants at this international symposium, and to our colleagues and staff who have worked very hard to make it successful. We invite all of you to take advantage of this unique opportunity, enjoy its scientific program, and meet friends and colleagues. Together, we will make this symposium a marvelous scientific and social event. We look forward to the opportunity to personally meet each of you in Jackson!!!

Paul B. Tchounwou, Sc.D., F.A.B.I., I.O.M. Symposium Chair & Director, NIH RCMI – Center for Environmental Health Interim Dean & Presidential Distinguished Professor College of Science, Engineering and Technology Jackson State University

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September 16, 2012 Dear Symposium Participants: On behalf of the City of Jackson, we extend a warm welcome to Jackson State University, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research. We are honored that you have chosen Jackson to host your symposium for the eighth time. Jackson is an exciting place, and it's getting better all the time. We are attracting visitors to Jackson from all over the world. We have venues that offer entertaining and educational activities to visitors and residents alike: the Mississippi Museum of Art, Smith Robertson Museum and Cultural Center, Russell C. Davis Planetarium, Mississippi Museum of Natural Science and many others. The newly-published guide for Jackson's Civil Rights Movement Driving Tour is available, and we also have a self-guided walking tour to acquaint you with many of our downtown attractions. When you have finished visiting those, you can partake of the wonderful food at our many fine restaurants. For a detailed listing, you may visit our website at www.visitjackson.com. Most of all, we know you will find the people of Jackson to be ambassadors of southern hospitality at its finest. Thank you again for selecting Jackson as the site for the 2012 Environmental Health Research symposium. Sincerely,

Elisa Piazza and Staff Jackson Convention & Visitors Bureau

921 N. President Street 39202 ■ P.O. Box 1450 • Jackson, Mississippi 39215-1450 (601) 960-1891 (MS) • 1 (800) 354-7695 ■ Fax (601) 960-1827 www.visitjackson.com

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RCMI-CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH (CEH) The Center for Environmental Health (CEH) was established in 1998 with a grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Our mission is to develop an innovative biomedical research program in which our investigators become highly competitive and successful in winning mainstream NIH and other federal grants. The Center’s long-term goal is to build and sustain a state-of-the-art infrastructure that serves as a platform for interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary biomedical research collaborations. In addition, the Center serves as a catalyst for scientific discoveries on the toxic mechanisms and modes of action of environmental hazards, as well as on the prevention and control of environmentally-induced diseases. For nearly a decade, CEH has addressed the challenges posed by environmentally induced diseases. Its multiuser core biomedical research laboratories and highly capable investigators are pursuing a full range of basic science and translational research programs on environmental and public health issues of concern to vulnerable and underserved communities. New scientific discoveries made at the CEH are making substantial contributions to advancing our understanding of the role played by the environment in the development of human diseases; and developing cost-effective strategies to prevent/control these illnesses. CEH has evolved as a major center for biomedical research excellence, and we are poised to expand our health research enterprise through strategic investments in biomedical infrastructure, recruitment, training and building of a critical mass of biomedical scientists to address major environmental health issues, thus improving the quality of life in our communities. It is this spirit of biomedical research innovation that has sustained excellence at CEH for many years and will propel us into the future as a major force in biomedical and environmental health research. Today, the CEH is recognized as one of the nation's outstanding biomedical research centers in minority institutions. Through our dedication to the CEH's mission of saving lives through biomedical research and education in environmental and preventive medicine, we are confident that this monumental development and success will be sustained. NIH Grant # 2G12RR013459-11

http://www.jsums.edu/cset/RCMI/index.htm


Profiles of Invited Speakers & Oral Presenters


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research INVITED SPEAKERS & ORAL PRESENTERS

H. Anwar Ahmad, Ph.D. Dr. H. Anwar Ahmad is Associate Professor at the Department of Biology and the Faculty Manager of the Biostatistical Support Unit - an NIH core consulting facility at Jackson State University, Mississippi. Besides teaching undergraduate and graduate courses in Biostatistics and other interdisciplinary areas, he provides consulting services to faculty, NIH investigators, graduate students, and other collaborators in USA and Pakistan. These services include all areas of Biostatics, such as experimental designs, data collection and management, data analysis, interpretation of results, and software training. Dr. Ahmad is actively involved in multidisciplinary and multifunctional collaborative research nationally and internationally with organizations, such as US Department of Agriculture (Quantitative Risk Assessment Studies of Food borne Illnesses), Department of State (Establishing a Biostatistical Consulting Center in Pakistan), etc. He has an extensive publication record with more than 80 research papers, abstracts and conference proceedings. Some of his research areas include: Biostatistics Education and Consulting; Neural Network Modeling of Physiological Variables; Microbial Risk Assessment; and Poultry Growth and Nutrition Modeling. Dr. Ahmad’s formal education includes BS, MS, and Ph.D. in Biological/Life sciences, MBA and MS in computer and information science. He has participated in various short-term training, such as bioinformatics, risk analysis, recombinant DNA technology, teaching methodology, and international relations.

Anthony E. Archibong, Ph.D. Dr. Anthony Archibong received his Ph.D. from Oregon State University, in the area of Reproductive Endocrinology and conducted post-doctoral research in the Department of Animal Science, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, in Embryo Physiology. He subsequently conducted another post-doctoral research at the Oregon National Primate Research Center, in Gamete Science. He is currently an Associate Professor and Director of the Core Endocrine in the Department of Physiology at Meharry Medical College. He is also an American Board of Bioanalysis (ABB) Certified Andrologist. Dr. Archibong’s expertise is in mammalian reproductive biology and the molecular mechanism(s) of environmental influence on reproductive function. He is particularly interested in the adverse effects of environmental pollutants on the hormones that regulate male and female gonadal function, gamete interaction and pre-implantation embryo development; and preservation of fertility using stem cell technology. He is currently a reviewer for Biology of Reproduction, Fertility Sterility, Asian Journal of Andrology, Toxicology Letters and Andrologia. He is also on his 14th year as a member of the Minority Affairs Committee of the Society for the Study of Reproduction, a committee saddled with responsibility of mentoring and encouraging Minority Students to take up professions in Biomedical Sciences. Dr. Archibong holds a fertility patent based on his discovery; Bombesin-like peptides and their receptor antagonists for fertility and contraception. He has published 38 peer-reviewed manuscripts and 5 book chapters and more than 77 abstracts in the area of reproductive biology/reproductive toxicology. 12


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research INVITED SPEAKERS & ORAL PRESENTERS

Zikri Arslan, Ph.D. Dr. Zikri Arslan is an Associate Professor of Analytical and Environmental Chemistry (Dept. of Chemistry), and a joint faculty member at the Environmental Science PhD program at Jackson State University, Jackson, Mississippi. He received his PhD in 2000 from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, MA in analytical chemistry with an emphasis on applied plasma source mass spectrometry for environmental analysis. In summer of 2000, Dr. Arslan received a post-doctoral research award from the National Research Council (NRC) to work as post-doctoral fellow at NOAA/NEFSC Howard Marine Sciences Laboratory in Sandy Hook, NJ between 2000 and 2002 under supervision of Dr. Anthony J. Paulson. Later, he continued his post-doctoral research as an assistant research scientist (2002-2003) at the University of Maryland, Chesapeake Biological Laboratory under supervision of Dr. Dave Secor researching on micromilling protocols for identification of bluefin tuna stocks using otoliths. Dr. Arslan’s research focuses on the chemistry and instrumental analysis of trace elements, heavy metals (specifically arsenic, cadmium, mercury and lead) and nanoparticles from environmental and biological samples (water, soil, fish) with an emphasis to understand the pathways of accumulation, transport and their impact on environment and human life. Solid phase extraction methods using microorganism (yeast and bacteria) and chelating materials are developed for separation and detection of elemental species and nanoparticles. Particular interest is given to understanding the impact of engineered nanomaterials, including quantum dots and metals oxides on biological systems using animal models and aquatic species (fish, algae and artemia). He has published numerous papers in peer-reviewed journals and given presentations in national and international conferences.

Maria Begonia, Ph.D. Dr. Maria Begonia is currently a tenured Professor and a Graduate Coordinator in the Department of Biology at Jackson State University. She also serves as Professor in the Environmental Science Ph.D. She holds the following degrees: B.S. from the University of the Philippines, M.S. from Mississippi State University and Ph.D. from the University of Missouri. Dr. Begonia has been very much dedicated to developing and implementing costeffective strategies to improve the scientific knowledge and training of students. She has published in the multidisciplinary area of biological and environmental sciences and has authored more than thirty peer-reviewed publications. In 2006, she was one of three senior faculty recipients of a JSU Faculty Research Productivity Award for her contribution to the JSU’s research enterprise. Dr. Begonia has been serving as an Editorial Board Member and has served as Associate Editor of the Journal of the Mississippi Academy of Sciences (JMAS). She has reviewed several Biology book chapters and a Biology laboratory manual. She has served for three years as an invited panelist in the Microbiology, Neuroscience and Anatomy Division as well as the Plant and Animal Science Division of the Graduate Research and Fellowship Program of the National Science Foundation in Washington, D.C. She is a member of several professional organizations including the Philippine Society for Microbiology (as life member), National Science Teachers Association, Mississippi Academy of Sciences, American Society for Microbiology and Sigma Xi-the Scientific Research Society. 13


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research INVITED SPEAKERS & ORAL PRESENTERS

Jorge L. Ble-Castillo, Ph.D. Dr. Jorge Luis Ble-Castillo is a Professor of Biochemistry in the Juarez Autonomous University of Tabasco and a Clinical Researcher at the General Hospital 46 of the Mexican Institute for Social Security. Dr. Ble-Castillo received his undergraduate training in Clinical Biochemistry at National Autonomous University of Mexico and the Ph. D. degree in Medicine Research of the Superior Medicine School, National Polytechnic Institute. He participates in the teaching of biochemistry to medical and graduate students. Dr. Ble-Castillo’s research interests are in the areas of biomedical research with special emphasis on oxidative stress, antioxidants, and metabolism alterations in chronic diseases. His current research involves investigations on the effects of banana resistant starch on rodents with diabetes and in patients with obesity and diabetes. Additional interests include the study of metabolic alterations including oxidative stress in patients with obesity, metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes.

Vincent Bond, Ph.D. Dr. Vincent Bond is an HIV/AIDS researcher, presenting his work at numerous national as well as international HIV meetings. He has served as ad hoc reviewer for several leading virological journals and has authored/co-authored over 125 scientific communications. These communications include: abstracts, six patent applications, two granted patents, and 45 publications, 31 of which are articles in peer-reviewed journals focused on aspects of HIV pathogenesis research. He received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. at the Pennsylvania State University in Viral Genetics, and subsequently, did a postdoctoral fellowship at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). There he extended his knowledge of host systems through the study of basic cell biology processes. Simultaneously, the basic life processes of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus I (HIV-1) were being elucidated elsewhere. Interesting commonalities between his cell work at Caltech, and aspects of HIV biology, enticed him, on arriving at the Morehouse School of Medicine in 1990, to begin to look at host-HIV-1 interactions and the role, if any, this plays in progression to AIDS. Currently, a Professor of Microbiology, Biochemistry, and Immunology, Dr. Bond has studied HIV/AIDS for 20 years and is an expert in HIV pathogenesis. His lab has focused its efforts on understanding the role(s) played by HIV-1 accessory proteins in the pathogenic manipulation of host systems. Over the last decade his lab has focused on the role of extracellular Nef-containing exosomes in HIV/SIV infection and pathogenesis leading to AIDS. Publications arising out of grant funded research have shown that the Nef protein is released from viral-infected cells in exosomal vesicles that can induce apoptosis, or can cause gene dysregulation in bystander cells leading to immune depletion/dysfunction capable of causing the pathogenesis leading to AIDS.

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Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research INVITED SPEAKERS & ORAL PRESENTERS

Erika Brown, Ph.D. Dr. Erika T. Brown is a recent graduate from Jackson State University’s Environmental Science Ph. D. Program. She received her Bachelor of Science degree in Biology, Master of Science, and Ph.D. in Environmental Science from Jackson State University. During her time at Jackson State University, Dr. Brown worked as a Graduate Assistant in the Molecular Toxicology Laboratory as well as the Cellomics and Toxicogenomics Research Laboratory. Her research focused on the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in arsenic toxicity to human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells. She worked for several years as a Teaching assistant for biology labs. She also served as a mentor for several high school and undergraduate students through Summer Immersion and Summer Bridge programs at Jackson State University. Dr. Brown has published several papers in peer-reviewed journals. She has presented her research by lecture and poster at over 20 national and international scientific conferences and received several accolades. She is a member of several professional organizations including American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), American Biological Institute (ABI), and Phi Kappa Phi National Honor Society.

Randy R. Brutkiewicz, Ph.D. Dr. Randy R. Brutkiewicz is an Assistant Dean in the Office of Faculty Affairs and Professional Development at the Indiana University School of Medicine (IUSM), where he is responsible for research faculty development. He is also a Professor in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology at the IUSM, where he has been since 1998. Dr. Brutkiewicz’s research interests are focused on increasing our understanding of how cell signaling pathways regulate innate immunity; specifically, lipid antigen presentation by CD1d molecules in the context of immune evasion by viruses and tumors. He has made a number of seminal observations in the field: 1. Recognition of CD1d by natural killer T (NKT) cells. 2. Discovery of a major natural ligand of mouse CD1d molecules (glycosylphosphatidylinositol). 3. Identification of -glucuronosylceramide as a CD1drestricted, NKT cell-specific ligand. 4. Identification of protein kinase C  and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) as important regulators of CD1d-mediated antigen presentation. He has published over 60 peer-reviewed articles in his field, and is also the author of 11 book chapters and reviews. His research efforts are supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health and Department of Defense. Dr. Brutkiewicz has taken on major leadership roles in graduate education for the IUSM. He is currently the Program Director for two separate NIH-funded underrepresented minority graduate student training grants: a “Bridges to the Doctorate” Program and the “Indiana University Initiative to Maximize Graduate Student Diversity” Program. He chairs his Department’s Graduate Student Recruitment Committee, and has also served on 20 graduate student committees. His efforts are focused on training outstanding students from under-represented backgrounds to become highly productive, independent biomedical science investigators and educators.

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Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research INVITED SPEAKERS & ORAL PRESENTERS

Gloria M. Calaf, Ph.D. Dr. Gloria Calaf is a full Professor at the Instituto de Alta Investigación, Arica, Chile and Adjunct Associate Research Scientist at Columbia University Medical Center of New York. She received her MS and PhD degrees in Biological Sciences at Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan. After completing her PhD research, she joined Michigan Cancer Foundation in Detroit, then Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia, PA and afterwards Columbia University in NY. Her research interest is in Environmental and Hormonal Carcinogenesis, developing in vitro and in vivo breast cancer models to understand initiation, promotion and prevention of breast cancer by the effects of either pesticides or radiation in presence of hormones. Dr. Calaf has identified several genes associated with such processes, and among them c-Ha-ras, a pivotal one in the transformation process by the effect of environmental substances. Her current research project is focused on oxidative stress and genomic instability in breast tumorigenesis. She has published 90 research papers in peer reviewed journals and has presented her research in several conferences, symposiums and workshops. She is a member of American Association for Cancer Research, Tissue Culture Association, New York Academy of Sciences, and International Association for Breast Cancer Research, among others. She has served as a reviewer for many peer-reviewed journals as well as Chilean and American grants as FODECYT and AVON. She is currently in charge of a Biology of Cancer laboratory at Tarapacá University in Arica, Chile.

José A. Centeno, Ph.D. Dr. José A. Centeno, is a graduate from Michigan State University and a research scientist at the Joint Pathology Center, with over 20 years of experience in the fields of environmental toxicology and medical geology. He is a founding member and the current Chairman of the International Medical Geology Association (IMGA). He is the US Officer of the IUGS-Commission on Geosciences for Environmental Management (GEM) and has served as Senior Adviser, UNESCO-IUGSInternational Year of Planet Earth (2007-2009). Dr. Centeno currently hold adjunct faculty positions at several national and international academic centers and universities including Turabo University in Puerto Rico (as a Distinguished Professor), Jackson State University in Jackson, Mississippi, Metropolitan University in Puerto Rico, and the Faculty of Chemistry-University of the Republic of Uruguay. Dr. Centeno is author and coauthor of over 200 publications (manuscripts, book chapters, reports, monographs and research abstracts), co-editor of the book “Essentials of Medical Geology – Impacts of the Natural Environment on Public Health” (2005) and “Medical Geology – A Regional Synthesis” (2010), serves on the editorial board of four scientific journal, and has organized several national and international conferences, including as the founding member of the International Medical Geology Conference series. He has been involved in numerous academic, government and professional activities including serving as a member of the Working Group for the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC, Vol. 74), US National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant proposal Study Sections, USAID grant proposal Review Panel, USEPA TOSCA Interagency Testing Committee, US National Research Council Committee on Earth Sciences and Public Health, and National Academies – Board on International Scientific Organizations (BISO). He is the recipient of several national and international awards. 16


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research INVITED SPEAKERS & ORAL PRESENTERS

Edmond E. Creppy, Ph.D. Dr. Edmond E. Creppy has been a Professor of Toxicology since 1989; First Class University Professor since 1996, University Bordeaux; Assistant Professor and senior Assistant Professor, Associate Professor and Research Director from 1975 to 1989, University of Strasbourg Louis Pasteur Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biology, CNRS, Strasbourg. He has received numerous degrees and awards during his luscious career. Dr. Creppy’s work experience and professional responsibilities include: Head of the Department of Toxicology and Applied Hygiene (consisting of a staff of 15 people), University of Bordeaux, Faculty of Pharmacy, 146 Rue Léo Saignat, 33076 Bordeaux (France). He is also a member of the following scientific societies, boards and committees: All International Societies of Toxicology including European Society of Toxicology (1987); EUROTOX (1989) and SOT (American Society, 1994); the editorial board and reviewer of the journal Toxicology (from 1991 to 1996 and since 2000) and of the journal Human and Experimental Toxicology (since 1994), and the journal Archives of Toxicology from June 1998; Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology, Life Sciences, BBA, etc.; several advisory boards at both national and international levels and consultant for Toxicology. Since 1977, Dr. Creppy has been the author of more than 220 international publications including Toxicology journals, FEBS Letters, BBRC, BBA, Phytochemistry, Tetrahedron Lett. Mutation Research, American Journal of Kidney Diseases, Brain Researches, and New England Journal of Medicine.

Padmanava Dash, Ph.D. Dr. Padmanava Dash, whose ongoing research focuses on Remote Sensing, is an Assistant Professor of Biology and Environmental Science with a Ph.D. from Louisiana State University (LSU), Baton Rouge, Louisiana. His research interest includes Remote Sensing of Harmful Algal Blooms, Ocean Color Remote Sensing, Limnology, Biological & Physical Oceanography and Coastal & Oceanic Biogeochemical processes. Dr. Dash’s current research focuses on quantifying Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) in the northern Gulf of Mexico and the bays & inland lakes of Mississippi. HABs are caused by species of tiny plants, phytoplankton. HABs may cause harm through the production of potent chemical toxins or by their accumulated biomass. Impacts include massive fish kills, loss of sales revenue primarily from fisheries and tourism, loss of commercially valuable and culturally vital shellfish resources, illness and death in populations of protected marine species, zones of depressed occurrence of benthic life (dead zones) and threats to human health. Dr. Dash’s current research interest includes field, laboratory and satellite remote sensing research to study various HAB forming species to enhance the current state of knowledge on detection and mapping of the HABs and thus support state and coastal community efforts to manage human health and fisheries in the region.

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Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research INVITED SPEAKERS & ORAL PRESENTERS

Asok K. Dasmahapatra, Ph.D. Dr. Asok Dasmahapatra is an Associate Professor of Pharmacology in the Department of Pharmacology, and a Senior Research Scientist at the National Center for Natural Product Research at the School of Pharmacy of the University of Mississippi, Oxford, Mississippi, USA. Dr. Dasmahapatra holds a B.Sc. (Honours), M.Sc. degrees in Zoology from the University of Burdwan, West Bengal, India and Ph. D. Degree in Zoology from of the University of Calcutta, West Bengal. India. He had postdoctoral training at the Department of Chemistry, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida, USA, Department of Gastroenterology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and in the Department of Biological Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA. He also worked at the Center for Great Lakes studies at the university as a Research Specialist. Dr Dasmahapatra’s research interests are mainly focused on Toxicology, Endocrinology and Molecular Biology. He is currently concentrated on Developmental Toxicology focusing on Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) and looking for the genes responsible for these developmental disorders. He is now mentoring graduate students who are searching a natural product that can prevent FAS. Dr. Dasmahapatra has published fifty seven scientific papers in peer-reviewed journals and three book chapters. He is also on the Editorial Board member of the Journal “Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology.”

Prescott Deininger, Ph.D. Dr. Prescott Deininger currently holds the Joe W. and Dorothy Brown Chair in Oncology as a Professor of Epidemiology at the Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine and is the Director of the Tulane Cancer Center and serves as the co-Director for the Louisiana Cancer Research Consortium. He has been an executive editor for Analytical Biochemistry since 1990 and Gene since 2007, and serves on the editorial boards of several international journals, as well as numerous grant review boards. He has served a term on the Board of Scientific Counselors for the National Toxicology Program of the NIEHS. Dr. Deininger was a graduate student with Dr. Carl Schmid at the University of California, Davis. He completed his dissertation entitled ‘Sequence Organization of the Human Genome’ in 1978. He carried out several years of postdoctoral training with Dr. Theodore Friedmann at the University of California, San Diego, followed by a year as a NATO fellow with Dr. Frederic Sanger at the MRC in Cambridge, England. Among his accomplishments during those years was the sequence of the polyoma virus genome; developing random shearing of DNA for shotgun DNA sequencing; initiating the EBV sequencing project; and isolation and analysis of the first clones of Alu repeats from the human genome. In 1981, he took a faculty position in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at LSU Health Sciences Center, New Orleans. In 1990, he developed the first dominant negative mutants while on sabbatical as an ACS Distinguished Fellow with Dr. Charles Stiles at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute and they hold the patent on the use of dominant negative mutants. His laboratory continues to be one of the major laboratories studying the role of human mobile elements in creating genetic instability. 18


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research INVITED SPEAKERS & ORAL PRESENTERS

Venkata B. Dodla, Ph.D. Dr. Venkata Dodla is a Visiting Professor at the Trent Lott Geospatial and Visualization Research Center, Jackson State University since February, 2009. He received his Ph.D. in Meteorology from Andhra University (India) in 1976. He worked at the Department of Meteorology and Oceanography, Andhra University during 1976-2008 as a teaching faculty and served in various other capacities including the Chair of the Department. He made significant contributions in the research with high resolution mesoscale atmospheric models (such as MM5 and WRF) for studies on tropical cyclones, monsoon climate, planetary boundary layer and atmospheric dispersion. His current research focuses on the following aspects: Climate change impacts on severe local weather hazards, air quality and urban hydrology; integrated weather prediction-atmospheric dispersion models for air quality studies; analysis and simulation coastal boundary layer circulations; and improvement of high resolution numerical models for simulation of hurricanes. Dr. Dodla has been recipient of many prestigious fellowships and research awards which include JSPS and STA Fellowships in Japan; DAAD Fellowship in Germany, ICTP Fellowship in Italy and Florida State University, USA. He has more than 100 research publications and authored one book; contributed chapters for 4 books; and mentored 15 students to receive Ph.D. in Meteorology. He is a recipient of awards and honors such as Dr. B. N. Desai Award from Indian Meteorological Society; Best Researcher and Dr. Radhakrishnan Academician Award from Andhra University. He is a Fellow of the Indian Geophysical Union and A. P. Akademi of Sciences. He is currently working on the application of high resolution WRF model for integration with HYSPLIT dispersion model and WRF/Chem model for studying air quality over Mississippi Gulf Coast region under NOAA ADP program at TLGVRC, Jackson State University.

Waneene C. Dorsey, Ph.D. Dr. Waneene C. Dorsey is a tenured and full professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at Grambling State University (GSU), Grambling, LA. She received her Doctor of Philosophy degree in Environmental Science from Jackson State University, Jackson, MS. Currently, she is the Director of the Molecular Toxicology Research Laboratory at GSU. Her focal research interest is signal transduction in AML-12 hepatocytes exposed to pentachlorophenol. From 2006 to 2008, she served as Director of the EPA-Water Quality Research Program (WQRP) where she investigated heavy metal translocation in recreational waters in the Northeast Louisiana watershed. A significant highlight of the EPA-WQRP program was that 19 K-12 teachers in six Louisiana parishes were taught to perform water parameters on local recreational waters as well as the importance of water quality management. As a NCATE liaison for the GSU Department of Curriculum and Instruction, she serves as the University Supervisor for Teacher Candidates in Secondary Biology Education. Dr. Dorsey is a reviewer for McGraw-Hill Publishers’ undergraduate biology textbooks, NSF graduate fellowships, and International Peer-Review Science Journals. She is a recipient of various civic awards and research grants. In addition, she is a member of GSU Policy and Procedures Committee, and the Title III Presidential Advisory Committee. Her desire is to get middle school, high school, and undergraduate students excited about the dynamics of science. Funded by the GRAD Act, Dr. Dorsey supervises high school teachers, who teach college-level biology courses for the GSU Dual-Enrollment Program. Her current investigations include analyzing ocean satellite imagery by using NASA Giovanni data. 19


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research INVITED SPEAKERS & ORAL PRESENTERS

Jimmy T. Efird, Ph.D. Dr. Jimmy T. Efird holds a joint appointment as Associate Professor in the Department of Public Health and as Epidemiologist/Chief Statistician (Director, Shared Resources) in the Center for Health Disparities Research, Brody School of Medicine, East Carolina University (ECU). He also serves as Director of Epidemiology and Outcomes Research for the ECU Heart Institute and is an Adjunct Associate Profession in the Department of Cardiovascular Sciences. Prior to joining ECU, Dr. Efird was Director of the Biostatistics Facility at the John A. Burns School of Medicine (Honolulu, Hawaii) and an Associate Member of the Cancer Research Center of Hawaii. Additionally, he headed the Shared Resources Unit for the Hawaii EXPORT Center (diabetes disparities and associated complications in Native Hawaiians and Pacific peoples) and continues to serve as a Consulting Statistician for the Center for Native and Pacific Health Disparities Research. He is Editor-inChief of Cancer Informatics, Associate Editor-in-Chief of International Journal of Biometrics and Bioinformatics, Associate Editor of Advances in Computational Research, and serves on the editorial board for Rare Tumors Journal, Journal of Carcinogenesis & Mutagenesis, Journal of Cancer Science & Therapy, American Journal of Analytical Chemistry, Journal of Biometrics and Biostatistics, UbiCC Journal, Hawaii Journal of Public Health, and Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Medicine, and Evolutionary Bioinformatics. Dr. Efird received his Ph.D. from Stanford University (Epidemiology with a concentration in Biostatistics). His expertise includes statistical methods for assessing gene-environment interaction, clinical trial design, computing power and sample size for correlated samples, and multiplicity adjustment for confidence intervals. He has served as a grant reviewer for NIH and the Susan B. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation. He currently serves as a Senior Statistical Consultant for The NCRR-funded RCMI Translational Research Network Data and Technology Coordinating Center.

Ebenezer Olatunde Farombi, Ph.D. Dr. Ebenezer Olatunde Farombi is a Full Professor of Biochemistry in the Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Nigeria. He holds a BSc., M.Sc. and Ph.D. Degrees in Biochemistry from the University of Ibadan. He had his Postdoctoral training at the Department of Biochemistry, University of Liverpool, UK and also at the Institute of Food Safety and Toxicology, Copenhagen, Denmark. He was Visiting Professor to the National Research Laboratory for Molecular Carcinogenesis and Chemoprevention, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea; Department of Nutritional Toxicology, Institute for Nutrition, Friedrich-Schiller University of Jena, Germany; University of Chicago Medical School, USA; and Cape Peninsular University of Technology, Cape Town, South Africa. Dr. Farombi’s research interests are on Molecular Toxicology, Cellular oxidative stress mechanisms; Antioxidant pharmacology; Pharmaceutical indications of nutraceuticals as prophylactic agents; Nutrigenomics; as well as Natural product Biotechnology. He is currently the Dean, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Medicine University of Ibadan and leads the University of Ibadan Biotechnology “Center of Excellence” project. He has over 100 scientific papers in international peer reviewed journals, 10 chapters in books and over 50 conference proceedings. He has recently edited a book titled “Nutritional Antioxidants in Cancer and Degenerative Diseases. A Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry, Cambridge, UK, he is on the Editorial board of many international journals. He is presently the Editor-in-Chief of the official journal of the West African Society of Toxicology. 20


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research INVITED SPEAKERS & ORAL PRESENTERS

Jean M. Feugang, Ph.D. Dr. Jean M. Feugang is a Research Assistant Professor in Reproductive Biology at Mississippi State University. He is an accomplished embryologist who started working in the reproductive area during his graduate studies at the French National Institute of Agricultural Research (I.N.R.A., Tours-Nouzilly, France), Catholic University of Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium) and postdoctoral trainees at The University of Arizona, Tucson and Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS. His young career began in 1997 with the setup of the in vitro porcine embryo production at I.N.R.A., which led to the birth of the first piglets from totally in vitro-produced embryos (Marchal and Feugang, 2001). Currently, Dr. Feugang conducts various research projects on gamete and early embryo quality in mammals at Mississippi State University. His research activities have generated numerous publications and he has been author and co-author of more than forty peer-review papers and abstracts. This publication record built on various funding supports such as NIH and USDA-ARS, and the successful contribution of highly motivated students from various background and nationalities, as well as numerous collaborators from clinical, academic and private areas. Dr. Feugang is well introduced in his area of research and actively contributes to the success of related professional societies. He has served either as reviewer or editorial member of prestigious scientific journals in the area of reproduction and the International Embryo Transfer Society (I.E.T.S.) annual meetings. With an ongoing research on real time imaging in living reproductive cells and large animals, using the nanotechnology approach, he is currently seeking for new collaborators for this new challenge.

Robert Finkelman, Ph.D. Dr. Robert Finkelman is an expert on the chemistry of coal and how its makeup affects its performance as an energy source and its impact on human health and the environment. His research has received widespread attention for revealing how tainted coal in southeast China led to the highest known rates of lung cancer among non-smoking women who live in a particular village. Dr. Finkelman is an expert at evaluating the complex interactions of chemicals and potential pollutants that come in contact with coal as it forms over millions of years. He has authored more than 600 articles and has spoken around the world on the emerging topic of medical Geology. Dr. Finkelman is a Fellow of the Geological Society of America and was the first person to have written a dissertation on the Returned Lunar Samples. His current research focuses on the health impacts of geologic materials and processes in Texas and around the world. He was co-editor of the book “Essentials of Medical Geology.� In 2005 he retired from the U.S. Geological Survey as a research chemist. He has served on the U.S. National Research Council committee tasked with studying the future of coal in the U.S. Dr. Finkelman received his Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of Maryland.

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Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research INVITED SPEAKERS & ORAL PRESENTERS

Fengxiang X. Han, Ph.D. Dr. Fengxiang X. Han is an Assistant Professor in Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at Jackson State University. He received his Ph.D. in Biogeochemistry from Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel in 1998. He has been an Associate Research Professor in the Institute for Clean Energy Technology at Mississippi State University since 2007. Dr. Han’s major research focuses are biogeochemistry and environmental chemistry of trace elements, heavy metals and radionuclides, bioremediation/phytoremediation of polluted soil, water, and wastes; surface chemistry of clay minerals; carbon sequestration and global warming. Dr. Han has been on the editorial boards of three international environmental science journals: Water Air and Soil Pollution, Soil and Sediment Contamination and Journal of Bioremediation & Biodegradation. He was a co-Chair of Environmental Science Working Group of James Worth Bagley College of Engineering, Mississippi State University from 2004 to 2011 and was a member of Organization Committee on International Workshop on Carbon Sequestration and Climate Change Mitigation in Agriculture, 2008, Nanjing, China. Dr. Han has published more than 140 referred papers, book chapters, and proceedings and conference presentations. He has obtained one U.S. provisional patent on remediation of trace element and heavy metals. In 2007, he published a book entitled Biogeochemistry of Trace Elements in Arid Environments by Springer.

Johnnie M. Hawkins, MPH Ms. Johnnie Hawkins is the Director of the Central Mississippi Area Health Education Center (AHEC). Central MS AHEC functions under the auspices of the Owens Health and Wellness Center at Tougaloo College. The center’s mission is to help create healthier communities by addressing the state’s health and health workforce needs. With the support of academic and public health partners, AHEC develops pipeline-training programs that educate, recruit, and train the workforce needed to improve the health of the people of Mississippi, works to eliminate health disparities, and improves health equity by addressing the lack of access to care in medically underserved areas in Mississippi. Ms. Hawkins’ professional interests and publication activities include extensive research on: Racial Profiling, Driving While Black (DWB), and Texting While Driving (TWD). Abstracts recently approved for presentation include: “A Collaborative Approach to Implementing a Standardized Community Health Worker Certification Program”, to be presented at the APHA Annual Meeting and Exposition (San Francisco, CA); and “A Profile of Primary Health Care Workforce Disparities in Central Mississippi”, being presented as part of this 9th International Symposium. Manuscripts recently submitted for publication review include: “The Association between Physical Activity and Cardiovascular Disease in Jackson Heart Study Participants”. Ms. Hawkins completed her undergraduate training at Tougaloo College, resides in Ridgeland, Mississippi, and is a military wife and mother. 22


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research INVITED SPEAKERS & ORAL PRESENTERS

Md. Alamgir Hossain, Ph.D. Dr. Alamgir Hossain is an associate professor of chemistry at Jackson State University. He received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in chemistry from the University of Dhaka and a Ph.D. in supramolecular chemistry from Hokkaido University in Japan. He was a recipient of an Alexander Humboldt Fellowship for his postdoctoral work with Professor Hans-Jorg Schneider in Germany. Later, he moved to USA, and worked as a postdoctoral researcher with Professor Kristin Bowman-James at the University of Kansas. Dr. Hossain has been serving as a faculty at Jackson State University since 2005. He is currently leading an independent research group consisting three doctoral, four masters and two undergraduate students, and one postdoctoral researcher. His research includes supramolecular and macromolecular chemistry focusing on non-covalent interactions between synthetic hosts and guest species, and developing new biomimetic sensors for anions of environmental and biological relevance. It was highlighted in Chemical and Engineering News, featured in ACS’s home page and covered in the Inorganic Chemistry. He was also featured by “Clarion Ledger” in 2011. Dr. Hossain has recently received National Science Foundation’s prestigious CAREER award that helps him to recruit students from high school to graduate levels at Jackson State University.

Sunali Khanna-Parulekar, Ph.D. Dr. Sunali Khanna-Parulekar is a faculty member of the Maharashtra University of Health Sciences in Mumbai, India. She is one of the youngest dental specialists of India and has a great interest in clinical and applied research. She guides students at Nair Hospital Dental College, Municipal Corporation of Greater Mumbai. Her work and expertise has earned appreciation from Dental Council of India, Ministry of Health and Indian Academy of Oral Medicine & Radiology. Dr. Khanna qualified in the all India merit examination for a B.D.S seat and later for Masters in Dental Surgery. She won academic distinctions and was recognized by the International College of Dentists in 2001. In 2005 she became the first in her class to qualify the D.N.B (Diplomate of National Boards) examination in India in Oral Medicine & Radiology. A year later, she was conferred membership to the National Academy of Medical Sciences, New Delhi. Recently, she has obtained the Post Graduate Diploma in Hospital & Healthcare Management and Medicolegal systems from the Symbiosis International University, Pune. She has also completed the Certificate Course on Clinical Research. She is presently the Vice President of the Indian Academy of Oral Medicine & Radiology and is currently the Co-Convener of International Conference on Environmental Health Research in collaboration with eleven Govt. Departments. Dr. Khanna is on the Editorial board & Peer Review Board of numerous National and Overseas journals and has been approached by the Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata, National Environmental Engineering Research Institute, Nagpur and Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Howard University and Egyptian Petroleum Research Institute for collaboration in key projects. She is on the expert panel of University Grants Commission, New-Delhi. She has co-authored book manuals apart from publishing 44 research papers in national and international journals. She has contributed chapters in textbook of Oral Radiology (Elsevier), Pediatric Dentistry and Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery. 23


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research INVITED SPEAKERS & ORAL PRESENTERS

Joseph R. Landolph Jr., Ph.D. Dr. Joseph R. Landolph, Jr., received a Ph.D. in Biophysical Chemistry from Univ. Calif. at Berkeley in Berkeley, Calif., (l976) under Prof. Melvin Calvin (Nobel Laureate). For his Ph.D., he studied metabolism of BaP and BaP-induced cytotoxicity and morphological transformation in cultured mouse liver epithelial cells and Balb/c 3T3 mouse fibroblasts. He performed postdoctoral study in chemical mutagenesis, morphological/neoplastic cell transformation, and carcinogenesis at USC/Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center under Prof. Charles Heidelberger (member, U. S. Nat’l. Academy of Sciences) from l977 to l980. Dr. Landolph is currently Assoc. Prof. of Molecular Microbiology/Immunology and Pathology in the Keck School of Medicine, Assoc. Professor of Molecular Pharmacology in the School of Pharmacy, and a Member of USC/Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center at USC. His research interests/activities include studies of the genetic toxicology/carcinogenicity of carcinogenic nickel (Ni), chromium, and arsenic compounds and P.A.H.s. His laboratory studies the ability of carcinogenic Ni and chromium compounds to induce morphological/neoplastic transformation of 10T1/2 mouse embryo cells, and expression of oncogenes/inactivation of expression of tumor suppressor genes and de-regulation of global gene expression, in Ni-transformed cell lines. He is an expert in chemically induced mutation and morphological/neoplastic transformation in murine/human fibroblasts. He has authored 66 scientific publications, given 192 invited scientific lectures, trained 97 B.S. students, 26 M.S. students, 13 Ph.D. students, and 31 postdoctoral fellows, and hosted 10 faculty and 4 high school teachers on sabbaticals.

Jerzey Leszczynski, Ph.D. Dr. Jerzy Leszczynski Professor of Chemistry and President’s Distinguished Fellow at Jackson State University. He attended the Technical University of Wroclaw in Wroclaw, Poland obtaining his M.S (1972) and Ph.D. (1975) degrees. In 1986 he moved to USA, initially as a visiting scientist at the University of Florida, Quantum Theory Project (1986-88) and as a research associate at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (1988-1990). From 1998 to 2008 he served as the director for the Computational Center for Molecular Structure and Interactions (NSF-CREST Center), and since October 2008 he has been directing the new Interdisciplinary Nanotoxicity CREST Center at JSU. Dr. Leszczynski is a computational quantum chemist whose vast areas of interest include: nature of chemical bonds, theoretical predictions of molecular potential energy surfaces and vibrational spectra, structures and properties of molecules with heavy elements, properties and structure of DNA fragments, and characteristics of nanomaterials. He also applies computational chemistry methods to environmental problems, surface chemistry and atmospheric chemistry. Two areas of his research contributions are the most noticeable: investigations of DNA fragments and development of novel techniques for investigation of properties and toxicity of nanomaterials. His 20 years research on DNA fragments appreciably contributes to understanding of structure and properties of DNA bases, their interactions with metal ions and solvent, formation of hydrogen bonds and stacking interactions, proton transfer, tautomeric equilibria, and excited state properties. More recent studies include also larger DNA fragments, sugar and phosphate groups, dynamic properties, and investigations of DNA damage by low energy electrons. The second focal point of innovative research activities of Dr. Leszczynski involves development and application of efficient methods to study nanomaterials. Due to unique characteristics of nanoparticles this 24


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research INVITED SPEAKERS & ORAL PRESENTERS

task requires development of novel QSAR approaches. Such studies are also combined with detailed computational investigations of interactions of nanospecies with biological species, providing details of such interactions and bridging together two major areas of his studies. Dr. Leszczynski has served as referee for over 50 journals (including the most prestigious such as Nature Nanotechnology, Nature Chemistry, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A., JACS, Angew., Chem,. or Chem European J.) and has published over 700 referred papers and over 50 book chapters. His papers have been cited more than 12,000 times and according to the Web of Science his Hirsh Index amounts to 52. He is the recipient of the White House Millennium Award for Teaching and Research Excellence in Mathematics, Science, and Engineering. Other selected awards include: Member of the European Academy of Sciences 2002; Guest Professorship, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, 2002; Honorary Doctorate, Dnipropetrovsk National University, 2003, Honorary Professorship, Wroclaw University of Technology, 2004; Member, European Academy of Sciences, Arts and Humanities, 2004; the Maria Sklodowska-Curie’s Medal (Medal for prominent chemists working permanently abroad), Polish Chemical Society, 2007 and the USA Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Mentoring, 2009; Honorary Professorship, Chongqing Normal University, 2010. Dr. Leszczynski is editor of “Structural Chemistry” (Springer), a book series: "Computational Chemistry: Reviews of Current Trends" World Scientific; Editor of a book series “Challenges and Advances in Computational Chemistry and Physics,” (Springer); Series Editor for “Lecture Notes in Chemistry” (Springer), and an editor and member of editorial boards of eight journals.

Dora N. Mbanya, MD, Ph.D. Dr. Dora Mbanya is Associate Professor of Haematology in the Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences in the University of Yaoundé I, Cameroon, and Consultant Haematologist in the University Teaching Hospital in Yaoundé, Cameroon. Her major interest is in Transfusion Medicine and HIV/AIDS-related issues in Sub Saharan Africa. She serves on national and international scientific committees, including the Expert Panel Committee for Blood Transfusion in the World Health Organization in Geneva, and the Working Party for Transfusion Transmissible Infections of the International Society for Blood Transfusion. She also serves on the Editorial Board of Health Sciences and Disease. Dr. Mbanya has worked with the Cameroonian community rendering services through her membership in the Cameroon Medical Women’s Association where she has held several posts in the past. She is currently the National President for the Society for Women and AIDS in Africa (SWAA) in Cameroon, where, as part of her contribution to community services, participates in reaching the community at various levels and positively impacting on their lives. Dr. Mbanya studied Medicine at the University Center for Health Sciences (CUSS), Yaoundé, Cameroon, is holder of a “Diplôme Universitaire” (DU) in Transfusion Medicine under the University of Abidjan in Côte d’Ivoire and a Ph.D. in Medicine (Haematology) from the University of Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK.

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Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research INVITED SPEAKERS & ORAL PRESENTERS

John A. McLachlan, Ph.D. Dr. John A. McLachlan, received his undergraduate degree from the Johns Hopkins University where he was also co-captain of the varsity football team. He is currently the Celia Scott Weatherhead and Albert J. Weatherhead, III Distinguished Chair in Environmental Studies as well as holding joint Professorships in the Departments of Pharmacology and Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at Tulane University. From 1995 to 2012. Prior to coming to Tulane, he was Scientific Director at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH. While at NIEHS, Professor McLachlan developed the conceptual framework thirty years ago for what is now called Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals. He has published over 200 peer-reviewed papers and sixty review articles dealing with the environment and the reproductive system and, in the process, helped introduce the concept of epigenetics to environmental research and thinking. At Tulane, Dr. McLachlan’s commitment to “use-inspired research” led him to explore community-based issues that could be approached in trans-disciplinary ways. A highlight of this effort was the use of the Mississippi River as an overarching metaphor for research and teaching. Faculty from the humanities, performing arts, natural sciences, social sciences came together around the ideas related to urban centers in river deltas. A highlight of this effort was the planning and design of RiverSphere, a research and cultural center located on seven acres of riverfront in the center of New Orleans. In September 2005, Dr McLachlan confronted the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina by establishing the NSFfunded Katrina Environmental Research and Restoration Network to coordinate research and restoration and, since 2009, has been co-principal investigator on a multi-disciplinary NSF grant, entitled, The “New Normal”: The Impact of Trauma on Urban Ecological and Social Diversity which studies how cities and communities function in the context of their natural ecosystems to gain a better understanding of resilience, recovery, and sustainability. His current research focuses on developing a scalable, comprehensive model integrating various environmental factors and functional change in biological systems. The goal is to provide a mechanistic model that can explain the contribution of broad environmental factors to human and community health.

Josaphat Ndelo-di-Phanzu, Ph.D. Dr. Josaphat Ndelo-di-Phanzu is a Congolese Toxicologist (Democratic Republic of Congo), from the University of Kinshasa, Faculties of Pharmaceutical sciences and Medicine where he teaches Toxicology (analytical, clinical, alimentary and veterinary), Phytopharmacy, Public Health and Biomedical research Ethics. Dr. Ndelo is a Pharmacist at the University of Kinshasa since 1975. After his graduate degree, he got a position of assistant at the University of Kinshasa, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences. In 1980, he moved to Belgium at the University of Leuven (Katholieke Universiteit Leuven) where he completed his doctorate degree (PhD) in Pharmaceutical Sciences, branch Toxicology after a Master degree in Pharmaceutical sciences. Apart this principal field of study, he has also been trained in Public health, Food and drug analysis, Academic pedagogy, Bioethics. After his studies, he went back home in 1986 and joined his University of origin, the University of Kinshasa. He was nominated Associate professor in 1986, Professor in 1998 and Ordinary Professor in 2005. He was Head of the Laboratory of food and drug analysis (1998-1992), Vice-Dean of the faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences (1996-1998), Dean of the faculty (1998-2001), Rector of the University of Kinshasa (2001-2005), Head of the Laboratory of the Laboratory of Toxicology (since 1998), Member of the Ethics Committee of the School of Public Health of the University of Kinshasa (since 2003). His research work is in toxicology, public health and medicinal plants. 26


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research INVITED SPEAKERS & ORAL PRESENTERS

Patrick N. Nhigula, Ph.D. Dr. Patrick Nhigula is an adjunct professor at South University in Columbia, South Carolina where he focuses on teaching health science and information technology courses. Prior to joining South University he was employed by Blue Cross Shield of South Carolina as a technical analyst where he coordinated Medicare and Medicaid contracts for the health insurance firm between 2006 and 2011. Dr. Nhigula has served two terms as a board member for South Carolina African American HIV/AIDS Council, a non-profit organization in Columbia, South Carolina. He has also served three terms as a board member for International Council of African Professional, non-profit organization. Between 2000 and 2006, Dr. Nhigula was employed by Spirit Telecom as a senior network support analyst where he coordinated and managed advanced telecommunication projects. He also served as a technical trainer for the same firm where he successfully coordinated training to clients. Prior to joining the telecommunication industry, Dr. Nhigula worked at the South Carolina Department of Social Services as Technical Support where he helped to implement different advanced technology systems in both hardware and software. Dr. Patrick has a combined experience and background in both health science and information technology. He received his doctorate in public health with specialization in Epidemiology from Walden University. He has done work and research on HIV/AIDS and Real-Time Technology among college students who attend HBCUs. He also received Masters of Science in public Health from the same institution. Dr. Nhigula holds a master degree in Information systems management from Webster University. He also holds a bachelor degree in Applied Mathematics from Allen University in South Carolina. Also, Dr. Nhigula received different technology certification in information technology including CISCO and Microsoft Certified Professional.

Monica M. B. Paoliello, Ph.D. Dr. Monica M. B. Paoliello is an Associate Professor of Toxicology in the Department of Pathology, and Clinical and Toxicological Analysis, Center of Health Sciences at the State University of Londrina, Parana, Brazil. Dr. Paoliello has a Ph.D. (2002) in Public Health from State University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Sao Paulo. She does research in the area of Toxicology and Environmental Health. She teaches undergraduate courses (Pharmacy and Medical School) and graduate courses (Public Health – master and doctorate degree) at the State University of Londrina. Dr. Paoliello received the Senior Award from International Union of Toxicologists (IUTOX) for 2006. Dr. Paoliello was the President of Brazilian Society of Toxicology (2006-2007). She has been a consultant at the Brazilian Agency of Health Surveillance (ANVISA) and at the Brazilian Oil Company (Petrobras). 27


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research INVITED SPEAKERS & ORAL PRESENTERS

Joann Powell, Ph.D. Dr. Joann Powell received her Ph.D. from Meharry Medical College in biomedical sciences, with an emphasis in pharmacology. She continued her training as a postdoctoral fellow at Emory University School of Medicine and the Winship Cancer Institute in the Department of Hematology and Oncology. Dr. Powell joined Clark Atlanta University’s Center for Cancer Research and Therapeutic Development (CCRTD) in 2010 where she also has a joint appointment in the Department of Biological Sciences. She is a member of the American Association for Cancer Research and the Society of Toxicology. Dr. Powell’s research focuses on investigating molecular mechanisms utilized by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) to influence cancer cell progression.

Aramandla Ramesh, Ph.D. Dr. Aramandla Ramesh is an Assistant Professor in Department of Cancer Biology in Meharry Medical College, located in Nashville, TN. The research in Dr. Ramesh’s laboratory focuses on the toxicity and carcinogenesis caused by benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), a lipophilic, widely distributed environmental chemical that belongs to the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) family of compounds. Their studies have shown that exposure of rats to BaP and other PAHs cause induction of the cytochrome P450 (CYP) family of enzymes resulting in the formation and distribution of reactive metabolites in plasma and target tissues. Dietary exposure of rats to PAHs via saturated fat results in an increased concentration of reactive metabolites, which stay in target tissues for a longer time and cause enhanced DNA damage. Their hypothesis is that dietary fat contributes to BaP-induced colon carcinogenesis through CYP-mediated metabolic pathways. Dr. Ramesh’s research also focuses on the role of resveratrol, a phytoestrogen in preventing colon cancer development and toxicity caused by BaP.

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Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research INVITED SPEAKERS & ORAL PRESENTERS

Paresh C. Ray, Ph.D. Dr. Paresh C. Ray is a program director of NSF-PREM program, in the Department of Chemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, Mississippi. Dr. Paresh Ray received his BS in Chemistry from Vidyasagar University, India and MS in Physical Chemistry from Kalyani University, India, in 1989 and 1992, respectively; and a Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry from Indian Institute of Science in 1997. He has been appointed to several positions including as a Research Scientist in Blacklight Power, New Jersey, as a Postdoctoral fellow in the University of Chicago, Illinois and Columbia University, New York. Dr. Ray has published over 100 scientific publications including peer-reviewed manuscripts, book chapters and abstracts. He has presented over 60 seminars, lectures and courses on various topics of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Nanomaterial spectroscopy, Nano-Bio technology, nonlinear optics and PDT material. Over the last decade, Dr. Ray has focused his attention on laser spectroscopy of nano-bio interface, RNA/DNA detection based on nanotechnology, Bacteria detection, Alzhimer’s biomarkers detection, cancer detection, molecular level understanding of CVD process, CVD diamond, carbon nanotubes, nano particle synthesis and characterization, alternative energy source based on plasma technology, theoretical understanding of nonlinear optical process and supramolecular hydrogen bonding.

Hector O. Rubio, Ph.D. Dr. Hector O. Rubio obtained his PhD program at New Mexico State University in 1989. He is retired of the National Research Institute of Forestry, Agriculture and Animal Production (INIFAP-Mexico). Presently, is a Professor-Researcher in the College of Zootechnology and Ecology of the Autonomous University of Chihuahua, where he is involved in different projects to determine the level of pollution in soils and water resources of Mexico. Dr. Rubio has been an invited as professor at the Advanced Materials Research Center (CIMAV-CONACYT) since 2006. Dr. Rubio has written four books, several book chapters and has about 50 peer-reviewed publications in different journals. He belongs to the National Researcher System of CONACYT-Mexico and is participating as a member of the biosecurity experts of the CONABIO-Mexico. Dr. Rubio serves on the editorial boards of several journals as well as had served as reviewer of many publications. Dr. Rubio´s work expertise includes head of the Department of Agriculture in the State of Chihuahua, Mexico.

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Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research INVITED SPEAKERS & ORAL PRESENTERS

Xianglin Shi, Ph.D. Dr. Xianglin Shi is a Professor in Toxicology, William A. Marquard Chair in Cancer Research, and Associate Director for Cancer Chemoprevention and Environmental Toxicology at Markey cancer Center, University of Kentucky. Dr. Shi earned a PhD in chemistry from the West Virginia University in 1988. From 1989 to 1996, he was a postdoctoral scientist at West Virginia University and National Cancer institute. In 1996 he moved to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV as a Research chemist and the Team Leader in the Oxidative Stress and Inflammation Team. At the same time, Dr. Shi jointed West Virginia University, where he rose through the academic ranks to full professor. In 2003, He served as a Founding director, Institution for Nutritional Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, China. In 2006, he relocated to University of Kentucky. Dr. Shi’s laboratory focuses very broadly on investigating molecular mechanisms of metel carcinofgenesis and cancer prevention. His major contribution is the establishment of Fenton type mechanism of Cr(VI)induced free radical generation, which is a foundation for the oxidative stress hypothesis of metal carcinogenesis. He is an organizer a series of meetings of Molecular Mechanisms of Metal Toxicity and Carcinogenesis. He has edited 8 special focused journal issues in his field and published and published 375 articles. These articles have received 10,600 citations with h-index of 55. Since 2000, he has served on various NIH studies sections and scientific advisory boards.

Natalia Shtemenko, Ph.D. Dr. Natalia Shtemenko, biochemist, was graduated from chemistry department, Dnipropetrovs’k National University (Dnipropetrovsk, Ukraine) in 1976. She worked for Institute of Organic Chemistry, USSR Academy of Sciences 19761981, Institute of Biology of Dnipropetrovs’k National University 1981-1996, from 1996 till now days she is the Head of the Department of Biophysics and Biochemistry of the Oles Gonchar Dnipropetrovs’k National University. In 2007 – 2009, Dr. Shtemenko was a visiting Professor of Helmholtz Center for Environmental Research, Leipzig, Germany according to DAAD Grants. She is an active participant of the “NATO Science for Peace and Security Program”, in 2011 she was a Codirector of the NATO Advanced Research Workshop (ARW): “Environmental and Food Security and Safety in Southeast Europe”, Dnipropetrovs’k, Ukraine. As a Fulbright scholar in 2011-2012, she worked in the Texas A&M University (USA) in the Departments of Chemistry and Biology. She is the head of Dnipropetrovs’k department of Ukrainian Biochemical Society and a member of the International Society of Inorganic Biochemistry. Dr. Shtemenko’s research interests are in the areas of anticancer research, application of metal-organic substances in medicine, nanobiotechnology. In recent years she focused on the development of rhenium – platinum antitumor system that in an animal model completely eliminates cancer cells and shows itself as antioxidant and antihemolytic.

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Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research INVITED SPEAKERS & ORAL PRESENTERS

Kamaleshwar P. Singh, Ph.D. Dr. Kamaleshwar P. Singh is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Environmental Toxicology and Institute of Environmental and Human Health (TIEHH), Texas Tech University at Lubbock, Texas. He received his PhD degree in Molecular Genetics from University of Delhi, India. After completing his PhD research, Dr. Singh joined University of Alabama at Birmingham as National Cancer Institute (NCI) Postdoctoral training fellow. His research interests are Molecular Toxicology, Environmental Carcinogenesis, Toxicogenomics, and Human Cancer Genomics. Dr. Singh’s current research is focused on the genetic and epigenetic bases for environmental estrogenic-chemicals and heavy metals-induced human cancers. He has published 29 research articles in peer- reviewed journals and has presented his research in several research meetings. He is a member of American Association of Cancer Research (AACR), and Society of Toxicology (SOT). Dr. Singh has served as a panel member for review of grant applications for federal and private funding agencies and many peer-reviewed journals. Currently, he serves as an editorial board member for PLoS ONE, Journal of Environmental Immunology & Toxicology, and Journal of Environmental & Analytical Toxicology.

Karam F. Soliman, Ph.D. Dr. Karam F. A. Soliman currently serves as a Distinguished Professor at Florida A&M University College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. He received his MS (Physiology) and Ph.D. (Endocrinology) in 1971 and 1972, respectively, from the University of Georgia. Prior to joining FAMU in 1975, he was an Assistant Professor of Physiology and Pharmacology at the School of Veterinary Medicine, Tuskegee University. Dr. Soliman was instrumental in establishing the graduate program in Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences. He has trained 24 PhDs and 20 MS students and is considered to be the top trainer (rank first) in the Nation of African- American PhD's in Pharmaceutical Sciences. Among 106 Historically Black Colleges and Universities in the country, he ranked number one as the most published faculty member His list of publications includes 131 refereed indexed articles, 215 abstracts, 2 books and 4 chapters in textbooks. Dr. Soliman serves as the Principal Investigator of multimillion dollar grant from the Research Center in Minority Institution (RCMI) of the National Institute of Health (NIH). During his tenure at FAMU, he has attracted more than $40 million in federal research funds to FAMU. He is a member of the American Society of Pharmacology and. Experimental Therapeutics, American Physiological Society, Endocrine Society, Neuroscience Society, and the American Society of Investigative Pathology. Dr. Soliman's most significant research contribution is related to the finding that anaerobic metabolism in the cancer cell is required for tumor cell survival. It is the hope that this discovery will lead to the finding of non-toxic therapeutic agents to fight cancer. His research interest is in Neuroscience and brain cancer; Natural products use in cancer prevention and therapy; and Natural products use in the treatment of skin diseases, dyshidrosis (skin dryness), psoriasis and eczema. As an inventor, he holds two US patents. 31


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research INVITED SPEAKERS & ORAL PRESENTERS

Herman A. Taylor, M.D. In his current role, Dr. Herman A. Taylor reports directly to the chief executives of the University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson State University and Tougaloo College - the 3 institutions participating in the Jackson Heart Study. This tri-institutional research, teaching and service enterprise is the hub of an expanding multidisciplinary collaborative network, with the daily involvement of students, trainees, and investigators from across the US and beyond. In addition to career scientists, clinicians, trainees and students involved in the JHS, there is an active community engagement unit involved in cohort retention, health literacy, translation of health information to the public, and practice community and the development of a network of community health workers. Thus the JHS is an expansive, multifaceted project enduring now for over 12 years. Key administrative units of the Study include Data Acquisition; Data Analysis; Data Management, Quality Assurance and IT; Surveillance and Events Monitoring; Education and Training; Community Partnership each headed by an Associate Director of the JHS. A Chief Administrative Officer and a Chief Science Officer have recently been recruited to augment the administrative team reporting to Dr. Taylor. The Study has received continuous funding since 1999 and has been the stimulus for numerous ancillary studies (R01’s, U01, R21’s, K awards, Diversity Supplements, etc.). Through its training programs it has helped develop a diverse group of young scholars focused on medicine, public health sciences and research.

Billy R. Thomas, MD, MPH Dr. Billy R. Thomas is a Neonatologist at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) and serves as the Vice Chancellor for Diversity and Inclusion in the Center for Diversity Affairs in the College of Medicine. He earned his Medical Degree at UAMS in 1980 and completed his internship and residency training in Pediatrics at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences/Arkansas Children’s Hospital. He subsequently completed a fellowship in Neonatal/Perinatal medicine at Case Western Reserve/Metropolitan General Hospital and later received a Master’s in Public Health from the Tulane School of Public Health. Dr. Thomas combines an active clinical practice with his administrative duties as Vice Chancellor for Diversity and Inclusion in the Center for Diversity Affairs. His clinical service is primarily inpatient and focuses on the care of critically ill neonates. In addition to his clinical responsibilities he teaches and mentors not only students and residents but also junior faculty. As Vice Chancellor of Diversity and Inclusion he is involved with all aspects of the Center which includes recruitment and retention of minority students and the development of academic enrichment programs for students from K to the undergraduate level. The overall goal of ALL programs is the diversification of the health care work force and ultimately the reduction of health care disparities. His community involvement ranges from organizing and participating in multiple health fairs to hosting a weekly radio program. Started in April of 2001 Dr. Thomas hosts a call-in radio program called “Feeling Good with Dr. T”. The program focused on health problems of African-Americans and other minorities with commentary by local health care experts. 32


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research INVITED SPEAKERS & ORAL PRESENTERS

Francis Tuluri, Ph.D. Dr. Francis Tuluri is serving as the Associate Professor in the Department of Technology since August, 2007. He joined Jackson State University in 2001, and worked as a visiting Professor in the Department of Physics, Atm. Sci. & Geo Science until 2007. He has over two decades of outstanding experience in teaching and research. During this time, he has taught a wide range of courses such as Electronics, Solid State Electronics and Devices, Physics (Calculus based and Algebra based), Solid State Physics and Materials Science, Physical Science, Engineering Physics, Math, and Computer Programming. His current areas of research include Electronics Instrumentation and microcontroller data acquisition; Air quality modeling, optically induced liquid crystal display devices and materials; and 2D NMR imaging for diffusion in polymer electrolyte fuel cell membranes. Recently, Dr. Tuluri’s has worked in collaboration with Virginia Tech, Virginia, under a grant by American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund Summer Research Fellowship, 2008, and as University Scholar of 2009. The research work involves the study of two dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, to understand solute morphology and transport in polymeric fuel cell materials. The work was carried out in the NMR laboratories of Dr. Louis Madsen, Department of Chemistry, Virginia Tech as a part of collaboration with Jackson State University. Furthermore, he is a collaborator with Professor Noel Clark, University of Colorado, Boulder. Dr. Tuluri is also developing collaboration with the Condensed Matter Research Group, Boulder and to induct Jackson State University under Institute of for Complex Adaptive Matter (ICAM_I2CAM). The collaboration will enable to send two of our students to do summer research work in their laboratories with undergraduate research assistantship.

Mohammad N. Uddin, Ph.D. Dr. Mohammad Nasir Uddin is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine at Scott & White Healthcare. Dr. Uddin obtained his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in biochemistry & molecular biology from the University of Dhaka in Bangladesh. He earned his PhD at Gifu University in Japan. He was a recipient of the Japanese Society for Promotion of Science Fellowship for his postdoctoral research. He served intermittently as a faculty member up to an associate professor for 12 years at University of Dhaka. Besides his primary position at TAMHSC/COM, currently he holds positions as adjunct faculty in the Texas Bioscience Institute and a Staff Scientist at Scott and White Memorial Hospital, Temple, TX. Dr. Uddin is an accomplished scientist with a research interest in translational medicine. He is currently leading an independent research group consisting of medical students and residents and research associates. Dr. Uddin’s work centers on the pathogenesis of hypertension especially on the pregnancyinduced hypertension, preeclampsia, and the potential role of cardiotonic steroids in this condition. Dr. Uddin’s published work includes more than 100 peer reviewed articles on a variety of subjects, primarily related to the renin-angiotensin system and preeclampsia. Other areas of publication include diabetes mellitus and the identification and actions of a number of naturally derived substances. 33


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research INVITED SPEAKERS & ORAL PRESENTERS

Candice Wilson, MPH Ms. Candice Wilson is a graduate of Xavier University of Louisiana where she received a Bachelor of Science degree in 2002. She furthered her education by earning a Master of Public Health degree in 2007 from Louisiana State University’s School of Public Health where her area of concentration was Biostatistics. Prior to her current employment, Ms. Wilson worked for three years as a Biostatistician for the Office of Community Affairs and Health Policy at Tulane University’s School of Medicine. During this time, she worked closely with medical directors to analyze patient health data and compile quality improvement reports for the Tulane Community Health Centers. She was heavily involved in data management and reporting that was an integral part of obtaining financial and community support for Tulane’s Community Health Centers. Her main responsibility was to report patient health and demographic statistics for the purposes of quality improvement within the health clinics. Ms. Candice Wilson currently serves as Biostatistician for the Head-off Environmental Asthma in Louisiana, Phase II (HEAL II) Project at Xavier University of Louisiana. She works closely with principal investigators, program managers and asthma educators to analyze and report health outcome data for the research project.

Anjaneyulu Yerramilli, Ph.D. Dr. Anjaneyulu Yerramilli is presently working as Visiting Professor in Environmental Science and Chemistry at Jackson State University, Jackson, Mississippi and coordinating the activities of Trent Lott Geospatial & Visualization Research Center (TLGVRC) in e-Center as its Director. He is involved as Lead investigator for the NOAA sponsored program on “Atmospheric dispersion Modeling for Gulf Coast” and a DoD sponsored program on “High-Performance Computational Methods for Novel MaterialsComputationally Designed Molecularly Imprinted Polymers as Poisonous Gas Sensors”. He received his PhD in Environmental Chemistry in 1973, from Andhra University, Waltair, India. From 1972 to 90, he worked in various capacities in the faculty of Chemistry at Andhra University and Nagarjuna University in India. Dr. Yerramilli worked as a Visiting Scientist of the British Council at University of Stratheclyde, Glasgow, UK from 1984 to 1986. He received advanced training in the application of Remote Sensing and GIS for Natural Resource Management from NRSA Hyderabad, India. From 1990-2002, he worked as a Professor and Head of the Center for Environment at J.N.T. University India and as the Institute’s Director from 2002-2005. As a Principal Investigator he executed a number of Research and Development projects sponsored by various government funding agencies in India. These projects are in the following areas: Geospatial Information Systems, Environmental Impact Assessment, Air pollution Modeling Monitoring, Sensor Development, Hazardous Waste Treatment, Hydrogen Production Technologies, and Nanomaterials. He had 33 years of teaching experience at Post Graduate level and published more than 130 Research Publications in various National and International journals and guided 33 PhD’s. He also authored 8 books on environmental Technologies and Chemistry. In 2003 he was invited by the Swedish Academy of Sciences to nominate a suitable scientist from India for consideration for the award of Nobel Prize in Chemistry and received BEST TEACHER award from Government of A.P INDIA. 34


Program


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research PROGRAM

Sunday, September 16, 2012

12:30 – 4:30 PM

5:00 – 7:00 PM

Pre-Symposium Workshop on the NIH-National Library of Medicine Web Resources for Environmental Health Research Facilitated by Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education Registration Meet and Greet

Jackson State University JAP Science Building Room-118

Marriott Hotel, Downtown Jackson, MS, USA

Monday, September 17, 2012

7:30 - 8:45 AM

Registration and Continental Breakfast

Mezzanine

8:45 - 9:30 AM

WELCOME AND OPENING REMARKS (Dr. Paul Tchounwou – Symposium Chair)

Windsor I

Dr. Carolyn W. Meyers President, Jackson State University (JSU), Jackson, MS, USA Principal Investigator, NIH-RCMI Center for Environmental Health, JSU, USA Honorable Phil Bryant Governor, State of Mississippi, USA Honorable Harvey Johnson Mayor, City of Jackson, MS, USA Dr. Mark G. Hardy Provost and Vice President of Academic Affairs Jackson State University, Jackson, MS, USA Dr. Felix Okojie Vice President for Research and Federal Relations Jackson State University, Jackson, MS, USA

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Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research PROGRAM

9:30 - 10:50 AM

PLENARY SESSION I-A: ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICOLOGY AND HEALTH RISK ASSESSMENT Windsor I 2 1 Chairpersons: Dr. José A. Centeno and Dr. Loretta Moore 1 Senior Supervisory Research Scientist & Chief, Division of Biophysical Toxicology, The Joint Pathology Center, Malcolm Grow Medical Clinic, Silver Spring, Joint Base Andrews Naval Air Facility Washington, Maryland, USA. 2 Associate Vice President for Research & Scholarly Engagement, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS, USA

9:30

Ni+2-Induced Global Deregulation of Gene Expression, Cytoskeletal Alterations, and Ca+2 Ion Distribution Alterations in Ni+2-Transformed 10T1/2 Mouse Embryo Cells. Dr. Joseph R. Landolph Cancer Research Laboratory, USC/Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, and Depts. of Molecular Microbiology/Immunology and Pathology, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA.

9:50

The Marine Toxin Okadaic Acid Modulates DNA (Cytosine-5)- Methyl Transferase Activity in Mouse Embryonic Stem ES-D3 Cell-Free System and in the Human Intestinal CACO2-Cells. Dr. Edmond E. Creppy Laboratory of Toxicology and Applied Hygiene, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University Victor Segalen Bordeaux 2, 146 rue Léo Saignat, F-33076 Bordeaux, France

10:10

Metabolism of Benzo(a)pyrene by Subcellular Fractions of Jejunum and Colon in Apcmin Mouse. Dr. Aramandla Ramesh Department of Biochemistry and Cancer Biology, Meharry Medical College, 1005 Dr. D.B. Todd Jr. Blvd., Nashville TN, 37208. USA

10:30

Molecular and Cellular mechanisms Involved in Arsenic Trioxide Toxicity to Human Liver Carcinoma Cells. Dr. Erica T. Brown Cellomics and Toxicogenomics Research Laboratory, NIH-Center for Environmental Health, College of Science Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA

Mezzanine

10:50 – 11:00 AM

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Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research PROGRAM

11:00- 12:20 PM

PLENARY SESSION I-B: ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICOLOGY AND HEALTH RISK ASSESSMENT Windsor I 2 1 Chairpersons: Dr. Mahmoud Manzoul and Dr. Monica M. B. Paoliello 1 Professor & Chair, Department of Computer Engineering, College of Science, Engineering, and Technology, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS, USA 2 President of Brazilian Society of Toxicology & Professor, Departamento de Patologia, Análises Clínicas e Toxicológicas, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Brazil

11:00

Type I NKT Cells Play a Protective (and Type Ii NKT Cells Play an Inhibitory) Role in the Host’s Innate Antitumor Immune Response against a Mouse Model of Multiple Myeloma. Dr. Randy R. Brutkiewicz Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Indiana University School of Medicine, 950 W. Walnut Street, Building R2, Room 302, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA

11:20

Mechanisms Underlying the Testicular Toxicity of Atrazine and the Role of Quercetin as Chemoprotective Agent in Rats and Sertoli-Germ Cell CoCulture. Dr. Ebenezer O. Farombi Drug Metabolism and Toxicology Research Laboratories, Department of Biochemistry College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Nigeria

11:40

Asian Ginseng (Panax Ginseng) Aggravates Ethanol Toxicity in Japanese Ricefish (Oryzias Latipes) Embryogenesis. Dr. Asok K. Dsasmahapatra National Center for Natural Product Research, Environmental Toxicology Research Program, Department of Pharmacology, University of Mississippi, University, MS 38677, USA

12:00

Resveratrol Restores Function to the Testes and Epididymides of BapTreated Rats Dr. Anthony E. Archibong Department of Physiology, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Meharry Medical College, Nashville, TN, USA

12:20 - 2:00 PM

Luncheon

Windsor III

Introduction of Luncheon Speaker Dr. Dorris Robinson-Gardner Dean, Graduate Studies, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS, USA “Honorary Biomedical Sciences and Health Information Lecture Series” “The Importance of Workforce Diversity and Cultural Competency in Improving Health” Dr. Billy Thomas: Vice Chancellor for Diversity & Professor of Pediatrics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 West Markham Street, #512, Little Rock, Arkansas 72205, USA 38


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research PROGRAM

2:00 - 3:40 PM

PLENARY SESSION II: NANOSCIENCE, NANOTECHNOLOGY AND NANOTOXICOLOGY Windsor I 1 2 Chairpersons: Dr. Carolyn Howard and Dr. Gordon Skelton 1 Associate Professor, Department of Biology, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, JSU, Jackson, MS, USA 2 Interim Chair & Professor, Department of Computer Science, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, JSU, Jackson, MS, USA

2:00

Investigations of Nanomaterials in Environment: Advantages of Computational Methodology. Dr. Jerzy Leszczynski Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Interdisciplinary Nanotoxicity Center, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch St., Jackson, MS, 39217, USA

2:20

Solid Nanoparticles and Nanoliposomes Loaded with RheniumPlatinum Antitumor System in Cancer Treatment Dr. Natalia Shtemenko Department of Biophysics and Biochemistry, Dnipropetrovs’k National University, 72 Gagarin avenue, 49050 Dnipropetrovs’k, Ukraine.

2:40

Application of Quantum Dot Technology for Photonic Imaging in Animal Reproduction Dr. Jean M. Feugang Facility for Organismal and Cellular Imaging, Department of Animal and Dairy Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS, USA

3:00

Gold Nanotechnology for Biological Imaging and Therapy Dr. Paresh Chandra Ray Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217-0168, USA

3:20

Profiling Bioaccumulation and Toxicity of Silica Encapsulated Lead Selenide Nanoparticles on Mice Model in vivo Dr. Zikri Arslan Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217-0168, USA

Mezzanine

3:40 - 3:50PM

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Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research PROGRAM

3:50 - 5:30 PM

PLENARY SESSION III: NATURAL RESOURCES DAMAGE ASSESSMENT AND MANAGEMENT Windsor I 1 2 Chairpersons: Dr. Jimmy T. Efird and Dr. Hongtao Yu 1 Director, Center for Health Disparities Research and Department of Public Health Brody School of Medicine, 600 Moye Blvd., Greenville, North Carolina, USA 2 Profesor and Chair, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, Jackson, Mississippi, USA

3:50

Water and Sediment Pollution in the Laguna De Bustillos in Mexico; Its Concerns about the Environment and Human Health. Dr. Hector Rubio-Arias College of Zootechnology and Ecology, Autonomous University of Chihuahua. Chihuahua, Mexico

4:15

Effect of Soil Sterilization on the Growth and Heavy Metal Accumulation of Plants Grown in Metal-Contaminated Soils. Dr. Maria Begonia Department of Biology, College of Science Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA

4:40

Phytotoxicity of Mercury on Chinese Brake Fern with Mycorrhizal Fungi Inoculation in Oak Ridge Soil Dr. Fengxiang X. Han Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217-0168, USA

5:05

The Effects of Crude Oil and Dispersant Toxicity on Marine Phytoplankton Productivity in the Gulf of Mexico Dr. Waneene C. Dorsey Department of Biology, College of Arts and Science, Grambling State University, Grambling, Louisiana, USA

5:30 - 7:00 PM

POSTER SESSION A – STUDENTS

7:00 - 9:30 PM

Reception by Invitation Marriott Hotel, Downtown Jackson, Jackson, MS, USA (Entertainment and Heavy Hors d’oeuvres)

40

Windsor II


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research PROGRAM

Tuesday, September 18, 2012 7:30 – 8:30 AM

Registration and Continental Breakfast

8:40 – 10:20 AM

PLENARY SESSION IV-A: NEW FRONTIERS IN ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH RESEARCH Windsor I 1 Chairpersons: Dr. J. R. Landolph and Dr. Edmond Creppy2 1 Associate Professor, Department of Pharmacology/Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA 2 Professor and Director of Toxicology Laboratory, University Bordeaux 2, 146, Rue Léo Saignat 33076 Bordeaux, France

8:40

Regulation of Pericellular pH Homeostasis in the Cancer Cell Dr. Karam F. A. Soliman Neurodegeneration Research Laboratory, College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Florida A & M University, Tallahassee, FL 32307, USA

9:00

Role of Reactive Oxygen Species in Cr(VI)-Induced Cell Transformation Dr. Xiangllin Shi Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40515, USA

9:20

Trace Elements (Copper, Molybdenum, Selenium & Zinc) as Markers in Oral Precancer and Cancer Dr. Sunali Khanna Department of Oral Medicine & Radiology, Nair Hospital Dental College, Mumbai, 400008 India

9:40

Identifying a Role for Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR) in Prostate Cancer Progression Dr. Joann Powell Center for Cancer Research and Therapeutic Development, Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

10:00

Breast Carcinogenesis Induced by Environmental Substances and Estrogen and Counteracted by an Antioxidant Dr. Gloria M. Calaf Instituto de Alta Investigación, Universidad de Tarapacá, Arica, Chile and Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA

Mezzanine

10:20 - 10:35 AM

41


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research PROGRAM

10:35 - 12:15 PM

PLENARY SESSION IV-B: NEW FRONTIERS IN ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH RESEARCH Windsor I 1 Chairpersons: Dr. Hector Rubio-Arias and Dr. Jacqueline Stevens2 1 Professor–Researcher, Faculty of Zootechnics, Autonomous University of Chihuahua, Mexico 2 Associate Professor & Director of the MARC Program, Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS, USA

10:35

Environmental Signaling and Gene Regulation: Integrating the Inside with the Outside Dr. John A. McLachlan Departments of Pharmacology, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA

10:55

Arsenic-Induced Epigenetic Changes and Susceptibility to Prostate Carcinogenesis Dr. Kamaleshwar P. Singh The Institute of Environmental and Human Health (TIEHH), Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409, USA

11:15

Role of Cardiotonic Steriod in Causation of Cerebral Vascular Leak Syndrome in Hypertension during Pregnancy: A Translational Approach Dr. Mohammad N. Uddin Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine/Scott & White Hospital, Temple, Texas, USA

11:35

Mobile Elements as a Source of Environmentally Sensitive Genetic Instability Dr. Prescott Deininger Tulane Cancer Center and Department of Epidemiology, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA, USA

11:55

Anion Sensors Dr. Md. Alamgir Hossain Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch St., Jackson, MS, 39217, USA

12:15 - 2:00 PM

Luncheon

Windsor III

Introduction of Luncheon Speaker Dr. James Perkins Director, RTRN-Data Technology Coordinating Center, College of Science, Engineering & Technology, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS, USA “Honorary Biomedical Sciences and Health Information Lecture Series” “Jackson Heart Study - Building a Platform for Change” Dr. Herman Taylor – Director of The Jackson Heart Study & Professor of Medicine, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, USA 42


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research PROGRAM

2:05 – 3:45 PM

PLENARY SESSION IV-C: MEDICAL GEOLOGY AND HUMAN HEALTH Windsor I 1 2 Chairpersons: Dr. Gloria M Calaf and Dr. Ramzi Kafoury 1 Professor, Instituto de Alta Investigación, Universidad de Tarapacá, Arica, Chile and Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA 2 Associate Professor and Assistant Chair, Department of Biology, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, Jackson, Mississippi, USA

2:05

Arsenic – A Beneficial Therapeutic and an Environmental Poison Dr. José A. Centeno Biophysical Toxicology, The Joint Pathology Center, Malcolm Grow Medical Clinic, 1057 West Perimeter Road, Bldg 1050, Room GB-3, Joint Base Andrews Naval Air Facility Washington, MD, USA

2:25

Low Level Lead Exposure and Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Diseases: A Preliminary Study Dr. Monica Maria Bastos Paoliello Graduate Program in Public Health, Department of Clinical and Toxicological Analysis, Health Science Center, State University of Londrina, Parana, Brazil

2:45

The Lignite-Water Syndrome: A Possible Environmental Health Threat to Millions. Dr. Robert B. Finkelman Department of Geosciences, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX 75080, USA

3:05

Assessment of Lead Exposure in Infants from 0 to 6 Years Old in the Township of Ndjili in Kinshasa (Dr Congo) Dr. J. Ndelo-di-Phanzu Laboratoire de Toxicologie, Faculté des Sciences Pharmaceutiques, Université de Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo

3:25

Natural Compounds and Vitamins Can Inhibit the Phip Induced Cytotoxicity in MCF-10a Cells by Transcriptional and Translational Changes Dr. Abhilash Samykutty Department of Natural Sciences, Albany State University, 504 College Dr. Albany, Georgia 31705, USA

Mezzanine

3:45 – 4:00 PM

43


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research PROGRAM

4:00 – 5:40 PM

PLENARY SESSION V: EMERGING TOPICS IN COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MODELING WINDSOR I 2 1 Chairpersons: Dr. Daniel Sarpong and Dr. Danuta Leszczynska 1 Senior Biostatistician, RTRN-Data Technology Coordinating Center, Jackson State University, Jackson, Mississippi, USA 2 Professor, Department of Civil Engineering, College of Science, Engineering & Technology, JSU, Jackson, MS, USA

4:00

Computing Mantel-Haenszel Adjusted Informational Odds Ratios: Application in Environmental Exposure Studies Dr. Jimmy T. Efird Center for Health Disparities Research and Department of Public Health Brody School of Medicine, 600 Moye Blvd., Greenville, North Carolina, USA

4:20

Source-Receptor Modeling using ARW Weather Prediction Model and HYSPLIT Pollutant Dispersion Model to Assess Mercury Pollution over the Mississippi Gulf Coast Region Dr. Anjaneyulu Yerramilli Trent Lott Geospatial and Visualization Research Centre, Jackson State University, JSU Box 18739, MS 39217, USA

4:40

Climatic Trends in Tornado Vulnerability and Convective Available Potential Energy over Mississippi, USA Dr. Venkata B. Dodla Trent Lott Geospatial and Visualization Research Center, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS, USA

5:00

Detection and Mapping of Cyanobacterial Harmful Algal Blooms using Satellite Data in One Louisiana Lake and Four Mississippi Lakes Dr. Padmanava Dash Department of Biology and the Environmental Science Ph.D. Program, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson State University, Jackson, Mississippi, USA

5:20

A Study of Airborne Diseases over Mississippi Region using Air Quality, Meteorological Parameters and Modeling Dr. Francis Tuluri Department of Technology, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS, USA

5:40 - 7:30 PM

POSTER SESSION B – FACULTY & PROFESSIONAL SCIENTISTS

Windsor II

8:00 – 11:00 PM

Symposium Banquet

Windsor III

Marriott Hotel, Downtown Jackson, Jackson, MS, USA

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Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research PROGRAM

Wednesday, September 19, 2012 Mezzanine

7:30 - 8:40 AM

Continental Breakfast

8:45 - 10:25 AM

PLENARY SESSION VI-A: HEALTH DISPARITIES AND ENVIRONMENTAL SECURITY WINDSOR I 2 1 Chairpersons: Dr. Dora N. Mbanya and Dr. John Colonias 1 Professor & Head, Hematology Laboratory, Faculty of Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, University of Yaoundé I, Cameroon 2 Interim Chair & Associate Professor, Department of Technology, College of Science, Engineering & Technology, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS, USA

8:45

Environmental Factors Influencing Asthma Severity and Control among Children Participating in HEAL, Phase II Ms. Candice Wilson Center for Minority Health & Health Disparities Research and Education, Xavier University of Louisiana,1 Drexel Drive New Orleans, Louisiana, USA

9:10

SMR-derived Peptide Disrupts HIV-1 Nef’s Interaction with Mortalin and Blocks Virus and Nef Exosome Release Dr. Vincent C. Bond Department of Microbiology, Biochemistry, Immunology, Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA USA

9:35

Effects of Chia Seed (Salvia hispanica L.) Suplementation on Body Weight and Metabolic Control in Diabetic Rats Dr. Jorge L. Ble-Castillo Centro de Investigacion, Division Academica de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad Juarez Autonoma de Tabasco, Villahermosa, Tabasco, Mexico

10:00

Spatial-Temporal Analysis of Influenza Virus in the State of Mississippi Dr. David Bandi National Center for Biodefense Communications (NCBC), Mississippi e-Center, Jackson State University, 1230 Raymond Road, Box 900 Jackson MS 392044530, USA

Mezzanine

10:25 – 10:40 AM

45


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research PROGRAM

10:40 - 12:20 AM

PLENARY SESSION VI-B: HEALTH DISPARITIES AND ENVIRONMENTAL SECURITY WINDSOR I 1 Chairpersons: Dr. Marinelle Payton and Dr. Mario Azevedo2 1 Assistant Dean for Research & Program Development, School of Health Sciences, College of Public Service, JSU, Jackson, MS, USA 2 Interim Dean, College of Public Service, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS, USA

10:40

HIV Epidemiological Findings amongst Agro-Industrial Workers in the Tiko Banana Project in Cameroon Dr. Dora Mbanya Faculty of Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, University of Yaoundé I, Cameroon, University and Hospital Centre, Yaoundé, Cameroon

11:05

Differences in HIV/Aids Knowledge between Historically Black College and University Students Who Use and Do Not Use Real-Time Technology Dr. Patrick N. Nhigula Walden University College of Health Science, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

11:30

Neural Network Modeling: An Efficient Tool to Forecast Biological Variables Dr. H. A. Ahmad Department of Biology, JSU Box 18540, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 3921, USA

11:55

A Profile of Primary Health Care Workforce Disparities in Central Mississippi Ms. Johnnie Hawkins Owens Health and Wellness Center, Tougaloo College, 500 W. County Line Rd. Tougaloo, Mississippi, 39174 USA

12:30 - 2:30 PM

Luncheon

Windsor III

(CLOSING REMARKS - RECOGNITIONS)

46


List of Abstracts


“Honorary Biomedical Sciences & Health Information Lecture Series”

THE IMPORTANCE OF WORKFORCE DIVERSITY AND CULTURAL COMPETENCY IN IMPROVING HEALTH A Distinguished Lecture By

Dr. Billy Thomas Vice Chancellor for Diversity & Professor of Pediatrics University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas 72205, USA

Objectives of the Presentation 

Provide the participants with a historical perspective of the health care system as it relates to barriers/problems within the system that have resulted in the uneven distribution of equitable quality care and multiple health disparities.

Define diversity, inclusion and cultural competency as interdependent entities along with their independent role and combined effects on both individual and population health and health care.

Examine the benefits of increasing the diversity of the research workforce: o The acceleration of advances in medical and public health research o Closing the health disparities gap

Provide some action steps or recommendations that will move us towards a culturally competent health care system and workforce that will be able to provide equitable quality care for a diverse population.

48


“Honorary Biomedical Sciences & Health Information Lecture Series�

BUILDING A PLATFORM FOR CHANGE A Distinguished Lecture By

Dr. Herman A. Taylor, Jr. Director and Principal Investigator Jackson Heart Study, Jackson, Mississippi, USA

Abstract: The goal of the JHS is to build a platform for improved health based on rigorous

scientific observation, the training of future leaders in medical and public health research and care, and effective community partnering. Its scientific output is beginning to define details of the CVD epidemic as it manifests in an economically diverse African American community. The early findings have implications for not only African Americans in the South, but for African Americans across the US and all who are threatened by cardiovascular disease. The trends of CVD noted over the course of the JHS and its companion observational study, ARIC (begun in 1987), make a strong case that research in health disparities should move resolutely to develop and launch novel trials of efficacious/effective interventions to alter the trajectory of disease in the population. Studies like the JHS offer important opportunities to guide the development and even be a part of such trials. Dr. Taylor will discuss the present status and future promise of this landmark study.

49


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research LIST OF ORAL PRESENTATIONS

O - 01

Ni+2-Induced Global Deregulation of Gene Expression, Cytoskeletal Alterations, and Ca+2 Ion Distribution Alterations in Ni+2-Transformed 10t1/2 Mouse Embryo Cells Joseph. R. Landolph, Jr.1,2,3, Prethi Samala1,3, Sara Keliipaakaua1,3 and Jiacong Guo1,3 1

Depts. of Mol. Microbiol./Immunol. and 2Pathology, 3USC Cancer Center, Keck School of Medicine, Univ. Southern California, Los Angeles, Calif., 90033, USA.

O - 02

The Marine Toxin Okadaic Acid Modulates DNA (Cytosine-5)- Methyl Transferase Activity in Mouse Embryonic Stem ES-D3 Cell-Free System and in the Human Intestinal CaCo2-Cells Edmond E. Creppy1, S. Moukha1, Eric Renault1 and Beatrice Sangare1,2 1

Laboratory of Toxicology and Applied Hygiene, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University Victor Segalen Bordeaux 2, 146 rue LĂŠo Saignat, F-33076 Bordeaux, France 2 Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Abidjan, Abidjan, Ivory Coast

O - 03

Metabolism of Benzo(A)Pyrene by Subcellular Fractions of Jejunum and Colon in Apcmin Mouse Kelly L. Harris, Leah D. Banks, Perumalla V. Rekhadevi, Mohammad S. Niaz, and Aramandla Ramesh Department of Biochemistry & Cancer Biology, Meharry Medical College, 1005 D.B. Todd Blvd. Nashville, TN 37208, USA

O - 04

Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms Involved in Arsenic Toxicity to Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HEPG2) Cells Erika T. Brown, Clement G. Yedjou and Paul B. Tchounwou Molecular Toxicology Research Laboratory, NIH-Center for Environmental Health, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi, USA

O - 05

Type I NKT Cells Play a Protective (and Type II NKT Cells Play an Inhibitory) Role in the Host’s Innate Antitumor Immune Response Against a Mouse Model of Multiple Myeloma Gourapura J. Renukaradhya1, Masood A. Khan1, Marcus Vieira1, Wenjun Du2, Jacquelyn GervayHague2 and Randy R. Brutkiewicz1 1

Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Indiana University School of Medicine, 950 W. Walnut Street, Building R2, Room 302, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA 2 Department of Chemistry, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA

O - 06

Mechanisms Underlying the Testicular Toxicity of Atrazine and the Role of Quercetin as Chemoprotective Agent in Rats and Sertoli-Germ Cell Co-Culture Ebenezer O. Farombi1, Sunny O. Abarikwu1 and Aditya B. Pant2 1

Drug Metabolism and Toxicology Research Laboratories, Department of Biochemistry College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Nigeria 2 Indian Institute of Toxicology, Lucknow, India

50


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research LIST OF ORAL PRESENTATIONS

O - 07

Asian Ginseng (Panax Ginseng) Aggravates Ethanol Toxicity in Japanese Ricefish (Oryzias latipes) Embryogenesis M. H. Haron1,2, L. A. Walker1,2, I. A. Khan1 and A. K. Dasmahapatra1,2 1

National Center for Natural Product Research, 2Department of Pharmacology, University of Mississippi, MS, USA

O - 08

Resveratrol Restores Function to the Testes and Epididymides of BAP-Treated Rats Anthony E. Archibong1, Mohammad S. Niaz2 and Aramandla Ramesh2 1

Departments of Physiology & 2Cancer Biology, Meharry Medical College, Nashville, TN 37208, USA

O - 09

Investigations of Nanomaterials in Environment: Methodology

Advantages of Computational

Jerzy Leszczynski Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Interdisciplinary Nanotoxicity Center, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch St., Jackson, MS, 39217, USA

O - 10

Solid Nanoparticles and Nanoliposomes Loaded with Rhenium-Platinum Antitumor System in Cancer Treatment Natalia Shtemenko1 and Alexander Shtemenko2 1

Department of Biophysics and Biochemistry, Dnipropetrovs’k National University, 72 Gagarin avenue, 49050 Dnipropetrovs’k, Ukraine. 2 Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Ukrainian State University of Chemical Technology, Gagarin av.8, Dnipropetrovs’k 49005, Ukraine

O - 11

Application of Quantum Dot Technology for Photonic Imaging in Animal Reproduction J. M. Feugang, R. C. Youngblood, H. L. Sánchez-Rodríguez, J. M. Greene, M. A. Crenshaw, S. T. Willard and P. L. Ryan Facility for Organismal and Cellular Imaging, Department of Animal and Dairy Sciences, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS, USA

O - 12

Gold Nanotechnology for Biological Imaging and Therapy Paresh Chandra Ray, Sadia Afrin Khan, Anant Kumar Singh, Dulal Senapati , Zhen Fan, Teresa Demeritte and Rajashekhar Kanchanapally Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS, USA

O - 13

Profiling Bioaccumulation and Toxicity of Silica Encapsulated Lead Selenide Nanoparticles on Mice Model In Vivo Zikri Arslan1, Mehmet Ates1, Oliva M. Premira-Pedrozo2 and Ibrahim O. Farah3 1

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, Mississippi 39217 USA School of Science and Technology, Universidad Metropolitana (UMET), San Juan, PR 00926 USA 3 Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson, Mississippi 39217, USA 2

51


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research LIST OF ORAL PRESENTATIONS

O - 14

Water and Sediment Pollution in the Laguna De Bustillos in Mexico; Its Concerns About the Environment and Human Health Hector Rubio-Arias, Rey M. Quintana and Adan Pinales Mungia College of Zoo-technology and Ecology, Autonomous University of Chihuahua, Mexico, Periferico Francisco R. Almada, Km. 1 Colonia Zootecnia, Chihuahua, Chihuahua, Mexico CP:31000

O - 15

Effect of Soil Sterilization on the Growth and Heavy Metal Accumulation of Plants Grown in Metal-Contaminated Soils Maria Begonia, Rachel Knott, Gloria Miller and Gregorio Begonia Department of Biology, P.O. Box 18540, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 J.R. Lynch St., Jackson, MS 39217, USA

O - 16

Phytotoxicity of Mercyrty on Chinese Brake Fern with Mycorrhizal Fungi Inoculation in Oak Ridge Soil Sergio T. Pichardo1, John G. Kelly1, Fengxiang X. Han2, Yunjun Xia1, Valerie Philips1, Yi Su1 and Frank Matta1 1

Institute for Clean Energy Technology, Mississippi State University, Starkville, Mississippi, USA Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, Jackson, Mississippi, USA 2

O - 17

The Effects of Crude Oil and Dispersant Toxicity on Marine Phytoplankton Productivity in the Gulf Of Mexico Waneene C. Dorsey1, Gulnihal Ozbay2 and Paul B. Tchounwou3 1

Molecular Toxicology Research Laboratory, Grambling State University, Grambling, LA, USA Deparment of Agriculture & Natural Resources, Delaware State University, Dover, DE, USA 3 Molecular Toxicology Research Laboratory, NIH-Center for Environmental Health, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch St., P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, MS, USA 2

O - 18

Regulation of Pericellular pH Homeostasis in the Cancer Cell Karam F. A. Soliman Neurodegeneration Research Laboratory, College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Florida A & M University, Tallahassee, FL 32307, USA

O - 19

Role of Reactive Oxygen Species in Cr(VI)-Induced Cell Transformation Xiangllin Shi Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40515, USA

O - 20

Trace Elements (Copper, Molybdenum, Selenium & Zinc) as Markers in Oral Precancer and Cancer Sunali Khanna1, A. C. Udas2, G. Kiran Kumar2, S. Soundarajan2 and F. R. Karjodkar1 1

Dept of Oral Medicine &Radiology, Nair Hospital Dental College, Mumbai, 400008 India Dept of Analytical Chemistry, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, 400085, India

2

52


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research LIST OF ORAL PRESENTATIONS

O - 21

Identifying a Role for Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR) in Prostate Cancer Progression Joann Powell Center for Cancer Research and Therapeutic Development, Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

O - 22

Breast Carcinogenesis Induced by Environmental Substances and Estrogen and Counteracted by an Antioxidant Gloria M. Calaf Instituto de Alta Investigaci贸n, Universidad de Tarapac谩, Arica, Chile and Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA

O - 23

Environmental Signaling and Gene Regulation: Integrating the Inside with the Outside John A. McLachlan1,2, Melyssa Bratton1, Iryna Isakova1 and Matthew E. Burow3 1

Departments of Pharmacology, 2Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and 3Medicine, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA

O - 24

Arsenic-Induced Epigenetic Changes and Susceptibility to Prostate Carcinogenesis Kamaleshwar P. Singh The Institute of Environmental and Human Health (TIEHH), Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409, USA

O - 25

Role of Cardiotonic Steriod in Causation of Cerebral Vascular Leak Syndrome in Hypertension During Pregnancy: A Translational Approach Mohammad N. Uddin1, Darijana Horvat2, Steven R. Allen1, Richard O. Jones1, David C. Zawieja2 and Thomas J. Kuehl1,3,4 Departments of Obstetrics & Gynecology1 and Systems Biology & Translational Medicine2, Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine/Scott & White Hospital, Temple, Texas, USA

O - 26

Mobile Elements as a Source of Environmentally Sensitive Genetic Instability Prescott Deininger Tulane Cancer Center and Department of Epidemiology, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA, USA

O - 27

Anion Sensors Md. Alamgir Hossain Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA

53


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research LIST OF ORAL PRESENTATIONS

O - 28

Arsenic – A Beneficial Therapeutic and an Environmental Poison José A. Centeno International Medical Geology Association (IMGA), The Joint Pathology Center, Biophysical Toxicology, Silver Spring, MD, USA

O - 29

Low Level Lead Exposure and Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Diseases: A Preliminary Study Monica Maria Bastos Paoliello1,2 Ana Carolina Bertin Almeida1, Conceição Turini2, Alissana Ester Camargo2, Tiemi Matsuo1,3 1

Graduate Program in Public Health, State University of Londrina, Parana, Brazil Department of Clinical and Toxicological Analysis, Health Science Center, State University of Londrina, Parana, Brazil 3 Department of Statistics, State University of Londrina, Parana, Brazil 2

O - 30

The Lignite-Water Syndrome: A Possible Environmental Health Threat to Millions Robert B. Finkelman Department of Geosciences, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX 75080, USA

O - 31

Assessment of Lead Exposure in Infants from 0 to 6 Years Old in the Township of Ndjili in Kinshasa (Dr Congo) F. Zisa Kitelo, Mputu Malolo, Y. Nuapia, Ndelo Matondo and J. Ndelo-di-Phanzu Laboratory of Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo

O - 32

Natural Compounds and Vitamins Can Inhibit the PHIP Induced Cytotoxicity in MCF-10A Cells by Transcriptional and Translational Changes Abhilash Samykutty, Carissa Jackson and Ashok Jain Department of Natural Sciences, Albany State University, 504 College Dr. Albany, Georgia 31705

O - 33

Computing Mantel-Haenszel Adjusted Informational Odds Ratios: Application in Environment Exposure Studies Jimmy T. Efird Center for Health Disparities Research and Department of Public Health, Brody School of Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina 27858, USA

O - 34

Source-Receptor Modeling Using ARW Weather Prediction Model and Hysplit Pollutant Dispersion Model to Assess Mercury Pollution over the Mississippi Gulf Coast Region Anjaneyulu Yerramilli, Venkata Bhaskar Rao Dodla, Srinivas Desamsetti, Julius Baham, John Young, Robert Hughes and Chuck Patrick Trent Lott Geospatial & Visualization Research Center, Jackson State University, 1230 Raymond Road, Jackson, MS 39204, USA

54


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research LIST OF ORAL PRESENTATIONS

O - 35

Climatic Trends in Tornado Vulnerability and Convective Available Potential Energy Over Mississippi, USA Venkata B. Dodla1, Sudha Yerramilli2, Srinivas Desamsetti1, Anjaneyulu Yerramilli1 and David Bandi2 1

Trent Lott Geospatial Visualization Research Centre, Jackson State University, 1230 Raymond Road, Jackson MS 39204, USA 2 National Center for Biodefense Communications, Jackson State University, 1230 Raymond Road, Jackson MS 39204, USA

O - 36

Detection and Mapping of Cyanobacterial Harmful Algal Blooms Using Satellite Data in One Louisiana Lake and Four Mississippi Lakes Padmanava Dash Department of Biology and the Environmental Science Ph.D. Program, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson State University, Jackson, Mississippi, USA

O - 37

A Study of Airborne Diseases Over Mississippi Region Using Air Quality, Meteorological Parameters And Modeling Francis Tuluri1, Desmond Vance1, R. Suseela Reddy1, Jerry Beasley2, Lei Zhang3, Bhaskar Rao Dodla1 and Yerramilli Anjaneyulu1 1

College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, MS 39217, USA Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality, Jackson, Mississippi, USA 3 Mississippi State Department of Health, Jackson, Mississippi, USA 2

O - 38

Environmental Factors Influencing Asthma Severity and Control Among Children Participating in Heal, Phase II Candice Wilson1, Leonard Jack Jr.1, Sandra C. Hayes2, Robert Post3, Kristi Rapp1 and Floyd Malveaux4 1

Center for Minority Health & Health Disparities Research and Education, Xavier University of Louisiana,1 Drexel Drive New Orleans, Louisiana, USA 2 Owens Health and Wellness Center, Tougaloo College, 500 W. County Line Rd. Tougaloo, MS, USA 3 Daughters of Charity Services of New Orleans, 3201 South Carrollton Avenue, New Orleans, LA, USA 4 Merck Childhood Asthma Network, 1400 K Street, N.W., Suite 750, Washington DC, USA

O - 39

SMR-Derived Peptide Disrupts HIV-1 NEF’s Interaction With Mortalin and Blocks Virus and NEF Exosome Release Vincent C. Bond, Martin N. Shelton, Ming-Bo Huang, Syed A. Ali and Michael D. Powell Department of Microbiology, Biochemistry, Immunology, Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA USA

55


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research LIST OF ORAL PRESENTATIONS

O - 40

Effects of Chia Seed (Salvia Hispanica L.) Suplementation on Body Weight and Metabolic Control in Diabetic Rats Jorge L. Ble-Castillo1, Isela E. Juárez-Rojop1, Hidemi Aguilar-Mariscal1, Ruben Cordova-Uscanga1, Maria R. Lopez-Guevara2, LauraVidal-Garcia1, Guadalupe Salvador-Garcia1 and Juan C. DiazZagoya1 1

Centro de Investigacion, División Académica de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad Juárez Autónoma de Tabasco, Villahermosa, Tabasco, Mexico 2 Hospital General de Zona 46, IMSS, Villahermosa, Tabasco, Mexico

O - 41

Spatial-Temporal Analysis of Influenza Virus in the State of Mississippi Sudha Yerramilli, Dayakar P. Nittala and David Bandi National Center for Biodefense Communications (NCBC), Mississippi e-Center, Jackson State University, 1230 Raymond Road, Box 900, Jackson MS 39204-4530, USA

O - 42

HIV Pidemiological Findings Amongst Agro-Industrial Workers in the Tiko Banana Project in Cameroon Dora Mbanya1,2, Pamela Mbang1, Claude Tayou Tagny1.2, Annick Mintya-Ndoumba2 and Lazare Kaptue3 1

Faculty of Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, University of Yaounde I, Cameroon University Teaching Hospital, Yaoundé, Cameroon 3 University of Montagnes, Bangangté, Cameroon 2

O - 43

Differences in HIV/AIDS Knowledge between Historically Black College and University Students Who Use and Do Not Use Real-Time Technology Patrick N. Nhigula Walden University College of Health Science, Minneapolis, Minnesota

O - 44

Neural Network Modeling: An Efficient Tool to Forecast Biological Variables H. A. Ahmad and L. Akil Department of Biology, JSU Box 18540, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA

O - 45

A Profile of Primary Health Care Workforce Disparities in Central Mississippi Johnnie M. Hawkins1, Sandra C. Hayes1, Sudha Yerramilli2, Dayakar Nittala2, David Bandi2 and DeMarc Hickson3 1

Owens Health and Wellness Center, Tougaloo College, 500 W. County Line Rd. Tougaloo, Mississippi 39174, USA 2 National Center for Biodefense Communications (NCBC), Mississippi e-Center at Jackson State University, 1230 Raymond Rd, Box 900, Jackson, Mississippi 39204, USA 3 My Brother’s Keeper, Inc, 710 Avignon Drive, Ridgeland, Mississippi 39157, USA

56


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research LIST OF POSTER PRESENTATIONS – SESSION A [STUDENTS]

PA - 01

Vitamin D3 Enhances the Activity of Arsenic trioxide in Human Leukemia (HL60) Cells Christan S. Rogers, Clement G. Yedjou and Paul B. Tchounwou RCMI-Center of Environmental Health, Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS, USA

PA - 02

Arsenic trioxide - Based Chemotherapy of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia Tammy Cox1, Clement G. Yedjou2 and Paul B. Tchounwou2 1

Provide High School, 2400 Robinson Street, Jackson, MS, 39209, USA Cellomics and Toxicogenomics Research Laboratory, NIH-Center for Environmental Health, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi, USA 2

PA - 03

Induction of Necrotic Cell Death by Arsenic trioxide - Treated Human Leukemia Cells Shaquana Jones1, Clement G. Yedjou2 and Paul B. Tchounwou2 1

University of Southern Mississippi, 118 College Drive, 0001 Hattiesburg, MS 39406, USA Cellomics and Toxicogenomics Research Laboratory, NIH-Center for Environmental Health, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi, USA. 2

PA - 04

Modulation of Phosphatidylserine Externalization in Human Leukemia (Hl-60) Induced by Garlic Extract Destinee Thompson, Sylvianne Njiki and Clement Yedjou Cellomics and Toxicogenomics Research Laboratory, NIH-Center for Environmental Health, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi, USA

PA - 05

Lead Nitrate-Mediated Cell Death via Caspase-3 in Human Leukemia (HL-60) Cells Alicia Meadows, Ariane Mbemi and Clement Yedjou Cellomics and Toxicogenomics Research Laboratory, NIH-Center for Environmental Health, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi, USA

PA - 06

Lead Nitrate-Induced Genotoxic Effects to Human Leukemia (HL-60) Cells Wundu Kwembe, Clement G. Yedjou and Paul B. Tchounwou Cellomics and Toxicogenomics Research Laboratory, NIH-Center for Environmental Health, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi, USA

57


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research LIST OF POSTER PRESENTATIONS – SESSION A [STUDENTS]

PA - 07

Leukemia Research: Ascorbic Acid Treatment Increase Arsenic trioxide Toxicity in Human Lymphoma Cells Raven Byrd, Clement Yedjou and Paul B. Tchounwou Cellomics and Toxicogenomics Research Laboratory, NIH-Center for Environmental Health, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, Jackson, Mississippi, USA

PA - 08

Leukemia Therapy: Vernonia amygdalina - Induced Genotoxic Damage and Apoptosis in Human Leukemia (HL-60) Cells Jessica Jerkens, Clement G. Yedjou, and Paul B. Tchounwou Cellomics and Toxicogenomics Research Laboratory, NIH-Center for Environmental Health; College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, Jackson, Mississippi, USA

PA - 09

Erhyl Acetate Vernonia amydalina Extracts Inhibits the Growth of Human Prostate (PC-3) Cells Through Microtubule Destabilization Will Johnson, Clement Yedjou and Ernest Izevbigie Cellular Signaling, Phytoceuticals, and Cancer Prevention and Therapies; NIH-Center for Environmental Health, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi, USA.

PA - 10

Vernonia amygdalina - Induced Cytotoxic Damage and Activation Of Caspase-3 in Human Leukemia (HL-60) Cells Chuks Agusiegbe, Clement G. Yedjou and Paul B. Tchounwou Cellomics and Toxicogenomics Research Laboratory, NIH-Center for Environmental Health; College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, Jackson, Mississippi, USA

PA - 11

Vernonia amygdalina - Induced Activation of Cyclin A and P53 Tumor Suppressor Gene in Human Breast Cells Viviaune Brown, Clement G. Yedjou and Paul B. Tchounwou Molecular Toxicology Research Laboratory, NIH-Center for Environmental Health, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi, USA

PA - 12

Human Breast Carcinoma Cells are Vernonia amygdalina Sensitive In-Vitro Lecia Gresham1,2 and Ernest B. Izevbigie1,2,3 1

The Laboratory of Cellular Signaling, Phytoceuticals, Cancer Prevention and Therapies; 2NIH-Center for Environmental Health, College of Science, Engineering and Technology; 3Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA

58


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research LIST OF POSTER PRESENTATIONS – SESSION A [STUDENTS]

PA - 13

Cytotoxic Effects of Vernonia amygdalina extracts in Cancerous Cells of the Breast Roderick McDowell and Carolyn Bingham Howard Breast Cancer Research Laboratory, NIH-Center for Environmental Health, College of Science Engineering and Technology, Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson, Mississippi, USA

PA - 14

Modeling Differential Xenobiotic Toxicities within a Phylogenetic Context – A Toxicity Assessment Among Select Fundulus Topminnows with Divergent Physiologies Mark A. Dugo and Paul B. Tchounwou Molecular Toxicology Research Laboratory, NIH-Center for Environmental Health, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi, USA

PA - 15

Arsenic toxicity: Modulation of Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Phatia Wells1, Barbara Graham1, Kenneth Ndebele1 and Paul Tchounwou2 1

Laboratory of Cancer Immunology Target Identification and Validation, 2RCMI Center of Environmental Health, Department of Biology College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi, USA.

PA - 16

Characterization of Nickel - Induced Immunological Dysfunction in Sw1573 Alveolar Carcinoma Cells Kellie G. Brown, Kenneth Ndebele, Barbara Graham and Paul B. Tchounwou Laboratory of Cancer Immunology Target Identification and Validation, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi, USA

PA - 17

In vitro Cytotoxicity Assessment of Silver Nanoparticles using Human Liver Carcinoma Cells Karen L. Saddler1, Kenneth Ndebele1, Paul Tchounwou2 and Barbara Graham1 1

Laboratory of Cancer Immunology, Target Identification and Validation, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, CSET Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA 2 Molecular Toxicology Research Laboratory, NIH- Center for Environmental Health, CSET, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA

PA - 18

Environmental Health Effects of Heavy Metals and Metallic Compounds in Luanda Soil from Angola Maria E. Gomes1,2,3, Clement Yedjou3 and Paul Tchounwou2,3 1

University of Science, Agostinho Neto, Angola Environmental Toxicology Research Laboratory; 3Cellomics and Toxicogenomics Research Laboratory; NIH-RCMI Center for Environmental Health, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi, USA 2

59


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research LIST OF POSTER PRESENTATIONS – SESSION A [STUDENTS]

PA - 19

DNA Damage and Repair of Human Skin Keratinocytes Concurrently Exposed to Pyrene Derivatives and UVA Light Tracie Perkins Fullove, Ying Zhang and Hongtao Yu Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA

PA - 20

Mechanistic Alteration of Organic Molecule Induced Toxicity of C60: The Roles of Light Energy and Dispersion Medium Winfred G. Aker1, Erbo Ying1, Rumei Gao2, Xiaojun Wang1, Yazhou Zhang2, Jasmine I. Watson3, Roshetta Williams2 and Huey-Min Hwang1 1

Department of Biology, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch St., Jackson, MS 39217, USA Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch St., Jackson, MS 39217, USA 3 Department of Chemistry, Xavier University of Louisiana, 1 Drexel Dr., New Orleans, LA 70125, USA 2

PA - 21

Determination of the Mechanism of Photo Induced Toxicity of Selected Metal Oxide Nanoparticles (ZnO, CuO, CO3O4 and TiO2) to E. coli Bacteria Thabitha P. Dasari1, Kavitha Pathakoti2 and Huey-Min Hwang1,2 1

Environmental Science Ph.D. Program, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA

2

PA - 22

Investigating the Photo-Induced Toxic Effects of Doped-TiO2 With Various Biological Models Shavonda M. Morrow, Kavitha Pathakoti and Huey-Min Hwang Department of Biology, Jackson State University, 1400 J.R. Lynch Street, Jackson, MS, USA

PA - 23

Socioeconomic Factors Affecting Type II Diabetes in Mississippi, Alabama, Louisiana, and Colorado Shavonda M. Morrow, Luma Akil and Hafiz A. Ahmad Biostatical Support Unit, Department of Biology, Jackson State University, 1400 J.R. Lynch Street, Jackson, MS, Mississippi, USA

PA - 24

Effects of Temperature on Salmonella Infections in Mississippi Luma Akil1, Remata S. Reddy2 and H. Anwar Ahmad1 1

Department of Biology/Environmental Science, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University 1400 Lynch Street, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi, USA 2 Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS, USA

PA - 25

Effects of Increased Tobacco Price on Number of Smokers in Mississippi from 2006-2010 Antia Cain, Luma Akil and H. Anwar Ahmad Department of Biology, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, Jackson, Mississippi, USA

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Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research LIST OF POSTER PRESENTATIONS – SESSION A [STUDENTS]

PA - 26

Childhood Obesity - Persistent Concern Among Young Mississippians Samuel Nittala and H. Anwar Ahmad Biostatistics Support Unit, NIH-Center for Environmental Health, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi, USA

PA - 27

Validation of New Theurapeutic Target for Early Detection of Glioblastoma Jennifer Sims, Kenneth Ndebele, Barbara Graham and Paul Tchounwou Laboratory of Cancer Immunology Target Identification and Validation, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi, USA

PA - 28

Di (n-pentyl) Phthalate (DnPP,DPeP) Induces Epithelial Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) and Anti-Androgenic Activity Through the Down Regulation of TMPRSS4 Mediated Pathways in Pancreatic Cancer Cell Lines Carvey Patterson, Kenneth Ndebele, Barbara Graham and Paul Tchounwou Laboratory of Cancer Immunology Target Identification and Validation, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi, USA.

PA - 29

Quantification and Analysis of Harmful Cyanobacterial Blooms Using Field and Satellite Data in Lake Grenada, Mississippi, USA Daniel Kibet1, Padmanava Dash2, Wellington Ayensu2, Julius Ikenga3 and James L. Pinckney4 1

Mississippi Valley State University, 14000 Highways 82 W., Itta Bena, Mississippi, 38941, USA Department of Biology, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi, USA 3 Department of Natural Sciences and Environmental Health, Mississippi Valley State University, 14000 Highway 82 W., Itta Bena, Mississippi, 38941, USA 4 Marine Science Program and Department of Biological Sciences, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina 29208, USA 2

PA - 30

Quantifying the Concentration of Harmful Algal Blooms in Lake Enid, Mississippi, USA Joyce Chumo1, Padmanava Dash2, Wellington Ayensu2, Julius Ikenga3 and James L. Pinckney4 1

Mississippi Valley State University, 14000 Highways 82 W., Itta Bena, Mississippi, 38941, USA Department of Biology, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi, USA 3 Department of Natural Sciences and Environmental Health, Mississippi Valley State University, 14000 Highway 82 W., Itta Bena, Mississippi, 38941, USA 4 Marine Science Program and Department of Biological Sciences, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina 29208, USA 2

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Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research LIST OF POSTER PRESENTATIONS – SESSION A [STUDENTS]

PA - 31

Detection of Harmful Algal Blooms in Lake Sardis, Mississippi, USA Marlon Flowers1, Padmanava Dash2, Wellington Ayensu2, Julius Ikenga3 and James L. Pinckney4 1

Mississippi Valley State University, 14000 Highways 82 W., Itta Bena, Mississippi, 38941, USA Department of Biology, Jackson State University, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi, USA 3 Department of Natural Sciences and Environmental Health, Mississippi Valley State University, 14000 Highway 82 W., Itta Bena, Mississippi, 38941, USA 4 Marine Science Program and Department of Biological Sciences, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina 29208, USA 2

PA - 32

Detection and Quantification of Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) in the Ross Barnett Reservoir, Jackson, Mississippi, USA Winny Tanui1, Padmanava Dash2, Wellington Ayensu2, Julius Ikenga3 and James L. Pinckney4 1

Mississippi Valley State University, 14000 Highways 82 W., Itta Bena, Mississippi, 38941, USA Department of Biology, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi, USA 3 Department of Natural Sciences and Environmental Health, Mississippi Valley State University, 14000 Highway 82 W., Itta Bena, Mississippi, 38941, USA 4 Marine Science Program and Department of Biological Sciences, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina 29208, USA 2

PA - 33

Plant Biotechnology: Standardization of Nutrient Media for Tissue Culture Briana Lee and Murty S. Kambhampati Department of Biology, College of Arts and Sciences, Southern University at New Orleans, 6400 Press Drive, New Orleans, LA 70126, USA

PA - 34

Ecophysiological Effects of Nitrogen on Soybeans [Glycine max (L.) MERR.] Ifeanyi Chukwu O. Onor and Murty S. Kambhampati Department of Biology, College of Arts and Sciences, Southern University at New Orleans, 6400 Press Drive, New Orleans, LA 70126, USA

PA - 35

Acute Toxicology: Effects of Cu on Grass Shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio L.) Van Tu Vu and Murty S. Kambhampati Department of Natural Sciences, College of Arts and Sciences, Southern University at New Orleans, 6400 Press Dr., P.O Box 70126, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA

PA - 36

Staphylococcus aureus - Use of Body Sampling to Establish Community Pathogens Teresha McGriff, Ann M. Stewart-Akers and Robert Wolff South University-Columbia, 9 Science Court, Columbia, SC 29203, USA

PA - 37

Use of Fomites to Track Enteric Bacteria Resistance Within a Community Victoria A. Davis, Ann M. Stewart-Akers and Robert Wolff South University, 9 Science Court Columbia, SC 29306, USA

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Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research LIST OF POSTER PRESENTATIONS – SESSION A [STUDENTS]

PA - 38

Hepatotoxicity Study of Two Different Size Silver Nanoparticles in SpragueDawley Rats Anita K. Patlolla, Tina Moore and Paul B. Tchounwou Molecular Toxicology Research Laboratory, NIH-RCMI Center for Environmental Health, College of Science Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS, USA.

PA - 39

Effect of Silver Nanoparticles in Three Different Biological Systems Tammy Epting1,2, Beth Thrasher1,2, Paul Tchounwou2 and Anita Patlolla2 1

Wingfield High School Teachers (CESTEME Summer Program), Jackson, MS, USA Molecular Toxicology Research Laboratory, NIH- Center for Environmental Health, CSET, JSU, Jackson, MS, USA 2

PA - 40

TGF-β Effects on Prostate Cancer Cell Migration are Mediated by PGE2 Activation of PI3K/AKT Pathway BaoHan T. Vo, Derrick Morton, Jr., Shravan Komaragiri, Ana Cecille Millena and Shafiq A. Khan Center for Cancer Research and Therapeutic Development and Department of Biological Sciences, Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta, GA 30314, USA

PA - 41

Extraction of Organic Compounds from Moringa oleifera Leaves and its Antioxidant Activity using DPPH Assay Racquel J. Wright1, Andrew O. Wheatley1,2, Hyacinth I. Hyacinth3, Jacqueline M. Hibbert3, Ken S. Lee4, Marvin E. Reid5 and Helen N. Asemota1,2 1

Biotechnology Centre, 2Department of Basic Medical Sciences (Biochemistry Section), University of the West Indies Mona, Kingston 7, Jamaica 3 Microbiology, Biochemistry & Immunology Department, Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA, 4 Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS, USA, 5Sickle Cell Unit, University Hospital of the West Indies, Mona, Kingston 7, Jamaica

PA - 42

Investigating the Molecular Mechanism of Inhibition of Proliferation of Human Prostate Cancer (PC-3) Cells by Fractionated Ocimum gratissimum (Og) Leaf Extracts Turquoise C. Alexander and Stephen I. N. Ekunwe Jackson State University, Department of Biology, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, P. O. Box 18540, Jackson, MS 39217, USA

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Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research LIST OF POSTER PRESENTATIONS – SESSION A [STUDENTS]

PA - 43

A Preliminary Study: Biogeochemistry of the Grand Bay Reserve and its Effect on Environmental Quality Jacqueline McComb1, F. X. Han2 and Paul B. Tchounwou3 1

Grand Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve, 6005 Bayou Heron Road Moss Point, MS 39562, USA 2 Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Jackson State University, 1400 J. R. Lynch Street P.O. Box 17910, Jackson, MS 39217-0510, Jackson, Mississippi, USA 3 College of Science, Engineering & Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 J. R. Lynch Street P.O. Box 17910, Jackson, MS 39217-0510, Jackson, Mississippi, USA

PA - 44

An Investigation of the Effects of Hurricane Alex on Transporting Waters from the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill to the Mississippi Gulf Coast Using the WRF Model Jerry Beasley, R. Suseela Reddy, Duanjun Lu, Ramzi Kafoury, Francis Tuluri and Paul B. Tchounwou College of Science, Engineering, and Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi, USA

PA - 45

Modeling and Forecasting Snow Events in Mississippi Brittany S. Hailey, Kantave M. Greene and Remata S. Reddy College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Department of Physics, Atmospheric Sciences, and Geosciences, Meteorology Lab, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, P.O. Box 17660, Jackson, Mississippi, USA

PA - 46

Does Gamma-Hexachlorocyclohexane Affect Cell Cycle Progression in MCF-7 Cells? Shanelle Joseph and Oswald d’Auvergne Department of Environmental Toxicology, Health research Center, Southern University and A&M College, Baton Rouge, LA, USA

PA - 47

A Comparative Analysis of Open Hysterectomy Versus Minimally Invasive Hysterectomy Vineet Aggarwal and Mildred Ridgway University of Mississippi Medical Center, 2500 North State Street, Jackson, Mississippi, USA

PA - 48

Ligand Binding Features and Gene Context of Tandem-Type Universal Stress Protein ABC3200 from Alkaliphilic Bacillus clausii Baraka S. Williams1,2, Raphael D. Isokpehi1, Andreas N. Mbah1, Shaneka S. Simmons1 and Bianca L. Garner2 1

Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Department of Biology, Jackson State University, PO Box 18540, Jackson, MS 39217, USA 2 Department of Biology, Division of Natural Science, Tougaloo College, 500 West County Line Road, Tougaloo, MS 39174, USA

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Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research LIST OF POSTER PRESENTATIONS – SESSION A [STUDENTS]

PA - 49

Elucidation of Stress Responsive Gene Indicators for Biotechnologically Relevant Bacillus megaterium Baraka S. Williams1,2, Raphael D. Isokpehi1, Shaneka S. Simmons1, Andreas N. Mbah1 and Bianca L. Garner2 1

Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Department of Biology, Jackson State University, PO Box 18540, Jackson, MS 39217, USA 2 Department of Biology, Division of Natural Science, Tougaloo College, 500 West County Line Road, Tougaloo, MS 39174, USA

PA - 50

Visual Analytics Resource for Predicting Stress Responsive Transcriptional Units in Microbial Genomes Antoinesha Hollman, Kyle Swanier, Jamanda Taylor, Natasha Amos, Melissa Crump, Baraka S. Williams, Shaneka S. Simmons, Andreas N. Mbah, Wellington Ayensu and Raphael D. Isokpehi Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson Mississippi 39217, USA

PA - 51

Sequence Analysis of Bacteria Sirtuins - Homologs of Mammalian Longevity Genes Victoria Gilmore1, Hugh Nicholas2 and Raphael D. Isokpehi1 1

Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson MS 39217, USA 2 Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center, Pittsburgh PA, USA

PA - 52

Differences in Distribution and Protein Sequence Length of Universal Stress Proteins Encoded in Brucella Genomes Dominique R. Smith-McInnis1, Desma Kelly1, 2, Shaneka S. Simmons1, Andreas N. Mbah1, Wellington K. Ayensu1 and Raphael D. Isokpehi1 1

Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson MS 39217, USA 2 Jackson Public Schools, Lanier High School, Jackson MS 39203, USA

PA - 53

Protein Sequence Length Frequency of Universal Stress Proteins Encoded in Edwardsiella Genomes Jessica L. Hobbs, Wellington K. Ayensu, Clement Yedjou and Raphael D. Isokpehi Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson, Mississippi 39217, USA

PA - 54

Functional and Sequence Annotations of Universal Stress Proteins Encoded in Haloterrigena turkmenica Genome Tamara Medley, Donee L. McAllister, Sylvia Leggette, Shaneka S. Simmons, Andreas N. Mbah and Raphael D. Isokpehi Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson MS 39217, USA

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Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research LIST OF POSTER PRESENTATIONS – SESSION A [STUDENTS]

PA - 55

Comparison of Ligand Binding Residues for Length-Identical Chromosomal and Plasmid-Encoded Universal Stress Proteins in Staphylococcus Genomes Shelton D. Griffith, Shaneka S. Simmons, Andreas N. Mbah, Wellington K. Ayensu and Raphael D. Isokpehi Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson MS 39217, USA

PA - 56

Structural and Functional Attributes of Necrotizing Fasciitis Toxin (Exotoxin J) from Streptococcus pyogenes Victoria Casher1, Adesuwa Ekunwe1,2, Kaelin Gates1,3, Andreas N. Mbah1 and Raphael D. Isokpehi1 1

Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson Mississippi 39217, USA 2 Clinton High School 401 Arrow Drive, Clinton MS, USA 3 Terry High School, 235 West Beasley Road Terry, MS 39170, USA

PA - 57

Structural and Functional Attributes of Necrotizing Fasciitis Toxin (Exotoxin I) from Streptococcus pyogenes Adesuwa Ekunwe1,3, Kaelin Gates2,3, Victoria Casher3, Andreas N. Mbah3 and Raphael D. Isokpehi3 1

Clinton High School 401 Arrow Drive, Clinton MS, USA Terry High School, 235 West Beasley Road Terry, MS 39170, USA 3 Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson Mississippi 39217, USA 2

PA - 58

Structural and Functional Attributes of Necrotizing Fasciitis Toxin from Aeromonas hydrophilia Kaelin Gates1,3, Adesuwa Ekunwe2,3, Victoria Casher3, Andreas N. Mbah3 and Raphael D. Isokpehi3 1

Terry High School, 235 West Beasley Road Terry, MS 39170, USA Clinton High School 401 Arrow Drive, Clinton MS, USA 3 Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson Mississippi 39217, USA 2

PA - 59

Structural Features of Francisella Universal Stress Proteins Joseph Grant1,2, Kelli Gills1, Michael R. Thompson1, Quentin Greathree1, Andreas N. Mbah1and Raphael D. Isokpehi1 1

Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson Mississippi 39217, USA; 2University of Arkansas at Monticello, USA

PA - 60

Structural Features of Brucella Universal Stress Proteins Kelli Gills, Joseph Grant, Quentin Greathree, Michael R. Thompson, Andreas N. Mbah and Raphael D. Isokpehi Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson Mississippi 39217, USA

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Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research LIST OF POSTER PRESENTATIONS – SESSION A [STUDENTS]

PA - 61

Structural Features of Clostridium Universal Stress Proteins Michael R. Thompson, Kelli Gills, Quentin Greathree, Joseph Grant, Andreas N. Mbah and Raphael D. Isokpehi Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson Mississippi 39217, USA

PA - 62

Structural Features of Edwardsiella Universal Stress Proteins Quentin Greathree, Michael R. Thompson, Kelli Gills, Joseph Grant, Andreas N. Mbah and Raphael D. Isokpehi Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson Mississippi 39217, USA

PA - 63

Infant Mortality and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome: International Rates, 1990 and 2005 Kyle Swanier, Shauna-Kay Spencer, John Riggins, Melissa Crump, Yachi Spencer, Natasha Amos, Natalie Offiah, Joseph Grant, Wellington K. Ayensu and Raphael D. Isokpehi Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson Mississippi 39217, USA

PA - 64

Interactive Comparison of Rates of Infant, Fetal and Perinatal Mortality Rates: United States, 1950-2008 Shauna-Kay Spencer, John Riggins, Yachi Spencer, Kyle Swanier, Natasha Amos, Natalie Offiah, Melissa Crump, Joseph Grant, Wellington K. Ayensu and Raphael D. Isokpehi Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson Mississippi 39217, USA

PA - 65

Low Dose Mercury Exposures in Human Renal Proximal Tubular (HK-2) Cells Devin Stewart, Portia Newell, Jhenna Victorian, Ebonie Butler and Dwayne Sutton Molecular Toxicology Research Laboratory, NIH-Centers for Environmental Health, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi, USA

PA - 66

Assessing the Role of Supra-Physiologic Levels of Retinoic Acid (ATRA) in Ovalbumin and Mold-Sensitized F344 Rat Lung Tissues and Improvement of Related Pathology by Citral Carlene Holt-Gray and Ibrahim O. Farah Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA

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Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research LIST OF POSTER PRESENTATIONS – SESSION A [STUDENTS]

PA - 67

Exposure to Lead and Oxidative Stress: A Systematic Review Ana Carolina B. A. Lopes1, Monica M. B. Paoliello1, 2, Tiago S. Peixe2 and Arthur E. Mesas3 1

Graduate Program in Public Health, State University of Londrina, Parana, Brazil Department of Clinical and Toxicological Analysis, Health Science Center, State University of Londrina, Parana, Brazil 3 Department of Public Health, Health Science Center, State University of Londrina, Parana, Brazil 2

PA - 68

Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome Among Adults in Southern Brazil Maira S. S. Bortoletto1, Ana Carolina B. A. Lopes1, Regina K. T. Souza2, Marcos A. S. Cabrera3, Alberto D. González2 1

Graduate Program in Public Health, State University of Londrina, Parana, Brazil Department of Public Health Science Center, State University of Londrina, Parana, Brazil 3 Department of medicine Health Science Center, State University of Londrina, Parana, Brazil 2

PA - 69

The Surface Hydrology of the Ground Waters of the Sauz-Encinillas for Hydrodynamic Modeling Purposes Gilberto Herrera Ponce and Adán Pinales Munguía College of Engineering, Autonomous University of Chihuahua. Circuito Universitario Campus II. C.P. 31000. Chihuahua, Chihuahua, México

PA - 70

Water Quality in Groundwater Which is Utilized as Potable Water in the Muncipality of Ascencion, Chihuahua, Mexico Lourdes Raquel Balderrama, Héctor O. Rubio, Eduviges Burrola Barraza and Rey Manuel Quintana College of Zoo technology and Ecology, Autonomous University of Chihuahua, Periferico Francisco R. Almada, Km. 1, Colonia Zootecnia. C.P. 31000. Chihuahua, Chihuahua, México

PA - 71

Influence of Climate Change on Lizards and Cacti in the Desert of Chihuahua Using MAXENT and GARP Irma Domínguez1, Leonor Cortés1, Octavio Hinojosa2, Oscar Viramontes1 and Héctor Gadsden2 1

Facultad de Zootecnia y Ecología, Universidad Autónoma de Chihuahua, Chihuahua, Mexico Centro de Investigación Sobre Sequía (CEISS)

2

PA - 72

Making a Healthy Sports Drink to Help Fight Health Disparities James Kelley1 and Christopher Kelley2 1

Health Sciences, College of Public Service, Jackson State University, Jackson, Mississippi, USA Clinton Public Schools, Clinton, MS, USA

2

PA - 73

Breastfeeding May Reduce the Risk of Postpartum Depression by Lowering Maternal Vitamin A Concentration: Hypothesis Anthony Mawson and Xueyuan Wang School of Health Sciences, College of Public Service, Jackson State University, 350 West Woodrow Wilson Drive, Jackson, MS 39213, USA

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Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research LIST OF POSTER PRESENTATIONS – SESSION A [STUDENTS]

PA - 74

Power to Prevent: An Effective Community-Based Tool for Diabetes Prevention Marinelle Payton and Xueyuan Wang School of Health Sciences, College of Public Service, Jackson State University,350 W. Woodrow Wilson Drive, Jackson, Mississippi, USA

PA - 75

The Dietary Intake and Levels of Physical Activity among College Students Jameskia Thompson, Blessing Dennis, Jung Hye Sung and Jae Eun Lee School of Health Sciences, College of Public Service, Jackson State University,350 W. Woodrow Wilson Drive, Jackson, Mississippi, USA

PA - 76

Prevalence of Hypertension among College Students in Jackson State University Anakor Christian, Grace O. Ochai, Jung Hye Sung and Jae Eun Lee School of Health Sciences, College of Public Service, Jackson State University,350 W. Woodrow Wilson Drive, Jackson, Mississippi, USA

PA - 77

Does Workplace Smoking Bans Induce Increased Smoking Behaviors After Work? Avius Carroll, Zimmerman, Edna Caston, Jung Hye Sung and Jae Eun Lee School of Health Sciences, College of Public Service, Jackson State University,350 W. Woodrow Wilson Drive, Jackson, Mississippi, USA

PA - 78

Self-Assessment Stress Level among Jackson State University Students and the Difference Between Male and Female Students Md Elham Momtahan, Anoosh Mokhtarian, Jung Hye Sung and Jae Eun Lee School of Health Sciences, College of Public Service, Jackson State University,350 W. Woodrow Wilson Drive, Jackson, Mississippi, USA

PA - 79

Attitudes and Perceived Barriers to Adoption of a More Plant-Based Pattern of Food Intake Kathy L. Johnson, Jung Hye Sung and Jae Eun Lee School of Health Sciences, College of Public Service, Jackson State University,350 W. Woodrow Wilson Drive, Jackson, Mississippi, USA

PA - 80

Effects of Excessive Alcohol Consumption on Adult Males and Females Kelia E. Neal, Jung Hye Sung and Jae Eun Lee School of Health Sciences, College of Public Service, Jackson State University,350 W. Woodrow Wilson Drive, Jackson, Mississippi, USA

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Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research LIST OF POSTER PRESENTATIONS – SESSION A [STUDENTS]

PA - 81

Survey on Level of Physical Activity in Health Care Workers in University Mississippi Maryam Yoosefi1, Ali Dehghani Firoozabadi1, Jung Hye Sung1, Ji-Young Lee2 and Jae Eun Lee1 1

School of Health Sciences, College of Public Service, Jackson State University,350 W. Woodrow Wilson Drive, Jackson, Mississippi, USA 2 Department of Psychology, University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, PA, USA

PA - 82

Sexually Transmitted Diseases and the Impact on Jackson, Mississippi Adolescents Paulette M. Ware, Elbony Smith, Jung Hye Sung and Jae Eun Lee School of Health Sciences, College of Public Service, Jackson State University,350 W. Woodrow Wilson Drive, Jackson, Mississippi, USA

PA - 83

Sexual Activity, Marijuana Use, & Alcohol Use in Relation to Gender for Non Adolescent Students Quotasze P. Williams, Jung Hye Sung and Jae Eun Lee School of Health Sciences, College of Public Service, Jackson State University,350 W. Woodrow Wilson Drive, Jackson, Mississippi, USA

PA - 84

The Frequency of Aspirin Use in a Stress Related Environment Shernica Ferguson, Roderick Hughes, Jung Hye Sung and Jae Eun Lee School of Health Sciences, College of Public Service, Jackson State University,350 W. Woodrow Wilson Drive, Jackson, Mississippi, USA

PA - 85

HPLC-MS Analysis of Environmental Pollutants in Water Samples Cassandra McCullum, Yiming Liu and Paul Tchounwou Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Jackson, State University, 1400 Lynch Street, Jackson, MS, USA, 39217, USA

PA - 86

Fe2+, Fe3+, Mg2+, and Pb2+- Induced Cytoxicity and Genotoxicity in PC-12 Cells Talia Sanders1, Yi-Ming Liu2 and Paul B. Tchounwou1 1

Department of Biology and 2Department of Chemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA

PA - 87

Exploration of Binding Modes Between p300 and Chetomin by Zn Ejection Using DFT and Protein-Ligand Docking Mike Cato1, Megan Peach2, Marc Nicklaus1 and Jerzy Leszczynski1 1

Jackson State University, Interdisciplinary Center for Nanotoxicity, Jackson, MS 39217, USA Chemical Biology Laboratory, National Cancer Institute at Frederick, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702, USA 2

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Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research LIST OF POSTER PRESENTATIONS – SESSION A [STUDENTS]

PA - 88

QSAR Modeling and Molecular Docking of Fullerene Analogues as Potential HIV-1 PR Inhibitors: A Computational Study Lucky Ahmed, Bakhtiyor Rasulev, Malakhat Turabekova and Jerzy Leszczynski Interdisciplinary Center for Nanotoxicity, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA

PA - 89

An Electrochemical Hydrogen Peroxide Sensor Based on MnO2/Single Walled Carbon Nanotube-Nafion Nanocomposite Modified Glassy Carbon Electrode A. B. M. Zakaria1, Danuta Leszczynska2 and Corneliu Bogatu2 1

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA 2

PA - 90

Impact of Nanoparticles and Human Health: Influence of Disinfection on the Behavior of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNTS) Trey Parker, Danuta Leszczynska and Corneliu Bogatu Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, Jackson, MS 39217, USA

PA - 91

Behavior of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes During Standard Disinfection of Water Treated for Drinking Purposes Trey Parker, Corneliu Bogatu and Danuta Leszczynska Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA

PA - 92

Selective Detection and Photothermal Therapy of Cancer Cells Using Iron Core Gold Shell Nanoparticles: SWCNT Hybrid Nanostructures Bhanu Priya Viraka Nellore and Ashton T. Hamme II Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Jackson State University, 1400 JR Lynch St., Jackson, Mississippi, USA

PA – 93

Application of 1,3-Dipolar Cycloaddition Toward SWCNT Functionalization and Subsequent Attachment of Gold Nanoparticles Yunfeng Lin and Ashton T. Hamme II Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, Mississippi, USA

PA – 94

CNT/Gold Nanoparticle Hybrid Surface Enhanced Raman Probe for Selective and Ultrasensitive Melamine Detection Willie Wesley and Paresh C. Ray Nanotechnology and Nanoparticle Synthesis Laboratory, Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 JR Lynch St, Jackson, Mississippi, USA

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Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research LIST OF POSTER PRESENTATIONS – SESSION A [STUDENTS]

PA – 95

A Gold Nanocage–CNT Hybrid for Targeted Imaging and Photothermal Destruction of Cancer Cells Rajashekhar Kanchanapally, Sadia Afrin Khan, Zhen Fan, Lule Beqa, Anant Kumar Singh, Dulal Senapati and Paresh Chandra Ray Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA

PA – 96

Popcorn Shape Gold Nano Particle Mediated SERS Probe for Low Level Selective Detection and Photothermal Nanotherapy of Multidrug Resistance Bacteria from Vegetables Sadia Afrin Khan, Anant Kumar Singh, Dulal Senapati, Zhen Fan, Paresh Chandra Ray Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA

PA - 97

Characterization of Sputter Deposited Gold Coatings Using AFM And SEM Sirak M. Mekonen Department of Physics, Atmospheric Science, and Geoscience, Jackson State University, 1400 J.R. Lynch Street, Jackson, MS 39217, USA

PA - 98

Visualization of Numerical Simulation for a Wind Dust Event William Parks, Christopher Luke and Duanjun Lu Department of Physics, Atmos. Sci. & Geoscience, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, Jackson, Mississippi, USA

PA - 99

Effects of Particle Solubility and Size on Toxicity of Zn and ZnO Nanoparticles on Artemia salina Larvae James Daniels1, Mehmet Ates1, Zikri Arslan1, Ibrahim O. Farah2 and Hilsamar Félix Rivera3 1

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson, Mississippi 39217, USA 3 Department of Chemistry, University of Puerto Rico-Mayaguez, Mayaguez, PR, 00681, USA 2

PA - 100

Evaluation of Particle Morphology on Toxicity of Titanum Dioxide Nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) on Artemia salina Martha Johnson, Terriona Cowan, Mehmet Ates and Zikri Arslan Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA.

PA - 101

Chemical Vapor Generation using Transition Metal Cyanides: Application to Detection of Cadmium by ICP-MS LaKeysha Rose, Vedat Yilmaz, Zikri Arslan and Maria Little Department of Chemistry& Biochemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA

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Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research LIST OF POSTER PRESENTATIONS – SESSION A [STUDENTS]

PA - 102

Theoretical Calculations of the Ionization Potentials and Electron Affinities of Guanine, Cytosine, Adenine And Thymine Noel Matthews-Gardner, David Magers and Glake Hill, Jr. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry; Jackson State University; Jackson, Mississippi 39217, USA

PA - 103

Comparative Halide Binding by a P-Cyano Based Dipodal Bis-Urea Receptor: A Highly Selective Receptor for Fluoride Abdallah Gana1, Avijit Pramanik1, Frank R. Fronczek2 and Md. Alamgir Hossain1 1

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA Department Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803, USA 2

PA- 104

Synthesis of a Thiophene-Based Monocyclic Receptor and its Anion Binding Studies in Solution and Solid States Musabbir A. Saeed1, Frank R. Fronczek2, Douglas R. Powell3 and Md. Alamgir Hossain1 1

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Jackson State University, USA, Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, USA, 3 Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Oklahoma, USA 2

PA- 105

Phosphate Binding with Thiophene-Based Polyaza Macrocylces in Water Rainier S. Berkley, Musabbir A. Saeed and Md. Alamgir Hossain Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Jackson State University, USA

PA- 106

Self-Assembly of Water and Fluoride in a Novel Thiophene Based Extended Monocyclic Receptor: A Highly Selective Receptor for Fluoride Syed Ataul Haque1, Musabbir A. Saeed1, Avijit Pramanik1, Douglas R. Powell2 and Md. Alamgir Hossain1 1

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019, USA

2

PA- 107

A New Dinuclear Nickel (II) Complex for Anion Binding in an Aqueous Medium Jala M. Morrow, Md. Mhahabubur Rhaman and Md. Alamgir Hossain Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Jackson State University, MS 39217, USA

PA- 108

Nucleotide Binding and DNA Cleavage Studies with Transition Metal Complexes of a Macrocycle Md. Mhahabubur Rhaman, Mercy Pilate and Md. Alamgir Hossain Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Jackson State University, MS 39217, USA

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Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research LIST OF POSTER PRESENTATIONS – SESSION A [STUDENTS]

PA- 109

Colorimetric and Spectroscopic Studies of Tren-Based Thiourea Receptors for Anions Maryam Emami Khansari, Avijit Pramanik and Md. Alamgir Hossain Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA

PA- 110

Spectroscopic and Colorimetric Investigation of an Acyclic Thiourea-Based Receptor for Anions Nya A. Williams, Maryam Emami Khansari and Md. Alamgir Hossain Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA

PA- 111

Synthesis and Anion Binding Studies an Azamacrocycle Toyketa Horne1, Frank R. Fronczek2 and Md. Alamgir Hossain1 1

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39212, USA Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803, USA

2

PA- 112

Reefs and their Evolution Over Geologic Time Ruth de Oliveira1,2 and Ezat Heydari1 1

Department of Physics, Atmospheric Sciences, and Geosciences, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, P. O. Box 17660, Jackson MS 39217, USA 2 Department of Geology – Faculty of Sciences, Agostinho Neto University, Av. 4 de Fevereiro, 7 – Luanda, Angola

PA- 113

Geospatial Dynamic Mapping Technique for Evaluating Toxic Release Emissions in Mississippi’s Regional Planning and Development Districts Chuck Patrick and Mukesh Kumar Department of Urban and Regional Planning, College of Public Service, School of Policy and Planning, Jackson State University, 3825 Ridgewood Road, Jackson, MS 39211, USA

PA- 114

Application of WRF-Chem Model for the Simulation of Surface Ozone over Urban Jackson Swatantra R. Kethireddy1, Paul B. Tchounwou1, Anjaneyulu Yerramilli2, Venkata B. Dodla2, Srinivas Desamsetti2 and John H. Young2 1

Department of Biology, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 JR Lynch Street, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi, USA 2 Trent Lott Geospatial Visualization and Research Centre, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, Mississippi e-Center, 1230 Raymond Road, Jackson, Mississippi, 39204, USA

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Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research LIST OF POSTER PRESENTATIONS – SESSION A [STUDENTS]

PA- 115

Correlation of Ground Level Ozone and Current Prevalence of Asthma in Six States of USA Swatantra R. Kethireddy1, Paul B. Tchounwou1, Hafiz A. Ahmad2, Anjaneyulu Yerramilli3, John H. Young3 and Srinivas Desamsetti3 1

Department of Biology, Jackson State University, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi 39217, USA Biostatistical Support Unit and Consulting Center, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA 3 Trent Lott Geospatial Visualization and Research Centre, Jackson State University, Jackson, Mississippi, 39204, USA 2

PA- 116

Asthma Prevalence in Mississippi and the Development of a Comprehensive Asthma Surveillance Instrument Rob Channell, Daniel Sarpong and Ramzi M. Kafoury Department of Biology and Environmental Science Ph.D. Program, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, MS, USA

PA- 117

Modeling the Probability of Detecting Cadmium Telluride (CDTE) Coated NanoParticles by the Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) Shontrice Garrett, David Muhammad, Deunte Sheard and Tor A. Kwembe Department of Mathematics, Jackson State University, JSU Box 17610, Jackson, MS 39217, USA

PA- 118

A Gimbaled Platform for Micro Aerial Vehicle Autopilot Simulation and Calibration Kamal S. Ali, Justin L. Shumaker, Lamarious Carter and Jordan Barber Department of Computer Engineering, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA

PA- 119

Quantifying Storm Surge Hazards with Advanced High Resolution Numerical Models Justin Griffin1, Hoonshin Jung2 and Himangshu Das1 1

Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA Center for Natural Disasters, Coastal Infrastructure and Emergency Management, Mississippi eCenter, Jackson State University, 1230 Raymond Road, Jackson, MS 39204, USA 2

PA- 120

Investigating Techniques to Detect Fake Reviews in Social Media Amber Johnson and Xifeng Yan Computer Science Department, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA

PA- 121

Relationship between Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonist, Caveolin-1, and Insulin Resistance C. Cezar1, G. K. Adler2 and L. Pojoga3 1

Tougaloo College Jackson Heart Study Program, Jackson, MS, USA Harvard University STARS Program, Brigham Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA, USA

2

75


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research LIST OF POSTER PRESENTATIONS – SESSION B [Faculty/Scientists]

PB - 01

Role of Fructose Diphosphate (FDP) and Glycerol an the Differential Survival of MRC5 and A549 Cell Lines Ibrahim O. Farah, Veshell L. Lewis, Wellington K. Ayensu and Joseph A. Cameron Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA

PB - 02

Therapeutic Implications of the Warburg Effect: Role of Oxalates and Acetates on the Differential Survival of MRC-5 and A549 Cell Lines Ibrahim O. Farah, Veshell L. Lewis and Wellington K. Ayensu Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA

PB - 03

Molecular Approach to Microbiological Examination of Water in the Grand Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve (NERR) in Mississippi S. S. Kishinhi, P. B. Tchounwou, I. O. Farah and J. Lukasik Environmental Microbiology Research Laboratory, Department of Biology, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, Box 18540, Jackson, MS 39217, USA

PB - 04

Genotoxicity of Silver Nanoparticles in Vicia faba: A Pilot Study on the Environmental Monitoring of Nanoparticles Anita K. Patlolla1, Ashley Berry1, 2, La Bethani May1,2, 3 and Paul Tchounwou1 1

Molecular Toxicology Research Laboratory, NIH-RCMI Center for Environmental Health, College of Science Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS, USA 2 Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS, USA 3 Murray High School student-SEPA Program, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS, USA

PB - 05

Green Synthesis of Silver Nanoparticles, Their Characterization and Application for Antibacterial Activity Florence Okafor, Afef Janen and Tatiana Kukhtareva Biological and Environmental Sciences and Physics, Chemistry and Mathematics Departments, Alabama A&M University, 4900 Meridian Street, Normal, Alabama, USA

PB - 06

A Visual Analytic Decision Support System for Tracking Impact of Public Health Benefits of Mercury Emission Reductions: Interdisciplinary Strategies to Advance from Disparity to Reform Wellington Ayensu1,2, Raphael Isokpehi1,2 and Ibrahim Farah3 1

Department of Biology & NIH-RCMI Center for Environmental Health, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi, USA 2 Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS39217, USA 3 Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS39217, USA

PB - 07

Assessment of PM2.5 from MODIS-AOT Data over Mississippi Gulf Coast using Regression Analysis Anjaneyulu Yerramilli, Srinivas Desamsetti, Venkata B. Dodla, Julius Baham, John Young and Chuck Patrick Trent Lott Geospatial & Visualization Research Center, Jackson State University, 1230 Raymond Road, Mississippi@e-Center, Jackson, MS 39204, USA

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Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research LIST OF POSTER PRESENTATIONS – SESSION B [Faculty/Scientists]

PB - 08

Environmental Modeling and Prediction for Climate Fluctuations over Grand Bay of Gulf of Mexico R. Suseela Reddy1, Paulinus Chigbu2 and Paul Tchounwou3 1

Department of Physics, Atmospheric Sciences and Geosccience,1400 J.R. Lynch Street, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS, 39217, USA 2 University of Maryland Eastern Shore, MD 21853, USA 3 College of Science, Engineering and Technology, 1400 J.R. Lynch Street, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS, 39217, USA

PB – 09

Separate and Joint Effect of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) and Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCB) on Aromatase CYP19a Transcription Level of Atlantic Tomcod (Microgradus tomcod) Adam Tulu1, Ali Ishaque1, Egbe Egiebor1, Christopher Chambers2 and Rosemary Jagus3 1

Department of Natural Science, University of Maryland, Eastern Shore, Princess Anne, MD 21853, USA NOAA-Fisheries, 74 Magruder Rd., Highlands, NJ 07732, USA 3 Center of Marine Biotechnology, University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute.701 E Pratt St. Baltimore, MD 21202, USA 2

PB - 10

Molecular Mechanisms of Vernonia amygdalina as Novel Botanical Agent for the Treatment of Breast Cancer Clement G. Yedjou1, Ernest Izevbigie2 and Paul B. Tchounwou 1,3 1

Cellomics and Toxicogenomics Research Laboratory, NIH-Center for Environmental Health; 2Cellular Signaling, Phytoceuticals, and Cancer Prevention and Therapies; 3Environmental Toxicology Research Laboratory College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, Jackson, Mississippi, USA

PB - 11

Vernonia amygdalina: A Novel Botanical Agent for the Treatment of Breast Cancer Clement Yedjou1, Lecia Gresham2, Ernest Izevbigie2 and Paul Tchounwou1 1

Cellomics and Toxicogenomics Research Laboratory, NIH-RCMI Center for Environmental Health; 2Cellular Signalling, Phytoceuticals, Cancer Prevention and Therapies, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi, USA

PB - 12

Arsenic Trioxide Induced Transcriptional Activation of Stress Genes and Program Cell Death of Human Leukemia Cells Sanjay Kumar, Clement G. Yedjou and Paul B. Tchounwou Molecular Toxicology Research Laboratory, NIH-Center for Environmental Health, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi, USA

PB - 13

Time-Course Gene Expression In Human Skin Cells Exposed To Arsenic Trioxide Udensi K. Udensi, C. Galindo, Paul B. Tchounwou and Raphael D. Isokpehi College of Science, Engineering & Technology, Jackson State University, Jackson Mississippi 39217, USA

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Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research LIST OF POSTER PRESENTATIONS – SESSION B [Faculty/Scientists]

PB - 14

Ato Mediates Intrinsic Pathways of Apoptosis in Colon Cancer Cells Jacqueline J. Stevens1, Alice M. Walker2, Halima Stringer1, Faith Sherman1 and Paul B. Tchounwou2 1

Molecular and Cellular Biology Research Laboratory, NIH-RCMI Center for Environmental Health, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 JR Lynch Street, Box 18540, Jackson, MS, USA 2 Molecular Toxicology Research Laboratory, NIH-RCMI Center for Environmental Health, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 JR Lynch Street, Box 18540, Jackson, MS, USA

PB - 15

Bacterial Growth on a Lead- and EDTA-Amended Nutrient Broth Medium Gloria Miller, Yasmin Partee, Terry Wilborn, Maria Begonia and Gregorio Begonia Department of Biology, P.O. Box 18540, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 J.R. Lynch, Jackson, MS 39217, USA

PB - 16

Discovery Dashboard for Exploring Health Disparities on Blood Lipids Traits Yachi Spencer, Victoria D. Gilmore, Kayla A. Echols and Raphael D. Isokpehi Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson Mississippi 39217, USA

PB - 17

Physicochemical Properties and Modeled Structural Features of Schistosoma mansoni Guanosine Triphosphate Binding Protein Andreas N. Mbah1, Henri L. Kamga2, Omatayo R. Awofolu3 and Raphael D. Isokpehi1 1

Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson Mississippi 39217, USA 2 Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Buea, P.O. Box 63 Buea, South West Region, Cameroon 3 Department of Environmental Sciences, College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, University of South Africa, P. O Box 392, UNISA, 0003, South Africa.

PB - 18

Comparative Genomics for Stress Responsiveness in Genomes of the Metabolically Versatile Rhodopseudomonas palustris Shaneka S. Simmons, Andreas N. Mbah and Raphael D. Isokpehi Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson Mississippi 39217, USA

PB - 19

Iron Transport Gene Neighbors of Stress-Responsive Major Facilitator in the Genome of Bioenergy Relevant Rhodopseudomonas palustris Shaneka S. Simmons and Raphael D. Isokpehi Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson Mississippi 39217, USA

PB - 20

Assessment of Efficacy and Safety of Garlic-Based Modern Traditional Medicine on Cutaneous Ulcer E. Sekela Kabamba, J. Ndelo-di-Phanzu and H. Egboki Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo

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Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research LIST OF POSTER PRESENTATIONS – SESSION B [Faculty/Scientists]

PB – 21

Helicobacter Pylori Responsible of Poisoning Suspicion in the Democratic Republic of Congo: About 56 Cases J. Ndelo-di-Phanzu, Mputu Malolo, P. Ndelo Matondo and Y. Nuapia Laboratory of Toxicology, University of Kinshasa, DR Congo

PB - 22

Phenol Photooxidation in the Presence of Hydrogen Peroxide and SWCNTs Danuta Leszczynska1, Corneliu Bogatu1, Anna Rabajczyk2, Dina Yegorova3 and A. B. M. Zakaria1 1

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Interdisciplinary Center of Nanotoxicity, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA 2 Independent Department of Environment Protection and Modelling, UJK Kielce, Poland 3 Ukrainian State Chemical-Technological University 49005, Dnepropetrovsk Ukraine

PB - 23

Predicting Toxicity of Nanoparticles: Discussion of Novel Computational Nanotoxicology Approaches and Recent Results Bakhtiyor Rasulev1, Danuta Leszczynska 2 and Jerzy Leszczynski1 1

Interdisciplinary Nanotoxicity Center, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA 2 Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA

PB - 24

Cytotoxicity of Carbon Nanoparticles towards Cells Immunity System M. Turabekova1,2, B. Rasulev1, M. Theodor3, J. Jackman3, D. Leszczynska2 and J. Leszczynski1 1

Interdisciplinary Center for Nanotoxicity, Department of Chemistry, Jackson State University, 1400 J. R. Lynch Street, P. O. Box 17910, Jackson, MS 39217, USA 2 Interdisciplinary Nanotoxicity Center, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Jackson State University, Jackson MS, USA 3 Applied Physics Laboratory, The Johns Hopkins University, Laurel, Maryland, MD, USA

PB - 25

Synthetic Studies toward the 11-Deoxyfistularin-3 Natural Product Ashton T. Hamme II1, Prasanta Das1, Erick D. Ellis1 and Edward J. Valente2 1

Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, Mississippi, USA Department of Chemistry, University of Portland, Portland, Oregon, USA

2

PB - 26

Synthesis of Spiro-Isoxazolines via Intramolecular Cyclization Prasanta Das1, Ann O. Omollo1, Eric McClendon1, Lungile Sitole1, Edward J. Valente2 and Ashton T. Hamme II1 1

Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, Mississippi, USA Department of Chemistry, University of Portland, Portland, Oregon, USA

2

PB - 27

Determination of Partition Coefficients of Various Silver Nanoparticles in Octanol/Water System Husniye Imamoglu1, Zikri Arslan1, Oliva M. Premira-Pedrozo2 and Mehmet Ates1 1

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, Mississippi 39217 USA School of Science and Technology, Universidad Metropolitana (UMET), San Juan, PR 00926 USA

2

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Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research LIST OF POSTER PRESENTATIONS – SESSION B [Faculty/Scientists]

PB - 28

Determination of Lead by Hydride Generation ICP-MS: Affecting Plumbane (PbH4) Formation by Potassium Hexacyano Manganate (III) Vedat Yilmaz, Zikri Arslan, LaKeysha Rose and Maria Little Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, College of Science and Technology, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA

PB - 29

A Novel Diquinoline Urea Receptor: Anion Complexation Studies in Solution and Solid States Joyce Williams1, Avijit Pramanik1, Douglas R. Powell2 and Md. Alamgir Hossain1 1

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019, USA

2

PB - 30

Comparative Binding and Recognition Studies of Sulfate Ion With P-Cyano Functionalized Dipodal and Tripodal Urea Receptors Avijit Pramanik1, Douglas R. Powell2 and Md. Alamgir Hossain1 1

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019, USA

2

PB - 31

Wells of the Meoqui-Delicias Aquifer in Chihuahua, Mexico Maria S. Espino1, Yaravi Barrera1, Blanca Rascón1, Ayde Dominguez1, Hector O. Rubio2 and Miguel Royo1 1

College of Engineering, Autonomous University of Chihuahua. Circuito No. 1, Campus Universitario 2. C.P. 31125. Chihuahua, Chihuahua, México 2 College of Zootechnology and Ecology, Autonomous University of Chihuahua, Mexico

PB - 32

Fluoride in the Groundwater of the Municipality of Rosales, Chihuahua, Mexico which is Utilized as Potable Water and its Potential Health Hazards Lourdes Villalba1, Luis Colmenero2, Adan Pinales1, Guadalupe Estrada1 and Héctor Rubio3 1

Engineering College of the Autonomous University of Chihuahua, Circuito No. 1, Campus Universitario 2. C.P. 31125, Chihuahua, Chihuahua, México 2 Basic Sciences Department, Technology Institute of Chihuahua II, 11101 Industrias Ave. P.O. Box 31310, Chihuahua, Chihuahua, Mexico 3 College of Zootechnology and Ecology, Autonomous University of Chihuahua, Chihuahua, Mexico

PB - 33

Radiation Levels in Natural Soils Near the Main Cities of Chihuahua, México Luis Colmenero-Sujo1, Lourdes Villalba2 and María Elena Montero3 1

Basic Sciences Department, Technology Institute of Chihuahua II, 11101 Industrias Ave. P.O. Box 31310, Chihuahua, Chihuahua, Mexico. 2 Engineery College, Autonomous University of Chihuahua, University Circuit, Chihuahua, Chihuahua, Mexico 3 Advance Materials Research Center, Miguel de Cervantes Blvd, Chihuahua, Chihuahua, Mexico

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Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research LIST OF POSTER PRESENTATIONS – SESSION B [Faculty/Scientists]

PB - 34

Analysis of the Milk Product System using a Sustainable Model in Northern Mexico Roberto Espinoza, S. E. Lujan, G. H. Aranda, R. M. Quintana, N. Callejas and N. R. Becerra College of Zootechnology and Ecology, Autonomous University of Chihuahua. Periferico R. Almada, Km. 1, Colonia Zootecnia, Chihuahua, Chihuahua, Mexico. CP:31000

PB - 35

Occupational Exposure Profile of Pb, Mn And Cd in Nonferrous Brazilian Sanitary Alloy Foundries Tiago S. Peixe1,2, Elizabeth de S. Nascimento2, Carlos S. Silva3 and Marco A. Bussacos4 1

Department of Pathology, Clinical and Toxicological Analysis, State University of Londrina, Paraná, Brazil Graduate Program in Toxicology and Analytical Toxicology, Department of Clinical and Toxicological Analysis, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil 3 Hygiene Division, Ministry of Labor, Fundacentro, São Paulo, Brazil 4 Statistics Division, Ministry of Labor, Fundacentro, Brazil 2

PB - 36

Protective Effect of Social Support on Reducing Acculturative Stress Related to Discrimination among Latino and Asian Immigrants: National Latino and Asian American Study Jae Eun Lee1, Jung Hye Sung2 and Ji Young Lee³ ¹RTRN DTCC, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39204, USA ²Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA ³Department of Psychology, University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, PA, USA

PB - 37

Roles of Data Coordinating Center in Data-Sharing Practice Jae Eun Lee1, James Perkins1, Daniel Sarpong1 and Jung Hye Sung2 1

RTRN-Data Technology Coordinating Center, JSU, Jackson, MS, USA Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA

2

PB - 38

Geospatial Assessment of Agricultural Landscape Variations in the Northern Mississippi Region Edmund C. Merem1, Yaw Twumasi2, Joan Wesley1, Marshand Cristler1, Chandra Richardson1, Jasmine Williams1 and Daphine Foster1 1

Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Jackson State University, 3825 Ridgewood Road, Jackson, MS 39211, USA Department of Agriculture, Alcorn State University, Lorman, MS 39096, USA

2

PB - 39

Using Wiser on Man-Made and Nature Disasters Pao-Chiang Yuan Hazardous Material and Emergency Management Technology Program, Department of Technology, Jackson State University, P.O. Box 18480, Jackson, MS 39217, USA

PB - 40

Paper Currency as a Fomite for Biosurveillance of Pathogens and Antibiotic Resistance Patterns in a Community Robert Wolff and Ann M. Stewart-Akers South University-Columbia, 9 Science Court, Columbia, S.C. 29203, USA

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Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research LIST OF POSTER PRESENTATIONS – SESSION B [Faculty/Scientists]

PB - 41

Windblown Dust Algorithm Development and Numerical Simulation for a Historical Case Duanjun Lu1, Rosa Fitzgerald2, William R Stockwell3, Remata S. Reddy1 and Loren White1 1

Department of Physics, Atmos. Sci. & Geoscience, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, Jackson, Mississippi, USA 2 Physics Department, University of Texas at El Paso, 500 W. University Avenue El Paso, TEXAS 79968, USA 3 Howard University Program of Atmospheric Sciences, Howard University, Washington DC 20059, USA

PB - 42

Effect of the Environmental Pollutant Hexachlorobenzene (HCB) on the Neuronal Differentiation of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells Cynthia Addae1, Henrique Cheng2 and Eduardo Martinez-Ceballos1 1

Department of Biological Sciences and Environmental Toxicology Program, Southern University and A&M College, Baton Rouge, LA 70813, USA 2 Department of Comparative Biomedical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA

PB - 43

Feasibility of City-Cluster-Economic Development Approach for the Eastern Province of Sri Lanka U. A. Chandrasena Department of Geography, University of Kelaniya, Sri Lanka, India

PB - 44

Phthalate Esters in Selected Foods from Commercial Stores around Tshwane Metropolis, South Africa Omotayo R. Awofolu and Ntsako D. Baloyi Department of Environmental Science, College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, University of South Africa, P. Bag X 6, Florida 1710, UNISA, Roodepoort, Johannesburg, South Africa

PB - 45

Incidences of Endocrine Disrupting the Effects of Occupational Exposure to Some Heavy Metals on Organ Functions, Expression of Cytokeratin -19 Fragments (CYFRA21-1) and Risk of Lung Cancer in Some Welders Bosun Banjoko1 and Olufunso Olorunsogo2 ¹Dept of Chemical Pathology, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria ²Dept of Biochemistry, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria

PB - 46

Higher Blood Lead Levels in Rural than Urban Pregnant Women in Eastern Nigeria Njoku Chinwendu1 and Orisakwe Orish Ebere2 1

Department of Medical Lab Science, Faculty of Science, Rivers State University of Science and Technology, Port-Harcourt, Rivers State, Nigeria 2 Toxicology Unit, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Port-Harcourt, Rivers State, Nigeria

82


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research ORAL PRESENTATION

1|Oral

Ni+2-INDUCED GLOBAL DEREGULATION OF GENE EXPRESSION, CYTOSKELETAL ALTERATIONS, AND Ca+2 ION DISTRIBUTION ALTERATIONS IN Ni+2-TRANSFORMED 10T1/2 MOUSE EMBRYO CELLS Joseph R. Landolph, Jr.1,2,3, Prethi Samala1,3, Sara Keliipaakaua1,3 and Jiacong Guo1,3 1

Depts. of Mol. Microbiol./Immunol. and 2Pathology, 3USC Cancer Center, Keck School of Medicine, Univ. Southern California, Los Angeles, Calif., 90033, USA. Abstract: Nickel (Ni) refinery workers who inhaled Ni-containing sulfidic ore dusts/smoked cigarettes in Ni refineries contracted lung/nasal cancers. Inhalation of Ni3S2/green NiO also induced respiratory cancer in rats. We showed Ni3S2 and green/black NiOs were phagocytosed into and induced chromosomal aberrations, cytotoxicity, and morphological, A. I., and neoplastic transformation in C3H/10T1/2 Cl 8(10T1/2) mouse embryo cells. 130 genes were differentially expressed between non-transformed and two 3-methylcholanthrene (MCA)-/four Ni-transformed (Tx) 10T1/2 cell lines (mRNA differential display). Ni/MCA-Tx cell lines contained a) ect-2 gene amplification/higher levels of ect-2 gene mRNA/protein; b) higher levels of calnexin mRNA/protein/Wdr1 gene mRNA; and c) no DRIP/TRA80/β2-centaurin-2 mRNAs. We hypothesized Ni+2 induced: 1) amplification of ect-2 gene/higher levels of rhoA-GTP led to higher levels of microtubules (MTs); 2) silencing of β-2-centaurin-2 gene, caused higher levels/aggregation of microfilaments (MFs); and 3) silencing the DRIP/TRAP80 gene altered distributions of Ca+2 ions, in Tx 10T1/2 cells. To test these hypotheses, we stained cells with fluorescent phalloidin to decorate MFs, with fluorescent antibody to α-tubulin/β-tubulin to decorate MTs, with Fluo 3AM to stain Ca+2 ions, and with DAPI to decorate nuclei, then examined cells by confocal microscopy. In non-transformed 10T1/2 cells, MFs/MTs were arranged homogeneously in long thin fibers. In NiS/green NiO-Tx cell lines, MFs and MTs were over-expressed and aggregated in some areas, absent in other areas, changing shapes of Tx cells, rounding them/altering their contact with extra-cellular matrix. In non-transformed cells, Ca+2 ions were found in two arrangements: State I, in low density cells, with a heavy concentration of Ca+2 ions in the nucleus, lesser amounts in the cytoplasm; and State II, in high density cells near confluence, where there were few Ca+2 ions in the nucleus, most in the cytoplasm. Nontransformed 10T1/2 cells cycled between States I and II. In Ni/MCA-Tx cell lines, Ca+2 ions were predominantly cytoplasmic (State II). Our data suggests the following model: mutations/methylations in each of 15 genes led to differential expression of 7 additional genes, leading to differential expression of a total of 130 genes. We conclude Ni ions caused amplification of the ect-2 gene and silenced expression of the β-centaurin-2 gene, leading to expression of higher steady-state levels of MTs/MFs, respectively, causing changes in cell shape, hence changes in global gene expression. Ni+2 ions also silenced the DRIP/TRAP80 gene, which led to altered distributions of Ca+2 ions gradients in Tx cells. These Ni ioninduced events cumulatively led to differential expression of 130 genes in Tx cell lines, altered cell shapes, and altered Ca+2 ion gradients, contributing to induction/maintenance of Tx phenotypes/Tx cell lines. Key words: Nickel, C3H/10T1/2 mouse cells, cell transformation, differential gene expression. Acknowledgements: This research was supported by grant R01 ES0-3341/NIEHS/NIH (PI, JRL), Cancer Center Core Grant, 5 P30 CA09320, from the NCI/NIH, and funding from the M. S. Program, Dept. Microbiol./ Imm. at USC, and USC Discretionary Funding at USC, to JRL.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research ORAL PRESENTATION

2|Oral

THE MARINE TOXIN OKADAIC ACID MODULATES DNA (CYTOSINE-5)METHYL TRANSFERASE ACTIVITY IN MOUSE EMBRYONIC STEM ES-D3 CELL-FREE SYSTEM AND IN THE HUMAN INTESTINAL CACO2-CELLS Edmond E. Creppy1, S. Moukha1, Eric Renault1 and Beatrice Sangare1,2 1

Laboratory of Toxicology and Applied Hygiene, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University Victor Segalen Bordeaux 2, 146 rue LÊo Saignat, F-33076 Bordeaux, France 2 Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Abidjan, Abidjan, Ivory Coast Abstract: Okadaic acid (OA) a polyether fatty acid produced by marine plankton (dinoflagellates) accumulates in the black sponge and in mussels and oysters and causes shellfish diarrheic syndrome in consumers. It is a tumour promoter in mouse skin, inhibitor of protein phosphatase 1 and 2A (IC50 = 33x109M-1) and a potent and specific inhibitor of protein synthesis in cell-free system (IC50 = 63 x 1012M1 ). The cell death induced by OA occurs by both apoptosis and necrosis. OA induces hypermethylation and/or hypomethylation of deosycytidine residues in the DNA concentration-dependently. It is suspected of causing gut tumours in humans. It was then hypothesized that okadaic acid could be (i) methyl donor (direct chemical reaction) or (ii) that it enhances or modulates the methylating activity of DNA (cytosine5)-methyl transferase (DNA Methylase) which transfers a methyl group from S-adenosyl-L-methiodine (SAM). We the investigated the effects of okadaic acid on the methylation of [poly(dIdC-dIdC)] by DNAMtase of ES-D3 cells in the presence of [3Hmethyl]-SAM, and OA labelled. The methylation rate was evaluated by the determination of the total [3H]-label in the thrichloracetate precipitated material after incubation (37°C for 60 min. in initial velocity conditions) and then by the radioactive counts of the peak corresponding to the [3H]m5dC by HPLC and Flo-one Packard coupled to UV detection. m5dC was also quantified by ELISA. In parallel, parameters such as lipoperoxidation, DNA-oxidized bases related to oxidative stress, ILs production, NF-kB, 8OH-dG, caspase-3, bax and bcl2 activation were determined. The results of three independent experiments showed hypermethylation for low concentrations of OA (maximum + 90% at 15nM) and hypomethylation for cytotoxic concentrations. Altogether these data point at an epigenetic mechanism of action of OA in the pathway for its tumour promotion. Since the epigenetic effects are already induced by low concentration of OA (hypermethylation-mitogenic activity) it should be taken into account when assessing the risk for human. Key-words: ES-D3, Caco-2 cells, Marine toxin, Okadaic Acid, DNA methylation, epigenetic effect Running title: DNA methylation rate is modified by okadaic acid


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research ORAL PRESENTATION

3|Oral

METABOLISM OF BENZO(A)PYRENE BY SUBCELLULAR FRACTIONS OF JEJUNUM AND COLON IN APCMIN MOUSE. Kelly L. Harris, Leah D. Banks, Perumalla V. Rekhadevi, Mohammad S. Niaz, and Aramandla Ramesh Department of Biochemistry & Cancer Biology, Meharry Medical College, 1005 D.B. Todd Blvd. Nashville, TN 37208, USA Abstract: Knowledge of the ability of the digestive system to metabolize polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is critical not only from the standpoint of toxicity, but also risk assessment. Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), a PAH compound is released into the environment from automobile exhausts, cigarette smoke, burning of refuse, industrial emissions, and hazardous waste sites. Additionally, a significant intake of BaP is expected in people who consume barbecued foods, and diet rich in saturated fat. In exposed animals, BaP becomes activated to reactive metabolites that interfere with target organ function and as a consequence cause toxicity. Studies from animal models from our laboratories have shown that BaP has the potential to cause cancers of the colon. Therefore, an understanding of the process by which BaP is metabolized in the digestive system will be of importance in the management of cancers of the digestive tract. The objective of our study was to characterize the metabolism of BaP by subcellular fractions (nuclear, cytosolic, mitochondrial, and microsomal) of jejunum and colon. Subcellular fractions were isolated by differential centrifugation from jejunum and colon tissues of ApcMin mice that received subchronic dose of 25 ď ­g/kg BaP. The fractions were incubated with 1 & 3ÂľM BaP. The control groups received nothing. Subsequent to incubation, samples were extracted with ethyl acetate and analyzed for BaP metabolites by reverse-phase HPLC equipped with fluorescence detection. Among the different fractions tested, mitochondrial BaP metabolism was higher than the rest of the fractions. Also, a dosedependent effect on metabolite concentrations generated by the subcellular fractions was noted. The BaP metabolites identified were as follows: BaP-9,10-diol; BaP-4,5-diol; BaP-7,8-diol; 9(OH) BaP; 1(OH) BaP; 3(OH) BaP; BaP-1,6-dione; BaP-3,6-dione; BaP-6,12-dione. Greater qualitative differences were observed between individual metabolite profiles. For e.g. the diol metabolites were detected in all the samples analyzed. Among diones, the 1, 6-dione metabolites was infrequently detected. Among the diol metabolites, the subcellular fractions preferentially formed BaP-7, 8-dihydrodiol, a precursor to the DNAreactive BaP-7,8-dihydrodiol epoxide (BPDE). The finding of preponderance of BaP-7, 8-dihydrodiol is interesting, given the fact that this precursor of BPDE has been linked to BaP-induced cancer. . Key words: Benzo(a)pyrene, jejunum, colon, metabolism, cancer. Acknowledgements: This research was supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health (5R01CA142845-02, 5T32HL007735-12, 5R25GM059994-11, 5U54CA091408-10) and Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research ORAL PRESENTATION

4|Oral

MOLECULAR AND CELLULAR MECHANISMS INVOLVED IN ARSENIC TOXICITY TO HUMAN HEPATOCELLULAR CARCINOMA (HEPG2) CELLS Erika T. Brown, Clement G. Yedjou, and Paul B. Tchounwou Molecular Toxicology Research Laboratory, NIH-Center for Environmental Health, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi, USA Abstract: Arsenic is a well-known toxic and carcinogenic agent associated with various human malignancies, including skin, lung, liver, kidney and bladder cancers. In the present studies, we used hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells as model to determine the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in arsenic toxicity. To achieve this goal we studied cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, genotoxicity, apoptosis, as well as, transcription and signaling factors. Utilizing the MTT [3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2yl)-2, 5-diphenyl tetrasodium bromide] assay, we assessed the cytotoxicity of arsenic trioxide (ATO) to hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells, which revealed a significant decrease in cell viability and a LD50 of 8.58 Âľg/ml. To determine the role of oxidative stress in ATO toxicity, we performed the lipid peroxidation, glutathione peroxidase and catalase assays, respectively. The results of the lipid peroxidation showed a significant increase (p <0.05) of malondialdehyde levels with increasing arsenic trioxide concentrations. Results obtained from glutathione peroxidase and catalase assays showed a gradual decrease in antioxidant enzyme activity in ATO-treated cells as compared to the control. In order to determine genotoxic damage cause by arsenic trioxide in HepG2 cells, we performed the comet assay. Data of this assay demonstrated a significant dose-dependent increase in DNA damage, with respect to comet tail-length and tail moment, as a result of arsenic trioxide exposure. The transcriptional activation of stress genes and related proteins (p53, p21, p38 mapk, GADD45, Bcl-2 and cytochrome c) in arsenic trioxide treated HepG2 cells were assessed by western blot analysis. Data from the western blot analysis revealed an up-regulation of p53, p21, p38 mapk, GADD45, and cytochrome c expression, while there was a down-regulation of Bcl-2. Apoptotic biomarkers were measured both by flow cytometry analysis and DNA laddering assay. Flow cytometry data showed a strong dose-response relationship between ATO exposure and Annexin-V positive HepG2 cells. Similar, a statistically significant was recorded with regard to caspase 3 activity in HepG2 cells. These results were confirmed by data of the DNA laddering assay showing clear evidence of nucleosomal DNA fragmentation in ATO-treated cells. Taken together, our research demonstrated that oxidative stress may play a key role in the molecular mechanisms involved in arsenic induced toxicity and cellular damage. Keywords: Arsenic trioxide, HepG2 cells, oxidative stress, western blot analysis, apoptosis Acknowledgements: This research was financially supported by a grant from the National Institutes of Health (Grant No. 2G12RR013459-14), through the RCMI-Center for Environmental Health at Jackson State University.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research ORAL PRESENTATION

5|Oral

TYPE I NKT CELLS PLAY A PROTECTIVE (AND TYPE II NKT CELLS PLAY AN INHIBITORY) ROLE IN THE HOST’S INNATE ANTITUMOR IMMUNE RESPONSE AGAINST A MOUSE MODEL OF MULTIPLE MYELOMA Gourapura J. Renukaradhya1, Masood A. Khan1, Marcus Vieira1, Wenjun Du2, Jacquelyn GervayHague2 and Randy R. Brutkiewicz1 1

Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Indiana University School of Medicine, 950 W. Walnut Street, Building R2, Room 302, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA 2 Department of Chemistry, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA Abstract: Natural killer T (NKT) cells are a T cell subpopulation known to possess immunoregulatory functions and recognize the MHC class I-like, lipid antigen presenting CD1d molecule. Most NKT cells express an invariant TCR  chain rearrangement (V14J18 in mice; V24J18 in humans) and are called type I NKT cells; all other NKT cells are type II. We have reported that NKT cells play important roles in the control of blood cancers. Interestingly, exposure of individuals to environmental toxins has been linked to a higher incidence of multiple myeloma and other blood cancers. In the current study, we have analyzed the roles for NKT cells in the host’s in vivo innate antitumor response against the murine B cell NS/0 tumor line, a model for multiple myeloma. In tumor-bearing mice, we found that type I NKT cells conferred protection in a CD1d-dependent manner, whereas type II NKT cells exhibited inhibitory activity. Pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines secreted by splenocytes from tumor-bearing mice correlated with tumor progression. Myeloid cells (CD11b+Gr1+) were present in large numbers at the tumor site and in the spleen of tumor-bearing type I NKT-deficient mice, suggesting that antitumor immunosurveillance was inhibited by CD11b+Gr1+ cells. Overall, these data suggest that there are distinct roles for NKT cell subsets in response to multiple myeloma cells in vivo, pointing to potential novel targets to be exploited in immunotherapeutic approaches against multiple myeloma and other blood cancers. Key words: Innate immunity, antigen presentation, multiple myeloma Acknowledgements: This work was supported by NIH grants R01 AI46455, CA89026 and P01 AI056097 to R.R.B, and NSF CHE-0194682 to J.G.H. G.J.R. was supported by NIH training grant T32 DK007519.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research ORAL PRESENTATION

6|Oral

MECHANISMS UNDERLYING THE TESTICULAR TOXICITY OF ATRAZINE AND THE ROLE OF QUERCETIN AS CHEMOPROTECTIVE AGENT IN RATS AND SERTOLI-GERM CELL CO-CULTURE Ebenezer O. Farombi1, Sunny O. Abarikwu1 and Aditya B. Pant2 1

Drug Metabolism and Toxicology Research Laboratories, Department of Biochemistry College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Nigeria 2 Indian Institute of Toxicology, Lucknow, India Abstract: A number of environmental chemicals have been implicated in the significant decline in the mean sperm count and quality among men without a history of infertility. These compounds are classified as endocrine disruptors and many of them are known to have an influence on reproductive potential. Atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-striazine) is a chloro-s-triazine herbicide employed extensively in the US and world-wide for over 40 years for the control of broadleaf and grassy weeds in the cultivation of corn, sorghum and sugar cane is now recognized to have disrupting effects on the reproductive systems of mammals. Because of its persistence in the environment (soil and water), human and wildlife are at risk of exposure. Several studies support the hypothesis of the steroidogenic capacity of Sertoli cell. Using sertoli-germ cell co-culture, we have evaluated the effects of ATZ on the transcripts levels of genes critical for steroid production. Western blot analysis of proteins involves in cell death and survival was monitored to show the mechanism of Sertoli-germ cell death-induced by ATZ and the protective effects of the flavonol, quercetin (QT). ATZ up-regulated the mRNA expression of the transcription factor, GATA-4, stem cell factor (SCF), androgen receptor (AR) and NF-κB and down regulated the expression of COX-2 mRNA. Furthermore ATZ up-regulated the expression of StAR and P450scc mRNA. The changes in the transcripts levels of these genes were inhibited by QT. Furthermore, the increased expression of P450scc mRNA caused by ATZ was enhanced by QT. Treatment of Sertoligerm cells with QT also up-regulated the transcripts level of SCF, AR, GATA-4 and StAR. Western blot analysis revealed that ATZ induces the expression of Bax, and c-Jun and down regulates the expression of, NF-κB, and c-Fos. QT abrogates ATZ-induced changes on c-Fos and NF-κB but not Bax and c-Jun proteins. The protective effect of QT on ATZ-induced down regulation of NF-κB proteins were sustained when dbcAMP was used to stimulate NF-κB protein expression. ATZ administered to rats at varying doses orally for 7 and 16 days impaired reproductive function and elicited a depletion of the antioxidant defense system in the testis and epididymis, indicating the induction of oxidative stress. Overall, our data suggest that the toxicity of ATZ in the testis of rats testicular cells is mediated by mechanisms involving apoptosis, oxidative stress and dysregulation in the expressions of several genes specific for the steroiodogenic pathway and that the, quercetin abrogated these molecular events and as such could be relevant in protecting testicular cells from ATZ-induced toxicity. The data have implication for the toxicological risk evaluation of atrazine. Key words: Atrazine; apoptosis, oxidative stress, daily sperm production; quercetin; Sertoli-germ cells


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research ORAL PRESENTATION

7|Oral

ASIAN GINSENG (PANAX GINSENG) AGGRAVATES ETHANOL TOXICITY IN JAPANESE RICEFISH (ORYZIAS LATIPES) EMBRYOGENESIS M. H. Haron1,2, L. A. Walker 1,2, I. A. Khan1 and A. K. Dasmahapatra 1,2 1

National Center for Natural Product Research, 2Department of Pharmacology, University of Mississippi, MS, USA Abstract: Alcohol is recognized as one of the oldest known teratogen that has serious central nervous system (CNS), cardiovascular, and craniofacial defects affecting the entire lifetime of an individual. Prevention of FASD, other than women abstaining from drinking alcohol during pregnancy, is not known. The synthetic drugs recommended for the treatment of alcoholism cannot be used by women during pregnancy. The limitations of synthetic drugs have led us to investigate on herbal products. In particular, many Chinese herbs including Asian ginseng (Panax ginseng) have therapeutic properties. More recently, black ginseng (produced from red ginseng by nine cycles of steam treatment) has been shown to inhibit ethanol-induced teratogenesis in mouse embryos in vitro. Due to ethical constraints, human studies of FASD are very limited. Fish embryos like zebra fish (Danio rerio) and Japanese ricefish or medaka (Oryzias latipes) have been proven efficacy and are now commonly used for toxicity studies. We have developed medaka as an animal model to study FASD and use them for searching herbal medicines that can attenuate toxic effects of ethanol. Fertilized medaka (Oryzias latipes) eggs in standard laboratory conditions (16L: 8D, 25 0C) were exposed to ginseng (PG) root extract (0- 2 mg/ml) for 0-2 day post fertilization (dpf). The calculated IC50 of PG as determined on 10 dpf is 355.3 +/- 1.115 Îźg/ml (n=3, r2= 0.9001). In separate experiments embryos were exposed to sub lethal concentrations of PG (50 and 200 Îźg/ml) with or without ethanol (100 and 300 mM) either for 0-2 dpf or 1-3 dpf and examined the mortality 10 dpf. It was observed that PG is able to enhance embryo mortality by disrupting the circulation status of the embryos. It is therefore concluded that PG aggravates some of the ethanol-dependent toxic pathways in medaka leading to decrease in embryo survivability. Key words: Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder, Japanese rice fish, Panax ginseng. Acknowledgements: This research supported by the National Center for Natural Product Research and the Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, University of Mississippi, University, MS.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research ORAL PRESENTATION

8|Oral

RESVERATROL RESTORES FUNCTION TO THE TESTES AND EPIDIDYMIDES OF BAP-TREATED RATS Anthony E. Archibong1, Mohammad S. Niaz2 and Aramandla Ramesh2 1

Departments of Physiology & 2Cancer Biology, Meharry Medical College, Nashville, TN 37208, USA

Abstract: Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) is a semi-volatile, high mol wt environmental pollutant. Apart from inhalation of BaP laden particulates present in cigarette smoke and occupational settings, humans are also exposed to this environmental pollutant through the consumption of contaminated foods. We have demonstrated that BaP represses testosterone biosynthesis and consequently perturbs fertility. Based on this observation, we hypothesize that BaP-induced reduction male fertility indices can be restored with normal levels of endogenous testosterone. The objective of this study was to assess the ability of resveratrol (RVT) to block the effect of oral BaP on gonadal function. Adult male F-344 rats were randomly assigned to receive BaP only (5 mg BaP/kg) or RVT (50 mg BaP/kg) + BaP (5 mg BaP/kg) or vehicle (tricaprilyn [VEH control]) for 60 days. Thereafter, all the animals were anesthetized to facilitated blood collection for the measurement of serum testosterone concentrations. Subsequently, testes and epididymides were harvested and weighed and percentage progressive motility and sperm density of stored spermatozoa determined. The right testes of rats in each group were subjected to H&E staining while the left testes assayed for isoprostane (oxidative damage marker). Testis weights did not differ among BaP-treated, RVT + BaP and VEH control rats. However, mean epididymal weight was reduced (P<0.01) among BaP-treated rats, an effect that was blocked by RVT compared to VEH control-treated rats. Similarly, RVT blocked the ability of BaP to reduce both stored sperm motility (P<0.05) and density (P<0.01). H&E staining showed a significant disruption in the integrity of the Leydig cell compartment of the testes of BaP-treated versus those of VEH control rats, a condition that was blocked by RVT. Testes from BaP-treated rats sustained a significant oxidative damage compared to those of controls rats, a condition that was blocked by RVT. Interestingly, serum testosterone concentrations were significantly reduced in BaP-treated versus VEH control rats. However, the concentrations of this steroid were not affected when BaP + RVT were administered to rats. These data suggest that RVT blocked BaP-induced disruption in endocrine-regulated fertility indices in male rats by maintaining normal testosterone secretion. Keywords: Benzo(a)pyrene, resveratrol, testes, epididymides, testosterone, sperm motility, sperm density Aknowledgement: This research was supported by NIH grant numbers: 1S11ES014156-05, U54RR022762, 5U54RR026140-02.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research ORAL PRESENTATION

9|Oral

INVESTIGATIONS OF NANOMATERIALS IN ENVIRONMENT: ADVANTAGES OF COMPUTATIONAL METHODOLOGY Jerzy Leszczynski Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Interdisciplinary Nanotoxicity Center, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch St., Jackson, MS, 39217, USA Abstract: As the applications of nanoparticles (NPs) expand they are becoming important components of over 1000 commercial products that are currently on shells of US stores. It creates a necessity to investigate the fate of such products once they are disposed and find out how released NPs are incorporate into the environment. According to actual state of knowledge, the elemental composition of the nanoparticles, factors such as their surface area, the characteristics of the surface, tendency to aggregate, the form of the particles and their surface charge all play decisive roles in their distribution through environment and live organisms. The interactions of nanoparticles with various components of environment are very complex. In order to comprehend them, information from various areas of research is necessary. This talk reveals applications of computational chemistry approaches to study interactions between nanoparticles and various components of biological and inorganic species. Computational chemistry provides diverse tools that could evaluate molecular interactions among diverse compounds including nanoparticles and models of different biological species. The details of interactions among various nanoparticles: metals, fullerenes, and carbon nanotubes with DNA bases and base pairs will be discussed. In additions, examples of possible applications of nanoparticles to protect an environment will be given. Key words: Nanomaterials, computational chemistry, interactions Acknowledgments: This research was supported by NSF-EPSCoR (Award #: 362492-19020001\NSFEPS-0903787) and NSF-CREST (HRD-0833178) grants.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research ORAL PRESENTATION

10 | O r a l

SOLID NANOPARTICLES AND NANOLIPOSOMES LOADED WITH RHENIUM-PLATINUM ANTITUMOR SYSTEM IN CANCER TREATMENT Natalia Shtemenko1 and Alexander Shtemenko2 1

Department of Biophysics and Biochemistry, Dnipropetrovs’k National University, 72 Gagarin Avenue, 49050 Dnipropetrovs’k, Ukraine. 2 Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Ukrainian State University of Chemical Technology, Gagarin Av.8, Dnipropetrovs’k 49005, Ukraine Abstract. The novel antitumor system including cluster rhenium compounds and cisplatin (Re-Pt system) has been recently presented [Shtemenko, 2007-2009] that was effective in the model of rat’s specific Guerink carcinoma T8 and in the majority of experiments led to disappearence of cancer cells. Structural types of dirhenium(III) carboxylates with formulas Re2(RCOO)4Cl2, cis-Re2(RCOO)2Cl4, transRe2(RCOO)2Cl4 were the matter of concern. Nanoliposomes and solid nanoparticles of 20 – 150 nm size were prepared, characterized and tried in some cancer models. The approach to circumvent such drawbacks of the drugs on the base of metal compounds as instability of the drug, dose-limiting toxicities (nephro-, hepato-, neurotoxicity, etc.) by encapsulation of the drug into a nanoparticle prevents by-side interactions was shown to be effective in experiments in vivo and in vitro. Hepatoprotective effect of rhenium cluster compounds in the model of tumor growth has been shown for the first time that was especially high in the case of liposomal forms of the Re-Pt system introductions, that was confirmed by decreasing of diagnostic enzymes activity in blood, practically normal enzymatic activity of the liver tissue and morphology of liver cells. Hepatoprotective activity of some rhenium compounds in the model of acute toxic hepatitis was confirmed. Nephrotoxicity and red blood cells destruction by cisplatin were shown to be reduced by rhenium compounds. Weight of kidneys, proteinuria, activity of gammaglutamiltranspeptidase and lactatedehydrogenase in urea and tissue homogenates of kidneys, relative reabsorbtion and glomerular filtration were studied. The introduction of some rhenium compounds led to normalization of the studied diagnostic indexes and to reduction of the toxic cisplatin influence that was confirmed by biochemical and morphological investigations. The proposition was made that rhenium compounds could positively influence on the synthesis of erythropoietin. Keywords: Rhenium-Platinum antitumor system, nanoliposomes, nanoparticles, cancer treatment, liver, kidneys. Acknowledgements. This research was supported by the Ministry of Education and Science of Ukraine (0104И000960) and by Fulbright Research Scholar Grant 2012 (USA).


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research ORAL PRESENTATION

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APPLICATION OF QUANTUM DOT TECHNOLOGY FOR PHOTONIC IMAGING IN ANIMAL REPRODUCTION J. M. Feugang, R. C. Youngblood, H. L. SĂĄnchez-RodrĂ­guez, J. M. Greene, M. A. Crenshaw, S. T. Willard and P. L. Ryan Facility for Organismal and Cellular Imaging, Department of Animal and Dairy Sciences, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS, USA Abstract: The rapid development of nanotechnology has led to the production of quantum dot (Qdot) conjugates that are less than 100 nm in diameter. These nanoparticles have unique optical properties and high photo-stability that make them useful for various bio-imaging applications. Especially in biomedicine, nanoparticles have been used for disease diagnoses or therapies, and the ability to combine them with various biomolecules offers new possibilities to elucidate biological processes that trigger a given physiological status of a cell or an organism. Therefore, we are developing a pioneer study that aims at employing Qdot for bioimaging in the reproductive field using domestic species. Here, we used a non-targeted self-illuminating Qdot that was conjugated to a light emitting protein luciferase (QD-BRET). In our first study, we evaluated the passive uptake of QD-BRET by spermatozoa. Motile boar and stallion spermatozoa were incubated at 37 oC with various concentrations of QD-BRET (0, 1 and 5 nM). After 30 min, spermatozoa were washed three times and sperm pellets were resuspended in the PBS with coelenterazine, the luciferase substrate. Mixtures were immediately subjected to bioluminescent imaging using the In Vitro Imaging System (IVIS-100). Supernatants collected after centrifugations were also imaged in order to evaluate the excess of QD-BRET. Aliquots of spermatozoa were submitted to fluorescence analysis of QD-BRET and Transmission Electron Microscopy to assess their cellular localization. Furthermore, QD-BRET effects on sperm motility and viability (mitochondrial potential membrane and plasma membrane integrity) were evaluated. The fertilizing potential of loaded spermatozoa was assessed after fertilization of in vitro-matured porcine oocytes. The second study focused on ex vivo imaging of labeled-spermatozoa within the reproductive tract (RT). Labeled-boar spermatozoa were mixed with coelenterazine, transferred into 0.5-mL plastic straws, and placed inside of prewarmed sections of freshly collected pig RT (oviduct, uterine horn and body). RT sections were immediately imaged using the IVIS. In the last study, 60 pM QD-BRET were microinjected into dissected antral follicles of freshly collected pig ovaries. Injected follicles were cultured at 37 oC, 5% CO2 and analyzed for cellular uptake of QD-BRET on day 2, 4 and 6 of culture. Follicles were microinjected with coelenterazine and immediately imaged. These follicles were fixed, cut in sections and placed on slides for fluorescence microscopy evaluation. Results indicated that spermatozoa incorporated QD-BRET in a dose dependent manner, but higher QD-BRET concentrations impaired the sperm motility. Adequate balances between spermatozoa and QDBRET concentrations are necessary to maintain the sperm motility and viability. The ratio of 10 8 spermatozoa /1nM QD-BRET had no impairment effects on the sperm functionality, and the fertilization rates were comparable between labeled and non-labeled spermatozoa. Microscopy analyses confirmed the uptake of QDBRET that were mainly located in the head and mid-piece regions of spermatozoa. Ex vivo imaging of RT tissues revealed the greatest proportion of light transmitted across the oviduct (22%), which was 3x and 20x higher than that captured over the uterine horn and body surfaces, respectively. Finally, all injected follicles emitted light that was inversely proportional to the follicle size; and QD-BRET appeared differentially accumulated in the follicle cell types. These findings suggest that QD conjugates can be used in reproductive biology, and could be potential tools for non-invasive imaging and functional analyses of mammalian gametes. Further studies are needed to optimize the use of QD in reproductive biology and to minimize their possible toxicity.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research ORAL PRESENTATION

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GOLD NANOTECHNOLOGY FOR BIOLOGICAL IMAGING AND THERAPY Paresh Chandra Ray, Sadia Afrin Khan, Anant Kumar Singh, Dulal Senapati , Zhen Fan, Teresa Demeritte and Rajashekhar Kanchanapally Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS, USA Abstract: Cancer is the greatest challenge in human healthcare today. Cancer causes 7.6 million deaths and economic losses of around 1 trillion dollars every year. Early diagnosis and effective treatment of cancer are crucial for saving lives. On the other hand, multiple drug resistant Salmonella enterica serover typhimurium definitive type 104 (DT104) is at present an emerging threat worldwide. As a result, an ultrasensitive sensing technology for the rapid detection and new approaches for the treatment of infectious bacterial pathogens that do not rely on traditional therapeutic regimes is very urgently required in todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s world. Here we will discuss our recent report on bio-conjugated nanomaterial based strategies for the selective pathogen and cancer sensing and photothermal applications. We will provide the basic concepts and critical properties of the nanostructures that are useful for the biological sensing and killing. Key words: Cancer, multiple drug resistant Salmonella, nano imaging and therapy. Acknowledgements: This research supported by a grant from the National Institutes of Health (Grant N0.1G12RR13459), through the NCRR-RCMI Center for Environmental Health at Jackson State University (JSU) and NSF-PREM grant # DMR-0611539.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research ORAL PRESENTATION

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PROFILING BIOACCUMULATION AND TOXICITY OF SILICA ENCAPSULATED LEAD SELENIDE NANOPARTICLES ON MICE MODEL IN VIVO Zikri Arslan1, Mehmet Ates1, Oliva M. Premira-Pedrozo2 and Ibrahim O. Farah3 1

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, Mississippi 39217 USA School of Science and Technology, Universidad Metropolitana (UMET), San Juan, PR 00926 USA 3 Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson, Mississippi 39217, USA 2

Abstract: Lead selenide nanoparticles (NPs) are class of semiconductor nanoparticles â&#x20AC;&#x201C; so called quantum dots. These NPs are strong absorbers of near- and mid-IR and thus realized as important materials for solar energy conversion and communication and sensing devices. Their optical properties can be tuned by changing the particle size. The use of PbSe NPs in technology and medicinal devices is however concerning about their effects on environmental and human health. In this study, bioaccumulation, excretion and toxicity of silica-coated PbSe NPs were investigated on mice in vivo to understand their metabolic distribution and toxic effects. CD-1 mice were exposed to aqueous suspension of PbSe NPs in metabolic cages. Single injection of NPs was made through tail vein. Urine and feces were collected over six weeks. Animals were sacrificed periodically and organs, including the brain, heart, intestine, kidneys, liver, spleen and lungs were collected. The urine, feces and organs were digested in acid and analyzed for Pb and Se by ICP-MS. Significant accumulation of PbSe NPs was observed in the liver and kidneys. Levels in other organs were not significant. Lead was high in fecal samples while selenium was higher in urine. Lead was eliminated from body within 42 days. Selenium was relatively constant. Malondialdehyde levels increased within first two weeks then fall off to normal levels. PbSe NPs mainly accumulate in the liver and mobilized to kidney. Particles are eliminated from the body through feces. Exposure induces toxic effects that are mediated by oxidative stress. Key words: Lead selenide, Nanoparticle, Bioaccumulation, Toxicity, Cadmium, Chemical vapor generation, Transition metal cyanide, ICP-MS Acknowledgements: This project was supported by grants from the National Center for Research Resources (5 G12 RR013459-15) and the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (8 G12 MD007581-15) from the National Institutes of Health.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research ORAL PRESENTATION

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WATER AND SEDIMENT POLLUTION IN THE LAGUNA DE BUSTILLOS IN MEXICO; ITS CONCERNS ABOUT THE ENVIRONMENT AND HUMAN HEALTH Hector Rubio-Arias, Rey M. Quintana and Adan Pinales Mungia College of Zoo-technology and Ecology, Autonomous University of Chihuahua, Mexico, Periferico Francisco R. Almada, Km. 1 Colonia Zootecnia, Chihuahua, Chihuahua, Mexico CP:31000 Abstract: The Laguna de Bustillos in the north of Mexico is an ecologic icon in the north of Mexico that has been the ecological refuge of several wildlife species as well as has provided food for the inhabitants established along its edge and its surrounding area. The objective was to determine the concentration of heavy metals in water and sediments of this aquatic ecosystem. Twenty eight sampling points were randomly selected throughout the Laguna´s area, where water samples were obtained. In addition, two sediment samples were collected in each point; at 0-15 cm and 15-30 cm depth. Hence, a total of 56 sediments samples were collected. Of the total 28 sampling points, seven points represented the area close to a panel’s industry discharge (PI), seven points represented the area close to the discharge of the city of Cuauhtemoc (C), seven points represented the area close to the Mennonite´s colonies discharges (MC) and seven points represented the area close to local communities named Ejidos (E). The following physicalchemical parameters were determined for water samples (Temperature, pH, EC, TS, TH, turbidity, alkalinity, total P, chlorides), sediments samples (pH, EC) as well as the subsequent 17 metals; Ag, As, Al, B, Ca, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb, Si, and Zn. An ANOVA was performed for data of water samples while a factorial treatment design 4x2 was utilized for data of sediment samples using a 0.05 significance level. The water results exhibited the following means in mg L-1: Al=82.75; As=0.07; B=0.23; Ca=50.06; Cr=0.024; Cu=0.03; Fe=36.41; K=26.50; Mg=13.0; Mn=0.57; Na=360.40; Ni=0.13; Si=0.75 and Zn=0.17. The parameters of Cd, Pb and Se were not detected in water. With respect to sediment samples, in all parameters it was found significance due to sampling points but no differences was noted for neither sampling depth nor the interaction. The pH varied from 9.1 in C to 8.6 in MC. The EC ranged from 0.38 mS in PI to 0.14 mS in MC. The elements that exceeded the amount in sediments were Ag with 2.76 mg k-1 in PI, Al with 13.03 mg k-1 in E, As with 15.72 mg k-1 in MC, B with 19.31 mg k-1 in PI, Ca with 118 mg k-1 in PI, Cd with 1.23 mg k-1 in PI, Cr with 46.14 mg k-1 in C, Cu with 19.76 mg k-1 in E, Fe with 12,943 mg k-1 in C, K with 4,490 mg k-1 in E, Mg with 8,061 mg k-1 in E, Mn with 337.03 mg k-1 in C, Na with 3,072 mg k-1 in PI, Ni with 31.51 mg k-1 in E and C, Pb with 5.65 mg k-1 in CI, Si with 180.79 mg k-1 in C and Zn with 41.88 mg k-1 in PI. One can conclude that the concentration of some elements were found in levels that can cause damage to the ecosystem of the area in the medium and / or long term and, as a consequence, represent a potential human health hazard because people consume fish from this aquatic reservoir. Key Word: Metals, Laguna de Bustillos, water, sediments, Chihuahua, Mexico


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research ORAL PRESENTATION

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EFFECT OF SOIL STERILIZATION ON THE GROWTH AND HEAVY METAL ACCUMULATION OF PLANTS GROWN IN METAL-CONTAMINATED SOILS Maria Begonia, Rachel Knott, Gloria Miller and Gregorio Begonia Department of Biology, P.O. Box 18540, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 J.R. Lynch St., Jackson, MS 39217, USA Abstract: Microorganisms are ubiquitous in soils to which heavy metal (HM) accumulating plants are native, even in those soils containing high concentrations of HM. It is known that some microorganisms can mobilize some metals in soil and can enhance the accumulation of some HM in roots of nonaccumulator plants. The objective of this study was to evaluate the growth and HM accumulation and translocation of plants (tall fescue and/or wheat) grown in sterile and non-sterile soils. Plants were grown in the greenhouse for six weeks in sterile and non-sterile growth media that had been amended with different concentrations of lead (Pb) or cadmium (Cd). After harvest, dry biomass and metal concentrations in root and shoot tissues were quantified. Our results revealed that the root and shoot dry biomass of both fescue and wheat plants grown in sterile soil were higher than those grown in non-sterile soil across all Pb and Cd concentrations. Cadmium concentrations in roots and shoots were higher in nonsterile soil amended with 500 ppm Cd, than at 0 and 250 ppm. Lead concentrations in root and shoot tissues were higher in Pb-amended non-sterile soil, compared to the sterile soil. These results suggest that the native populations of microorganisms in soil can enhance the HM accumulation in plants. Key Words: Lead, cadmium, metal accumulation, fescue, wheat, sterile soil, non-sterile soil Acknowledgements: This research was made possible through support provided by the NASA through The University of Mississippi (No. NNX10AJ79H/11-05-084; M.B., PI/PD) to Jackson State University. The opinions expressed herein are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of NASA or The University of Mississippi.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research ORAL PRESENTATION

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PHYTOTOXICITY OF MERCYRTY ON CHINESE BRAKE FERN WITH MYCORRHIZAL FUNGI INOCULATION IN OAK RIDGE SOIL Sergio T. Pichardo1, John G. Kelly1, Fengxiang X. Han2, Yunjun Xia1, Valerie Philips1, Yi Su1 and Frank Matta1 1

Institute for Clean Energy Technology, Mississippi State University, Starkville, Mississippi, USA Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, Jackson, Mississippi, USA 2

Abstract: Historically as part of its national security mission, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Y-12 National Security Facility in Oak Ridge, TN acquired a significant fraction of the world’s supply of elemental mercury. During the 1950s and 1960s, a large amount of elemental mercury escaped confinement and is still present in the watershed surrounding the Y-12 facility. In order to cost effectively implement those remediation efforts, it is necessary now to obtain an improved understanding of biological means of removing mercury and mercury compounds from the Oak Ridge ecosystem. Phytoremediation is a technology that uses various plants to degrade, extract, contain, or immobilize contaminants from soil and water. In particular, phytoextraction is the uptake of contaminants by plant roots and translocation within the plants to shoots or leaves. Contaminants are generally removed by harvesting the plants. We have investigated phytoextraction of mercury from contaminated soil by using some of the known metal accumulating wild plants since no natural plant species with mercury hyperaccumulating properties has yet been identified. Different natural plant species have been studied for mercury uptake, accumulation, toxicity and overall mercury removal efficiency. Chinese brake fern is an easy mycorrhizal plant which is documented to be a hyperaccumulator of some heavy metals. Little information is available when the fern is growing in contaminated soil with mercury and infested with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. Objectives of this study were to determine the phytotoxicity of mercury on Chinese brake fern biomass production and examinee the concentration of mercury in roots of Chinese brake fern grown in soil with mycorrhizal fungi inoculant. We observe that the mercury concentration in Chinese brake fern roots had a strong (R² = 0.8122) and positive (y = 0.3775x + 61.893) correlation with the increasing of mercury rates in soil. Mycorrhizal fungi inoculant significantly contributed to concentrate more mercury in Chinese brake fern roots grown on soil contaminated with 100 ppm mercury. Key words: Mercury, phytotoxicity, Chinese brake fern, cytotoxicity, mycorrhizae, Oak Ridge


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research ORAL PRESENTATION

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THE EFFECTS OF CRUDE OIL AND DISPERSANT TOXICITY ON MARINE PHYTOPLANKTON PRODUCTIVITY IN THE GULF OF MEXICO Waneene C. Dorsey1, Gulnihal Ozbay2 and Paul B. Tchounwou3 1

Molecular Toxicology Research Laboratory, Grambling State University, Grambling, LA, USA Deparment of Agriculture & Natural Resources, Delaware State University, Dover, DE, USA 3 Molecular Toxicology Research Laboratory, NIH-Center for Environmental Health, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch St., P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, MS USA 2

Abstract: The Deep Horizon oil spill incident on April 20, 2012 compromised the Gulf Coastâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ecosystem and human health potentially through the marine food chain. One of the mitigation strategies to impede oil migration to the Gulf Coastâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s shorelines was to burn off crude oil. Crude oil combustion resulted in the production of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emissions such as, benzo[a]anthracene, benzo[a]pyrene, and benzo[b]fluoranthene compounds. Noticeable high deaths of marine animals and a decline in phytoplankton productivity have been linked to PAH- and dispersant-toxicity. Phytoplanktons play a pivotal role in natural ecosystems by functioning as biological pumps that sequester CO2, by serving as a food source for marine animals, and by releasing high levels of O2 into the environment. Chlorophyll a is an essential photosynthetic compound that facilitates CO2 entrapment. We hypothesized that exposure to benzenoid PAHs and oil dispersants will have deleterious effects on phytoplankton productivity.

In the present study, chlorophyll a (9 km mg/m3) was used as an indicator to study phytoplankton productivity in the Gulf of Mexico, region 97W-82W, 25N-30N. This region includes the shorelines of Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida pan-handle in the Gulf of Mexico. We used NASA Giovanni data and spectral satellite images to examine phytoplankton productivity around coastal shorelines. Area-Averaged Time Series from Giovanni data portal indicated that June was the peak month for high concentrations of chlorophyll a from 2007 to 2012; demonstrating high phytoplankton productivity. Next, we examined chlorophyll a concentrations from the range of 0.08 to 30 9km mg/m3 in the month of June for 2007 through 2012. Spectral images showed that the highest concentration, 9km 30 mg/m3 chlorophyll a was and widely distributed around the shorelines of Louisiana, Mississippi, and Florida pan-handle from June 2007 to June 2008. In June 2009, there was a drastic decline in phytoplankton productivity at the 2.5 9km mg/m3 chlorophyll a in the Florida pan-handle; however phytoplankton productivity remained constant (9km 30 mg/m3) around Louisiana and Mississippi shorelines. In June 2010 and 2011, 9km 30 mg/m3 chlorophyll a was highly distributed around Texas, Louisiana, and Mississippi; demonstrating high phytoplankton productivity in new locations. In June 2012, satellite images data showed a low concentration chlorophyll a of 10 9km mg/m3around the shorelines of Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida pan-handle in the Gulf of Mexico; indicating a drastic decline in phytoplankton productivity. Low phytoplankton productivity is attributed to PAH- and dispersant-toxicity. Key words: chlorophyll a, phytoplankton, dispersants, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Acknowledgements: This research was supported by a grant from NASA Innovations in Climate Education: Engaging Minority University STEM Education Professors in the Science of Climate Change through Elizabeth City State University and University of New Hampshire.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research ORAL PRESENTATION

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REGULATION OF PERICELLULAR PH HOMEOSTASIS IN THE CANCER CELL Karam F. A. Soliman Neurodegeneration Research Laboratory, College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Florida A & M University, Tallahassee, FL 32307, USA Abstract: Malignant tumor cells display an accelerated rate of glucose consumption with dominant reliance on substrate level phosphorylation (SLP) rather than oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) to produce ATP. The heightened glycolytic activity is typically indicative of the metabolic response to the lack of oxygen. In the cancer cell, this pattern occurs in the presence or absence of O2 with accumulation of lactic acid (Warburg effect). Using whole-genome, proteomic MALDI-TOF-MS and metabolite analysis, we investigated the Warburg effect in malignant neuroblastoma N2A cells. The findings show that the Warburg effect serves a functional role in regulating acidic pericellular pH (pHe), which is mediated by metabolic inversion or a fluctuating dominance between glycolytic-rate substrate level phosphorylation (SLP) and mitochondrial (mt) oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) to control lactic acid production. The results also show that an alkaline pHe caused an elevation in SLP/OXPHOS ratio of 98%, while the ratio was approximately 56% at neutral pHe and approximately 93% in acidic pHe. Acidic pHe paralleled greater expression of mitochondrial biogenesis and OXPHOS genes, such as complex III 窶天 (Uqcr10, Atp5 and Cox7c), mt Fmc1, Romo1, Tmem 173, Tomm6, aldehyde dehydrogenase, mt Sod2 mt biogenesis component PPAR-c co-activator 1 adjunct to loss of mt fission (Mff). Moreover, acidic pHe corresponded to metabolic efficiency evidenced by a rise in mTOR nutrient sensor GbL, its downstream target (Eif4ebp1), insulin modulators (Trib3 and Fetub) and loss of catabolic (Hadhb, Bdh1 and Pygl)/glycolytic processes (aldolase C, pyruvate kinase, Nampt and aldose-reductase). In contrast, alkaline pHe initiated loss of mitofusin 2, complex II窶的V (Sdhaf1, Uqcrq, Cox4i2 and Aldh1l2), aconitase, mitochondrial carrier triple repeat 1 and mt biosynthetic (Coq2, Coq5 and Coq9). It was concluded from this study that the Warburg effect might expand beyond its role in energy metabolism and could be the primary means by which tumor cells can regulate the rate of glycolysis (glucose/lactate conversion) to neutralize the microenvironment. The negative feedback system involves a rapid switch between acidmediated mitochondrial OXPHOS (lactate production is halted) or excessive lactate produced by SLP, with a rise in alkalinity. These effects are independent of energy requirements and/or levels of O2. Keywords: Glucose, Hypoxia, Glycolysis, Mitochondria, Neuroblastoma 2-A, dehydrogenase

OXPHOS. Lactic acid

Acknowledgment: This project was supported by NCRR and NIMHD of the NIH through a grant number 8 G12 MD007582-28


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research ORAL PRESENTATION

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ROLE OF REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES IN CR(VI)-INDUCED CELL TRANSFORMATION Xiangllin Shi Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40515, USA Abstract: Hexavalent chromium (Cr VI)) is an environmental contaminant and known human carcinogen associated with the incidence of lung cancer. It has been postulated that overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative DNA damage play a major role in carcinogenicity of Cr(VI). To specify the sources of ROS induced by Cr (VI), we investigated whether NADPH oxidase (NOX), a major superoxide-generating enzymatic system in human, plays a role in the Cr(VI)-induced oxidative stress and carcinogenesis. Our results showed that short-term exposure to 2 ÂľM Cr (VI) resulted in a rapid increase in both superoxide and hydrogen peroxide production in Beas-2B cells. These events were blocked by cotreatment with antioxidants, superoxidase dismutases (SOD) or catalase (CAT), and NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin. The expression of NOX members (NOX1-3 and NOX5) and subunits (p22phox, p47phox, p40phox, and p67phox) were also increased. Concomitantly, Cr(VI) induced phosphorylation of p47phox, and membrane translocation of p47phox and p67phox, which are all required for NOX activation. Knocking down p47phox with the short hairpin RNA (shRNA) attenuated the ROS production and the level of 8hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), which is an indicator of oxidative DNA damage. The expression of main antioxidants enzymes had no change in the Beas-2B cells exposed to short-term Cr(VI). Chronic exposure (up to 3 month) to low concentrations of Cr (VI) (0.125, 0.25, and 0.5 ÂľM) resulted in malignant transformation of Beas-2B cells, increasing anchorage-independent growth in soft agar in dose-dependent manner. Additionally, Beas-2B cells exposed to long-term Cr(VI) treatment can form aggressive tumors in nude mice. Exposed to chronic Cr(VI) increased ROS generation in time- and dose- dependent manner in Beas-2B cells. The expression of NOX subunits, p47phox and p67phox, were increased, while the main antioxidant enzymes, such as SOD and GPx, were decreased. Stable knock-down p47phox, or overexpression of SOD1, SOD2, or CAT greatly inhbited the colony and tumor growth induced by chronic Cr (VI) exposure. Our results indicate NADPH oxidase plays an important role in Cr(VI)-induced ROS generation and carcinogenesis, and provide a potential drug targets in cancer induced by Cr (VI).


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research ORAL PRESENTATION

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TRACE ELEMENTS (COPPER, MOLYBDENUM, SELENIUM & ZINC) AS MARKERS IN ORAL PRECANCER AND CANCER Sunali Khanna1, A. C. Udas2, G. Kiran Kumar2, S. Soundarajan2 and F. R Karjodkar1 1 2

Department of Oral Medicine &Radiology, Nair Hospital Dental College, Mumbai, 400008 India Department of Analytical Chemistry, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, 400085, India

Abstract: Oral Cancer is a major cause of cancer morbidity and mortality worldwide. In India oral cancer is prevalent in most areas where tobacco related practices are observed. Imbalance in trace element profile and its modifying effects in the process of carcinogenesis warrants further investigation. The aim was to evaluate the levels of Copper (Cu), Molybdenum (Mo), Selenium (Se) and Zinc (Zn) in serum of patients of precancer (Oral Submucous Fibrosis and oral cancer {Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC)} and analyze the alterations of these critical parameters. Cu/Zn ratio deemed important is determined in oral precancer and cancer. An attempt is also made to identify predictors amongst these parameters for disease occurrence and progression. This research is also undertaken to assess the tobacco related practices and socio-cultural challenges in patients of precancer and cancer. Guided dialogue techniques, questionnaires and proforma based evaluation formed a part of the study. Serum Copper and Zinc was determined using Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. Serum estimation of Selenium and Molybdenum was done by Graphite Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. The socio-cultural factors pertaining to tobacco related practices bring forth stark grass root realities in this randomised controlled clinical trial. Data analysis reveals a marked, progressive and significant increase in copper levels in precancer and cancer groups as compared to the normal group. Cu/Zn ratio is slightly elevated in the cancer and precancer groups. Serum levels of Molybdenum and Selenium are significantly decreased in the precancer and cancer group. The levels of zinc are marginally elevated in the precancer and cancer. The probable predictors for disease occurrence and progression in precancer group are serum Mo and Se .In the cancer group age, Cu, Mo & Se are identified as probable predictors for disease progression. Proactive intervention would help in early diagnosis, management and monitoring the efficacy of treatment. This study shows alteration of serum levels of Cu, Mo, Se & Zn in precancer (OSMF) and cancer (SCC). An attempt is also made to identify these parameters as predictors for disease occurrence and progression. This may also serve as an additional diagnostic tool for oral precancer along with predicting malignant potential of OSMF. Further research with larger population would highlight the significance of these parameters and their importance with contributing neoplastic factors. This is a pioneering study to analyze the roles of serum copper, molybdenum, selenium, and zinc as probable biomarkers in oral carcinogenesis and disease progression. Keywords: Oral Precancer, Oral cancer, copper, molybdenum, selenium and zinc


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research ORAL PRESENTATION

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IDENTIFYING A ROLE FOR ARYL HYDROCARBON RECEPTOR (AhR) IN PROSTATE CANCER PROGRESSION Joann Powell Center for Cancer Research and Therapeutic Development, Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA Abstract: The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand activated member of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) family of transcription factors. In the cytoplasm, AhR is found in a protein complex designed to maintain the inactive conformation and prevent nuclear translocation. AhR is activated by environmental polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachloro-dibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and has been widely studied for its transcriptional regulation of metabolizing enzymes cytochrome P450-1A1 and 1B1 (CYP1A1 and CYP1B1). Although initially studied as a key regulator of xenobiotic metabolism, AhR has also been shown to exhibit regulatory functions by modulating the function of other transcription factors, including Rb/E2F, NFď ŤB, estrogen receptor (ER) and androgen receptor (AR). Experiments utilizing a constitutively active recombinant AhR construct demonstrated AhRâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ability to act as a co-regulator for unliganded ER and AR. Also, AhR has been reported to serve as an E3 ubiquitin ligase for the degradation of ER and AR. AhR has already been reported to be overexpressed in breast cancer and ectopic overexpression in mammary epithelial cells has been shown to result in a constitutively active form of the receptor. However, the mechanism of action of AhR in more advanced stages of prostate cancer has not been considered and may also involve a constitutively active form of the receptor. To understand the role AhR may play in prostate cancer progression we assessed the expression and activity of AhR in androgen dependent and androgen independent cell lines using RT-PCR, western blotting, immunofluorescence and shRNA transfection. We show that AhR protein is overexpressed in castrate resistant C4-2 prostate cancer cells compared to the androgen dependent LNCaP cells. Furthermore, CYP1A1 is expressed in C4-2 cells without the ligand activation required in the androgen dependent LNCaP cell line. Interestingly, translocation of AhR following ligand activation is also accompanied by an increase in c-Src phosphorylation, translocation of androgen receptor and increased expression of prostate specific antigen (PSA). Taken together, these data point to the existence of a constitutively active AhR that has significant crosstalk with the androgen receptor pathway in advance prostate cancer cells. Keywords: AhR, prostate, poly-aromatic hydrocarbons, cancer progression Acknowledgements: This work was supported by the RCMI grant 2G12RR003062-22.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research ORAL PRESENTATION

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BREAST CARCINOGENESIS INDUCED BY ENVIRONMENTAL SUBSTANCES AND ESTROGEN AND COUNTERACTED BY AN ANTIOXIDANT Gloria M. Calaf Instituto de Alta Investigación, Universidad de Tarapacá, Arica, Chile and Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA Abstract: Breast carconogenesis is a multistage process that it involves numerous mutations and cellular phenotypic alterations attributed to exposure to exogenous environmental substances as well as endogenous agents as female hormones. The aim of this study was to evaluate markers for breast carcinogenesis. An in vitro model was developed with the immortalized breast epithelial cell line, MCF10F that it was exposed to low doses of high LET (linear energy transfer) alpha particles (150 keV/m) of radiation, and cultured in presence of 17β–estradiol (estrogen). This model consisted of: i) MCF-10F, ii) Estrogen cell line, iii) Alpha3, a malignant non-tumorigenic, iv) Alpha5 and v) Tumor2 (derived from Alpha5 injected into the nude mice), both malignant and tumorigenic cell lines. Results showed that Alpha5 and Tumor2 increased cell proliferation, anchorage independency, invasive capabilities and tumor formation in nude mice, microsatellite instability and loss of heterozygosity in chromosomes 6, 8, 11 and 17 and mutations of c-Ha-ras and Rho-A among others. Curcumin, derived from Curcuma longa, it has antioxidant and anti-proliferative properties. These studies indicated that curcumin decreased anchorageindependent growth, hydrogen peroxide formation, lipid peroxidation, PCNA, p16, RasGRF1, Rho-A, Bcl2, Annexin IV, Annexin V, Caspase 3, protein expression. It also increased percentage of cells from G0/G1 with a concomitant increase in G2/M phases and induced cleavage of PARP-1 in transformed cell lines in comparison to control. The human oxidative stress and antioxidant defense array demonstrated that curcumin decreased gene BNIP3 that belongs to Bcl-2 family and mediated apoptosis in control and Tumor2 cell lines. On the other hand, environmental substances as organophosphorous pesticides, malathion and parathion, induced rat mammary gland cancer after 240 days of 5 day injection. Estrogen and malathion increased lobule and duct formation of mammary glands in comparison to control. It can be concluded that there are critical steps in breast carcinogenesis induced by environmental substances, and antioxidants can be potential chemo-preventive agents for cancer progression Key words: Curcuma longa, breast, carcinogenesis, apoptosis Acknowledgements: This research was supported by a grant from the National Grants: FONDECYT 1120006 and Convenio de Desempeño, Universidad de Tarapacá-MINEDUC, Chile.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research ORAL PRESENTATION

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ENVIRONMENTAL SIGNALING AND GENE REGULATION: INTEGRATING THE INSIDE WITH THE OUTSIDE John A. McLachlan1,2, Melyssa Bratton1, Iryna Isakova1 and Matthew E. Burow3 1

Departments of Pharmacology, 2Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and 3Medicine, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA Abstract: Environmental signals are exogenous factors including, but not limited to, chemicals that change cellular function or fate (Delivering the Information). Meaningful changes in cell function or fate rely on mechanisms that embed or encode alterations in gene expression such that disease or dysfunction may ensue (Fixing the Information). A model that integrates in a scalable way the signaling systems of the micro- and macro-environment is at the center of understanding the environment and health. Our lab has studied environmental chemicals with estrogenic or anti-estrogenic activities including phytoestrogens, pesticides (DDT), plasticizers (BPA) and drugs (diethylstilbestrol or DES). Using cell cultures of hormone responsive human tissues like breast or uterus, we have shown that various estrogenic chemicals elicit cellular signals initiated at the cellular membrane (Membrane Initiated Signaling Systems) and the nuclear receptor (Receptor Mediated Signaling Systems). In most cases the signals converge at one or more transcription sites in the nucleus; for instance the MISS signal initiated by DDT activates the AP-1 transcription factor. We have also studied the recruitment of co-regulators to ERι and shown that different estrogenic environmental chemicals effect the recruitment of different co-activators or corepressors. Recently, we have investigated the induction of non-coding microRNAs in MCF-7 cells following treatment with estradiol-17β, BPA or DDT. The patterns of miRNA vary with the estrogenic chemical. Molecular changes in miRNAs are considered early indications of epigenetic imprinting in a cell and support our earlier work and the work of others that estrogenic xenobiotics epigenetically alter the fate of cells and are associated with disease. From a literature survey, we can determine that other environmental stressor signals, such as the heavy metal, lead, temperature increases and traumatic stress can also lead to epigenetic imprints suggesting that signal integration and fixation may be a key factor in environmental disease and dysfunction. Key words: Endocrine disrupting chemicals, lead, trauma, estrogen receptor, epigenetics, signal integration, molecular toxicology Acknowledgements: Research supported by grants for the Office of Naval Research, DOD (Grant number N00014-11-1-0177)


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research ORAL PRESENTATION

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ARSENIC-INDUCED EPIGENETIC CHANGES AND SUSCEPTIBILITY TO PROSTATE CARCINOGENESIS Kamaleshwar P. Singh The Institute of Environmental and Human Health (TIEHH), Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409, USA Abstract: Chronic exposure to arsenic is a known risk factor for cancer development in various target organs. Both epidemiological and experimental studies suggest that exposure to arsenic causes prostate cancer. Though various genetic and epigenetic changes have been reported in arsenic exposed prostate epithelial cells, however, the molecular mechanism of arsenic-induced prostate carcinogenesis is not well understood. Therefore, the objective of this study was to identify molecular targets of arsenic-induced epigenetic changes and evaluate their role in arsenic-induced malignant transformation of prostate epithelial cells. To achieve this goal, the human prostate epithelial cells were given chronic exposure to various doses of arsenic and their effects on cell proliferation and neoplastic transformation were evaluated. The genome-wide global and gene-specific DNA methylation changes in arsenic exposed cells were also determined. Histone modifications in arsenic exposed cells were also analyzed. Finally, the involvement of these epigenetic changes in arsenic-induced cell proliferation and neoplastic transformation of human prostate epithelial cells were investigated. Our data suggest that arsenic-induced epigenetic changes increase the susceptibility to prostate carcinogenesis by increasing cell survival and inhibiting the apoptotic potential of cells. Key words: Arsenic, Prostate Cancer, Epigenetics, DNA Methylation, Histone Modifications


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research ORAL PRESENTATION

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ROLE OF CARDIOTONIC STERIOD IN CAUSATION OF CEREBRAL VASCULAR LEAK SYNDROME IN HYPERTENSION DURING PREGNANCY: A TRANSLATIONAL APPROACH Mohammad N Uddin1, Darijana Horvat2, Steven R. Allen1, Richard O. Jones1, David C. Zawieja2 and Thomas J. Kuehl1,3,4 Departments of Obstetrics & Gynecology1 and Systems Biology & Translational Medicine2, Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine/Scott & White Hospital, Temple, Texas, USA Abstract: Preeclampsia (PreE) has multiple pathophysiologic triggers leading to a common cascade of symptoms. In an animal model of this syndrome, we have shown that the urinary excretion of a bufadienolide, marinobufagenin (MBG), is elevated prior to the development of symptoms. Vasogenic cerebral edema represents a breach of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and is a potential preE complication. We investigated alterations in the endothelial cells of the cerebral circulation in rats rendered "preE", the effects of MBG on these alterations, and the underlying molecular mechanisms. (1) The blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability in normal pregnant (NP), “preE” and MBG-infused pregnant (NPM) rats was assessed by Evan’s blue dye extravasation. (2) Human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) were used to test for effects of MBG and ouabain on monolayer permeability in vitro. In HBMEC, phosphorylation of ERK1/2, Jnk, p38, and Src was evaluated after MBG treatment. Apoptosis was evaluated by examining alterations in caspase 3/7 and annexin-V staining with and without pretreatment with p38 inhibitor. Effects of MBG and ouabain on endothelial tight junction proteins were assessed. (3) MBG levels and angiogenic factors were assayed in the urine samples of 17 preE and 23 pregnant patients. (1) Dye extravasation was greater (p<0.05) in “preE” and NPM compared to NP rats. (2) Concentrations of MBG and ouabain ≥ 1 nM significantly increased monolayer permeability, caused a significant decrease in the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and activated the phosphorylation of Jnk, p38, and Src. The activation of apoptosis was prevented by pretreatment with a p38 inhibitor. Additionally, MBG caused the disruption of endothelial adherens tight junction proteins. (3) The MBG levels were higher in preE patients compared to normal and angiogenic imbalance was observed in preE patients. These data provide evidence for the view that cardiotonic steroid, may play an important role in cerebral edema and neurologic abnormalities seen in preE. Cardiotonic steroid-induced impairment of HBMEC proliferation and enhanced monolayer permeability occurs by downregulation of ERK1/2, and activation of Jnk, p38, Src, and apoptosis. Therapeutic targeting of the cardiotonic steroid signaling pathway may provide treatment paradigms for preE. Key words: Cardiotonic steroid, Hypertension, Pregnancy, Vascular leak


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MOBILE ELEMENTS AS A SOURCE OF ENVIRONMENTALLY SENSITIVE GENETIC INSTABILITY Prescott Deininger Tulane Cancer Center and Department of Epidemiology, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA, USA Abstract: Mobile elements represent a major intrinsic form of genetic instability in mammalian genomes. There is at least one mobile element insertion in every 20 new human births, resulting in about 0.2% of new genetic diseases. In addition, new reports show high levels of activity in some somatic tissues and tumors, suggesting that their insertion continues to contribute to degenerative processes, such as aging and cancer. L1 elements insert in the human genome using target-primed reverse transcription, a process which creates a cDNA intermediate that closely resembles a DNA â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;flapâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;. We have previously shown that this flap is recognized by the ERCC1/XPF flap endonuclease complex, resulting in greatly decreased completion of retrotransposition events in the presence of this endonuclease activity. We have now utilized cells defective in XPC, XPA and XPD to suggest that the entire nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway appears to be involved in sensing these nascent insertion events and protecting the human genome from insertional mutagenesis. After insertion, mobile elements, particularly Alu, continue to contribute to genetic instability as a major source of non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR). In addition to these direct forms of DNA damage, L1 elements have been shown to encode an APE-like endonuclease that causes DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in great excess relative to the level of insertion. We have created a reporter-gene system that measures the rate of NAHR between two Alu elements that can be inserted in single copy in the genome. Using this reporter-gene system, we have shown that expression of L1 elements triggers Alu/Alu NAHR at a very high frequency, in an L1 endonuclease-dependent and endonuclease target-site-dependent manner. These studies demonstrate that the DSBs caused by L1 are likely to contribute a major source of DNA DSBs that create DNA damage that has not previously been associated with mobile element activity. Key words: Genetic instability, recombination, mobile elements, DNA repair, DNA damage Acknowledgements: This work was supported by Grants Number P20RR020152 and R01GM45668


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ANION SENSORS Md. Alamgir Hossain Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA Abstract: Anions are important in chemistry and biology, playing critical roles in the environment and human health. Their functions and properties are at the core of many scientific research programs within the field of supramoelcular chemistry. However, this field was not explored until 1968, when Park and Simmons discovered diazabicyclic compounds, named katapinands, forming inclusion complexes with halides in water. Encapsulation was confirmed from the crystal structure of the chloride complex in 1975 reported by Bell and coworkers. This landmark contribution led this area to become a major field of research at the interface of chemistry and biology. Although transition metal complexes with the monocyclic analogues are well documented and a high level of understanding has been achieved on physicochemical and structural aspects, their application as anion receptors is comparatively little known. In particular, selectivity of common anionic pollutants are important from both fundamental and technological viewpoints. One of the major aims of this current research is to synthesize receptors with high selectivity for practical applications Anion receptors are either charged or neutral compounds containing certain functional groups, e.g. protonated amines, quaternary amines, amides, thioamides, sulfonamides, pyrroles and Lewis acid centers, providing the necessary binding forces to attract an anion. The binding magnitude depends on solvents, functional groups, the nature of anions, and finally on the complementarity between receptors and anions. In this presentation, several types of receptors including polyamine, urea and thiourea based receptors and their affinity toward environmental and biological important anions will be discussed. Acknowledgment: The NSF is acknowledged for a CAREER award (CHE-1056927) to MAH. The project described was supported by NIH-RCMI (G12RR013459).


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ARSENIC – A BENEFICIAL THERAPEUTIC AND AN ENVIRONMENTAL POISON José A. Centeno International Medical Geology Association (IMGA), The Joint Pathology Center, Biophysical Toxicology, Silver Spring, MD, USA Abstract: Arsenic is a ubiquitous element in the earth' crust with a crustal average of about 2 mg/kg but with concentrations in clastic sedimentary rocks as high as 500 mg/kg. Arsenic is transported mainly by water, although other natural and anthropogenic sources of exposure to arsenic, including volcanic emissions, forest and agricultural fires, pressure treated wood, mining and smelting activities, and burning of arsenic-rich coal, are of increasing concern. The history of arsenic is double-edged in that it has a beneficial or medicinal aspect and a detrimental or poisonous aspect. In medicine, arsenicals were used in the Greek and Roman civilizations to treat a wide range of ailments. In the 1930s arsenic trioxide was the main therapeutic agent in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukaemia. Later in the 20th Century, arsenic trioxide was introduced as an anticancer agent in China for the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL). In the US, the use of arsenic trioxide in medicine has been approved by the FDA for the treatment of patients with relapsed or refractory APL. As an environmental poison, acute and chronic health effects of inorganic arsenic exposure in humans have been described from contaminated drinking water and food. An example of the breadth and severity of health problems caused by exposure to arsenic can be found in Guizhou Province, P. R. China where villagers used coal with arsenic concentrations as high as 35,000 mg/kg in a residential setting. Exposure to arsenic resulted from ingestion of crops dried over coal fires, ingestion of arsenic-rich dust, and inhalation of indoor air polluted by the arsenic mobilized by coal combustion. Tens of thousands of people in the region consequently suffered from chronic arsenic poisoning. Those affected exhibited typical symptoms of arsenic poisoning including hyperpigmentation, hypopigmentation, hyperkeratosis, Bowen's disease, and squamous cell carcinoma. Suggested Reading: 1. Centeno JA, Mullick FG. Environmental pathology and health effects from arsenc poisoning: A systematic overview. In Arsenic in Geosphere and Human Diseases (Jean JS, BundschuhJ, Bhattacharya P, editors). 2010 CRC Press, Taylor & Francis Group, London, ISBN: 978-0-41557898-1; 270-272 2. Centeno JA, Tseng CH, van der Voet GB, Finkelman RB. Global Impacts of Geogenic Arsenic – A Medical Geology Research Case. Ambio 2007;36(1):78-81. 3. Centeno JA, Mullick FG, Martinez L, Page NP, Gibb H, Longfellow D, Thompson D, Ladich ER. Pathology Related to Chronic Arsenic Exposure. Environmental Health Perspectives 110(5);883886:2002.


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LOW LEVEL LEAD EXPOSURE AND RISK FACTORS FOR CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES: A PRELIMINARY STUDY Monica Maria Bastos Paoliello1,2 Ana Carolina Bertin Almeida1, Conceição Turini2, Alissana Ester Camargo2, Tiemi Matsuo1,3 1

Graduate Program in Public Health, State University of Londrina, Parana, Brazil Department of Clinical and Toxicological Analysis, Health Science Center, State University of Londrina, Parana, Brazil 3 Department of Statistics, State University of Londrina, Parana, Brazil 2

Abstract: Concern about lead exposure as a significant public health problem has increased as evidence has mounted regarding adverse health effects at successively lower levels. Many authors have found association between mortality by cardiovascular diseases and blood lead levels below 10 µg/dL, values which were until then considered “safe” to health. Currently, after several studies have been made, it is accepted that lead causes an increase in blood pressure and that extended exposure to low doses of the metal can generate arterial hypertension. As well as changes in blood pressure, exposure to lead compounds has been related to disruptions in lipidic profile, which is also a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. The objective of the current study is to present a methodological proposal and the preliminary results in the evaluation of the relationship between blood lead levels and the risk factors for cardiovascular diseases in general population. This is a population-based study conducted in the city of Cambé, Paraná, Southern Brazil, with a total of 92,888 inhabitants. The study population was composed by urban residents, aged 40 or more, and a total of 33.1% of the population of that city was in this age group. The size of the sample was calculated using the program Epi Info 3.5.1, considering an expected ratio of 50%, error margin of 3% and confidence interval of 95% with an increase of 20% for losses and refusals, resulting in a sample of 1,311 subjects interviewed. Contiguous households were visited in a randomly traced trajectory, and in each domicile, a draw was made to select one dweller with more than 40 years old, until reaching the quota of people to be interviewed, according to gender and age group in each censor sector. The dependent variable was the blood lead level and the independent variables were: demographic and social-economic variables, variables related to health conditions (weight, height, arterial blood pressure, body mass index, lipid fraction, kidney disease, and stroke), variables related to lifestyle, and variables related to comorbities. The determination of lead in blood was performed by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry Technique (ICP-MS). For the statistical analysis, the Chi-square test will be used, together with variance analysis, with significance level of 5%. The present study intends to contribute to the discussion on the influence of exposure to low levels of lead on the risk factors to cardiovascular diseases. All efforts will be made to disseminate the results to the community.


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THE LIGNITE-WATER SYNDROME: A POSSIBLE ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH THREAT TO MILLIONS Robert B. Finkelman Department of Geosciences, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX 75080, USA Abstract: Ground water percolating through low-rank coal (lignite) beds or through aquifers that are in communication with lignite beds extract a wide range of organic compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, aromatic amines, aliphatic compounds, etc. Ingestion of this water may contribute to widespread kidney disease and urinary tract cancers. This syndrome, first recognized in the former Yugoslavia where it is called Balkan endemic nephropathy, may occur in the U.S. Gulf Coast and in the Northern Great Planes. States containing lignite deposits have some of the highest incidence of renal pelvis cancer mortality. In these states the counties underlain by lignite-associated aquifers have end stage renal disease (ESDR) rates significantly higher than in adjacent counties using water from other sources. In east Texas the number of dialysis beds per unit population is two to three times higher in those counties drawing water from the lignite-bearing Carrizo-Wilcox Formation than in adjacent counties drawing surface water and water from aquifers not associated with lignite deposits. Significantly, there is no difference between the regions in the incidence of diabetes, the main cause of kidney failure. Similar relationships exist in Louisiana, Arkansas, and North Dakota. In Mississippi the 13 counties with the highest ESRD rates may all be underlain by lignite deposits. In Florida the five westernmost counties in the Panhandle are underlain by lignite and have among the highest incidence of kidney and renal pelvis cancer incidence and mortality rates in the state. While not conclusive, these relationships indicate that ingestion of water containing organic compounds extracted from low-rank coals may be an important contributing factor for idiopathic kidney disease. Key words: kidney disease, lignite, renal pelvis cancer, ground water, organic compounds


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ASSESSMENT OF LEAD EXPOSURE IN INFANTS FROM 0 TO 6 YEARS OLD IN THE TOWNSHIP OF NDJILI IN KINSHASA (DR CONGO) F. Zisa Kitelo, Mputu Malolo, Y. Nuapia, Ndelo Matondo and J. Ndelo-di-Phanzu Laboratory of Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo Abstract: A study has been conducted on 50 randomly selected children from 0 to 6 years old, of one of the most popular townships of Kinshasa for the evaluation of the lead concentration in the blood: 30 of them living along a major highway (Case group), 20 living far from a major highway (Control group). Living along a major highway is considered as a risk factor of lead exposure in our countries as the gasoline does still contain lead tetraethyl. The quantitative measurement has been performed in veinous blood samples using a spectrophotometric method in the visible range of waves, reading, at 515 nm, the complex compound formed between the lead and dithizon in a suitable medium. The spectrometric apparatus used was a model DR/2000 HACH 1991, operating from 400 to 900 nm, equipped with a photodiode silicon detector. A survey of parents has been, at the same time, carried out and the t student statistics has been used to compare the averages of lead concentration between the case and the control groups. Hemoglobin and hematocrit have also been measured. The results are summarized as followed: Subjects of the case group were from 2 months to 72 months years old; those of the control group were from 2 months to 60 months years old. The average rate of the lead blood concentration for the case group was 10, 2 ± 5, 7 µg/dl and 0,975 ± 3, 02 µg/dl for the control group; the difference was statistically significative. The average rate of Hemoglobin was 11, 3 ± 1, 64 µg/dl for the case group and 9, 54 ± 1, 24 µg/dl for the control group. The average rate of hematocrit was 33, 9 ± 5, 03 % for the case group and 28,6 % ± 3, 76 % for the control group. The results indicate that children living along the major highways show an alarming lead blood concentration, reaching the threshold level from which it becomes necessary to set about realizing corrective measures. The hemoglobin and hematocrit results are not correlated to the lead blood concentration. This does mean that the children involved in this study suffer from other diseases responsible of anemia. Key words: Lead, Infants, Toxicology, Gasoline, Environment, DRC, Kinshasa


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NATURAL COMPOUNDS AND VITAMINS CAN INHIBIT THE PHIP INDUCED CYTOTOXICITY IN MCF-10A CELLS BY TRANSCRIPTIONAL AND TRANSLATIONAL CHANGES Abhilash Samykutty, Carissa Jackson and Ashok Jain Department of Natural Sciences, Albany State University, 504 College Dr. Albany, Georgia 31705 Abstract: Amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) is a mammary gland carcinogen present in the human diet in cooked meat and associated with mammary carcinomas in animals and humans. PhIP is metabolized by cytochrome reductases producing free radicals causing DNA strand breaks. We hypothesized that natural compounds commonly found in fruits, vegetables and vitamins are capable of inhibiting the PhIP carcinogenicity. The aim of the study is to identify the natural dietary compound capable of inhibiting the PhIP induced toxicity. Several compounds like Curcumin, Gingerol [6] and [10], lycopene, Curcumin, Vitamin K3, Vitamin E, and Piperine in combination with PhIP were used to evaluate the inhibition of PhIP-induced DNA strand breaks and cell death. N-acytle cysteine (NAC) was used to compare the results with natural compounds. To test this hypothesis, we treated MCF10A cells with PhIP with various concentrations. MTT assay results have shown significant level of cytotoxicity on PhIP treated MCF-10A cells (p<0.05) from 50 to 500 µM concentrations. We have studied the dose response of these compounds against PhIP induced cytotoxicity at wider concentrations [Curcumin (10µM -1mM), Gingerol [6], [10] and lycopene (12.5µM - 100µM), Vitamin E (1µM 100µM), Piperine and Vitamin K3 (5µM - 500µM)]. Curcumin (100 - 250 µM), Piperine (5 - 10µM) and Vitamin K3 (5 - 10µM) has shown reduction of PhIP induced cytotoxicity at these concentrations. Gingerol [6], [10] and lycopene was not much effective in reduction of PhIP induced cytotoxicity on MCF-10A cells. These natural compounds and Vitamins show differential level of reduction in the PhIP induced cytotoxicity at 24 hours. The results from the Reverse transcriptase PCR and Western blot analysis have shown the activation of Anti-oxidant genes with concomitant decrease in the expression of DNA repair genes with PhIP. Some of the natural compounds and vitamins reduced the expression of antioxidant genes with the significant expression of DNA repair genes and can inhibit this reduction in cell viability and may prevent PhIP-induced breast cancer via alterations in DNA damage and cell viability. Keywords: MCF-10A, PhIP, Cyotoxicity, Antioxidant genes


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COMPUTING MANTEL-HAENSZEL ADJUSTED INFORMATIONAL ODDS RATIOS: APPLICATION IN ENVIRONMENT EXPOSURE STUDIES Jimmy T. Efird Center for Health Disparities Research and Department of Public Health, Brody School of Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina 27858, USA Abstract: The informational odds ratio (IOR) is a measure of information gained after knowing exposure status and is computed by dividing the post-exposure odds by the pre-exposure odds. Mantel-Haenszel adjusted IORs, analogous to risk ratios (RR), generally are collapsible (i.e., the combined crude ratio will not change after adjusting for a variable that is not a confounder). In contrast, adjusted traditional odds ratios (TORs) are not collapsible. Furthermore, IORs are an interpretable and valid measure of disease association in environmental case-referent studies when disease is common in exposed and/or unexposed groups. Computational examples using standard statistical software are presented. Key words: Informational odds ratio, collapsibility, pre- and post-exposure odds. Acknowledgements: This research supported by institutional funds from the Division of Research and Graduate Studies, East Carolina University.


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SOURCE-RECEPTOR MODELING USING ARW WEATHER PREDICTION MODEL AND HYSPLIT POLLUTANT DISPERSION MODEL TO ASSESS MERCURY POLLUTION OVER THE MISSISSIPPI GULF COAST REGION Anjaneyulu Yerramilli, Venkata Bhaskar Rao Dodla, Srinivas Desamsetti, Julius Baham, John Young, Robert Hughes and Chuck Patrick Trent Lott Geospatial & Visualization Research Center, Jackson State University, 1230 Raymond Road, Jackson, MS 39204, USA Abstract: Mercury (Hg), a potential contaminant to the environment because of its toxic nature, transboundary movement and ability of bioaccumulation etc. presently considered as reaching levels of concern in the Gulf Coast atmosphere as according to a number of studies. For many ecosystems, atmospheric deposition is an important loading pathway for mercury. Identification of sources contributing to atmospheric mercury concentrations and deposition will be useful for formulating pollution control and mitigation strategies in the region. Hourly observations of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM), divalent/oxidized reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) and fine particulate mercury (FPM) available from the NOAA Grand Bay NERR observation site during 2008 are critically analyzed. RGM is important both for dry and wet depositions due to its higher deposition velocities and relatively high solubility than the other two forms. The observations of RGM are generally below 30 pg/m3 and exceeded 50 pg/m3 on a few days However episodes of maximum as 270 pg/m3 on 10 February, 2008, 137 pg/m3 on 6 May, 2008; 169 pg/m3 on 21 July, 2008 and 92 pg/m3 on 2 November, 2008 during the four different seasons are identified from source- receptor analysis. An integrated weather prediction and atmospheric dispersion model was used for source identification, apportionment and dispersion of mercury species over the Mississippi Gulf coast region. Meteorological flow fields were produced using the Advanced Research dynamical solver of the Weather Research and Forecasting (ARW) model adapted to have three two-way interactive nested domains with 36-12-4 km resolutions, with the inner finest 4-km domain covering the study region. Model simulated wind flow fields are evaluated through comparison with hourly wind observations at NERR location. Identification of the potential sources and source apportionment was made using the HYSPLIT (Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory) model. The Lagrangian paths of back-trajectories from the NERR observation station was generated at 1hour interval to identify major mercury emissions sources in the region that might have contributed to the observed high concentrations. Results from the backward trajectories indicated that the coal-fired power plants within 300 km radius as a potential source. HYSPLIT model with the choice of 3-D particle method was used to compute the forward dispersion computations and to assess source apportionment. This procedure is repeated for each of the four episodes to analyze the seasonal differences in the meteorological flow fields that resulted in the source differentiation and apportionment towards the observed maxima. The results of this study demonstrates the advantages of using the ARW-HYSPLIT integrated modeling approach in the understanding of the regional fate and transport of mercury emitted from various sources in the Mississippi Gulf coast region. Key words: Atmospheric mercury, ARW model, HYSPLIT model, atmospheric dispersion


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CLIMATIC TRENDS IN TORNADO VULNERABILITY AND CONVECTIVE AVAILABLE POTENTIAL ENERGY OVER MISSISSIPPI, USA Venkata B. Dodla1, Sudha Yerramilli2, Srinivas Desamsetti1, Anjaneyulu Yerramilli1 and David Bandi2 1

Trent Lott Geospatial Visualization Research Centre, Jackson State University, 1230 Raymond Road, Jackson MS 39204, USA 2 National Center for Biodefense Communications, Jackson State University, 1230 Raymond Road, Jackson MS 39204, USA Abstract: Tornadoes are known to occur in many parts of the world, but according to the National Climatic Data Center of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, USA experiences the highest number of tornadoes per year indicating its impact on vulnerable populations. The destruction due to tornadoes results from strong winds that typically go up to 110 mph. Regionally, the occurrence of tornadoes is closely related to the interaction of warm and cold air masses during the warm season. A tornado can occur in any location under favorable environmental conditions of high moisture, instability, low level wind shear and upward lifting of air in the vicinity of fronts. Gulf States, such as Mississippi and Louisiana, are the frequent targets for tornadoes between the months of February and April. Some of the significant issues concerning tornadoes in the wake of global warming are their frequency, intensity and population vulnerability. Earlier studies on tornadoes in USA indicate that no significant trends could be established mainly due to difficulties in observing and reporting tornado occurrences prior to Doppler Weather Radar technology. Despite the lack of identifiable trends in the tornado frequencies, the year 2008 had evidenced a record number of 1700 tornadoes causing 125 fatalities followed by 492 tornadoes causing 356 fatalities in 2011. During the first two months of 2012, USA evidenced 183 tornados and 49 associated fatalities. Among the 48 contiguous states of USA, Texas ranks first in tornado frequency and Mississippi ranks twelve. But in terms of tornado related deaths Mississippi stands second and considering the injuries per area, it stands third. The sudden increase of tornado numbers in 2008 and 2011 has brought the issue of increasing trends in tornado frequencies to the fore. In this study, tornado frequency and vulnerability area analysis has been carried out using the data from 1950through 2011 to assess the significant trends as related to global warming climate change. The results indicate increasing trends both in frequency and area vulnerability in certain counties of Mississippi. Due to the gaps in the status of tornado observations and reporting in the pre-radar era, convective available potential energy (CAPE), a parameter indicative of the potential for severe convection, is analyzed in this study. CAPE represents the amount of buoyant energy available to speed up a parcel vertically, meaning higher the CAPE value more is the energy available for storm growth. CAPE values of 1000-2500, 2500-3500 and >3500 (J/Kg) correspond respectively to moderate, high and extreme unstable conditions. Analysis of CAPE values and the number of days exceeding the threshold limits of 1000, 2500 and 3500 J/Kg have indicated an increasing trend of tornadoes over Mississippi and resultant vulnerability. The occurrence of tornadoes is also qualitatively related to selected health problems such as mucormycosis. Key words: Tornadoes, Climate change, CAPE, vulnerability.


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DETECTION AND MAPPING OF CYANOBACTERIAL HARMFUL ALGAL BLOOMS USING SATELLITE DATA IN ONE LOUISIANA LAKE AND FOUR MISSISSIPPI LAKES Padmanava Dash Department of Biology and the Environmental Science Ph.D. Program, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson State University, Jackson, Mississippi, USA Abstract: Cyanobacteria represent the major harmful algal group in fresh to brackish water environments. Cyanobacterial blooms are aesthetically undesirable since they discolor the water, cause turbidity in recreational facilities and synthesize a large number of low molecular weight compounds which cause taste and odor problems. Of particular concern are a diverse range of toxins produced by cyanobacteria, termed cyanotoxins, which are hazardous to human, animal and aquatic ecosystem health. Due to the human health threats and their negative impact on aquatic life, recreation and tourism, cyanobacterial blooms have significant economic and sociocultural impacts worldwide. Recently, a procedure was developed to estimate cyanobacterial concentrations by quantifying chlorophyll a (Chl a) and the primary cyanobacterial pigment phycocyanin (PC) using OCM satellite data over a small lake (49 km2 surface area) Lac des Allemands in Louisiana, USA. This required the development of an atmospheric correction and vicarious calibration methodology for satellite data over inland and coastal waters. Empirical inversion algorithms were developed to convert the OCM Rrs at bands centered at 510.6 and 556.4 nm to concentrations of PC. For the algorithms to be uniformly valid over all areas (or all bio-optical regimes) of the lake, a holistic approach was developed to minimize the influence of other optically active constituents. Similarly, empirical algorithms to estimate Chl a concentrations were developed using OCM bands centered at 556.4 and 669 nm. The best PC algorithm (R2=0.7450, p<0.0001, n=72) yielded a root mean square error (RMSE) of 36.92 μg/L and a mean absolute error (MAE) of 21.79 μg/L (PC from 2.75 to 363.50 μg/L, n=48). The best algorithm for Chl a (R2=0.7510, p<0.0001) produced an RMSE of 31.19 μg/L and a MAE of 16.56 μg/L (Chl a from 9.46 to 212.76 μg/L, n=48). The results demonstrated the preliminary success of using OCM satellite data to map cyanobacterial blooms in a small lake in Louisiana. In the summer of 2012, five field campaigns were undertaken to four large Mississippi lakes, Lake Sardis, Lake Enid, Lake Grenada, and the Ross R Barnett reservoir in order to obtain a database of photosynthetic pigment concentrations and phytoplankton composition. The objective of this project is to combine multiple satellite data from several sensors such as VIIRS, MODIS AQUA and OCM-2, and developed techniques to quantify cyanobacteria in these four large Mississippi lakes and make the mapped images available through a website for use by water quality managers and general public to rapidly obtain synoptic information on cyanobacterial blooms. Time-series of true color satellite images clearly shows the presence of algal blooms. Preliminary analyses of the field data analyzed thus far demonstrate the presence of numerous toxic species of cyanobacteria in these lakes. Preliminary results from this project will be presented. Key words: Remote sensing, Cyanobacteria, Phycocyanin, PC, Chlorophyll a, Chl a, Satellite data Acknowledgements: The author is thankful to Dr. Paul Tchounwou for the start-up funds which supported this project. The author is also thankful to Mississippi INBRE program and a NASA grant NNX10AB49A for partially funding this research.


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A STUDY OF AIRBORNE DISEASES OVER MISSISSIPPI REGION USING AIR QUALITY, METEOROLOGICAL PARAMETERS AND MODELING Francis Tuluri1, Desmond Vance1, R. Suseela Reddy1, Jerry Beasley2, Lei Zhang3, Bhaskar Rao Dodla1 and Yerramilli Anjaneyulu1 1

College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, MS 39217, USA Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality, Jackson, Mississippi, USA 3 Mississippi State Department of Health, Jackson, Mississippi, USA 2

Abstract: The urban air quality of southern regions of US is very much affected by the industrial, commercial, and transportation activity surrounding off-shore and on-shore of Gulf of Mexico. Some of the air pollutants of concern are particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and Ozone caused by the emissions from sources such as cars, power plants, chemical plants, industrial boilers, power plants, oil refineries. In particular, the population in the urban areas over the US southern regions is likely to be exposed to higher levels of air pollutants under certain weather conditions and meteorological conditions. Air Quality levels are strongly affected by weather, while air borne diseases are also aggravated by meteorological conditions. In human beings, health related diseases like asthma are of much concern in addition to climate sensitive diseases such as malaria and smog. It is important to investigate and understand the interplay between air pollutants, meteorological parameters, and health. In the present study, we present a detailed study of the long term and spatial variations of air pollutants such as particulate matter and Ozone in selected regions of Mississippi â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Northern, Central, and Southern. The health data will be collected from CDC and will be examined for any association with the observed air pollutant data and meteorological data in these regions. Key words: Criteria Air Pollutants, Wind Speed, Wind Directions, Statistical Modeling, Environmental modeling, Health Impacts


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38 | O r a l ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS INFLUENCING ASTHMA SEVERITY AND CONTROL AMONG CHILDREN PARTICIPATING IN HEAL, PHASE II Candice Wilson1, Leonard Jack Jr.1, Sandra C. Hayes2, Robert Post3, Kristi Rapp1 and Floyd Malveaux4 1

Center for Minority Health & Health Disparities Research and Education, Xavier University of Louisiana,1 Drexel Drive New Orleans, Louisiana, USA 2 Owens Health and Wellness Center, Tougaloo College, 500 W. County Line Rd. Tougaloo, MS, USA 3 Daughters of Charity Services of New Orleans, 3201 South Carrollton Avenue, New Orleans, LA, USA 4 Merck Childhood Asthma Network, 1400 K Street, N.W., Suite 750, Washington DC, USA Abstract: Pediatric asthma is a growing public health issue, which disproportionately affects low income people and minorities. Childhood asthma also places strain on health care resources because of doctor and hospital visits and the cost of treatment. The prevalence of asthma varies globally, possibly because of different exposure to respiratory infection, indoor and outdoor pollution, and diet. Certain environmental risk factors appear to predispose children to developing asthma and atopic disease. Although the clinical manifestations of asthma are known, the exact relationships between exposure and/or severity of disease are still being examined. We hypothesized that the severity and control of asthma among children participating in the Head-off Environmental Asthma in Louisiana (HEAL) Phase II project was associated with exposure to environmental triggers, such as exposure to environmental tobacco smoke, pet dander, moisture and carpet. To test this hypothesis, we used responses obtained from the Child Asthma Risk Assessment Tool (CARAT) to determine if environmental exposures are associated asthma severity and control among children participating in the study. The CARAT is an assessment tool designed to help clinicians, asthma counselors and parents determine potential risks for children with asthma. Preliminary analysis included data from patients having the CARAT survey, severity assessment and control assessment completed at baseline. Tests for associations produced differences in proportions of environmental exposure among categories of asthma severity and control, but none of the differences were found to be statistically significant. Further analysis of baseline data will continue to monitor the relationship between environmental exposures and both asthma severity and control. Results from the CARAT can be used to identify areas that need to be targeted in the development of effective pediatric asthma interventions. Key words: pediatric asthma, environmental exposure, CARAT Acknowledgements: The Head-off Environmental Asthma in Louisiana, Phase II Project is supported through funds from the Merck Childhood Asthma Network, Inc. (MCAN).


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SMR-DERIVED PEPTIDE DISRUPTS HIV-1 NEFâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S INTERACTION WITH MORTALIN AND BLOCKS VIRUS AND NEF EXOSOME RELEASE Vincent C. Bond, Martin N. Shelton, Ming-Bo Huang, Syed A. Ali and Michael D. Powell Department of Microbiology, Biochemistry, Immunology, Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA USA Abstract: Nef is secreted from infected cells in exosomes and is found in abundance in the sera of HIVinfected individuals. Secreted exosomal Nef (exNef) induces apoptosis in uninfected CD4 T cells and may be a key component of HIV pathogenesis. The exosomal pathway has been implicated in HIV-1 virus release, suggesting a possible link between these two processes. We have previously described a Nef motif, the secretion modification region (SMR; amino acids 66-70), that is required for exNef secretion. We hypothesized that the Nef SMR binds a cellular protein involved in protein trafficking and that inhibition of this interaction would abrogate exNef secretion. By using tandem mass spectrometry and coimmunoprecipitation with a novel SMR-based peptide (SMRwt) that blocks exNef secretion and HIV-1 virus release, we identified mortalin as an SMR-specific cellular protein. A second set of coimmunoprecipitation experiments with full-length Nef confirmed that mortalin interacts with Nef via the SMR motif and that this interaction is disrupted by the SMRwt peptide. Overexpression and microRNA knockdown of mortalin revealed a positive correlation between exNef secretion levels and mortalin protein expression. Using antibody inhibition we demonstrated that the Nef/mortalin interaction is necessary for exNef secretion. This work constitutes a significant step in understanding the mechanisms underlying exNef secretion, identifies a novel host-pathogen interaction, and introduces an HIV-derived peptide with antiviral properties. Acknowledgements: Dr. Martin Shelton was supported by NIH/NIAID/NRSA grant F31 AI091484, and NIH/NIGMS/MBRS grant R25 GM058268. The research was supported by NIH/NIGMS/MBRS grant S06 GM08248, NIH/NCRR/RCMI grant G12-RR03034, Georgia Research Alliance funding grant GRA.VAC08.W, and Emory CFAR grant P30 A1050409. This investigation was conducted in a facility constructed with support from Research Facilities Improvement Grant #C06 RR18386 from NIH/NCRR.


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EFFECTS OF CHIA SEED (Salvia hispanica L.) SUPLEMENTATION ON BODY WEIGHT AND METABOLIC CONTROL IN DIABETIC RATS Jorge L. Ble-Castillo1, Isela E. Juárez-Rojop1, Hidemi Aguilar-Mariscal1, Ruben Cordova-Uscanga1, Maria R. Lopez-Guevara2, LauraVidal-Garcia1, Guadalupe Salvador-Garcia1 and Juan C. DiazZagoya1 1

Centro de Investigacion, División Académica de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad Juárez Autónoma de Tabasco, Villahermosa, Tabasco, Mexico 2 Hospital General de Zona 46, IMSS, Villahermosa, Tabasco, Mexico Abstract: Diabetes is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Some studies have indicated that supplementation with n-3 fatty acids from plant products might help to reduce the risk. Chia seed is an oilseed native to southern Mexico and northern Guatemala with a high content of α-linolenic acid (ALA; 18:3n-3). Findings from studies on metabolic effects of Chia seed are contradictory. Our aim was to investigate the effects of Chia seed (Salvia hispanica L) on body weight and metabolic control in diabetic rats. Thirty four male Wistar rats received a high-saturated fat diet during 15 days and then Streptozotocin 40 mg/Kg body weight. Diabetic animals were randomly divided and assigned to 4 groups (n = 7) receiving Harlan-Teklad diet (CD) or this diet supplemented with Chia Mexicana 5.75% (w/w), 11.5% and 23%. A group of normal rats (CN, n = 6) fed the standardized diet. Diets and water were administered ad libitum during 30 days and a 1 g/Kg OGTT was performed two days before animals sacrifice. Chia supplementation induced a higher dose-dependent body weight gain through the experimental period when compared to the CD group (P < 0.001). Blood triacylglycerols were reduced in a dose-dependent manner by the Chia supplementation in comparison with the diabetic control group. No changes were observed in serum cholesterol levels; however, Chia 11.5% increased HDL-Chol when compared to CD group (P < 0.05). Glycemia levels tended to be reduced after Chia in comparison with CD group. Glycemia AUC was reduced after Chia 23% in comparison with the CD group (P < 0.05). In conclusion, Chia supplementation induced body weight gain, reduced blood triacylglcerols in a dose-dependent manner and improved glucose tolerance. Further studies must be conducted to understand mechanisms. Key words: Chia Mexicana, diabetes, triacylglycerols, cholesterol, body weight.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research ORAL PRESENTATION

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SPATIAL-TEMPORAL ANALYSIS OF INFLUENZA VIRUS IN THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI Sudha Yerramilli, Dayakar P. Nittala and David Bandi National Center for Biodefense Communications (NCBC), Mississippi e-Center, Jackson State University, 1230 Raymond Road, Box 900, Jackson MS 39204-4530, USA Abstract: Influenza virus has become a major public health concern in past decade. The efficiency of the remedial measures can be improved when the spatial and temporal distribution of the disease spread is known. In this paper we investigate a model of disease transmission through a population. The demography, socio-economic determinants are important in understanding the disparities of influenza spread. Revealing any possible underlying socio-economic factors for the spread can help the emergency managers/officials to plan appropriate measures for avoiding/minimizing the disease outbreak effect. We aimed to find the relationship between the spread of influenza and neighborhood characteristics using GIS. Geographical Information System provides a powerful platform for such epidemiological studies with numerous spatial/statistical analyst tools. This study aims at collecting the influenza virus hospitalization data and by using spatial analyst/tracking analyst tools; the spatial-temporal distribution of the outbreak will be analyzed. Further, the study intends to analyze if any socio-economic factors are responsible for the spread pattern and to derive conclusions from the results. Acknowledgements: This research supported by a grant from the Department of Justice through the grant 2010-DD-BX-0596, through the National Center for Biodefense Communications at Jackson State University (JSU).


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research ORAL PRESENTATION

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HIV PIDEMIOLOGICAL FINDINGS AMONGST AGRO-INDUSTRIAL WORKERS IN THE TIKO BANANA PROJECT IN CAMEROON Dora Mbanya1,2, Pamela Mbang1, Claude Tayou Tagny1.2, Annick Mintya-Ndoumba2 and Lazare Kaptue3 1

Faculty of Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, University of Yaounde I, Cameroon University Teaching Hospital, Yaoundé, Cameroon 3 University of Montagnes, Bangangté, Cameroon 2

Abstract: Over three decades since its description, the HIV and AIDS pandemic continues to be a public health issue affecting mainly countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, where about 67% of 33.3 million people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) worldwide are lodged. In Cameroon, the epidemic has been stabilized with a national HIV prevalence estimated at 5.5% in 2004 and 5.3% in 2009 and with women and youths being predominantly infected. The Cameroon development Corporation (CDC) is the largest agroindustrial corporation in West and Central Africa, responsible for the production of rubber, palm oil and banana. It is the second largest employer in Cameroon, after the state, with about 16,000 workers of which about 4000 work on the Tiko Banana Project (TBP). The CDC runs an HIV/AIDS Prevention Programme since 1996, but no studies had examined the prevalence of HIV and associated factors. Thus, to determine the HIV prevalence amongst the TBP workers as well as describe the various associated factors, a crosssectional descriptive study was carried out among these workers. Pre-structured questionnaires were used to collect relevant information from all consenting participants. Pretest counseling was performed and 5 mls of venous blood was collected into Ethylene Diamine Tretra-acetate-containing tubes. All samples were transported to the Haematology Laboratory, Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. Following centrifugation, the plasma was aliquoted and stored at -20oC until used for HIV testing. The Determine ½ rapid test (ABBOTT Laboratories, Japan) and the Murex HIV Ag/Ab Combination tests (DiaSorin, Italy) were used for HIV screening and the ABBOTT research kit (MNO2) was used to distinguish the HIV-1 types. All data collected were analyzed appropriately and the Chi square test established differences between variables. Our findings showed that a total of 296 TBP workers (mainly males; 74%) were included in the study with a mean age of 31.5 years (range 19 – 54 years). Of the 296, the HIV prevalence was 15.2% all of whom were HIV-1 group M. The socio-demographic and epidemiological data showed that the females had a higher prevalence of HIV infection (35.1%) than the males (8.2%) with the 40-49 years age group mostly represented. Looking at marital and educational status, widows and high school graduates were most affected (57.1% and 24% respectively). Workers with less than 50,000 Frs CFA earnings per month (approximately $98 USD) were most infected, (16.3%) and those with a history of sexually transmitted infection and blood transfusion respectively represented 20.5% and 37.5%. These findings suggest that HIV infection is still very much a cause for concern and that more effective and specific strategies be adopted in this agro-industrial setting to curb the spread of HIV. Keywords: HIV, AIDS, Epidemiology, CDC, Cameroon


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DIFFERENCES IN HIV/AIDS KNOWLEDGE BETWEEN HISTORICALLY BLACK COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY STUDENTS WHO USE AND DO NOT USE REAL-TIME TECHNOLOGY Patrick N. Nhigula Walden University College of Health Science, Minneapolis, Minnesota Abstract: Numerous studies have shown that college students report high knowledge of HIV/AIDS transmission and prevention; yet unprotected sex, peer pressure, alcohol, and other factors continue to place college students at increased risk for contracting HIV. Therefore, new measures are required to study shifting trends and patterns of this epidemic among minority students. This study examined the characteristics of students attending a historically Black college or university (HBCU) who do and do not use real-time as well as whether HBCU students who seek health information online through websites such as Twitter and Facebook report higher HIV knowledge scores than HBCU students who do not. The health belief model and communication theory were used to support the research study. Three sets of survey questionnaires that covered HIV knowledge, sexual behavior, and demographic items were administered to 350 students during class hours. Results show that 90% of study participants are users of real-time technology; and chi square analysis indicated no significant differences between real-time technology users and non-users based on demographic characteristics (e.g., gender, employment, marital status). T test for equality of means revealed no significant differences in HIV knowledge between realtime technology users and non-users, although those who use real-time technology are more likely to seek out information related to their vulnerability to HIV and sexually transmitted infections. Implications for positive social change include identification of the potential for use of real-time technology to increase awareness and knowledge of HIV/AIDS prevention among young adults, especially HBCU students. Ultimately, use of real-time technology could help reduce risk for HIV/AIDS transmission. Key words: HIV/AIDS, Real-Time Technology, College Students, Historically Black Colleges and University, Health Promotion, Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research ORAL PRESENTATION

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NEURAL NETWORK MODELING: AN EFFICIENT TOOL TO FORECAST BIOLOGICAL VARIABLES H. A. Ahmad and L. Akil Department of Biology, JSU Box 18540, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA Abstract: Neural network modeling has been in use for several decades; its application in biological sciences is relatively new and modestly reported. This modeling approach uses various procedures of data manipulation and programming architecture to forecast a given variable. We have applied this methodology to predict commercial egg price, CD4+ cells in HIV patients, broiler body weight, egg production in commercial layers, obesity, milk production in dairy cattle, and recently the salmonella outbreaks. In modeling those variables we applied various data manipulation techniques, such as simulation, etc. The response variables were predicted using several classification variables as in classical modeling approaches or using pattern recognition in the given variable itself. Several neural network architecture, such as back propagation-3 and 5 and general regression neural network were compared for their efficacy. In egg price determination, for example all the tested neural networks produced better fitted lines compared to the regression analysis with R2 as high as 0.60. In egg production modeling trials we found the best model in general regression neural network, where R2 was 0.71 compared to other neural network models tested. In obesity modeling when high blood pressure was predicted using obesity as classification variable, the R2 was 0.41. Neural network models may offer a viable alternative approach to classical mathematical and statistical models, especially where a predefined model is not available or to solve a non-linear problem or where data are fuzzy. Data manipulation schemes remain the underlying determinants in such neural network models. Key words: Neural networks biological variables data manipulation modeling. Acknowledgements: The project described was supported by Grant Numbers G12RR013459 from the National Center of Research Resources and PGA-P210944 from DOS.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research ORAL PRESENTATION

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A PROFILE OF PRIMARY HEALTH CARE WORKFORCE DISPARITIES IN CENTRAL MISSISSIPPI Johnnie M. Hawkins1, Sandra C. Hayes1, Sudha Yerramilli2, Dayakar Nittala2, David Bandi2 and DeMarc Hickson3 1

Owens Health and Wellness Center, Tougaloo College, 500 W. County Line Rd. Tougaloo, Mississippi 39174, USA 2 National Center for Biodefense Communications (NCBC), Mississippi e-Center at Jackson State University, 1230 Raymond Rd, Box 900, Jackson, Mississippi 39204, USA 3 My Brotherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Keeper, Inc, 710 Avignon Drive, Ridgeland, Mississippi 39157, USA Abstract: Health care is one of the largest industries in the country, employing a vast number of workers. Still, many communities experience health care workforce shortage problems, with the most severe being in rural health professional shortage areas and medically needy and underserved population groups. Rural health care workforce shortages carry a negative impact on health care quality, through reduced health care access as well as through increased stress on providers. Shortages not only contribute to higher costs by raising compensation levels to reflect increased demand but also by increasing the use of overtime pay and expensive temporary personnel. Health care workforce shortages are pervasive in rural and urban communities across the country. The specific aims of the project were to: (1) detect social and political interactions and other elements important to increasing the primary health care workforce; (2) define potential threats, opportunities or changes for the health care workforce based on those interactions or elements; (3) to determine organizational/administrative elements required to improve the diversity and quantity of primary health care providers in the target area; and (4) to identify health trends which are converging, diverging, interacting, accelerating or slowing. As part of the preliminary study, selected data variables (demographic and socio-economic) were mapped for 10 counties in Central Mississippi using GIS. The locations of health care providers were geocoded from addresses obtained from primary surveys and incorporated into GIS analysis. The study integrated the county profiles with spatial distribution of health care work force locations to identify any gaps or shortages in order to improve the health care workforce conditions in these counties. Key words: Health care workforce, health disparity, workforce shortage. Acknowledgements: This abstract was supported by the Cooperative Agreement Number: 1U58DP003711 from The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION A [STUDENTS]

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VITAMIN D3 ENHANCES THE ACTIVITY OF ARSENIC TRIOXIDE IN HUMAN LEUKEMIA (HL-60) CELLS Christan S. Rogers, Clement G. Yedjou and Paul B. Tchounwou RCMI-Center of Environmental Health, Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS USA Abstract: Vitamin D3, an active metabolite of vitamin D, inhibits the growth of a number of cancer types such as prostate, colorectal, breast and leukemia. Arsenic trioxide (ATO) is an innovative form of therapy that has recently been found to benefit acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) patients. We hypothesize that co-exposure to vitamin D3 increases the efficacy of ATO through cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, oxidative stress and apoptosis associated with increased ATO toxicity in human leukemia (HL-60) cells. In our current investigation, we performed the MTT assay and trypan blue exclusion test to measure cell viability, malondialdehyde (MDA) determination for lipid peroxidation, single cell gel electrophoresis (Comet) assay for genotoxicity, flow cytometry analysis of annexin-V, and DNA laddering assay for apoptosis, all were performed using HL-60 cells co-exposed to ATO and vitamin D3 in combination. Trypan blue exclusion test and MTT assay indicated that vitamin D3 exposure potentiates the toxic activity of ATO in HL-60 cells in a dose dependent manner. Co-administration of vitamin D3 and ATO resulted in a significant (P<0.05) increase in MDA level compared to ATO alone. DNA damage was correlated with a significant increase in comet tail length. A statistically significant and dose-dependent increase (p <0.05) was recorded in DNA fragmentation and annexin V positive cells with increasing doses of vitamin D3 in ATO-treated cells. Overall, the present study indicates that vitamin D3 potentiates the antitumor effects of ATO at least part, via cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, DNA damage, nucleosomal fragmentation and phosphatidylserine externalization. Acknowledgements: Research supported by NIH-RCMI Grant # 2G12RR013459, and NIH-NIMHD Grant # 8G12MD007581 at Jackson State University.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION A [STUDENTS]

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ARSENIC TRIOXIDE-BASED CHEMOTHERAPY OF ACUTE PROMYELOCYTIC LEUKEMIA Tammy Cox1, Clement G. Yedjou2 and Paul B. Tchounwou2 1

Provide High School, 2400 Robinson Street, Jackson, MS, 39209, USA Cellomics and Toxicogenomics Research Laboratory, NIH-Center for Environmental Health, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi, USA 2

Abstract: Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is a blood cancer characterized by a rapid accumulation of abnormal white blood cells in the bone marrow and blood resulting in anemia, susceptibility to infections, bleeding, and hemorrhage. Arsenic trioxide (ATO)-based chemotherapy has recently been approved by the FDA based on its effectiveness in providing for a complete remission in de novo and relapsed APL patients. Although ATO has been reported to induce degradation of PML-RAR alpha protein in these patients, its molecular mechanisms of action against cancer cells remain to be elucidated. In this research, we hypothesize that the anticancer activity of ATO may be mediated by simple toxicity leading to cell death. To test this hypothesis, we performed the MTT-assay for cell viability. Live and death cells were determined by trypan blue exclusion test using the cellometer vision. MTT assay indicated a strong dose-response relationship with regard to the cytotoxic property of ATO. The results obtained from the trypan blue exclusion test indicated that at very low concentration, ATO has a stimulatory effect on the growth of HL-60 cells. A significant (p < 0.05) gradual decrease in brightfield negative cells (live cells) was observed when exposed to high level of ATO between the range dose of (2-20 Âľg/mL). Arsenic trioxide pharmacotherapy is associated with a cytotoxicity that is mediated by the loss of the membrane integrity as revealed by the trypan blue using the cellometer vision. Keywords: Arsenic trioxide, HL-60 cells, toxicity, cell death Acknowledgements: This research was financially supported by a grant from the National Institutes of Health (Grant No. G12RR013459-14), through the RCMI-Center for Environmental Health.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION A [STUDENTS]

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INDUCTION OF NECROTIC CELL DEATH BY ARSENIC TRIOXIDETREATED HUMAN LEUKEMIA CELLS Shaquana Jones1, Clement G. Yedjou2 and Paul B. Tchounwou2 1

University of Southern Mississippi, 118 College Drive, 0001 Hattiesburg, MS 39406, USA Cellomics and Toxicogenomics Research Laboratory, NIH-Center for Environmental Health, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi, USA. 2

Abstract: The treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) has been based on the administration of all-trans retinoic acid plus anthracycline chemotherapy, which is very effective as first line therapy; however 25 to 30% of patients will relapse with their disease becoming refractory to conventional therapy. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate whether arsenic trioxide (ATO) induced cell death is associated with necrosis. To achieve this goal, HL-60 cells were treated with different concentrations of ATO for 24 h prior to cell viability using MTT, trypan blue, and propidium iodide assays respectively. The results obtained from the MTT, trypan blue, propidium iodine assay indicated that at very low concentration, ATO has a stimulatory effect on the growth of HL-60 cells. A significant (p < 0.05) gradual decrease in brightfield negative cells (live cells) was observed when exposed to high level of ATO between the range dose of (2-20 ug/mL). Data generated from the propidium iodide indicated that ATO exposure significantly (p < 0.05) increased the proportion of fluorescence positive cells (necrotic death cells) compared to the control. In summary, these studies demonstrated that ATO exerts dual effects on HL-60 promyelocytic leukemia cells. At low doses, it plays a stimulatory effect on the growth of HL-60 cells whereas at high dose tested, it becomes highly cytotoxic. This cytotoxicity was found to be associated with necrosis as revealed by a significant increase in dead cell concentration (Fluorescence) with increasing of ATO doses. Keywords: Arsenic trioxide, HL-60 cells, cytotoxicity, MTT assay, trypan blue, propidium iodine, cellometer vision Acknowledgements: This research was financially supported in part by a grant from the MS-INBRE Research Scholar Program at the University of Southern Mississippi, and in part by a grant from the National Institute of Health (Grant No. G12RR013459-13), through the RCMI-Center for Environmental Health at Jackson State University.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION A [STUDENTS]

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MODULATION OF PHOSPHATIDYLSERINE EXTERNALIZATION IN HUMAN LEUKEMIA (HL-60) INDUCED BY GARLIC EXTRACT Destinee Thompson, Sylvianne Njiki and Clement Yedjou Cellomics and Toxicogenomics Research Laboratory, NIH-Center for Environmental Health, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi, USA. Abstract: Garlic supplementation in diet has been shown to be beneficial to cancer patients. Recently, its pharmacological role in the prevention and treatment of cancer has received increasing attention. However, the mechanisms by which garlic extract induces cytotoxic and apoptotic effects in cancer cells remain largely unknown. The present study was designed to use HL-60 cells as a test model to determine the cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of garlic after treatment of human leukemia cells. Human leukemia (HL-60) cells were treated with different concentrations of garlic extract for 12 hr. Live and dead cells was determined by trypan blue exclusion test using the cellometer vision. Annexin V negative and positive cells was determined by flow cytometry. Data obtained from the trypan blue exclusion test indicated that GE significantly (p < 0.05) reduced the viability of HL-60 cells in a concentrationdependent manner. Flow cytometry data showed a strong concentration-response relationship between GE exposure and annexin-V positive HL-60 cells. Finding from the present study demonstrates that at therapeutic concentrations, garlic treatment induced cytotoxic and apoptotic effects in HL-60 cells. Keywords: Garlic extract, HL-60 cells, trypan blue, cellometer vision Acknowledgements: This research was financially supported in part by a grant from the MS-INBRE Research Scholar Program at the University of Southern Mississippi, and in part by a grant from the National Institute of Health (Grant No. G12RR013459-13), through the RCMI-Center for Environmental Health at JacksonStateUniversity.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION A [STUDENTS]

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LEAD NITRATE-MEDIATED CELL DEATH VIA CASPASE-3 IN HUMAN LEUKEMIA (HL-60) CELLS Alicia Meadows, Ariane Mbemi and Clement Yedjou Cellomics and Toxicogenomics Research Laboratory, NIH-Center for Environmental Health, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi, USA Abstract: Lead poisoning has been extensively studied over the years. Many adverse physiological and behavioral impacts on the human body have been reported due to the entry of this heavy metal. It especially causes the hematological effects to people of all ages. However, the molecular mechanisms of lead causing apoptosis are still largely unknown. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the apoptotic mechanism of lead nitrate in HL-60 cells. Human leukemia (HL-60) cells were treated with different doses of lead nitrate for 24 h. The flow cytometry and DNA fragmentation were for apoptosis assessment, respectively. The flow cytometric assessment (caspace-3 activity) showed a strong dose-response relationship between water lead nitrate exposure and early stage apoptosis of HL60 cells. Upon 24 hrs of exposure, the results of caspase-3 activity showed that the percentages of HL60 cells undergone late stage apoptotic were 5 ± 0%, 13 ± 0.7%, 17 ± 5.7%, 22 ± 4.6, and 18 ± 0% in 0, 10, 20, 30, and 40 μg/mL of lead nitrate, respectively. This result was further confirmed by the data of DNA laddering assay showing a clear evidence of nucleosomal DNA fragmentation in lead nitratetreated HL-60 cells. In summary, these studies demonstrated that lead nitrate represents an apoptosisinducing agent in HL-60 promyelocytic leukemia cells and its apoptotic mechanism functions via caspase 3 activation, following by nucleosomal DNA fragmentation. Key words: HL-60 cells, caspase-3, DNA fragmentation, flow cytometry Acknowledgements: This research was financially supported by a grant from National Institutes of Health (Grant No. 1G12RR13459), through the RCMI-Center for Environmental Health at Jackson State University.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION A [STUDENTS]

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LEAD NITRATE-INDUCED GENOTOXIC EFFECTS TO HUMAN LEUKEMIA (HL-60) CELLS Wundu Kwembe, Clement G. Yedjou and Paul B. Tchounwou Cellomics and Toxicogenomics Research Laboratory, NIH-Center for Environmental Health, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi, USA Abstract: Although lead nitrate [Pb(N03)2] has been the subject of toxicological research, in vitro cytotoxicity and genotoxicity studies using relevant cell models and uniform methodology are not well elucidated. Hence, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the genotoxicity induced by lead nitrate in a human leukemia (HL-60) cell line using the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (Comet) assay. HL-60 cells were treated with different doses of Pb(N03)2 for 24 h prior to genetic assessment. Data generated from the comet assay also indicated a significant dose-dependent increase in DNA damage in HL-60 cells associated with exposure. We observed a significant increase (P < 0.05) in comet taillength, tail arm and tail moment, as well as in percentages of DNA cleavage at all doses tested, showing an evidence of Pb(N03)2-induced genotoxic damage in HL-60 cells. This study confirms that the comet assay is sensitive and effective method to detect DNA damage caused by heavy metals like lead. Taken together, our findings suggest that lead exposure significantly (P < 0.05) induces DNA damage in HL-60 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Keywords: Lead nitrate, HL-60 cells, DNA damage, comet assay Acknowledgements: This research was financially supported by a grant from the National Institutes of Health (Grant No. G12RR013459-14), through the RCMI-Center for Environmental Health.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION A [STUDENTS]

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LEUKEMIA RESEARCH: ASCORBIC ACID TREATMENT INCREASE ARSENIC TRIOXIDE TOXICITY IN HUMAN LYMPHOMA CELLS Raven Byrd, Clement Yedjou and Paul B. Tchounwou Cellomics and Toxicogenomics Research Laboratory, NIH-Center for Environmental Health, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, Jackson, Mississippi, USA Abstract : Arsenic trioxide (ATO) has been reported to have activity in vitro against multiple myeloma cells. Recently, it has also been used as a therapeutic agent to treat acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) patients who have relapsed from conventional treatment with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and chemotherapy. Recent studies from our laboratory indicate that ascorbic acid (AA) enhances the activity of ATO in HL-60 cells by increasing its cytotoxic effect and the level of oxidative stress. However, the potential effect of AA and ATO combination in the treatment of lymphoma patients has not been examined. Our central aim was to assess whether physiologic doses of ascorbic acid increase ATO toxicity in human Jurkat T lymphoma cells. Human Jurkat T lymphoma cells were treated either with a dose (9µg/mL) of ATO alone or with several physiologic doses of AA plus 9µg/mL ATO for 48 h. Cell survival was determined by trypan blue exclusion test using the Cellometer Vision. Data generated from this experiment indicated that AA co-treatment at 100µM and 200µM significantly (p < 0.05) increased cell death in ATO-treated cells. The viability decreased from 61 ± 8% in cells with ATO alone to 31 ± 4% in cells treated with 200µM AA plus 9µg/mL ATO. Our research demonstrates that ATO alone is cytotoxic to human Jurkat T lymphoma cells, and co-administration of physiologic doses of AA enhances its toxicity in a dose-dependent manner. Keywords: Jurkat T-cells, arsenic trioxide, ascorbic acid, lymphoma, cellometer vision Acknowledgements: This research was financially supported by a grant from the National Institutes of Health (Grant No. G12RR013459-13), through the RCMI-Center for Environmental Health at Jackson State University.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION A [STUDENTS]

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LEUKEMIA THERAPY: VERNONIA AMYGDALINA-INDUCED GENOTOXIC DAMAGE AND APOPTOSIS IN HUMAN LEUKEMIA (HL-60) CELLS Jessica Jerkens, Clement G. Yedjou, and Paul B. Tchounwou Cellomics and Toxicogenomics Research Laboratory, NIH-Center for Environmental Health; College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, Jackson, Mississippi, USA Abstract: Although arsenic trioxide (Trisenox) is a new form of therapy that has recently been found to benefit acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) patients, this disease still kills thousands of Americans who are resistant to Trisenox regimen. Since 1980, the World Health Organization has been encouraging countries to identify and exploit traditional medicine easily available to patients at low cost. Traditional medicine represents the first-choice of healthcare treatment for at least 80% of people living in developing countries. Our central hypothesis was that pharmacologic doses of Vernonia amygdalina (VA) extracts induced toxicity in leukemia cells through increasing genotoxic damage and apoptosis by direct activation of caspases and induction of nucleosomal DNA fragmentation. Therefore, our goal was to determine the genotoxic and apoptotic mechanisms of action of VA leaf extracts in HL-60 cells. To achieve this goal, cell damage was detected by comet assay. Cell apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry analysis and DNA laddering assay. Data obtained from the comet assay indicated that VA causes DNA damage in HL-60 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Flow cytometry data showed a strong dose-response relationship between VA exposure and caspase-3 positive HL-60 cells. These results were confirmed by data of DNA laddering assay showing a clear evidence of nucleosomal DNA fragmentation in VA-treated cells. Taken together, our research demonstrated that VA represents a DNA damaging and apoptosis-inducing anticancer agent and its mechanisms of action involve genotoxic damage, caspase-3 activation, and nucleosomal DNA fragmentation. Keywords: Vernonia amygdalina, HL-60 cells, DNA damage, apoptosis Acknowledgements: This research was financially supported by a grant from the National Institutes of Health (Grant No. G12RR013459-14), through the RCMI-Center for Environmental Health.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION A [STUDENTS]

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ERHYL ACETATE VERNONIA AMYDALINA EXTRACTS INHIBITS THE GROWTH OF HUMAN PROSTATE (PC-3) CELLS THROUGH MICROTUBULE DESTABILIZATION Will Johnson, Clement Yedjou and Ernest Izevbigie Cellular Signaling, Phytoceuticals, and Cancer Prevention and Therapies; NIH-Center for Environmental Health, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi, USA. Abstract: Clinical studies show higher prostate cancer incidence rates with poorer prognosis in Western societies than in the rest of the world. The American Cancer Society estimates 241,740 new prostate cancer cases in the U.S. in 2012, accounting for 29% of all the cancers diagnosed in men. Taxol (TAX) sold on the pharmaceutical market targets the microtubules of cancerous cells and alters their functions by depolymerization or hyper-stabilization, thus resulting in cell death. However, TAX is associated with a wide range of undesirable side-effects such as nausea, edema, and darkening of the skin. Previous studies show that low concentrations of an edible Nigerian plant, V. amygdalina (VA), potently arrests the proliferative activities of estrogen receptor positive (ER+) human breast cancerous cells (MCF-7). Here, we hypothesized that androgen-independent prostate cancerous (PC-3) cells to similar concentrations of VA extracts retard cellular proliferation rates and affect microtubule dynamics, via microtubule destabilization, without side effects. Treatment of cells with various concentrations (12.5µg/ml, 25µg/ml, 50µg/ml, 100µg/ml) of VA potently inhibited growth in a concentrationdependent fashion with an IC50 value of 30 ± 2µg/ml, as determined by Sulforhodamine B (SRB) cytotoxicity assay. [3H]-thymidine incorporation assay corroborates the SRB assay showing a gradual inhibition (p < 0.05) of DNA synthesis in VA-treated cells compared to the control. Data generated using immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that the incidence of microtubule abnormalities was VA concentration-dependent, as the abnormalities increased in severity and occurrence with concentration, suggesting the microtubules as possible targets for VA anti-mitotic actions.

Keywords: Vernonia amygdalina, PC-3 cells, [3H]-thymidine, cytotoxicity, microtubules


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VERNONIA AMYGDALINA - INDUCED CYTOTOXIC DAMAGE AND ACTIVATION OF CASPASE-3 IN HUMAN LEUKEMIA (HL-60) CELLS Chuks Agusiegbe, Clement G. Yedjou, and Paul B. Tchounwou Cellomics and Toxicogenomics Research Laboratory, NIH-Center for Environmental Health; College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, Jackson, Mississippi, USA Abstract: Although published studies indicate that Vernonia amygdalina has medicinal properties effective against many diseases other than leukemia, the molecular mechanisms under which this extract exerts its therapeutic effect in cancer cells remain largely unknown. Therefore, the specific aim of the present study was to use HL-60, a human promyelocitic cell line as test model to determine the mechanisms of therapeutic efficacy of V. amygdalina leaf extracts as anti-cancer agents for the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). To reach our specific aim, HL-60 cells were treated with different doses of V. amygdalina. Cell viability, live and death cells were determined by the means of trypan blue exclusion test using the cellometer vision. Caspace-3 activity was determined by the cytometry analysis. Data obtained from the trypan blue test demonstrated that VA treatment reduce cell viability in a dose-dependent manner. The flow cytometry assessment showed a strong dose-response relationship with regard to VA exposure and caspase-3 positive cells. Taken together, our data provide a basis for further studies on the mechanisms of action and the potential for using VA as therapeutic agent in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia. Keywords: Vernonia amygdalina, HL-60 cells, live and dead cells, caspase-3 positive cells Acknowledgements: This research work was financially supported in part by Jackson State University Center of Excellence in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Education (Grant #W911NF-11-1-0123) from the Department of Defense (DoD); and in part by a grant from the National Institutes of Health (Grant No. G12RR013459-14), through the RCMI-Center for Environmental Health.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION A [STUDENTS]

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VERNONIA AMYGDALINA - INDUCED ACTIVATION OF CYCLIN A AND P53 TUMOR SUPPRESSOR GENE IN HUMAN BREAST CELLS Viviaune Brown, Clement G. Yedjou and Paul B. Tchounwou Molecular Toxicology Research Laboratory, NIH-Center for Environmental Health, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi, USA Abstract: In the present study, we used the human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) cell line as a test model to study the cellular and molecular mechanisms of anti-cancer properties of Vernonia amygdalina. We hypothesized that V. amygdalina-induced expression of stress genes and related proteins may play a role in the cellular and molecular events leading to cell cycle modulation in cancer cells. To test this hypothesis, we performed Western blot analysis to assess the expression of specific cellular response proteins including p53 and Cyclin A. Western Blot analyses demonstrated a strong dose-response relationship with regard to p53 and Cyclin A expression within the dose range tested. The images obtained from the confocal microscope show a statistically significant up-regulation of these proteins with increasing doses on V. amygdalina in MCF-7 cells. Up-regulation of Cyclin A suggests that it is required for S phase and passage through G2 phase in cell cycle progression. Taken together, these results indicate that V. amygdalina has the potential to induce cell cycle arrest through activation of the 53-kDa tumor suppressor protein. These data are in agreement with previous results generated in our laboratory, the pharmacology of V. amygdalina as anticancer agent is mediated through phosphatidylserine externalization, activation of caspase-3, and nucleosomal DNA fragmentation. Key words: Vernonia amygdalina, cyclin A, p53, western blot, MCF-7 cells Acknowledgements: This research supported by a grant from the National Institutes of Health (Grant N0.1G12RR13459-14), through the NCRR-RCMI Center for Environmental Health at Jackson State University (JSU).


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION A [STUDENTS]

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HUMAN BREAST CARCINOMA CELLS ARE VERNONIA AMYGDALINA SENSITIVE IN-VITRO Lecia Gresham1,2 and Ernest B. Izevbigie1,2,3 1

The Laboratory of Cellular Signaling, Phytoceuticals, Cancer Prevention and Therapies; 2NIH-Center for Environmental Health, College of Science, Engineering and Technology; 3Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA Abstract: Cancer of the breast is the most commonly diagnosed non-skin cancer and second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women in the United States. Breast cancer represents 29% of new cases of all cancers. An estimated 226,870 women will be diagnosed with invasive breast cancer and 39,510 women will die from the disease this year in the United States. There is an urgent need for the discovery and development of agent(s) efficacious against breast cancer to decrease breast cancer mortality and morbidity. National surveys on the use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) among patients show more than eighty percent of cancer patients, representing a spectrum of malignancies and disease stages acknowledged the use of CAM. The growing popularity of CAM usage has led to the discovery of aqueous leaf extracts of Vernonia amygdalina (VA), a Nigerian edible plant as a very strong candidate. Previous studies have shown VA to inhibit the proliferation of estrogen receptor positive (ER+) and estrogen receptor negative (ER-) human breast carcinoma cells in vitro. VA may be used alone or in combination (adjuvant) with known breast cancer drugs. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to further assess the growth inhibitory activity as well as profile the effects on the biological functions of VA on carcinoma cells of the breast. The data presented will further suggest that breast cancer patients of all kinds may benefit from VA as a CAM agent is relatively high in the near future. Key words: Vernonia amygdalina, estrogen receptor, ductal carcinoma


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CYTOTOXIC EFFECTS OF VERNONIA AMYGDALINA EXTRACTS IN CANCEROUS CELLS OF THE BREAST Roderick McDowell and Carolyn Bingham Howard Breast Cancer Research Laboratory, NIH-Center for Environmental Health, College of Science Engineering and Technology, Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson, Mississippi, USA Abstract: Using natural products as chemotherapeutic agents against Breast Cancer has gained international attention because the disease continues to hail as the leading cause of death in women between ages 40-55 and use the currently available treatment drugs such as Paclitaxel (Taxol) also cause numerous adverse side effects. It has been shown Vernonia amygdalina (VA), a Nigerian plant has chemotherapeutic properties and causes no known side effects. Experiments assessing cell viability and DNA damage following VA and/or Taxol treatment were conducted in estrogen receptor negative MDA MB 231 breast cancerous cells. Our goal is to provide evidence to support VAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s usage as an alternative to Taxol treatment, thus eliminating the unwanted side effects while effectively inhibiting cancerous growth. When given alone, VA was shown to exhibit anti-proliferative effects in cancer cells. Additionally, VA synergized or showed an additive effect in MDA MB 231 cell growth inhibition when given in combination with Taxol. Cells were propagated in RPMI-1640 medium, supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum and 1% penicillin-streptomycin. Cell growth or inhibition was determined by DNA synthesis assays and confirmed by cell counts using a hemacytometer. TAX (100 nM) and VA (100 Îźg/ml) inhibited DNA synthesis, on average of three independent experiments by 50 and 364% respectively. Interestingly, TAX alone had no effects on DNA synthesis, but inhibited DNA synthesis significantly (P<0.5) in the presence of VA in a VA concentration-dependent fashion. Upon further studies, these findings may translate to patient regimens with reduced dosage amounts of currently used breast cancer drugs. Thus, fewer side effects, improve quality of life (QOL) and better survival rates. Key Words: MDA MB 231 cells, Paclitaxel, Vernonia amygdalina, Breast cancer. Acknowledgements: This research was supported in part by the Research Centers in Minority Institutions (RCMI)/NIH grant # G122RR13459 and the Extramural Associates Research Development Award (EARDA)/NIH grant #1G11HD046519.


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MODELING DIFFERENTIAL XENOBIOTIC TOXICITIES WITHIN A PHYLOGENETIC CONTEXT â&#x20AC;&#x201C; A TOXICITY ASSESSMENT AMONG SELECT FUNDULUS TOPMINNOWS WITH DIVERGENT PHYSIOLOGIES Mark A. Dugo and Paul B. Tchounwou Molecular Toxicology Research Laboratory, NIH-Center for Environmental Health, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi, USA Abstract: There are over 30 species of described Fundulus classified among four subgenera, with the greatest diversity occurring in the Mississippi River basin and drainages of the northern Gulf of Mexico. The Fundulids occupy a diverse range of habitats not limited to small creeks, rivers, backwater swamps, and coastal shores. The interspecific diversity of habitat types among Fundulus corresponds with well documented physiological variability, most notably a significant range of osmotolerance. Patterns of physiological variability observed among Fundulids provides the opportunity to development a toxicological stress model to test for differential responses to xenobiotic treatments among closely related species with divergent life histories. In addition to the classically observed variation of salinity tolerance among Fundulids, our recent phylogenetic analyses of the F. notti species complex and the F. notatus species complex using cytochrome b DNA sequence data provides a robust comparative signal when testing for differential xenobiotic toxicity. Enzymatic activity provides a traditional marker of toxicity. Herein, we present a preliminary assessment of cytochrome p450 (CYPA1A) and flavincontaining monooxygenase (FMO) enzyme activity levels in multiple tissues for a series of Fundulus species exposed to known inducers of these enzyme systems, including 3-Methylcholanthrene (a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)) and Aldicarb (a thioether pesticide). The CYPA1A and FMO systems have demonstrated a detoxifying role among euryhaline fishes, and the FMO system has been shown to play a functional role in osmoregulation. The FMO system is induced by thioethers and is upregulated in saline environments, whereas the toxicity of environmental pollutants has been shown to be greater in osmotic stressed conditions, as measured by FMO activity. Laboratory treatments are being conducted across a salinity gradient to assess toxicological response in the context of osmotic stress. Our ecotoxicology study of the Fundulus is framed in a phylogenetic perspective and includes primarily freshwater represenatives of the F. notti and F. notatus species complexes, in addition estuarine forms including, F. grandis, F. pulvereus and the saltmarsh topminnow, F. jenkinsi, which is a longstanding NOAA species of concern and recent candidate for listing under the Endangered Species Act. Key words: Ecotoxicology, Fundulus, CYP enzymes, FMO enzymes, PAHâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Acknowledgements: This project is supported by NOAA-Environmental Cooperative Center Grant # NA11SEC4810001-Sub Contract # 003499; NIH RCMI-Center for Environmental Health Grant # 5G12RR013459-15, and NIH NIMHD Grant # 8G12MD007581-15 at Jackson State University.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION A [STUDENTS]

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ARSENIC TOXICITY: MODULATION OF HUMAN-INDUCED PLURIPOTENT STEM CELLS Phatia Wells1, Barbara Graham1, Kenneth Ndebele1 and Paul Tchounwou2 1

Laboratory of Cancer Immunology Target Identification and Validation, 2RCMI Center of Environmental Health, Department of Biology College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi, USA. Abstract: Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are an artificially derived type of pluripotent stem cell from a non-pluripotent cell, typically an adult somatic cell, by inducing a "forced" expression of certain genes. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are somatic cells reprogrammed to a pluripotent or embryonic stem cellâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;like state with factors important for maintaining the defining properties of embryonic stem cells. IPSCs show many of the same characteristics as natural pluripotent stem cells, such as the expression of certain stem cell genes and proteins, chromatin methylation patterns, doubling time, embryoid body formation, teratoma formation, viable chimera formation, potency and differentiability. IPSCs are a hopeful therapeutic model; there is a critical need to determine the effect that environmental factors will have on reprogrammed cells in a self-renewing induced state. Effects of arsenic on skin cells have been studied extensively; however, its effect on growth and molecular pathways of iPSCs is uncertain. Investigating the effect that arsenic will have on human (h) iPSCs will further our knowledge on its potential mechanism of action. We hypothesize that arsenic will induce alterations in gene expression involved in pluripotency and self-renewal of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). MTT assay and trypan blue exclusion assay will be used todetermine the relative toxicity of arsenic trioxide (ATO) on hiPSCs. By determining relative toxicity, information will be gathered on how much ATO will affect proliferation and viability of reprogrammed-iPSC. Microarray analysis data will be collected to identify alterations in gene expression; thereby, giving us a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying dysfunctional or interrupted biological processes. Pluripotency and self-renewal are traits regulated by a number of cell signaling pathways. In hESCs, the predominant signaling pathways involved are TGF-β, FGFR, and Wnt resulting in the expression and activation of Oct-4, Sox2, and Nanog. Arsenic is known to affect signal transduction pathways and cause a wide range of alterationsleading to apoptosisand other immunotoxic effects. This project will select based on microarray analysis, pathways of interest affected by arsenic toxicity. Overall, it is anticipated that this study will provide important insight into the carcinogenic potential of arsenic on reprogramming, self-renewal and continued pluripotency of human induced pluripotent stem cells. Keywords: Human induced pluripotent stem cells, arsenic, microarray, pluripotency, differentiation Acknowledgements: This research was financially supported by the NIH-RCMI Grant No. 5G12RR13459-15, NIH-NIMHD Grant No. 8G12MD007581-15.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION A [STUDENTS]

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CHARACTERIZATION OF NICKEL-INDUCED IMMUNOLOGICAL DISFUNCTION IN SW1573 ALVEOLAR CARCINOMA CELLS Kellie G. Brown, Kenneth Ndebele, Barbara Graham and Paul B. Tchounwou Laboratory of Cancer Immunology Target Identification and Validation, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi, USA Abstract: Nickel is a persistent environmental pollutant with toxic effects in man and other animals. Nickel has been classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer and the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency a carcinogen. Nickel is a widespread contaminant in the environment. It is commonly found in soil, water, plants, volcanic emissions, and foods. Exposure to Nickel is a public health concern and is associated with a wide range of adverse systemic health effects. Lung inhalation is the major route of exposure for nickel-induced toxicity. Nickel can also be ingested or absorbed through the skin. The primary target organs are the liver, kidneys and lungs. To our knowledge there are no studies that have addressed the immunological mechanisms underlying nickel-induced cytokine expression in lungs. We hypothesize that nickel exposure has the potential of modifying the cytokine milieu in lungs. In this study we used SW1573 Alveolar carcinoma cells as a model and determined if nickel could alter cytokine expression in alveoli cells. The levels of cytokine expression will be assessed by western blotting assay and levels of proliferation were assessed using a MTS solution at 72 hours. Here, we demonstrated that in the presence of nickel alone, a consistent decrease in cell proliferation was induced over a 72 hour incubation period. This decrease in proliferation was associated with an increase in levels of HSP70 as nickel concentrations increased. Nickel-induced suppression of cell proliferation and cytokine expression and in SW1573 Alveolar cells may have many ramifications for our understanding of immune and autoimmune responses and for the development of potential therapeutic intervention. Key words: Nickel, SW1573 Alveolar cells, cytokine expression Acknowledgements: This research was financially supported by the NIH-RCMI Grant No. 1G12RR013459, NIH-NIMHD Grant No. 8G12MD007581, and DoEd Grant No. P031B090210.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION A [STUDENTS]

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IN VITRO CYTOTOXICITY ASSESSMENT OF SILVER NANOPARTICLES USING HUMAN LIVER CARCINOMA CELLS Karen L. Saddler1, Kenneth Ndebele1, Paul Tchounwou2 and Barbara Graham1 1

Laboratory of Cancer Immunology, Target Identification and Validation, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, CSET Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA 2 Molecular Toxicology Research Laboratory, NIH- Center for Environmental Health, CSET, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA

Abstract: Despite the huge potential benefits of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in the field of biomedical and industrial applications, studies are ongoing to determine the cytotoxic effects and bioavailability in cells. Although the cellular effects of AgNPs have been investigated in various cell models including keratinocytes, fibroblasts, monocytes, colon, and lung cells, the literature is scarce regarding their hepatotoxicity. Considering the fact that oral intake may constitute a major route of AgNPs exposure and the liver being the primary metabolic organ after gastro-intestinal absorption of chemicals, it is important to investigate the hepatocellular effects of AgNPs, with a special emphasis on the elucidation of their molecular mechanisms of toxicity. We hypothesize that AgNP’s will induce cytotoxic effects leading to a decrease in cell viability on Human Liver Carcinoma Cells (HePG2). To test this following assays were used: MTT Cell Proliferation assay (cell viability and the cytotoxic effect), Western Blot analysis (of oxidative stress/heat stress) and Comet Assay (DNA damage). Results showed that at 24 hours of exposure of HepG2 to AgNPs (various concentrations used were (0 µg/ml (control), 1 µg/ml, 5 µg/ml and 10 µg/ml), AgNPs significantly inhibited cell growth and viability, by 50% when exposed at a concentration of 4.5 µg/ml, indicating a dose-dependent response relationship. The HSP70 protein (using Western Blot) was expressed in the various samples indicative of AgNPs causing toxicity in human liver carcinoma cells. DNA damage and DNA fragmentation was observed in data obtained from the Comet Assay Test. DNA damage and fragmentation for the control or 0µg/ml was 3.43%, 34.16% for 1.0 µg/ml, 50.81% for 5.0 µg/ml and 16.08% for 10 µg/ml. These studies provide new insights into the mechanisms of action of silver nanoparticles in vitro, as well as provide relevant scientific information for the possible use in drug therapy management. Key Words: HePG2 cells, cytotoxicity, silver nanoparticles Acknowledgements: This project is supported by the U.S. Department of Defense through the Engineer, Research and Development Center (Vicksburg, MS); Contract #W912HZ-10-2-0045


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ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH EFFECTS OF HEAVY METALS AND METALLIC COMPOUNDS IN LUANDA SOIL FROM ANGOLA Maria E. Gomes1,2,3, Clement Yedjou3 and Paul Tchounwou2,3 1

University of Science, Agostinho Neto, Angola Environmental Toxicology Research Laboratory; 3Cellomics and Toxicogenomics Research Laboratory; NIH-RCMI Center for Environmental Health, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi, USA. 2

Abstract: Heavy metals and metallic compounds occur universally in the environment, either in the earth’s crust or as a result of human activities. Consequently, the entire human population is exposed at one time or another to these metals. Although some metals in trace levels are essential for human nutrition, the same metals are toxic at higher concentrations. Other metals are toxic even at low levels of exposure. For instance, acute exposure to heavy metals can be associated with neurological damage, behavioral disorders, loss of memory, and other negative health effects. Each metal has unique features and physic-chemical properties that confer to its specific toxicological mechanisms of action. The goal of the present study was to monitor and assess the level of metals in soil samples collected in the city of Luanda located in Angola, Africa. To achieve to goal, the Niton handheld XRF analyzer was used to measure the levels of various heavy metals and metallic compounds in soil samples collected from Luanda (the largest city in Angola). The level of each heavy metal detected was compared to Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards and regulatory guidelines. Among the soil samples tested, we detected large range of heavy metals and metallic compounds with means ± SDs values of 20.9 ± 10.0 ppm arsenic, 50361.98 ± 387.51 ppm calcium, 63.69 ± 14.48 ppm copper, 22085.74 ± 238.13 ppm iron,270.70 ± 12.52 ppm lead, 330.95 ± 48.14 ppm magnesium, 14614.94 ± 352.25 ppm potassium, 1674.66 ± 41.58 rubidium, 176.03 ± 5.14 ppm strontium, 1376.30 ± 345.52 sulfur, 3550.54 ± 113.12 ppm titanium, 254.16 ± 15.68 ppm zinc, 818.42 ± 11.23 ppm zirconiumin Luanda soil. We found that these concentrations vary significantly from compound to compound and from one site to another. The levels of many metals detected above the EPA standards and regulatory guidelines. Based on the EPA standards and regulatory guidelines, we conclude Luanda soil in Angola has high level of heavy metals above EPA standard, indicative that this environment is hazardous or not safe especially for children activities such as playground. Key words: Heavy metals, EPA standard, XRF analyzer, Luanda Soil, health effects Acknowledgements: This research was financially supported in part by the University of Science Agostinho Neto, Angola and by a grant from the National Institutes of Health (Grant No. 2G12RR013459-11), through the RCMI-Center for Environmental Health at Jackson State University.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION A [STUDENTS]

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DNA DAMAGE AND REPAIR OF HUMAN SKIN KERATINOCYTES CONCURRENTLY EXPOSED TO PYRENE DERIVATIVES AND UVA LIGHT Tracie Perkins Fullove, Ying Zhang and Hongtao Yu Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA Abstract: Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), a class of mutagenic environmental contaminants, insert toxicity through both metabolic activation and light irradiation. Pyrene, one of the most widely studied PAHs, along with its mono-substituted derivatives, 1-amino, 1-bromo, 1-hydroxy, and 1nitropyrene, were chosen to study the effect of substituents on their phototoxicity, DNA damage and repair. Both alkaline Comet assay, which detects direct DNA damages, and Fpg endonuclease Comet assay, which detects oxidative DNA damages, were conducted at 0, 2, 4, 8, and 24 h of incubation of the cells in minimal growth medium after concomitant exposure to pyrene derivatives and UVA light. All these compounds are photocytotoxic and the phototoxicity is both incubation time and PAH dose dependent; whereas, those without light are not toxic. The LC50 obtained are in the range of 3.5 – 9.3 µM. Cellular DNA damages, both direct and oxidative, are observed immediately after the cells are treated with UVA light and the pyrene derivatives at a concentration of 1.0 µM. The amount of DNA damages (both direct and oxidative) increase from 0 to 4 h of incubation. After longer incubation of 8 h, the damaged cellular DNA start to be repaired, resulting in greatly reduced amount of DNA damages, and the DNA damage reaches the minimum at 24 h of incubation. 1-Amopyrene and 1-hydroxypyrene cause more DNA oxidative damages immediately after the exposure (0 h of incubation), and these damages are repaired within the same timeframe as the other tested compounds. The oxidative DNA damages caused by 1-bromopyrene are repaired starting at 2 h of incubation, earlier than the damages caused by all the other compounds. Keywords: Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, UV radiation, phototoxicity, DNA damage. Acknowledgements: This publication was made possible by the U.S. Department of Education Grant number P031B090210-11 through Title III-HBGI. Core research facilities were supported by grants from the National Science Foundation (CHE-0840450) and National Institutes of Health (NCRR 2G12RR013459-11).


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MECHANISTIC ALTERATION OF ORGANIC MOLECULE INDUCED TOXICITY OF C60: THE ROLES OF LIGHT ENERGY AND DISPERSION MEDIUM Winfred G. Aker1, Erbo Ying1, Rumei Gao2, Xiaojun Wang1, Yazhou Zhang2, Jasmine I. Watson3, Roshetta Williams2 and Huey-Min Hwang1 1

Department of Biology, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch St., Jackson, MS 39217, USA Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch St., Jackson, MS 39217, USA 3 Department of Chemistry, Xavier University of Louisiana, 1 Drexel Dr., New Orleans, LA 70125, USA 2

Abstract: Many biomolecules including E. coli and DNA contain photoactive reducing agents that may induce cytotoxicity under light irradiation. Not fully understood are the mechanisms of interaction of those biomolecules with C60 fullerenes and the roles of light energy and dispersion medium. The clarification of these issues is critical to the adequate determination of fullerene phototoxicity as E. coli and DNA are widely used as indicators for toxicity evaluation. In the present work, the effect of light energy and aqueous dispersion media on the toxicity of C60 was assessed in the presence of E. coli and NADH that acted as both electron donors and toxicity indicators. Our results showed that the phototoxicity of C60 could be modified by electron donors and dispersion medium. E. coli and NADH are insensitive to visible light. The production of O2.- by C60 under visible irradiation was effected via the type I mechanism in the presence of E. coli or NADH. These reducing agents, however, could be excited by UVA light and undergo photosensitized type I reactions for O2.- production. UVA lightinduced toxicity therefore resulted from C60 reaction separately with both photoactive E. coli and NADH. The electron transfer from E. coli or NADH to C60 would somewhat suppress type I photo activity of E. coli or NADH but enhance the production of O2.- by C60, which could be further improved in solvents where C60 has a higher solubility. Based on the mechanisms proposed, the â&#x20AC;&#x153;bio-protectionâ&#x20AC;? effect in DMF as opposed to DMSO, reported within the E. coli system, might be attributed to the decreased photo activity of E. coli or NADH. It is reasonable to assume that the differences in cytotoxic behaviors from the two aqueous dispersion media resulted mainly from type I rather than type II mechanisms because of the short lifetime of 1O2 in aqueous solutions with only 1% organic solvents added. The differences in cytotoxicity from the two dispersion systems might result mainly from type I pathways. Schemes depicting the alteration of O2.- production under UVA- and visible light irradiation were proposed. Under our study conditions, DMF was found to be a green solvent by promoting the cytoprotective function of C60 fullerenes. Key words: C60 fullerenes, N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF), DMSO, E. coli, NADH, phototoxicity, superoxide radicals Acknowledgements: This study was supported in part by the following grants (1) JSU Interdisciplinary Center for Nanotoxicity - NSF HRD #0833178 and (2) National Science Foundation REU DMR- Award 0755499.


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DETERMINATION OF THE MECHANISM OF PHOTO INDUCED TOXICITY OF SELECTED METAL OXIDE NANOPARTICLES (ZnO, CuO, Co3O4 AND TiO2) TO E. COLI BACTERIA Thabitha P. Dasari1, Kavitha Pathakoti2 and Huey-Min Hwang1,2 1 2

Environmental Science Ph.D. Program, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA

Abstract: In this study the cyto-toxicity of selected metal oxide nanoparticles (ZnO, CuO, Co3O4 and TiO2) was investigated in E. coli both under the light and dark conditions. Cytotoxicity experiments were conducted with spread plate counting and the LC50 values were calculated. We determined the mechanism of toxicity via measurement ofoxidative stress, glutathione, lipid peroxidation, and ion analysis. The overall ranking of the LC50 values was in the order of ZnO< CuO< Co3O4< TiO2 and ZnO < CuO <TiO2< Co3O4 under dark and light conditions respectively. ZnO metal oxide NPs were the most toxic among the tested nanoparticles. Our results indicate the depletion of reduced glutathione levels and elevation of malondialdehyde levels correlated with the increase in oxidative stress levels. However the release of ions found to have partial effect on the toxicity of metal oxide NPs to E. coli. The dynamic interactions of multiple mechanisms lead to the toxicity of the tested metal oxide NPs to E. coli. Key words: Metal oxide nanoparticles, Reactive oxygen species, Median lethal concentration(LC50), Glutathione, Lipid peroxidation Acknowledgements: This study was supported by (1) NSF-SBIR grant # IIP-0823040 and (2) NSFCREST program with grant # HRD-0833178 (3) Strengthening the Environmental Science Ph.D. program in instruction, grant # P031B090210-11


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INVESTIGATING THE PHOTO-INDUCED TOXIC EFFECTS OF DOPED-TiO2 WITH VARIOUS BIOLOGICAL MODELS Shavonda M. Morrow, Kavitha Pathakoti, Huey-Min Hwang, Martha Taplin and Keonte Turner Department of Biology, Jackson State University, 1400 J.R. Lynch Street, Jackson, MS, Mississippi, USA Abstract: Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is one of the most widely used photocatalysts for the degradation of organic contaminants in water and air. However, their use for in situ remediation of contaminated water media is limited because of the weak absorption in visible light wavelengths. Consequently, development of doped-TiO2 is underway in the scientific community to expand its visible-light adsorption for field remediation. This study aims in developing environmentally safe nanotechnology by assessing the photo-induced toxicity of various doped TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) with human keratinocytes HaCaT cells, zebrafish liver cells (ZFL), and E. coli bacteria. In this study, sulfur and nitrogen-fluorine doped TiO2 were tested against various biological models in comparison to commercially available undoped TiO2 Degussa P-25 and Sigma-TiO2. All the TiO2 NPs were not toxic to HaCaT cells and ZFL cells under UV/visible light (VL) irradiation or dark conditions at concentrations up to 1000 ppm. N-F-TiO2 did not show any toxicity towards E. coli. S-TiO2 showed a moderate toxicity under UV or VL irradiation. It was also found that Degussa P-25 and Sigma-TiO2 were showing the highest photo-inactivation activity towards E. coli under UV irradiation. After VL irradiation Sigma-TiO2 was showing higher photo-inactivation activity, whereas S-TiO2 and Degussa P25 were showing moderate activity. Oxidative stress to E. coli occurred via formation of hydroxyl radicals leading to lipid peroxidation as the primary mechanism of bacterial inactivation. These findings also demonstrate that these TiO2 NPs do not show any adverse effects in HaCaT cells and ZFL cells. Key Words: Titanium dioxide, toxicity, HaCaT cells, Zebrafish liver cells, E. coli Acknowledgement: This study was supported by (1) NSF-CREST program with grant #HRD-0833178, and (2) NIH-RISE program with grant #5R25GM067122.


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SOCIOECONOMIC FACTORS AFFECTING TYPE II DIABETES IN MISSISSIPPI, ALABAMA, LOUISIANA, AND COLORADO Shavonda M. Morrow, Luma Akil and Hafiz A. Ahmad Biostatical Support Unit, Department of Biology, Jackson State University, 1400 J.R. Lynch Street, Jackson, MS, Mississippi, USA Abstract: Diabetes is a group of diseases marked by high levels of blood glucose resulting from defects in insulin production, insulin action, or both. There are different types of diabetes such as Type I, Type II, Type III, Prediabetes and Insulin Resistance, and Gestational. Recent studies have shown that diabetes rates vary by race and ethnicity, with African Americans and Hispanics adults are twice as likely as Caucasians adults to have Type II diabetes. The objective of this study was to examine relationships between the socioeconomic factors and diabetes in Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Louisiana (LA), and Colorado (CO). The socioeconomic factors included: age, gender, race, income level, and educational level. The data were obtained from the Center for Disease Controlâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BFRSS) and the American Diabetes Association. The data were analyzed using the General Linear Model (GLM) procedure of SAS software (SAS, Inc. v 9.1) to determine the significant difference in diabetes prevalence rate among the selected states with different socioeconomic variables followed by the Tukeyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s studentized range test for further classification. Colorado was chosen as a reference state for its lower diabetes rate compared to the southern states between the years of 2007 and 2010. Results indicated that AL had the highest diabetes rate in males with 12.5% and 13.9% for females in 2010 while CO had the lowest rate 6.7%. African Americans and Hispanics living in MS had the highest overall rate of Type II diabetes, 14.9% and 14.7% respectively. Keywords: Diabetes, Socioeconomic factors, African Americans, Caucasians, Hispanics Acknowledgements: The project described was supported by Grant Number G12RR013459 from the National Center of Research Resources and PGA-P210944 from DOS


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EFFECTS OF TEMPERATURE ON SALMONELLA INFECTIONS IN MISSISSIPPI Luma Akil1, Remata S. Reddy2 and H. Anwar Ahmad1 1

Department of Biology/Environmental Science, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University 1400 Lynch Street, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi, USA. 2Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS, USA Abstract: Salmonella is one of the most common pathogens associated with the foodborne illness. It is often transmitted by contaminated food or water. Emergence or resurgence of numerous infectious diseases is strongly influenced by environmental factors, such as climate, hydrologic cycle and ecological conditions. Mississippi is one of the southern states that had witnessed an extreme weather conditions in the past few years. In this study, the association between Salmonella outbreaks and temperature variations has been examined in Mississippi. Data, of reported Salmonella outbreaks for this study, were collected from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR). The metrological data, including average temperature, for Mississippi for the year 2005-2011, were retrieved from the Southeast Regional Climate Center. Results of this study showed a total of 467 reported cases of Salmonellosis for the study period in Mississippi. The highest yearly average of Salmonella outbreaks were reported in 2008 (13.25 Âą 15.21), while the highest monthly average were reported during the month of August (30.0 Âą 20.15). Regression analysis and time series analysis showed a positive correlation between temperature and Salmonella outbreaks. In conclusion, warmer temperatures may contribute to enteric infections including Salmonella infection. Predictive statistical modeling may help better understand the effects of temperature on the spread of Salmonella. Salmonella infection is an ongoing challenge and it is critical to understand underlying causes, such as climate variation and global warming. Key words: Salmonella, Temperature, Environment, Mississippi Acknowledgement: The project described was supported by Grant Number G12RR013459 from the National Center of Research Resources, and PGA-P210944 from the US Department of State.


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EFFECTS OF INCREASED TOBACCO PRICE ON NUMBER OF SMOKERS IN MISSISSIPPI FROM 2006-2010 Antia Cain, Luma Akil and H. Anwar Ahmad Department of Biology, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, Jackson, Mississippi, USA Abstract: Smoking is a centuries old practice that started around the 17thcentury in the United States and became popular in 19th century. As of 2010, in Mississippi, 22.7% of the adult population (18+ years old) is current smokers. Amongst the 599 addictive ingredients approved by the government in cigarettes, the major component is tobaccos, which are the leaves of a plant called Nicotiana. With a 6.5% markup, the tobacco prices in Mississippi have reached a significant high compared to the average US markup, which is 2%. It is hypothesized that if the price of tobacco keeps rising consistently, then the number of smokers will decline in the state of Mississippi. To evaluate this, â&#x20AC;&#x153;States & Reportsâ&#x20AC;? annual reports for Mississippi from 2006-2010 were used to determine various variables such as, year/price of tobacco vs. number of smokers, their age, race, education, and income. SAS software package was used to analyze this data. Initial results indicated that there has not been a significant decline in number of smokers in Mississippi, since the recent increase in tobacco sales tax. Though, there was not a significance overall, results have shown it is safe to conclude that from the years of 2007-2008 tobacco taxes were at a high in Mississippi which obviously affected the number of smokers in the age group of 18-24yrs. Key words: tobacco, smokers, sales tax Acknowledgements: This research was supported by LSMAMP, Center for Bioinformatics and Computational Biology and the Biostatistical Support Unit (NIH/RCMI grants 2G12RR003059-16 and G12 RR13459).


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CHILDHOOD OBESITY - PERSISTENT CONCERN AMONG YOUNG MISSISSIPPIANS Samuel Nittala and H. Anwar Ahmad Biostatistics Support Unit, NIH-Center for Environmental Health, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi, USA Abstract: Obesity is a major risk factor for chronic disease and can decrease longevity, quality of life, and economic productivity. It is recorded that there are estimated 9 million children and young adults that are overweight. During the recent years, Mississippi has developed into the top obese states in the United States. The objective of this project is to evaluate obesity level in children in Mississippi, their activity level and nutrition. The current generation is recorded to be the most physically inactive, compared with others in Mississippi. This is due to the decrease in school physical education, and access to only a limited amount of community recreational facilities. With this epidemic being prevalent in Mississippi in the past seven years; several actions have been taken to alleviate this. In order to prevent a high risk for future health related illnesses, one of the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s major health goals is to help the local community lose weight and better its general health. As recorded from the belly-fat-health news, Mississippi is one of the 20 states choosing school meal standards that are stricter than the USDA standards. In order to raise awareness and amend this problem, federal government has funded grants through the Mississippi Department of Education, such as: Five Star Food Grant, Nutrition Integrity Grant, Committed to Move Grant, and more throughout the years as a response to the Healthy Students Act in 2007. Key words: Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Obesity, Mississippi, Nutrition, activity level Acknowledgements: The project described was supported by Grant Number G12RR013459 from the National Center of Research Resources, and PGA-P210944 from the US Department of State.


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VALIDATION OF NEW THEURAPEUTIC TARGET FOR EARLY DETECTION OF GLIOBLASTOMA Jennifer Sims, Kenneth Ndebele, Barbara Graham and Paul Tchounwou Laboratory of Cancer Immunology Target Identification and Validation, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi, USA. Abstract: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common aggressive brain cancer with a median survival of approximately 1 to 2 years. Our recent strategic efforts have focused on identifying environmental factors, such as exposure to phthalates and novel molecular targets that could be therapeutically developed. In data mining studies, we found a plethora of potential glioblastoma therapeutic targets and biomarkers. We have identified a small set of the most promising plasma membrane and secretory candidates. Using raw data from several independent glioblastoma transcriptome data-sets, we employed an optimized meta-analysis strategy. In this approach, the candidate genes generated for each dataset were combined and statistically evaluated to pinpoint genes that are differentially expressed in glioblastoma compared to matched normal brain cells. These results were used to generate a 10-gene classifier that predicted glioblastoma with high sensitivity and specificity in the training sets and in several independent validation sets that included normal brain and non-malignant brain cells as control. S100P emerged as the top priority therapeutic target. S100P is a transmembrane and secreted protein. It promotes cancer progression via its specific roles in cell proliferation, survival, metastasis, and apoptosis. The selection of S100P is based on: 1) experimental in vitro and in vivo evidence supporting a causative relevance in the development and/or progression of cancer; 2) high frequency of overexpression and strong association with glioblastoma; 3) restricted expression in normal tissues limiting expected overlap; 4) overexpression in other cancers suggesting broad development potential. We hypothesize that S100P is a high priority therapeutic target that is essential for glioblastoma development and progression as a result to phthalate exposure. siRNA and shRNA against this novel target are anticipated to exhibit strong efficacy against glioblastoma. Key words: Glioblastoma, S100P, and Phthalate Acknowledgements: This research was financially supported by the NIH-RCMI Grant No. 1G12RR13459, NIH-NIMHD Grant No. 8G12MD007581, and DoEd Grant No. P031B090210.


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Di (n-pentyl) PHTHALATE (DnPP, DPeP) INDUCES EPITHELIAL MESENCHYMAL TRANSITION (EMT) and ANTI-ANDROGENIC ACTIVITY THROUGH THE DOWN REGULATION OF TMPRSS4 MEDIATED PATHWAYS IN PANCREATIC CANCER CELL LINES Carvey Patterson, Kenneth Ndebele, Barbara Graham and Paul Tchounwou Laboratory of Cancer Immunology Target Identification and Validation, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi, USA. Abstract: Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a truly devastating disease, as marked by a mortality rate, which is nearly equivalent to its incidence rate. The extremely aggressive nature of the disease, in conjunction with the general absence of diagnosable symptoms translates into most patients being diagnosed after the cancer has spread to regional (26%) and/or distant sites (52%). Given that the 5-year relative survival rate for patients with locally advanced and metastatic disease is 8.2% and 1.8%, respectively, the prognosis of nearly all pancreatic cancer patients is dismal. The most current cancer treatments typically fail to control disease progression and surgical resection of localized tumors. These treatments serve as the only potentially curative options for pancreatic cancer. The ability to detect pancreatic cancer during its early treatable stage is a considerable challenge and paving the way to this challenge is imperative for improving the survival rate of pancreatic cancer patients. Consequently, there is a dire need to identify and develop novel biologically relevant, reliable, cost-effective, early detection biomarkers, and find environmental factors that influence gene expression for pancreatic cancer. In our preliminary studies, we have identified an environmental chemical phthalate ester and a putative biomarker, TMPRSS4 as a novel marker for detection of pancreatic cancer. Phthalates constitute a large class of plasticizer compounds that are widely used for many consumer product applications and TMPRSS4 is a novel type II transmembrane serine protease that is highly expressed on the cell surface in pancreatic, thyroid and other cancer tissues at various levels. Studies show that TMPRSS4 caused significant changes in: gene expression/transcript maturation of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers including cadherin switching, p120ctn isoform switching and mesenchymal marker up regulation, changes in cellular behaviors such as substantial morphological changes, enhanced motility, and invasiveness suggesting that TMPRSS4 is a novel regulator of the molecular networks that induce EMT. Therefore, we hypothesize that silencing TMPRSS4 potentiates Di (n- pentyl) Phthalate in the induction of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT), and androgenic activity in pancreatic cancer cell lines. The potential use and study for both phthalate esters and TMPRSS4 as a biomarker for pancreatic cancer detection or as a predictor of patient's outcome warrants further investigation. Keywords: Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma, TMPRSS4, Di (n- pentyl) Phthalate, epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT), RNAi Acknowledgements: This research was financially supported by the NIH-RCMI Grant No. 1G12RR13459, NIH-NIMHD Grant No. 8G12MD007581, and DoEd Grant No. P031B090210.


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QUANTIFICATION AND ANALYSIS OF HARMFUL CYANOBACTERIAL BLOOMS USING FIELD AND SATELLITE DATA IN LAKE GRENADA, MISSISSIPPI, USA Daniel Kibet1, Padmanava Dash2, Wellington Ayensu2, Julius Ikenga3 and James L. Pinckney4 1

Mississippi Valley State University, 14000 Highways 82 W., Itta Bena, Mississippi, 38941, USA2Department of Biology, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi, USA 3 Department of Natural Sciences and Environmental Health, Mississippi Valley State University, 14000 Highway 82 W., Itta Bena, Mississippi, 38941, USA 4 Marine Science Program and Department of Biological Sciences, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina 29208, USA Abstract: Harmful algal blooms (HABs)are phytoplankton bloom events involving toxic or other negative impacts to other organisms. The main objective of this study was to quantify and analyze HABs using field and satellite data in Lake Grenada, Mississippi, in USA. First, time-series of satellite data (January 2010 - July 2012) from several satellite sensors were processed to generate true color images for obtaining information about phytoplankton occurring in Lake Grenada. Many satellite sensors such as Medium Resolution imaging Spectrum (MERIS), Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Sea-viewing Wide Fieldâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;of-view Sensor (SeaWiFs) have made it possible to exploit large amount of data to support studies such as mapping of phytoplankton blooms. Field data were collected on 20 June, 2012 around noon targeting the time of satellite overpass. During the trip twelve sites in Lake Grenada were sampled. The field data included the collection of water samples in clean Nalgene bottles, in situ water quality data using a portable Hanna Instrument (HI769828) and in situ remote sensing reflectance measurements using a GER (Geophysical and Environmental Research) 1500 spectrometer. The water samples were collected for High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) photo-pigments, the cyanobacteria unique pigment phycocyanin (PC), Colored Dissolved Organic Matter (CDOM), Suspend Particulate Matter (SPM), toxin, and microscopic analyses. In addition, the absorption coefficients of total particulate, phytoplankton and non-algal particulate matter (NAP) were measured in the laboratory from the water samples collected on the field trips using the quantitative filter pad technique (QFT). Retrospective true color satellite images clearly showed several phytoplankton bloom events in Lake Grenada. HPLC analysis of the collected water samples on 20 June 2012 for algal pigments revealed that the dominant algal groups were cyanobacteria, cryptophytes, euglenophytes and diatoms. The chlorophyll a concentrations were higher towards the southwest portion of the lake, which signifies higher concentration of phytoplankton in that region. The toxin analysis indicated the presence of high concentration of the toxin, microcystin that is produced by cyanobacteria present in the lake. This study demonstratesthat certainly Lake Grenada has HABs problem. Key Words: Harmful Algal Blooms, phytoplankton, cyanobacteria, microcystin Acknowledgements: This work was funded by MS INBRE, Title III HBGI USDE Grant PO31B090210-11, and NASA NICE Grant NNX10AB49A.


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QUANTIFYING THE CONCENTRATION OF HARMFUL ALGAL BLOOMS IN LAKE ENID, MISSISSIPPI, USA Joyce Chumo1, Padmanava Dash2, Wellington Ayensu2, Julius Ikenga3 and James L. Pinckney4 1

Mississippi Valley State University, 14000 Highway 82 W., Itta Bena, Mississippi, 38941, USA Department of Biology, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi, USA 3 Department of Natural Sciences and Environmental Health, Mississippi Valley State University, 14000 Highway 82 W., Itta Bena, Mississippi, 38941, USA 4 Marine Science Program and Department of Biological Sciences, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina 29208, USA 2

Abstract: Algal blooms can block the sunlight that other organisms need to live, deplete the oxygen and some can produce toxins that are harmful to the health of the total ecosystem including animals and humans. Thus they are termed as harmful algal blooms (HABs). In freshwater systems, cyanobacteria are the major harmful algal group. Cyanobacteria are single celled photosynthetic gram positive prokaryotes, and have pigments like chlorophyll a, carotenoids, and phycobilins. The objective of this research was to quantify the concentration of harmful algal blooms or HABs in Lake Enid, Mississippi, USA using remote sensing data and laboratory analyses. As a first step, data from satellite sensors such as Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS), Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Sea-viewing Wide Fieldâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) were used to generate true-color images those were used to infer the presence or absence of algal blooms in Lake Enid for a three year period from 2010 to 2012. Consequently, field data were collected on 20 June, 2012 at twelve sites in Lake Enid. The field data included the collection of water samples in clean Nalgene bottles, in situ water quality data using a portable Hanna Instrument (HI769828) and in situRrs measurements using a GER (Geophysical and Environmental Research) 1500 spectrometer. The water samples were collected for High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) photo pigments, the cyanobacteria unique pigment phycocyanin (PC), Colored Dissolved Organic Matter (CDOM), Suspend Particulate Matter (SPM), absorption coefficient, toxin, and microscopic analyses. Frequent algal bloom events were observed in the preliminary analysis of time-series of satellite data during 2010-2012. HPLC results showed that cyanobacteria achieved highest abundance in Lake Enid on the field trip date. The toxin analysis revealed high concentration of microcystin (higher than 5 Âľg/L in 50 ml of water sample) in the surface water of Lake Enid. The time-series of satellite data and field data demonstrated high concentration of harmful algal blooms, which can be a major concern to the water quality of Lake Enid. Key Words: Harmful Algal Blooms, phytoplankton, cyanobacteria, microcystin Acknowledgements: This work was funded by MS INBRE, Title III HBGI USDE Grant PO31B090210-11, and NASA NICE Grant NNX10AB49A.


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DETECTION OF HARMFUL ALGAL BLOOMS IN LAKE SARDIS, MISSISSIPPI, USA Marlon Flowers1, Padmanava Dash2, Wellington Ayensu2, Julius Ikenga3 and James L. Pinckney4 1

Mississippi Valley State University, 14000 Highway 82 W., Itta Bena, Mississippi, 38941, USA Department of Biology, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi, USA 3 Department of Natural Sciences and Environmental Health, Mississippi Valley State University, 14000 Highway 82 W., Itta Bena, Mississippi, 38941, USA 4 Marine Science Program and Department of Biological Sciences, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina 29208, USA 2

Abstract: The purpose of this research was to examine the water quality of Lake Sardis in Mississippi, USA for the presence of harmful algal blooms (HABs). Our approach involved processing of true color satellite images retrospectively followed by field sampling and measurement of the concentration of phytoplankton and several other water quality parameters. Satellite data from several sensors such as Medium Resolution imaging Spectrometer (MERIS), Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Sea-viewing Wide Fieldâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) were processed and true color images were generated. These images were used to detect the presence or absence of algal blooms in Lake Sardis for a period of two and a half years from January 2010 to July 2012. To know the concentrations quantitatively, a field campaign was performed on 26 June 2012 to Lake Sardis to collect water samples at twelve separate sites for analysis in the laboratory. The laboratory analyses of the water samples included the following: High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) analysis for the quantification of pigments, analysis for the cyanobacteria specific pigment phycocyanin, Colored Dissolved Organic Matter (CDOM) analysis, Suspended Particulate Matter (SPM) analysis, microscopic analysis, toxin analysis, and determination of absorption coefficients of total particulate, phytoplankton, and non-algal particulate matter. The true color MERIS and high resolution MODIS images clearly showed the presence of algal blooms in Lake Sardis whereas the spatial resolution of SeaWiFS sensor was not adequate to resolve the algal blooms in the lake at the same time when phytoplankton blooms were observed in the MERIS and MODIS images. The HPLC pigment data clearly showed the dominance of cyanobacteria at the sites towards the southwest portion of the lake. The toxin (microcystin) levels were higher than 5 Âľg/L in 50 ml of water sample that was analyzed for each site. The presence of algal blooms together with the toxin levels demonstrates that the HABs can be a concern to Lake Sardis water quality. Key words: Harmful Algal Blooms, phytoplankton, cyanobacteria, microcystin Acknowledgements: This work was funded by MS INBRE, Title III HBGI USDE Grant PO31B090210-11, and NASA NICE Grant NNX10AB49A.


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DETECTION AND QUANTIFICATION OF HARMFUL ALGAL BLOOMS (HABs) IN THE ROSS BARNETT RESERVOIR, JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI, USA Winny Tanui1, Padmanava Dash2, Wellington Ayensu2, Julius Ikenga3 and James L. Pinckney4 1

Mississippi Valley State University, 14000 Highway 82 W., Itta Bena, Mississippi, 38941, USA Department of Biology, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi, USA 3 Department of Natural Sciences and Environmental Health, Mississippi Valley State University, 14000 Highway 82 W., Itta Bena, Mississippi, 38941, USA 4 Marine Science Program and Department of Biological Sciences, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina 29208, USA 2

Abstract: The toxin producing blooms of phytoplankton cause water quality problems thus limiting aquatic habitats, recreational activities and fisheries in addition to taste and odor problems. Hence, monitoring the mechanisms through which Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) cause diseases is of great interest. The Ross Barnett reservoir serves as the main drinking water source and the major recreational destination for the greater Jackson area. This study was focused on the detection and quantification of harmful algal blooms that occur in the Ross Barnett reservoir. It has been shown that quantitative mapping and monitoring of the spatial and temporal variation of near surface phytoplankton during bloom conditions is possible using satellite data. To investigate the presence or absence of phytoplankton blooms, a time-series of satellite data from the satellite sensors- SeaWiFS (Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor),) MODIS (Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer), and MERIS (Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer) were processed and true color images were generated. Two field campaigns were performed, one on 13 June 2012 and another on 29 June 2012, to obtain water samples for HPLC (High performance Liquid Chromatography)photo-pigments, the cyanobacteria unique pigment phycocyanin (PC), Colored Dissolved Organic Matter (CDOM), Suspended Particulate Matter (SPM), absorption, toxin, and microscopic analyses. The time-series of true color satellite images from January 2010 to July 2012 clearly indicated the presence of phytoplankton blooms in the Ross Barnett reservoir. The field data collected during the two field campaigns indicated the presence of several harmful algal groups including cyanobacteria and diatoms. The toxin analysis indicated the presence of high concentration of the toxin, microcystin which is hepatotoxic. The findings in this study demonstrate the need to continuously monitor the water quality of Ross Barnett reservoir for harmful algal blooms. Key words: Harmful Algal Blooms, phytoplankton, phycotoxins, cyanobacteria, microcystin Acknowledgements: This work was funded by MS INBRE, Title III HBGI USDE Grant PO31B090210-11, and NASA NICE Grant NNX10AB49A.


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PLANT BIOTECHNOLOGY: STANDARDIZATION OF NUTRIENT MEDIA FOR TISSUE CULTURE Briana Lee and Murty S. Kambhampati Department of Biology, College of Arts and Sciences, Southern University at New Orleans, 6400 Press Drive, New Orleans, LA 70126, USA Abstract: Plant tissue culture is a technique that is needed in the improvement and enhancement of crops in agriculture. Plant tissue culture is a collection of techniques that are used to develop and maintain plant cells, tissues, and organs under sterile conditions. The long-term goal for this study is to apply tissue culture techniques in crop improvement. The short-term of this research project is to standardize the best possible nutrient media for tissue culture. We hypothesize that callus formation and organogenesis in different crop plants respond differently to the same plant stimulators. Effect of various combinations of different media (MS Basal Medium with Vitamins, LB Agar, MS Basal Salt Mixture, and MS Basal Medium with Gamborg Vitamins) and different hormones (BAP, 2,4-D, NAA, IBA, Kinetin, and IAA) were investigated for callus formation using different plant parts (epicotyl, hypocotyl, leaf explants, endosperm and embryo). Plants that were used in the study were both monocot and dicot: alfalfa, corn, pea, peanut, sunflower, and tobacco. Dry seeds were sterilized for germination of seedlings and extraction of endosperm and embryos; mature leaves were also sterilized for leaf explants. Seedlings were used for epicotyl and hypocotyl explants. MS Basal Medium with Vitamins supplemented with BAP, 2,4-D and kinetin was the most suitable for callus formation with the highest percentage of response: 100% peanut embryo and hypocotyl; peanut and sunflower endosperm. All media supplemented with NAA, 2-4 D, and kinetin had an overall low response of callus formation. The data in this study is supported by previous studies in which, BAP and 2,4-D induced a high percentage of callus response. MS Medium with Vitamins proved to be a source for complete plant regeneration for many different plants with the use of multiple plant parts. Key words: Biotechnology, plant tissue culture, callus, nutrient media, 2,4-D, IAA, BAP, Kinetin Acknowledgements: This research is supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF HRD0928797).


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ECOPHYSIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF NITROGEN ON SOYBEANS [GLYCINE MAX (L.)MERR.] Ifeanyi Chukwu O. Onor and Murty S. Kambhampati Department of Biology, College of Arts and Sciences, Southern University at New Orleans, 6400 Press Drive, New Orleans, LA 70126, USA Abstract: Soybeans [Glycine max (L.) Merr.]belong to the family Leguminoceae; which include legume crops such as beans and peas. Legumes are of high nutritional value because of their high protein content and abundance of essential amino acids. Soybeans perform nitrogen fixation by establishing symbiotic relationship with the bacterium Bradyrhizobium japonicum. Prior research report low yield and performance of soybeans subjected to fertilizers containing nitrogen. The goal of this research was to determine optimal nitrogen requirement for the growth of soybeans as a part of environmental and plant health. We hypothesized that increasing the concentration of nitrogen in soil should enhance soybean growth and productivity. Specific objectives for this experiment were to observe the plants for: a) the growth rate, b) morphological deformities, and c) chlorophyll concentration in the leaves. Plants were grown in replicates of four under three soil nitrogen amendments: low, medium, and high concentrations of modified Hoagland nutrient solution and subsequently, were kept under controlled environmental conditions in Biotronette® Environmental chamber. A control group, without soil nitrogen amendments, was compared to the three soil nitrogen amendments. Temperature of the environmental chamber was regulated at 27°C and the photoperiod was set to 10L: 14D. Nutrient solution (50mL) was added twice to the soil at the seedling stage and a week before harvest. Growth rate, morphological deformities and leaf chlorophyll were periodically observed and recorded. Plants grown in low and medium nutrient treatment had the highest growth rate (1.2 ± 0.0995 cm/day) in comparison with plants grown in control and high nutrient treatment plants (1.1±0.1565 cm/day). Leaf necrosis was severe in the high nutrient conditions compared to medium treatment, low treatment and control plants, possibly because of the high osmotic pressure of the concentration of nitrogen in the medium. The chlorophyll concentration of the plants declined in general after the second addition of the nutrients, but the low treatment plants had the highest total chlorophyll concentration (315.8 ± 26.9 µg/mL/gFW), while the medium had the least total chlorophyll concentration (298 ± 20.6 µg/mL/gFW). The low nutrient amendments had the optimal effect on plant growth. The low nutrient amendments also had no necrosis. Future research will focus on examining the effect of nitrogen on nodule formation in soybeans. Keywords: Soybeans, Nitrogen fixation, Growth rate, Morphological deformities, Chlorophyll concentration Acknowledgements: This research was supported by a grant from the National Science Foundation (Grant No. HRD-0102620).


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ACUTE TOXICOLOGY: EFFECTS OF Cu ON GRASS SHRIMP (PALAEMONETES PUGIO L.) Van Tu Vu and Murty S. Kambhampati Department of Natural Sciences, College of Arts and Sciences, Southern University at New Orleans, 6400 Press Dr., P.O Box 70126, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA Abstract: Acute toxicity of copper on grass shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio L.) at varying concentrations of salinities was investigated. Water in aquaria was stabilized in order to maintain test subjects. Test subjects were acclimated in aquaria of 5, 10, and 20 ppt salinity levels for 10 days before toxicity tests were initiated. Test subjects were treated with 0.25, 0.50, 1.0, 2.0, and 4.0 ppm Cu to determine LC50 in replicates of 4. We hypothesized that test subjects would survive in 4.0 ppm Cu in all salinity levels; mortality rate would be lower in higher salinity levels. Water quality for dissolved oxygen, pH, temperature, salinity, and ammonia nitrogen were measured in aquaria at weekly intervals throughout the studies. Data collection for mortality rates were taken at 3, 6, 9, 12, 24, 48, 72, and 96 h. Lethal median concentration (LC50) values were determined at the end of each set of experiments. Morphological effects of Cu were documented with specific focus on the abnormalities of the head, abdomen, and tail. At 20 ppt salinity, mortality rate was lower compared to 5 and 10 ppt salinity; toxicity test at 20 ppt salinity failed to reach LC 50. In contrast to 20 ppt salinity, experiments at 5 ppt yielded more LC50 values along with a faster rate of mortality. Lower levels of salinity gave more potency to toxins used in research; higher levels salinity decreases potency of a toxin. Grass shrimp survive better at a higher salinity level in presence of toxin in water medium. Key words: Palaemonetes pugio, Copper, LC50, acute toxicity, water quality, salinity Acknowledgments: We thank the National Science Foundation (NSF-HRD-0928797) for financial support to carry out this research project.


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STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS - USE OF BODY SAMPLING TO ESTABLISH COMMUNITY PATHOGENS Teresha McGriff, Ann M. Stewart-Akers and Robert Wolff South University-Columbia, 9 Science Court, Columbia, SC 29203, USA Abstract: Staphylococcus aureus is part of natural biota of humans and other mammals, establishing itself on the skin, eyes, and mucus membranes. S.aureus can cause infections of the skin, deeper soft tissue and food poisoning through the release of exotoxins. This gram-positive cocci is a non-spore forming, non-motile, and catalase-positive bacteria. By having a thick cell wall, S. aureus is more resistant to antimicrobial drug therapy. S. aureus is responsible for a myriad of infections. It is the most common causes of both endemic and epidemic infections acquired in hospitals. Due to the increase of resistance, S. aureus infections have become difficult to treat. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a highly infectious strain of bacteria. In recent times, MRSA infections have gone from being a controllable condition, limited mostly to healthcare settings HA-MRSA, to now being a major public health with infection outbreaks occurring in the communities CA-MRSA. The most common sampling site is nares; however, other body sites can carry these bacteria. We hypothesized; S. aureus can be passed around the community through casual contact with skin sites, such as the web of fingers (F) , wrist (W), and nares (N). In this preliminary study, normal biota from these three body sites was examined from 7 subjects. Swabs were used to collect bacteria from the F, W and N sites and samples were placed on to Mannitol Salt Agar (MSA) to select for the Staphlyococcussp.. The plates were incubated for 24 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 48 hours and colonies from the plates were selected for testing antibiotic resistance. A Kirby-Bauer assay was used to measure the antibiotic resistance to eight different antibiotics and the zones of inhibition present after 24 hour incubation was used to determine the sensitivity of the bacteria to the antibiotic using established values. 86% of the samples showed some resistance to antibiotics. 66% of the samples were resistant to Penicillin (14/21), 20% to Erythromycin (4/21), 14% to Chloramphenicol (3/21), 5% to Kanamycin, 5% to Streptomycin (1/21), and no resistance was measured to Neomycin, Novobiocin, or Tetracycline. Furthermore, 40% of the samples tested were shown to be MRSA using a ChromaMRSA agar plates. When the antibiotic resistance at the various body sites was examined 100% of the N samples (7/7) showed some resistance, 86% of the W samples (6/7), and 57% of the F samples (4/7). Furthermore, each person carried different bacteria at each site based on different antibiotic resistance patterns measured for each sample. This data shows that just testing with nares when looking for MRSA, as many of the published studies have used to establish MRSA carriage, may not sufficient. Testing of the other bodies parts may help in understanding how bacteria can be passed, not only in hospital settings, but maybe more importantly throughout the community. By testing these sites, we can survey the community of potential pathogens. The wrist and finger body parts are more likely to touch objects and therefore be important in the community spread of antibiotic resistant bacteria. Key words: Staphylococcus aureus, antibiotic resistance, CA-MRSA, potential pathogens


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USE OF FOMITES TO TRACK ENTERIC BACTERIA RESISTANCE WITHIN A COMMUNITY Victoria A. Davis, Ann M. Stewart-Akers and Robert Wolff South University, 9 Science Court Columbia, SC 29306, USA Abstract: The spread of bacteria in communities has been and still is a major public health concern. Escherichia coli 0157:H7, a possible nosocomial pathogen can persist on inanimate objects for weeks or even months, causing server illnesses including bloody diarrhea and haemolytic uremic syndrome. Each year it is estimated that more than 2.2 million lives are lost due to these infections, more than malaria, HIV/AIDS and measles combined. Many factors lead to individuals coming into contact with pathogens. Bacteria may be passed directly through hand to hand contact from fomites such as door knobs, bank machines, public restrooms, and money. Paper currency is least considered when thinking about the spread of bacteria. However paper currency is widely used to purchase goods as well many other services in the community, making it a good vehicle to track the spread of pathogens. We hypothesize this fomite can be used to determine the enteric bacteria present in an area. To examine the bacteria carried by money, dollar bills were pressed onto and cultured on EMB agar. A bacterial colony was gram stained and the negative rods were then inoculated into an Enterotube II. Bacteria identified by the Enterotube IIâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, a multitest system, included Shigella, Acienetobacter, Serratia, and Proteus. Many of the bacteria being gram negative demonstrated resistance to Penicillin G. Other antibiotic sensitivity tested included, Streptomycin, Erythromycin, Neomycin, Novobiocin, Kanamycin, Tetracycline, Chloramphenicol. Many of the bacteria tested showed resistance to 3 or more antibiotics suggesting that multi-drug resistant enteric bacteria are common. We suggest that monitoring the antibiotic resistance of the enteric bacteria within a community may be a first line signaling emerging antibiotic resistance. Keywords: Enteric bacteria, Fomite, Antibiotic resistance, Paper currency, Shigella, EnterotubeII multitest system


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HEPATOTOXICITY STUDY OF TWO DIFFERENT SIZE SILVER NANOPARTICLES IN SPRAGUE-DAWLEY RATS Anita K. Patlolla, Tina Moore and Paul B.Tchounwou Molecular Toxicology Research Laboratory, NIH-RCMI Center for Environmental Health, College of Science Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS, USA. Abstract: The antibacterial effect of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) has resulted in their extensive application in health, electronic, and household products. Due to the intensive commercial application of Ag-NPs, their health risk assessment is of great importance. The previous in vitro studies demonstrated that AgNPs caused toxicity in various cell-lines. However, the data on the toxicity of Ag-NPs in vivo is largely lacking. The main objective of this study was to determine the effect of two different diameter sizes (6nm, 10nm) silver nanoparticles on certain liver enzymes (alanine ALT, aspartate AST and alkaline phosphatase ALP) in serum of Sprague-Dawley rats. Four groups of five male rats, each weighing approximately 80 + 2 g, were administered orally, once a day for five days with doses of 5, 25, 50, 100, mg/kg body weight (BW) of Ag-NPs. A control group was also made of five rats. Serum was collected following standard protocols, and the activity of the liver enzymes (ALT, AST and ALP) was determined by colorimeteric method. The results demonstrated that Ag-NPs exposure increased the activities of the liver enzymes (ALT, AST, ALP) in exposed groups compared to control. The increase in the activity was larger in 6nm size AgNPs compared to 10nm size. Only the highest two concentrations 50 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg showed statistically significant increases in ALT and ALP in both diameter size AgNPs compared to control. AST activity showed an increase; however, it was not statistically significant compared to control. Furthermore, the smallest sized AgNPs (6nm size) had a greater ability to induce hepatic damage in Sprague-Dawley rats than the other sized AgNPs (10 nm). These data suggest that the AgNPs-induced hepatotoxic effects against tissue cells are particle sizedependent, and thus, the particle size needs careful consideration in the design of the nanoparticles for biomedical uses. Keywords: silver nanoparticles, hepatotoxicity, serum aminotransferases, Sprague-Dawley rats, Acknowledgement This research was supported by grants from U.S. Department of Defense through the Engineer, Research and Development Center #W912HZ-10-2-0045 (CMCM) and National Institutes of Health-RCMI Center for Environmental Health (Grant No. 2G12RR01349-15) at Jackson State University.


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EFFECT OF SILVER NANOPARTICLES IN THREE DIFFERENT BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS Tammy Epting1,2, Beth Thrasher1,2, Paul Tchounwou2 and Anita Patlolla2 1

Wingfield High School Teachers (CESTEME Summer Program), Jackson, MS, USA Molecular Toxicology Research Laboratory, NIH- Center for Environmental Health, CSET, JSU, Jackson, MS, USA 2

Abstract: Nanomaterials are part of an industrial revolution to develop lightweight but strong materials for a variety of purposes. Due to the novel physical and chemical properties of nanoscale materials, nanomaterials have been used to create new consumer products as well as applications for life sciences and biotechnology. Chemically, the nanoparticles are very diverse. It is estimated that of all the nanomaterials used in consumer products, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) currently have the highest degree of commercialization, so they are more likely to be exposed to humans and to the environment at large. The main objective of this study was to determine the effect of two different diameter size (10nm, 20 nm) silver nanoparticles in three different biological systems. Plant growth pattern in Zea maize (corn), liver enzyme (aminotransferases) activity in serum of Sprague-Dawley rats, and cytotoxic effect in normal human dermal fibroblasts cells were the biomarkers in three different systems that were used as toxicity endpoints. The three experiments were performed following standard protocols. Silver nanoparticle exposure induced a decrease in both shoot length and root length in Zea maize compared to control. The decrease in shoot length was statistically significant in a dose and size-dependent manner; however decrease in root length was not statistically significant with both dose and size. The activity of serum aminotransferases (alanine & aspartate) increased, but only the highest doses (50 mg/kg & 100 mg/kg) were statistically significant compared to control. Cytotoxicity could not be performed due to closing of the program. From this study we infer that AgNPs might cause damage to any biological system. Therefore it is imperative to determine a relatively inexpensive and commonly used short-term assay for evaluation of the biological hazards of nanoparticles to human health and the environment. Keywords: Silver nanoparticles, Zea maize, Sprague-Dawley rats, human dermal fibroblast cells, serum aminotransferases, root length, shoot length, cytotoxicity. Acknowledgements: This research was made possible by funding from the CESTEME Grant (Proposal # 58775-RT-REP) provided by the Department of Defense to Jackson State University.


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TGF-β EFFECTS ON PROSTATE CANCER CELL MIGRATION ARE MEDIATED BY PGE2 ACTIVATION OF PI3K/AKT PATHWAY BaoHan T. Vo, Derrick Morton, Jr., Shravan Komaragiri, Ana Cecille Millena and Shafiq A. Khan Center for Cancer Research and Therapeutic Development and Department of Biological Sciences, Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta, GA 30314, USA Abstract: Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) plays an important role in the progression of prostate cancer. It exhibits both tumor suppressor and tumor promoting activities. Correlations between COX-2 over expression and enhanced production of PGE2 have been implicated in cancer progression; however, there are no studies indicating that TGF-β effects on cell migration in prostate cancer cells involve PGE2 synthesis. In this study, we investigated TGF-β regulation of COX-1 and COX-2 expression in prostate cancer cells and if the effects of TGF-β on cell proliferation and migration are mediated by PGE2. Normal prostate epithelial cells and prostate cancer cells were used. Western blot analysis for COX-1, COX-2, p-AKT, and AKT expressions, enzyme immunoassay for PGE2 secretion, MTT assay for cell proliferation, and in vitro cell migration assays were performed. COX-1 protein was ubiquitously expressed in all prostate cell lines; however, high levels of COX-2 protein were only detected in prostate cancer cells. Treatment with exogenous TGF-β increased COX-2 protein levels and PGE2 secretion in PC3 cells. Exogenous PGE2 and PGF2α had no effects on cell proliferation in LNCaP, DU145, and PC3 cells. On the other hand, PGE2, PGF2α, and TGF-β induced migratory behavior in PC3 cells, but not in DU145 cells. Additionally, both PGE2 and TGF-β induced phosphorylation of AKT was blocked by antagonists of PGE2 (EP4) receptors (L161982, AH23848) and PI3-kinase inhibitor (LY294002) in PC3 cells. Pretreatment with L161982, AH23848, or LY294002 also blocked the stimulatory effects of both PGE2 and TGF-β on cell migration. We conclude that TGF-β increases COX2 levels and PGE2 secretion in prostate cancer cells which, in turn, mediate TGF-β effects on cell migration through the activation of PI3K/AKT pathway. Key words: TGF-β, PGE2, COX-2, PI3K/AKT pathway, prostate cancer, cell migration Acknowledgements: These studies were supported by the NIH/NCRR/RCMI grant #2G12RR003062, NIH P20 grant #5P20MD002285-02, DOD grant #W8I-08-1-0077 and NIGMS/NIH (MBRS/RISE) grant #2R25GM060414.


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EXTRACTION OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM MORINGA OLEIFERA LEAVES AND ITS ANTIOXIDANT ACTIVITY USING DPPH ASSAY Racquel J. Wright1, Andrew O. Wheatley1,2, Hyacinth I. Hyacinth3, Jacqueline M. Hibbert3 Ken S. Lee4, Marvin E. Reid5 and Helen N. Asemota1,2 1

Biotechnology Centre, 2Department of Basic Medical Sciences (Biochemistry Section), University of the West Indies Mona, Kingston 7, Jamaica 3 Microbiology, Biochemistry & Immunology Department, Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA 4 Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS, USA, 5Sickle Cell Unit, University Hospital of the West Indies, Mona, Kingston 7, Jamaica Abstract: Persons with sickle cell anemia (SCA) have increased oxidative stress which leads to chronic inflammation and organ damage which in turn reduces life expectancy. Antioxidants cause a reduction in oxidative stress. Moringa oleiefera leaves are a potential source of antioxidants. Extracts from Moringa oleifera leaves (grown in Jamaica) were evaluated for anti-oxidant activity of extracts. Leaf extracts were prepared using non-polar and polar solvents for a total of 7 fractions. Leaf extracts were prepared and purified based on solvent polarity using hexane, chloroform, butanol and water. Each fraction’s antioxidant activity was tested using 2, 2-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay and the extracts were labeled E, E1-E5 and A. A standard curve of Trolox (a vitamin E analogue) was generated to calculate the antioxidant activity. The percentage of DPPH reduced and IC 50 (the amount of antioxidant needed to reduce 50% of DPPH) were calculated from mean absorbance values. Extracts E1 and E2 had IC50 values of 1423µg/ml and 4458µg/ml respectively, while extracts E, E3, E4, E5 and A had approximately 2 to 6 times lower IC50 values of 835µg/ml, 177µg/ml, 1100µg/ml, 524µg/ml and 1004µg/ml respectively. Lower IC50 values correlate with greater antioxidant activity of the extract; therefore extracts E3 and E5 had the best antioxidant activities. Extracts E3 and E5 were prepared from the most polar solvents used, 1-butanol and water respectively. In general, extracts prepared using polar solvents (E, E3, E4, E5 and A) had better antioxidant activity (lower IC50) compared with those from non-polar solvents (E1 and E2). These extracts therefore may have clinical applications in diseases where there is a chronic state of oxidative stress. Keywords: Antioxidant activity; DPPH, Moringa oleifera; sickle cell anemia; oxidative stress Acknowledgements: This research was funded by grants from the Eagle-i consortium, supported by NCRR (award #U24 RR 029825) ; The Biotechnology Centre and Office of Graduate Studies University of the West Indies, Mona, Jamaica.


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INVESTIGATING THE MOLECULAR MECHANISM OF INHIBITION OF PROLIFERATION OF HUMAN PROSTATE CANCER (PC-3) CELLS BY FRACTIONATED OCIMUM GRATISSIMUM (OG) LEAF EXTRACTS Turquoise C. Alexander and Stephen I.N. Ekunwe Jackson State University, Department of Biology, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, P. O. Box 18540, Jackson, MS 39217, USA Abstract: Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of death in men. 1 in 36 men will die from this disease. Doctors are exploring new treatment options for the disease. Researchers are also studying how complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) can reduce the adverse side effects of treatments offered to prostate cancer patients. Many CAM researchers are searching for cancer-fighting compounds in natural products such as medicinal herbs. One such medicinal herb is Ocimum gratissimum (Og) which is the subject of this project. Extracts of Og leaves have been reported as treatment for diarrhea, upset stomach and hemorrhoids. There is anecdotal evidence that Og leaf extracts reduce the size of hemorrhoids, bleeding and itching associated with the hemorrhoids. It has also been reported that Og possesses anti-inflammatory and anti-angiogenesis properties suggesting potential cancer-fighting properties. This project focused on investigating the molecular mechanism behind the inhibition of proliferation of human prostate cancer (PC-3) cells by fractionated Ocimum gratissimum (Og) leaf extracts. This study hypothesized that: (a) Og fraction PS/PT1 will inhibit the proliferation of PC-3 cells in a dose-dependent manner, and (b) aqueous Og extract, fractions PS/PT1 and P2 will decrease the levels of Androgen Receptor (AR) and Survivin. Using human prostate PC-3 cells in a cell proliferation assay, the inhibition of cell proliferation was determined by counting surviving cells after treatment with fractionated Og leaf extracts by the indirect method of [3H]–thymidine incorporation during DNA synthesis. Also, the molecular mechanism of inhibition was evaluated by targeting the following proteins: Androgen Receptor (AR) and Survivin through Western Blotting techniques. Og fraction PS/PT1 inhibited growth of human prostate cancer PC-3 cells at the following concentrations: 25, 50, 100, 200, 400 and 800 μg/mL in a dose-dependent manner. In the Western blot analysis, PC-3 cells treated with PS/PT1 for 48 hours decreased the level of Survivin protein at 25 and 38 μg/mL but increased its level at 50 μg/mL. In PC-3 cells treated with P2 for 48 hours, the levels of AR increased at 50 and 200 μg/mL, but decreased significantly at 400 μg/mL. PC-3 cells treated with aqueous Og extract for 24 hours showed increases in levels of AR at 50, 200 and 400 μg/mL. These findings suggest that further investigations are needed to elucidate the molecular mechanism of inhibition of proliferation of human prostate (PC-3) cells by fractionated Ocimum gratissimum leaf extract.


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A PRELIMINARY STUDY: BIOGEOCHEMISTRY OF THE GRAND BAY RESERVE AND ITS EFFECT ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY Jacqueline McComb1, F. X. Han2 and Paul B. Tchounwou3 1

Grand Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve, 6005 Bayou Heron RoadMoss Point, MS 39562, USA Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry,Jackson State University, 1400 J. R. Lynch Street P.O. Box 17910, Jackson, MS 39217-0510, Jackson, Mississippi, USA 3 College of Science, Engineering & Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 J. R. Lynch Street P.O. Box 17910, Jackson, MS 39217-0510, Jackson, Mississippi, USA 2

Abstract: This preliminary study is to investigate the biogeochemistry of trace elements (mercury, arsenic, lead, cadmium, chromium etc.) in coastal and marine ecosystems. Three areas will be focused initially: Bayou Heron, Bayou Heron, and possible BP affected areas in the Grand Bay. Laboratory simulation experiments on various biogeochemical background scenarios will be conducted to reveal the relationship between biogeochemistry and environmental quality. The biogeochemistry of trace metals such as arsenic, lead and mercury are with relation to their presence in high concentrations that can be toxic to both fish and humans. Consequently, the spatial distribution and bioavailability of trace elements are very important in their biogeochemical cycles, estuarine health, and food safety and human health via food chains. This study is aimed at providing the essential information of these trace elements, heavy metals and their environmental risk in one of NERR sites Grand Bay areas. Our goal was to investigate the biogeochemistry of the region and the overall contribution to the environmental quality at the Grand Bay Reserve. This study is essential to define and characterize the whole coastal ecosystem health and water quality as stated in ECSC focus areas on ecological processes and risk assessment thematic areas. Understanding basic biogeochemical cycling in costal ecosystems strongly supports ECSC core goals on enhancing the scientific understanding of human interactions with the coastal environment in support of NOAAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s place-based management and specifically in the response of coastal and marine ecosystems to natural and human induced stressors. This study is not only biogeochemical studies, but also the comprehensive investigation on the health and function of estuarine ecosystems subject to anthropogenic disturbance. Key words: Ecological processes, ecological characterization, water quality, risk assessment, nutrient cycling, biogeochemistry Acknowledgements: This research supported by a grant from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration â&#x20AC;&#x201C; NOAA.


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AN INVESTIGATION OF THE EFFECTS OF HURRICANE ALEX ON TRANSPORTING WATERS FROM THE DEEPWATER HORIZON OIL SPILL TO THE MISSISSIPPI GULF COAST USING THE WRF MODEL Jerry Beasley, R. Suseela Reddy, Duanjun Lu, Ramzi Kafoury, Francis Tuluri and Paul B. Tchounwou1 College of Science, Engineering, and Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi, USA Abstract: On April 20, 2010, the Deepwater Horizon oil drilling rig exploded and caught on fire in the Gulf of Mexico (Gulf). The rig sank on April 22, 2010, and subsequently started to release oil into the Gulf. Since then, it is estimated that between 2.9 and 5.0 million barrels of oil have been released. The location of the release was about 100 miles south of the Mississippi Gulf Coast. There was speculation by scientists and the media regarding the effects on coastal water quality if a hurricane hit the Gulf Coast during the oil spill. The concern was that oil spill contaminated waters would be transported several miles inland due to storm surge, thus affecting the ecosystems of inland estuarine and freshwater bodies. However, a hurricane did not hit the Gulf Coast during the oil spill, but Hurricane Alex passed about 400-500 miles south of the oil spill in late June 2010. The Mississippi Gulf Coast did not observe water quality issues such as tar balls and oil sheens until the passage of Hurricane Alex, about two months after the oil spill started. In order to determine why the Mississippi Gulf Coast started experiencing water quality issues during Hurricane Alex, the effects of Hurricane Alex on the transport and distribution of a portion of the oil spill into marine and coastal ecosystems of the Mississippi Gulf Coast were investigated using the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model. The influence of the weather pattern present during the summer of 2010 had on the oil spill was also examined. This investigation determined that surface high pressure was in control over the oil spill during much of the May and June time period resulting is light winds. High pressure was also dominant in the upper layers of the atmosphere. These conditions allowed for the oil spill to drift and not be pushed past the Mississippi Gulf Coast barrier islands until June 27.The WRF model was run using three domains: 36 km, 12 km, and 4 km resolutions with 35 sigma vertical levels for the period of June 25 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 29, 2010, using the areas shown in Figure 15. Parameters included surface sea level pressure; surface air temperature; thermoclines at 400mb, 500 mb, 700 mb, and 850 mb; surface wind speed, and surface wind direction. The model was initialized at June 25, 2010, 12Z. Based on the WRF model outputs, strong southeasterly winds caused by a tight pressure gradient between the large circulation of Hurricane Alex and a Bermuda high pressure system in the Atlantic seemed to have had a significant effect on causing the oil spill to reach the Mississippi Gulf Coast on June 27, 2010. Another contributor included light southerly currents in the Gulf. Key words: Oil spill, Mississippi Gulf Coast, Hurricane Alex, WRF Model


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MODELING AND FORECASTING SNOW EVENTS IN MISSISSIPPI Brittany S. Hailey, Kantave M. Greene and Remata S. Reddy College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Department of Physics, Atmospheric Sciences, and Geosciences, Meteorology Lab, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, P.O. Box 17660, Jackson, Mississippi, USA Abstract: It is important to be able to forecast snow and severe winter weather because of the damaging aftermath these events leave behind. The economic and environmental impacts, including infrastructure damage, crop failure, broken water mains, dead livestock, business closures, delayed import/export transportation, and closed airports are all consequences that can be slowed or effectively maintained with proper forecasting of significant snow events and accurate models to aid in this forecasting. Snowfall is very uncommon to the Southeastern United States, and therefore poorly documented, studied, and forecasted. Models have been created to predict snow in regions all across the United States, except the Southeast region, because it simply does not receive enough snowfall for many people to take interest, thus leaving the region vulnerable to surprise snow storms and the consequences of such. The aim of this research is to gather preliminary data in order to design computer models specifically for the prediction and analysis of significant winter weather events in the southern United States. For this research, we focused specifically on snowfall from 1998 to the present in the state of Mississippi. Over this time period, there were seventeen recorded dates of snowfall in Mississippi. From this pool of data, we chose two of the most significant events, January 1st - 2nd, 2002, and February 10th-11th , 2010, where total snowfall amounts reached up to eight inches. Using the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) composite modeling system, we analyzed the conditions of the days prior to the events and the actual event day itself, taking particular interest in the parameters of vector and scalar winds at 1500 mb, specific humidity, moisture availability, and horizontal moisture divergence at 850 mb. For each of these parameters, we created a composite of the average of each parameter two days leading up to the event and the actual event itself, as well as composites for each individual day (one for each day leading up to the event and the day of the actual event). We then used these composites to compare and contrast the conditions surrounding the two events. After comparing the composites, it was concluded that moisture availability and horizontal moisture divergence were the same on both dates. Furthermore, humidity and vector winds were different, although snowfall amount was the same, suggesting moisture and divergence played a larger role in snowfall than winds and humidity. Key words: Snowfall, models, forecasting, NARR, vector/scalar winds, specific humidity, horizontal moisture divergence, moisture availability Acknowledgments: This research was aided by my mentors, Kantave M. Greene and Remata S. Reddy, Department of Physics, Atmospheric Sciences, and Geosciences for the CESTEME Summer Research Institute at Jackson State University, funded by the Department of Defense.


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DOES GAMMA-HEXACHLOROCYCLOHEXANE AFFECT CELL CYCLE PROGRESSION IN MCF-7 CELLS? Shanelle Joseph and Oswald d’Auvergne Department of Environmental Toxicology, Health research Center, Southern University and A&M College, Baton Rouge, LA, USA Abstract: Organochlorines such as gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane (gamma-HCH) are known to sequester and accumulate in adipocytes. However, a positive correlation of organochlorine exposure and breast cancer progression is currently ambiguous. Gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane is sold under the brand name Lindane and is administered as a second line of defense against parisitic infestations. The drug is scheduled to be phased out and will remain on the market as a pharmaceutical agent until 2015.Gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane and associated isomers are found in ground water and soils where they may sequester for up to thirty years. In many cases, such chemicals enter the human biological system by means of biomagnification. To determine the proliferative potential of MCF-7 breast cancer cells, upon exposure to HCH, the cells were exposed to the chemical at ( 0ppm, 12.5ppm, and 25ppm) followed by incubation periods of 24 and 48 hours respectively. The proliferative potential was measured using an MTT assay. Additionally, PCR and gel electrophoreses were performed to investigate the effect of HCH on the expression of p53 and cyclin-A2. Data obtained from flow cytometry has shown that in both groups, control populations move through the cell cycle at a fairly normal rate while populations treated with 12.5ppm of the chemical progressed at a slower rate. Populations treated with 25ppm of the drug lagged behind significantly as compared to the control populations. Analyses of PCR products by gel electrophoresis have shown that the genes p53 produced strong signals while cyclin-A2 struggled to persist. 24 hours post-incubation, there was a slight decrease in cell viability in the treated cells as compared to the control. 48 hours post incubation, there was a significant reduction in cell proliferation for the population treated with 25ppm of the drug as compared to the control (p<.05) while there was no significant difference amongst the control and the population treated with 12.5ppm of the drug. There was an increase in proliferation observed in the control and populations treated with 12.5ppm of the drug and 48 hours incubation as compared to the populations incubated for 24 hours. There was a significant decrease in proliferation of the population treated with 25ppm at 48 hours incubation as compared to the population incubated for 24 hours at the same concentration of the drug. Keywords: Gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane, p53, proliferation, cell cycle, gene expression


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A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF OPEN HYSTERECTOMY VERSUS MINIMALLY INVASIVE HYSTERECTOMY Vineet Aggarwal and Mildred Ridgway University of Mississippi Medical Center, 2500 North State Street, Jackson, Mississippi, USA Abstract: CBS News on April 3, 2008, reported, “Over 600,000 open hysterectomies are performed in this country every year…and open hysterectomy can lead to weeks of painful recovery.” Open hysterectomy is the surgical removal of the uterus, in which the entire abdomen is opened for the procedure. Recently a new type of surgery, minimally invasive hysterectomy, has been introduced to doctors. This procedure utilizes surgical instruments and cameras, which are inserted through small incisions made in the abdomen. However, many doctors are still averse to this new procedure and continue to use the traditional abdominal laparotomy even though it can lead to about 6 to 8 weeks in total recovery time. Since minimally invasive surgery, or laparoscopy, is a fairly new procedure in the United States, this project serves to compare open hysterectomy to its laparoscopic counterpart and to determine if or when minimally invasive hysterectomy is a better alternative. A study was conducted of patients with and without cancer, who had received either open hysterectomy or laparoscopic hysterectomy, including robot-assisted laparoscopy, from the same two doctors in the time from June 2011 to December 2011.The data from these 92 patients was used to compare the procedures’ outcomes. The physical characteristics of the patients themselves, even though they underwent different procedures, were quite similar with the average ages and body mass indexes differing by only about 2 years and 2 BMI points. While there were no significant differences in the body mass indexes and ages for patients of both methods, there was substantial deviation in the length of stay, complications, estimated blood loss, pain, and costs resulting from the procedures. For each variable, the effects of the minimally invasive surgery were better than those of open hysterectomy.The average length of stay of open hysterectomy was 6.4 days with a range from 1 day to 59 days while the average length of stay of minimally invasive hysterectomy was 1.31 days with a range from 1 day to 6 days. Furthermore, the operation time of minimally invasive hysterectomy was about 20 minutes shorter. The two procedures also significantly differed in their number of complications. Out of the 54 open hysterectomies, there were 15 complications total, most of which were transfusions and wound infections, but did include one death. Minimally invasive hysterectomy, on the other hand, only had 3 complications total. During surgery as well, the average blood loss of open hysterectomy was 500 cc greater than that of its laparoscopic counterpart. Not only did the minimally invasive hysterectomy patients experience less blood loss but also they felt less pain because a fewer number of them took morphine as a prescribed medication. Finally, when examining total charges, the average cost of laparoscopy was about 15 thousand dollars less than that of open hysterectomy. As a result, because age and race do not play a role in the type of procedure used, laparoscopic surgery can be accomplished on heavier patients in less time with fewer drawbacks than open hysterectomy. Moreover, minimally invasive surgery results in significantly less blood loss, shorter lengths of stay, and much less pain to the patient, greatly improving the quality of life of the patients after surgery. Keywords: Hysterectomy, open hysterectomy, minimally invasive hysterectomy, laparoscopy


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LIGAND BINDING FEATURES AND GENE CONTEXT OF TANDEM-TYPE UNIVERSAL STRESS PROTEIN ABC3200 FROM ALKALIPHILIC BACILLUS CLAUSII Baraka S. Williams1,2, Raphael D. Isokpehi1, Andreas N. Mbah1, Shaneka S. Simmons1 and Bianca L. Garner2 1

Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Department of Biology, Jackson State University, PO Box 18540, Jackson, MS 39217, USA 2 Department of Biology, Division of Natural Science, Tougaloo College, 500 West County Line Road, Tougaloo, MS 39174, USA Abstract: Genes encoding the Universal Stress Protein (USP) domain provide diverse organisms including bacteria with the ability to survive in adverse or extreme conditions. Over 300 proteins encoding the USP domain have been predicted from genome sequences of at least 119 Bacillus isolates. Bacillus species are ubiquitous Gram-positive organisms of diverse medical and economic importance. Members of Bacillus genus are diverse organisms that can be isolated from animals, insects and soil. We have used conserved domain search to predict ligand binding sites for 330 Bacillus USPs. We discovered that Bacillus clausii had a unique 296aa USP (ABC3200) with two USP domains in tandem. Each USP domain had 12 ligand binding sites. The second USP domain had the ATP binding motif G2X-G-9X-G-(S/T). In the first USP domain a serine is located in the position of the first glycine of the ATP-binding motif. Gene context analysis revealed a cluster of genes upstream of ABC3200 predicted to function as a fructose-specific phosphotransferase system. Further research is required to determine the regulation of ABC3200 as well as its function in the simultaneously catalysis and modulation of fructose utilization in extremely alkaliphilic conditions. Acknowledgments: Research and Training in the Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology are sponsored by National Institutes of Health (NIH-NCRR G12RR13459; NIH-NIGMS T36GM095335; NIH-NIMHD 1P20MD002725-01; NIH-NCRR-P20RR016476; NIH-NIGMSP20GM103476-11; NIH-NCRR-P20RR016460); National Science Foundation (EPS-0903787; NSFDBI-0958179); US Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate (2009-ST062-000014; 2011-ST-062-000048). Research and training at Tougaloo College was sponsored by 8 P20 GM103476-11. Disclaimer: â&#x20AC;&#x153;The views and conclusions contained in this document are those of the authors and should not be interpreted as necessarily representing the official policies, either expressed or implied, of the funding agenciesâ&#x20AC;?.


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ELUCIDATION OF STRESS RESPONSIVE GENE INDICATORS FOR BIOTECHNOLOGICALLY RELEVANT BACILLUS MEGATERIUM Baraka S. Williams1,2, Raphael D. Isokpehi1, Shaneka S. Simmons1, Andreas N. Mbah1 and Bianca Garner2 1

Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson Mississippi 39217, USA 2 Department of Biology, Division of Natural Science, Tougaloo College, 500 West County Line Road, Tougaloo, MS 39174, USA Abstract: Microbial stress response systems ensure that bacteria can survive adverse and fluctuating conditions. In response to stress, bacteria have evolved abilities to activate genes and regulate gene expression via signals in the intracellular and extracellular environment. Genes encoding the Universal Stress Protein (USP) domain have been identified in diverse organisms, including bacteria, and confer the ability to survive extreme harsh conditions such as iron-limitation by genetically regulated processes. Bacillus species are ubiquitous Gram-positive organisms of medical and industrial importance. Over 300 proteins encoding the USP domain have been predicted from genome sequences of at least 119 Bacillus isolates. Computational analysis revealed an increasingly high count of USP in Bacillus megaterium, a commercially available, non-pathogenic host for the biotechnological production of vitamin B12 and penicillin acylase. Gene context data provided insights on possible cellular functions of B. megaterium universal stress protein. These functions include sulfate and potassium uptake, acid extrusion, cellular energy level sensing, survival in high oxygen conditions and acetate utilization. Experimental investigations included bacterial growth in response to acid and iron-limitation. The predicted usp were expressed under conditions tested, with increased expression associated with increased acid concentrations. We predict that elucidation of universal stress protein functions in the model organism Bacillus megaterium will provide important insights into how these proteins function in Bacillus species. Acknowledgements: Research and Training in the Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology are sponsored by National Institutes of Health (NIH-NCRR G12RR13459; NIH-NIGMS T36GM095335; NIH-NIMHD 1P20MD002725-01; NIH-NCRR-P20RR016476; NIH-NIGMSP20GM103476-11; NIH-NCRR-P20RR016460; U54DA021519); National Science Foundation (EPS0903787; NSF-DBI-0958179; DBI-1062057); US Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate (2009-ST-062-000014; 2011-ST-062-000048). The Research and Training at Tougaloo College was sponsored by 8P20GM103476-11. Disclaimer: â&#x20AC;&#x153;The views and conclusions contained in this document are those of the authors and should not be interpreted as necessarily representing the official policies, either expressed or implied, of the funding agenciesâ&#x20AC;?.


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VISUAL ANALYTICS RESOURCE FOR PREDICTING STRESS RESPONSIVE TRANSCRIPTIONAL UNITS IN MICROBIAL GENOMES Antoinesha Hollman, Kyle Swanier, Jamanda Taylor, Natasha Amos, Melissa Crump, Baraka S. Williams, Shaneka S. Simmons, Andreas N. Mbah, Wellington Ayensu and Raphael D. Isokpehi Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson Mississippi 39217, USA Abstract: A transcription unit is a set of one or more genes that are transcribed to produce a single messenger RNA. We refer to a stress responsive transcriptional unit as one that contains a gene induced in response to unfavorable conditions. We are particularly interested in the genes encoding Universal Stress Proteins (USPs), a conserved group of proteins found in all domains of life and are expressed in response to a variety of environmental stress. Our hypothesis is that genes in the same transcriptional direction with the gene for a universal stress protein could be part of stress responsive transcriptional units. We have developed a dataset of transcription direction of adjacent neighbors of 10,134 USP genes from 2,353 genomes. Subsequently we developed a visual analytics web resource to allow interaction with the datasets for selecting genes and genomes with a particular transcription direction profile. We have used the web resource to determine potential stress responsive transcriptional units in the genomes of Brucella, Bacillus, Clostridium and Staphylococcus genera. As an example, in anaerobic and haloalkaliphile Bacillus selenitireducens, multiple stress-responsive transcriptional units were observed. A transcriptional unit consisted of a USP gene and a gene for Mechanosensitive (MS) channels that provide protection against hypo-osmotic shock. Further research will include enhancing the dataset with putative functions of adjacent genes. Acknowledgements: RCMI-Center for Environmental Health, Jackson State University; National Institutes of Health (NIH-NCRR G12RR13459; NIH-NIGMS T36GM095335; NIH-NIMHD 1P20MD002725-01; NIH-NCRR-P20RR016476; NIH-NCRR-P20RR016460); National Science Foundation (EPS-0903787; NSF-DBI-0958179; DBI-1062057); and US Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate (2007-ST-104-000007; 2009- ST-062-000014; 2011-ST062-000048). Disclaimer: The views and conclusions contained in this document are those of the authors and should not be interpreted as necessarily representing the official policies, either expressed or implied, of the funding agencies.


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SEQUENCE ANALYSIS OF BACTERIA SIRTUINS - HOMOLOGS OF MAMMALIAN LONGEVITY GENES Victoria Gilmore1, Hugh Nicholas2 and Raphael D. Isokpehi1 1

Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson MS 39217, USA 2 Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center, Pittsburgh PA, USA Abstract: Sirtuins are NAD+ dependent deacetylases, which are important for regulating rDNA, silencing genes and stabilizing chromosomes. Members of the sirtuins prolong lifespan in yeast, nematode, mouse and fruitfly. Thus sirtuins have been described as longevity genes. The purpose of the research was to construct a non-redundant dataset of bacteria sirtuins protein sequences, identify distinctive sequence features and reconstruct a phylogenetic relationship of the bacterial sequences. Sirtuins sequences were retrieved from Protein Information Resource (PIR) and processed through the CD-HIT program in Galaxy, bioinformatics workflow system. The multiple sequence alignment using T-Coffee of the non-redundant sequences was visualized in GeneDoc, which then guided the construction of phylogenetic tree using Figtree and Notung. Finally, an R program was used to generate 2D plot and Eigenvalue analysis of the sequences. A preliminary dataset of 76 non-redundant bacterial and 15 non-bacterial sirtuins protein sequences was constructed. Visualization of the multiple sequence alignment revealed sequences lacking conserved motifs. Further research includes comparing sequence and structural features of clusters of sequences defined by the phylogenetic tree. Acknowledgements: Research and Training in the Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology are sponsored by National Institutes of Health (NIH-NCRR G12RR13459; NIH-NIGMS T36GM095335; NIH-NIMHD 1P20MD002725-01; NIH-NCRR-P20RR016476; NIH-NIGMSP20GM103476-11; NIH-NCRR-P20RR016460; U54DA021519); National Science Foundation (EPS0903787; NSF-DBI-0958179; DBI-1062057); US Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate (2009-ST-062-000014; 2011-ST-062-000048). Disclaimer: â&#x20AC;&#x153;The views and conclusions contained in this document are those of the authors and should not be interpreted as necessarily representing the official policies, either expressed or implied, of the funding agenciesâ&#x20AC;?.


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DIFFERENCES IN DISTRIBUTION AND PROTEIN SEQUENCE LENGTH OF UNIVERSAL STRESS PROTEINS ENCODED IN BRUCELLA GENOMES Dominique R. Smith-McInnis1, Desma Kelly1, 2, Shaneka S. Simmons, Andreas N. Mbah1, Wellington K. Ayensu1, and Raphael D. Isokpehi1 1

Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson MS 39217, USA 2 Jackson Public Schools, Lanier High School, Jackson MS 39203, USA Abstract: Brucella is a Gram-negative, non-motile, non-encapsulated, facultative intracellular coccobacillus, which causes brucellosis in humans and a variety of animal species. The survival and replication of Brucella in macrophages requires adaptation to a hostile environment. Gene encoding proteins with the universal stress protein (USP) domain are known to provide cells with the ability to respond to various environmental stresses such as nutrient starvation, high salinity, extreme temperatures, drought and exposure to toxic chemicals. Preliminary visual analytics of functional annotation data of 165 USP genes from 42 Brucella genomes revealed the presence of 3 to 4 USP genes with protein sequence length ranging from 101 aa to 281 aa. The 10 distinct protein sequence lengths (in aa) observed were 101, 121, 147, 148, 149, 150, 162, 179 and 281. The purpose of the reported research was to determine differences in the distribution and protein length of USP genes in Brucella genomes from same species. The hypothesis of the research is that visual analytics views will help identify knowledge building insights from functional annotation data on Brucella universal stress proteins. We therefore constructed visual analytics views of functional annotation data from the Integrated Microbial Genomes to accomplish the objective. For the 10 Brucella abortus genomes, protein sequence lengths observed were 148, 149, 162, 179 and 291 with the USP of sequence length 162 aa found only in Brucella abortus bv 1,9-941. Homologs of this USP were found in three additional genomes: Brucella melitensis bv. 1 Abortus 2308, Brucella microti CCM 4915, Brucella sp. BO1 and Brucella suis bv 1,1330. Interestingly, the five protein sequences do not have predicted ligand binding sites that could help infer their chemical ligands that can regulation their function. Additional research is ongoing to determine the function of the Brucella USPs. Acknowledgements: DRS acknowledge Fellowship from National Center for Foreign Animal and Zoonotic Disease Defense. DK participated in the summer institute of the Department of Defense Center of Excellence in Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics Education at Jackson State University. Research and Training in the Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology are sponsored by National Institutes of Health (NIH-NCRR G12RR13459; NIH-NIGMS T36GM095335; NIH-NIMHD 1P20MD002725-01; NIH-NCRR-P20RR016476; NIH-NIGMS-P20GM103476-11; NIHNCRR-P20RR016460; U54DA021519); National Science Foundation (EPS-0903787; NSF-DBI0958179; DBI-1062057); US Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate (2009-ST-062-000014; 2011-ST-062-000048). Disclaimer: â&#x20AC;&#x153;The views and conclusions contained in this document are those of the authors and should not be interpreted as necessarily representing the official policies, either expressed or implied, of the funding agenciesâ&#x20AC;?.


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PROTEIN SEQUENCE LENGTH FREQUENCY OF UNIVERSAL STRESS PROTEINS ENCODED IN EDWARDSIELLA GENOMES Jessica L. Hobbs, Wellington K. Ayensu, Clement Yedjou and Raphael D. Isokpehi Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson, Mississippi 39217, USA Abstract: In the United States catfish is the leading aquaculture industry. Over 46 percent of aquaculture production is by commercial catfish. More than 94 percent of catfish production acreage is located in Mississippi, Arkansas, Alabama, and Louisiana. However, bacterial pathogens such as Edwardsiella ictaluri and Edwardsiella tarda have had a major impact on the catfish industry. Edwardsiella ictaluri is the prevalent pathogen that causes enteric septicemia in catfish (ESC). Edwardsiella tarda is the causative agent for edwardsiellosis in freshwater and marine fish. The ability to adapt to adverse conditions by Edwardsiella species is essential for survival and colonization of diverse host niches. An example of a gene family that allows the bacteria to respond to unfavorable conditions is the universal stress proteins. Genes that encode the universal stress protein (USP) domain (Pfam Identifier: PF00582) are found in plants, fungi, archaea, and most importantly bacteria. The production of these proteins is induced by adverse conditions such as extreme temperatures, drought, high salinity, and exposure to toxic chemicals. The overall goal of this research is to examine the protein length frequency of orthologous universal stress proteins encoded in Edwardsiella genomes. The ranges of protein lengths observed were from 121 amino acids to 902 amino acids with the length of 143 having the highest frequency. Various length differences were uncovered in Edwardsiella species. Bioinformatics tools such as ClustalW were used to perform multiple sequence alignment to analyze length differences. There were N-terminal insertions and deletions present among the universal stress proteins creating a fluctuation in the length of individual USPs. Interestingly, there was a positive correlation between protein length and the presence of specific adjacent genes. These distinctive sequence features could serve as molecular markers for identifying strains of Edwardsiella. Keywords: Edwardsiella, protein sequence length, universal stress proteins (USP) Acknowledgements: Research and Training in the Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology are sponsored by National Institutes of Health (NIH-NCRR G12RR13459; NIH-NIGMS T36GM095335; NIH-NIMHD 1P20MD002725-01; NIH-NCRR-P20RR016476; NIH-NIGMSP20GM103476-11; NIH-NCRR-P20RR016460; U54DA021519); National Science Foundation (EPS0903787; NSF-DBI-0958179; DBI-1062057); US Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate (2009-ST-062-000014; 2011-ST-062-000048).


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FUNCTIONAL AND SEQUENCE ANNOTATIONS OF UNIVERSAL STRESS PROTEINS ENCODED IN HALOTERRIGENA TURKMENICA GENOME Tamara Medley, Donee L. McAllister, Sylvia Leggette, Shaneka S. Simmons, Andreas N. Mbah and Raphael D. Isokpehi Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson MS 39217, USA Abstract: Haloterrigena turkmenica is an extremely halophilic member of the euryarchaeal family Halobacteriaceae. The complete genome of 5,440,782 bp genome, including six plasmids, encodes 5,287 protein-coding and 63 RNA genes. The isolate of Haloterrigena turkmenica sequenced was obtained from sulfate saline soil in Turkmenistan. The genome of Haloterrigena turkmenica has 66 genes that encode protein sequences with the universal stress protein (USP) domain. The USP domain (PF00582) is known to provide archaea, bacteria, and other organisms with the ability to cope with diverse environmental stressors. The purpose of the reported research was to cluster the 66 protein sequences by the protein family annotation (Pfam) and protein sequence length. The hypothesis of the research is that visual analytics views will help identify knowledge building insights from the functional and sequence annotation data on universal stress proteins of Haloterrigena turkmenica. We therefore constructed visual analytics views of functional and sequence annotation data from the Integrated Microbial Genomes to accomplish the objective. A total of 49 unique protein sequence lengths were observed with lengths ranging from 83 aa to 770 aa. The 66 USPs were divided into 6 functional annotation groups consisting of single of multiple protein families. The observed protein domains colocated on the protein sequences with the USP domain were PF00005 (ATP-binding domain of ATPBinding Cassette transporters); PF00324 (Amino acid permeases); PF00999 (Sodium/hydrogen exchanger family); PF01226 (Formate/nitrite transporter); and PF04982 (Integral Membrane Proteins with Histidine-Proline-Proline [HPP] motif). All the proteins domains located with the USP domain have predicted transporter functions. The USP domain could function to enhance transporter function in the extreme sulfate saline soil environment. Additional research is ongoing to determine potential biochemical regulation of the USPs of Haloterrigena turkmenica through analysis of ligand binding residues and associated ligands. Acknowledgements: Research and Training in the Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology are sponsored by National Institutes of Health (NIH-NCRR G12RR13459; NIH-NIGMS T36GM095335; NIH-NIMHD 1P20MD002725-01; NIH-NCRR-P20RR016476; NIH-NIGMSP20GM103476-11; NIH-NCRR-P20RR016460; U54DA021519); National Science Foundation (EPS0903787; NSF-DBI-0958179; DBI-1062057); US Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate (2009-ST-062-000014; 2011-ST-062-000048). Disclaimer: â&#x20AC;&#x153;The views and conclusions contained in this document are those of the authors and should not be interpreted as necessarily representing the official policies, either expressed or implied, of the funding agenciesâ&#x20AC;?.


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COMPARISON OF LIGAND BINDING RESIDUES FOR LENGTH-IDENTICAL CHROMOSOMAL AND PLASMID-ENCODED UNIVERSAL STRESS PROTEINS IN STAPYLOCOCCUS GENOMES Shelton D. Griffith, Shaneka S. Simmons, Andreas N. Mbah, Wellington K. Ayensu and Raphael D. Isokpehi Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson MS 39217, USA Abstract: The genus Stapylococcus contains pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria species including strains that are multidrug resistant found in hospital and food-animal processing settings. Therefore, research to understand the genes that allow certain Stapylococci to survive unfavorable conditions is a continuous need. The genome sequences of at least 92 strains of Stapylococcus are available in public bioinformatics databases. Genes encoding proteins with the universal stress protein (USP) domain are known to provide cells with the ability to respond to various environmental stresses such as nutrient starvation, high salinity, extreme temperatures, drought and exposure to toxic chemicals. Initially, visual analytics of the functional and sequence annotation data on universal stress proteins encoded in staphylococci genomes revealed 193 predicted USP sequences. The USP gene count per staphylococci genome (draft and finished) ranged from 1 to 4. Pattern analysis revealed pairs of USPs for 7 strains with identical length of 137 aa. The Staphylococcus species and strains with the paired identical length 137 aa USPs were aureus (A5948, A9765, MR1); epidermidis (ATCC 12228, RP62A, W23144); and hominis (C80). Strains MR1 and A5948 are known methicillin resistant isolates. Search for chemical ligand binding residues of the sequences reveal that ATP-binding motif is present in one of the sequences. In the genomes of strains ATCC 12228 and RP62A, the genes are adjacent and in same transcription direction to a sulfate transporter gene. Additional research is in progress to determine the ligands associated with amino acid residues. Acknowledgements: Research and Training in the Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology are sponsored by National Institutes of Health (NIH-NCRR G12RR13459; NIH-NIGMS T36GM095335; NIH-NIMHD 1P20MD002725-01; NIH-NCRR-P20RR016476; NIH-NIGMSP20GM103476-11; NIH-NCRR-P20RR016460; U54DA021519); National Science Foundation (EPS0903787; NSF-DBI-0958179; DBI-1062057); US Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate (2009-ST-062-000014; 2011-ST-062-000048). Disclaimer: â&#x20AC;&#x153;The views and conclusions contained in this document are those of the authors and should not be interpreted as necessarily representing the official policies, either expressed or implied, of the funding agenciesâ&#x20AC;?.


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STRUCTURAL AND FUNCTIONAL ATTRIBUTES OF NECROTIZING FASCIITIS TOXIN (EXOTOXIN J) FROM STREPTOCOCCUS PYOGENES Victoria Casher1, Adesuwa Ekunwe 1,2, Kaelin Gates1,3, Andreas N. Mbah1 and Raphael D. Isokpehi1 1

Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson Mississippi 39217, USA 2 Clinton High School 401 Arrow Drive, Clinton MS, USA 3 Terry High School, 235 West Beasley Road Terry, MS 39170, USA Abstract: Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) also commonly known as flesh eating bacteria syndrome is a rare infection of the deeper layer of the skin and subcutaneous tissue, which can easily spread across the facial plane within the subcutaneous tissue. This disease is rapidly becoming a scary public health problem in the United States, which if not treated immediately might result to tissue necrosis, amputation or patient death. The common cause of NF had been attributed to environmentally meditated exotoxins elicited by microorganisms such as Steptococcus pyogenes and Aeromonas hydrophilia. Presently there is knowledge gap on the function associated attributes of these toxins. The associated functional attributes of these toxins will help in understanding their functional regulations in a disease state. We investigated the structural and functional related attributes of Steptococcus pyogenes extoxin J using a suite of bioinformatics and protein 3D visualization tools. The extoxin J is basic, moderately hydrophilic and carry a net positive charge in nature. The protein is also antigenic, thermostable and very reactive in water. The function of the protein can be regulated by four ligand binding site residues of Ala 184, His 190, His224 and Asp 226, which binds to Zinc/Magnesium ions as possible ligands. The antigenic sites can serve as points for vaccine interactions, while the ligand(s) and the four ligand interaction residues can be used for functional regulation of the protein and also as possible drug targets. Further analysis is needed in understanding how the exotoxin J producing Steptococcus pyogenes progresses quickly in an oxidative stressful environment of the subcutaneous tissues. Acknowledgements: Research and Training in the Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology are sponsored by National Institutes of Health (NIH-NCRR G12RR13459; NIH-NIGMS T36GM095335; NIH-NIMHD 1P20MD002725-01; NIH-NCRR-P20RR016476; NIH-NIGMSP20GM103476-11; NIH-NCRR-P20RR016460; U54DA021519); National Science Foundation (EPS0903787; NSF-DBI-0958179; DBI-1062057); US Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate (2009-ST-062-000014; 2011-ST-062-000048). Disclaimer: â&#x20AC;&#x153;The views and conclusions contained in this document are those of the authors and should not be interpreted as necessarily representing the official policies, either expressed or implied, of the funding agenciesâ&#x20AC;?.


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STRUCTURAL AND FUNCTIONAL ATTRIBUTES OF NECROTIZING FASCIITIS TOXIN (EXOTOXIN I) FROM STREPTOCOCCUS PYOGENES Adesuwa Ekunwe 1,3, Kaelin Gates2,3, Victoria Casher3, Andreas N. Mbah3 and Raphael D. Isokpehi3 1

Clinton High School 401 Arrow Drive, Clinton MS, USA Terry High School, 235 West Beasley Road Terry, MS 39170, USA 3 Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson Mississippi 39217, USA 2

Abstract: Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) also commonly known as flesh eating bacteria syndrome is a rare infection of the deeper layer of the skin and subcutaneous tissue, which can easily spread across the facial plane within the subcutaneous tissue. This disease is rapidly becoming a scary public health problem in the United States, which if not treated immediately might result to tissue necrosis, amputation or patient death. The common cause of NF had been attributed to environmentally meditated exotoxins elicited by microorganisms such as Steptococcus pyogenes and Aeromonas hydrophilia. Presently there is knowledge gap on the functional associated attributes of these toxins. The associated functional attributes of these toxins will help in understanding their functional regulations in a disease state. We investigated the structural and functional related attributes of Steptococcus pyogenes extoxin I using a suite of bioinformatics and protein 3D visualization tools. The exotoxin I is basic, moderately hydrophilic and carry a net positive charge in nature. The protein is also antigenic, thermo stable and very reactive in water. The function of the protein can be regulated by four ligand binding site residues of Lys22, Asp68, Ser93 and Arg97, which binds to Zinc ions as the only ligand. The antigenic sites can serve as points for vaccine interactions, while the ligand and the four ligand interaction residues can be used for functional regulation of the protein and also as possible drug targets. Further investigation is required to unravel how the exotoxin I producing Steptococcus pyogenes progresses quickly in an oxidative stressful environment of the subcutaneous tissues. Acknowledgements: Research and Training in the Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology are sponsored by National Institutes of Health (NIH-NCRR G12RR13459; NIH-NIGMS T36GM095335; NIH-NIMHD 1P20MD002725-01; NIH-NCRR-P20RR016476; NIH-NIGMSP20GM103476-11; NIH-NCRR-P20RR016460; U54DA021519); National Science Foundation (EPS0903787; NSF-DBI-0958179; DBI-1062057); US Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate (2009-ST-062-000014; 2011-ST-062-000048). Disclaimer: â&#x20AC;&#x153;The views and conclusions contained in this document are those of the authors and should not be interpreted as necessarily representing the official policies, either expressed or implied, of the funding agenciesâ&#x20AC;?.


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STRUCTURAL AND FUNCTIONAL ATTRIBUTES OF NECROTIZING FASCIITIS TOXIN FROM AEROMONAS HYDROPHILIA Kaelin Gates1,3, Adesuwa Ekunwe2,3, Victoria Casher3, Andreas N. Mbah3 and Raphael D. Isokpehi3 1

Terry High School, 235 West Beasley Road Terry, MS 39170, USA Clinton High School 401 Arrow Drive, Clinton MS, USA 3 Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson Mississippi 39217, USA 2

Abstract: Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) also commonly known as flesh eating bacteria syndrome is a rare infection of the deeper layer of the skin and subcutaneous tissue, which can easily spread across the facial plane within the subcutaneous tissue. This disease is rapidly becoming a scary public health problem in the United States, which if not treated immediately might result to tissue necrosis, amputation or patient death. The common and virulent form of NF had been attributed to environmentally meditated exotoxins such as hemolysin and aerolysin elicited by Aeromonas hydrophilia, which are found in most fresh water environments. Presently there is knowledge gap on the functional and structural genomics of the associated toxins. Exploitable functional attributes of Aeromonas hydrophilia elicited hemolysin will help in understanding its functional regulations in flesh eating bacteria syndrome. We have investigated the structural and functional related attributes of Aeromonas hydrophilia hemolysin toxin using a suite of bioinformatics and protein 3D visualization tools. This hemolysin toxin is slightly acidic, moderately hydrophilic and carries a net positive charge in nature. The protein is also antigenic, thermostable and very reactive in water. The function of the protein can be regulated by eight ligand binding site residues of Pro166, Pro167, Glu328, Val329, Ala342, Lys343, Phe344 and Ser345 which binds to 3 sugars GAL, NAN and NAG as possible ligands. Further analysis is needed to unveil how hemolysin producing Aeromonas hydrophilia thrive in an oxidative stressful environment of the subcutaneous tissues. Acknowledgements: Research and Training in the Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology are sponsored by National Institutes of Health (NIH-NCRR G12RR13459; NIH-NIGMS T36GM095335; NIH-NIMHD 1P20MD002725-01; NIH-NCRR-P20RR016476; NIH-NIGMSP20GM103476-11; NIH-NCRR-P20RR016460; U54DA021519); National Science Foundation (EPS0903787; NSF-DBI-0958179; DBI-1062057); US Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate (2009-ST-062-000014; 2011-ST-062-000048). Disclaimer: â&#x20AC;&#x153;The views and conclusions contained in this document are those of the authors and should not be interpreted as necessarily representing the official policies, either expressed or implied, of the funding agenciesâ&#x20AC;?.


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STRUCTURAL FEATURES OF FRANCISELLA UNIVERSAL STRESS PROTEINS Joseph Grant1,2, Kelli Gills1, Michael R. Thompson1, Quentin Greathree1, Andreas N. Mbah1and Raphael D. Isokpehi1 1

Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson Mississippi 39217, USA 2 University of Arkansas at Monticello, USA Abstract: The genus Francisella is a group of facultative aerobic Gram-negative bacteria. Some members of this genus are intracellular pathogens capable of invading the macrophage. They are rod like shape commonly found in environmental samples such as natural waters. They are common pathogens of birds, arthropods, humans and other mammals. Francisella species encounter a plethora of environmental stressors to survive in their habitats. Genes encoding the universal stress protein (USP) domain are induced to cope with diverse stress conditions. The availability of genome sequences of Francisella presents ongoing opportunities to identify distinctive structural features that mapped to the function of Francisella universal stress proteins in response to the diverse environmental stressors. The purpose of the reported research was to determine exploitable distinctive structural features of Francisella USPs that can contribute to the understanding of their functional mechanism. We hypothesize that determining the physicochemical features and conserved protein domain architecture, post translation phosphorylation couple with the cellular functional sites of the USPs will help identify putative functional features. We have conducted analysis of the sequence of 15 Francisella USPs using a collection of web-based bioinformatics tools. Our analysis revealed that these USPs are stable and hydrophilic with mixed surface charge and contain single and double USP domain architectures. The Francisella USPs are mainly located in the cytoplasm and cell membrane. Although they lack ATP binding motif, they undergo some type of indirect binding to ATP molecule during phosphorylation. There was no direct relationship between sequence length and domain length. It can be assume that USPs with similar domain length have similar stress response functions, because domain length is the function unit of USP. Further research is planned to understand the overall contribution of the structural features to the overall functioning of the Francisella USPs in environmentally stressful conditions. Acknowledgements: Research and Training in the Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology are sponsored by National Institutes of Health (NIH-NCRR G12RR13459; NIH-NIGMS T36GM095335; NIH-NIMHD 1P20MD002725-01; NIH-NCRR-P20RR016476; NIH-NIGMSP20GM103476-11; NIH-NCRR-P20RR016460; U54DA021519); National Science Foundation (EPS0903787; NSF-DBI-0958179; DBI-1062057); US Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate (2009-ST-062-000014; 2011-ST-062-000048). Disclaimer: â&#x20AC;&#x153;The views and conclusions contained in this document are those of the authors and should not be interpreted as necessarily representing the official policies, either expressed or implied, of the funding agenciesâ&#x20AC;?.


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STRUCTURAL FEATURES OF BRUCELLA UNIVERSAL STRESS PROTEINS Kelli Gills, Joseph Grant, Quentin Greathree, Michael R. Thompson, Andreas N. Mbah and Raphael D. Isokpehi Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson Mississippi 39217, USA Abstract: The Brucella genus belongs to the bacteria family Brucellaceae and includes environmental zoonotic pathogens capable of infecting both animals and humans. Brucella includes about six main species: B. abortus, B. canis, B. melitensis, B. microti, B. ovis and B. suis. Brucella species encounter a plethora of environmental stressors to survive in their habitats. Genes encoding the universal stress protein (USP) domain are induced to cope with diverse stress conditions. The availability of genome sequences of Brucella presents ongoing opportunities to identify distinctive structural features that mapped to the function of Brucella universal stress proteins in response to the diverse environmental stressors. We have conducted analysis of the sequence of 20 Brucella USPs using a collection of webbased bioinformatics tools. Our analysis revealed that these USPs are more unstable and moderately hydrophobic with single USP domain architecture. They Brucella USPs are mainly located in the cytoplasm and even though they lack ATP binding motif, they undergo some type of indirect binding to ATP molecule during phosphorylation as shown by the present of Gly, Ser, Thr as binding sites to all the USPs. There was direct relationship between sequence length and domain length. It can be assume that USPs with similar domain length have similar stress response functions, because domain length is the function unit of USP. Further research is planned to understand the overall contribution of the structural features to the functioning of the Brucella USPs in environmentally stressful conditions. Acknowledgements: Research and Training in the Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology are sponsored by National Institutes of Health (NIH-NCRR G12RR13459; NIH-NIGMS T36GM095335; NIH-NIMHD 1P20MD002725-01; NIH-NCRR-P20RR016476; NIH-NIGMSP20GM103476-11; NIH-NCRR-P20RR016460; U54DA021519); National Science Foundation (EPS0903787; NSF-DBI-0958179; DBI-1062057); US Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate (2009-ST-062-000014; 2011-ST-062-000048). Disclaimer: â&#x20AC;&#x153;The views and conclusions contained in this document are those of the authors and should not be interpreted as necessarily representing the official policies, either expressed or implied, of the funding agenciesâ&#x20AC;?.


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STRUCTURAL FEATURES OF CLOSTRIDIUM UNIVERSAL STRESS PROTEINS Michael R. Thompson, Kelli Gills, Quentin Greathree, Joseph Grant, Andreas N. Mbah and Raphael D. Isokpehi Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson Mississippi 39217, USA Abstract: Clostridium is a large genus that encompasses species, which are Gram-positive and rodshaped. They form endospores, which allow them to thrive in harsh conditions. The Clostridium belongs to the bacteria family Clostridiaceae and includes pathogens that cause foodborne illness. Genes encoding the universal stress protein (USP) domain are induced to cope with diverse stress conditions. The availability of genome sequences of Clostridium presents ongoing opportunities to identify distinctive structural features that map to the function of Clostridium universal stress proteins in response to the diverse environmental stressors. The purpose of the reported research was to determine exploitable distinctive structural features of Clostridium USPs that can contribute to the understanding of their functional mechanism. We hypothesize that determining the physicochemical features and conserved domain architecture, post-translation phosphorylation sites couple with the cellular functional sites of the USPs will help identify putative functional features. We have conducted analysis of the sequence of 28 Clostridium USPs using a collection of web-based bioinformatics tools. Our analysis revealed that these USPs are more stable and moderately hydrophilic with single USP domain architecture. They Clostridium USPs are mainly located in the cytoplasm and cell membrane. Although they lack the ATP binding motif, there was evidence for indirect binding to ATP molecule during phosphorylation. There was no direct relationship between sequence length and domain length. It can be assume that USPs with similar domain length have similar stress response functions, because domain length is the function unit of USP. Further research is planned to understand the overall contribution of the structural features to the functioning of the Clostridium USPs in environmentally stressful conditions. Acknowledgements: Research and Training in the Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology are sponsored by National Institutes of Health (NIH-NCRR G12RR13459; NIH-NIGMS T36GM095335; NIH-NIMHD 1P20MD002725-01; NIH-NCRR-P20RR016476; NIH-NIGMSP20GM103476-11; NIH-NCRR-P20RR016460; U54DA021519); National Science Foundation (EPS0903787; NSF-DBI-0958179; DBI-1062057); US Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate (2009-ST-062-000014; 2011-ST-062-000048). Disclaimer: â&#x20AC;&#x153;The views and conclusions contained in this document are those of the authors and should not be interpreted as necessarily representing the official policies, either expressed or implied, of the funding agenciesâ&#x20AC;?.


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STRUCTURAL FEATURES OF EDWARDSIELLA UNIVERSAL STRESS PROTEINS Quentin Greathree, Michael R. Thompson, Kelli Gills, Joseph Grant, Andreas N. Mbah and Raphael D. Isokpehi Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson Mississippi 39217, USA Abstract: Edwardsiella is a genus of Gram-negative, facultative anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria of the family Enterobacteriaceae. The Edwardsiella species include pathogens of channel catfish. Edwardsiella species encounter a plethora of environmental stressors to survive in their habitats. Genes encoding the universal stress protein (USP) domain are induced to cope with diverse stress conditions. The availability of genome sequences of Edwardsiella presents ongoing opportunities to identify distinctive structural features that map to the function of EdwardsiellaUSPs in response to the diverse environmental stressors. The purpose of the reported research was to determine exploitable distinctive structural features of Edwardsiella universal stress proteins that can contribute to the understanding of their functional mechanism. We hypothesize that determining the physicochemical features, conserved protein domain architecture, post translation phosphorylation coupled with the cellular functional sites of the USPs will help identify putative functional features. We conducted analysis of the sequence of 17 Edwardsiella USPs using a collection of web-based bioinformatics tools. Our analysis revealed that these USPs are more unstable and more moderately hydrophobic with single USP domain. These USPs are mainly located in the cytoplasm and cell membrane. Although they lack the ATP binding motif, there was evidence for indirect binding to ATP molecule during phosphorylation. There was no direct relationship between sequence length and domain length, but it can be assume that the Edwardsiella USP with similar domain length might be carry out similar stress respond functions, since the domain length is the functional unit of USPs. Further research is planned to understand the overall contribution of the structural features to the functioning of the EdwardsiellaUSPs in environmentally stressful conditions. Acknowledgements: Research and Training in the Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology are sponsored by National Institutes of Health (NIH-NCRR G12RR13459; NIH-NIGMS T36GM095335; NIH-NIMHD 1P20MD002725-01; NIH-NCRR-P20RR016476; NIH-NIGMSP20GM103476-11; NIH-NCRR-P20RR016460; U54DA021519); National Science Foundation (EPS0903787; NSF-DBI-0958179; DBI-1062057); US Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate (2009-ST-062-000014; 2011-ST-062-000048). Disclaimer: â&#x20AC;&#x153;The views and conclusions contained in this document are those of the authors and should not be interpreted as necessarily representing the official policies, either expressed or implied, of the funding agenciesâ&#x20AC;?.


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INFANT MORTALITY AND SUDDEN INFANT DEATH SYNDROME: INTERNATIONAL RATES, 1990 and 2005 Kyle Swanier, Shauna-Kay Spencer, John Riggins, Melissa Crump, Yachi Spencer, Natasha Amos, Natalie Offiah, Joseph Grant, Wellington K. Ayensu and Raphael D. Isokpehi Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson Mississippi 39217, USA Abstract: The purpose of the research was to identify changing trends between fifteen countries in the years 1990 and 2005 that could be linked to the risk reduction campaigns initiated in each country. The countries were Netherlands, Japan, Sweden, Canada, England/Wales, Norway, Australia, France, Austria, Ireland, Scotland, Germany, Argentina, United States and New Zealand. Datasets were extracted from www.sidscenter.org. Visual Analytics software was used to design and construct views to give multiple outputs of data visualization. The interaction options allow for the selection of SIDS rate, Year, and Year when Risk Reduction Campaign began. The views generated included world maps for 1990 and 2005 to enhance analytical reasoning of the data. In the year 1990, Japan had the lowest SIDS rate at 0.30 and New Zealand with the highest value of 2.90. However fifteen years later in 2005 New Zealand had a SIDS rate value of 0.80 whereas Japan had a value of 0.160. The evidence from the sixteen-year span shows that the SIDS rate for a sample of the countries decreased. The rate reduction could be a direct result of the Risk Reduction Campaign initiated in the surveyed countries roughly over a nine-year span between 1987 and 2005. At the conclusion of each year at each surveyed country at risk with high SIDS rates, those values decreased each year after the campaigns began. The overall improvements in SIDS rate represent a continuation of the long-term improvement of the infants affected by SIDS these countries. The designs of the views can be adopted for other related datasets that include a geographical component. Acknowledgements: Mississippi SIDS African American Outreach Project at Jackson State University. Disclaimer: The views and conclusions contained in this document are those of the authors and should not be interpreted as necessarily representing the official policies, either expressed or implied, of the funding agencies.


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INTERACTIVE COMPARISON OF RATES OF INFANT, FETAL AND PERINATAL MORTALITY RATES: UNITED STATES, 1950-2008 Shauna-Kay Spencer, John Riggins, Yachi Spencer, Kyle Swanier, Natasha Amos, Natalie Offiah, Melissa Crump, Joseph Grant, Wellington K. Ayensu and Raphael D. Isokpehi Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson Mississippi 39217, USA Abstract: Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) is an occurrence of incidental death amongst children under the age of one. Several risk factors that have been attributed to SIDS including: sleep position, gender, ethnicity of mother and child, and economical background. Datasets exists on multi-year on infant, fetal and perinatal mortality rates for the United States. To obtain deep insights on data and facilitate policy decision making, interactive comparison of the datasets are needed. The purpose of the research was to develop visual analytics views for infant, fetal and perinatal mortality rates. Datasets (from Table 17) were extracted from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention website (http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/hus/child.htm). The datasets were then converted into formats suitable for designing interactive views. Multiple views of the data were constructed to accomplish the purpose of the study. The infant mortality rate in 2009 was 6.40 compared to 29.20 in 1950. One of the views provided a vertical comparison the mortality rates of fetal, infant, late fetal, prenatal, postnatal, under 7 days and under 28 days. Further, most infants die in the neonatal stage of life. The interactive comparison views of infant, fetal and perinatal mortality rates were developed and interesting patterns identified from the dataset. Acknowledgements: Mississippi SIDS African American Outreach Project at Jackson State University. Disclaimer: The views and conclusions contained in this document are those of the authors and should not be interpreted as necessarily representing the official policies, either expressed or implied, of the funding agencies.


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LOW DOSE MERCURY EXPOSURES IN HUMAN RENAL PROXIMAL TUBULAR (HK-2) CELLS Devin Stewart, Portia Newell, Jhenna Victorian, Ebonie Butler and Dwayne Sutton Molecular Toxicology Research Laboratory, NIH-Centers for Environmental Health, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi, USA Abstract: Inorganic mercury is one of the most environmentally abundant toxic metals and among the chemical forms of mercury the most potent and selective nephrotoxicant. Renal proximal tubular cells represent the primary target site where highly reactive inorganic mercury ions are proved to rapidly accumulate and induce cell injury. Moreover, the binding interactions of inorganic mercuric ions with various extracellular and intracellular thiols have been shown to directly influence their cell uptake, accumulation, as well as toxicity. Low dose mercury toxicity has been shown to affect renal systems because the kidneys accumulate the highest levels of mercury compared to the brain and liver. Studies have shown that mercuric ions with a low concentration range that does not predispose to necrotic cell death, nonetheless specifically impairs thiol-dependent signal transduction processes which may increase the susceptibility of the kidney cells to cytotoxic effects of other endogenous or exogenous agents. However, the mechanisms and functional consequences of these effects remain to be demonstrated. This study was specifically designed to examine low dose inorganic mercury toxicity in human renal proximal tubular cells. Cell viability was measure by the MTT assay and cells were treated with serial dilutions of 0-6 µg/ml. The LD50 value was found to be 4.65 ± 0.6 µg/ml indicting that mercury is highly toxic to the cells. The trypan blue exclusion assay and the alkaline comet assay were used to assay the low dose toxicity of inorganic mercury to human renal proximal tubular cells. Cells were treated with (0, 0.38 µM, 0.75µM, and 1.5µM) respectively. In the comet assay cells were treated for 3 hrs and in the trypan blue exclusion assay they were treated for 24 hours. Both results indicated a dose response with no significant differences in the comets or the trypan blue exclusion assays. These results point out that those low doses of inorganic mercury are impacting the cells and that the mechanisms and functional consequences need to be demonstrated. Key Words: Renal epithelial cells, low dose mercury toxicity, nephrotoxicity, mercuric ions


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ASSESSING THE ROLE OF SUPRA-PHYSIOLOGIC LEVELS OF RETINOIC ACID (ATRA) IN OVALBUMIN AND MOLD-SENSITIZED F344 RAT LUNG TISSUES AND IMPROVEMENT OF RELATED PATHOLOGY BY CITRAL Carlene Holt-Gray and Ibrahim O. Farah Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA Abstract: The role of retinoic acid (All Trans Retinoic Acid; ATRA) in the development of lung pathology and tissue remodeling are not well established in the literature. As well, the role of citral (inhibitor of retinoid function) in the improvement of lung pathology was not ascertained under an in vivo setting. Therefore, it is hypothesized that ovalbumin and mold exposure will sensitize lung tissues to supra-physiologic levels of ATRA leading to lung tissue pathology and that citrals (C1 and C2) will reverse or ameliorate the related pathological damage to lung tissues. The study used an IACUC approved between-subject in vivo randomized split plot factorial design (F344 rat model; N=80). Two groups representing intratrachael mold spore instillation and ovalbumin (intraperitoneal) were exposed to 16 different treatments including positive and negative controls, ATRA, citrals (C1 and C2) and their combinations by intra-peritoneal injection. Rat weight data and blood were collected on Days 1 and 21. All animals were sacrificed on day 21 and lung tissues were processed for histopathology. Results showed that even though C1 and C2 were not toxic individually, their combination at high dosing (50 mg/kg) was lethal. Evidence from weights and blood (ANOVA and Duncan) as well as histopatholgical analysis supported the findings that exposure of ovalbumin-sensitized and mold-sensitized rats to ATRA showed different levels of lung tissue damage that was improved by C1and C2 respectively. This comprehensive in vivo study showed variable responses on the interaction of ovalbumin, citrals, mold and ATRA as related to their improvement of lung tissue pathologies. Acknowledgements: This research is supported by a grant from the National Institutes of Health (Grant No.1G12RR13459), through the NCRR-RCMI Center for Environmental Health at Jackson State University (JSU).


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EXPOSURE TO LEAD AND OXIDATIVE STRESS: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW Ana Carolina B. A. Lopes1, Monica M. B. Paoliello1, 2, Tiago S. Peixe2 and Arthur E. Mesas3 1

Graduate Program in Public Health, State University of Londrina, Parana, Brazil Department of Clinical and Toxicological Analysis, Health Science Center, State University of Londrina, Parana, Brazil 3 Department of Public Health, Health Science Center, State University of Londrina, Parana, Brazil 2

Abstract: Lead is considered a serious public health issuebecause it is one of the most widespread environmental and industrial toxins. Lead has been known to adversely affect many organs and systems in humans, as central and peripheral nervous system, hematopoietic system, cardiovascular system, liver, kidney and reproductive system. Therefore, there has been a considerable interest in studying the mechanisms involved in lead toxicity. Several researches have demonstrated that lead induce oxidative stress by increasing reactive oxygen species formation and decrease antioxidant system ability. The purpose of the current study is to present a review about lead exposure and oxidative stressin general population as well as in occupationally population exposed to lead. The search strategy aimed to identify all observational studies regarding the association between lead-related oxidative stress, as the indicators of the oxidative stress and the know indices of lead exposure that are accessed to evaluate this association. We searched PubMed, TOXLINE and Web of Knowledge, with no date limits and no language restriction. No original data, no human research, case series, case reports, ecologic studies, guidelines, studies with no data on lead exposure or no oxidative stress outcome were excluded. Using free text it was found a total of 1013 articles (408 in PubMed, 253 in TOXLINE and 352 in Web of Knowledge). After excluding articles by reading titles and/or abstracts, even as excluding the duplicates, we found 61 studies. Blood lead levels (BLL) was the most used biomarker for lead exposure presented in the studies. The most commonly used parameter to access lead toxicity was aminolevulinic acid dehidratase (ALAD), and to evaluate the lead-induced oxidative stress were: reduced glutathione (GSH), glutathione disulfide (GSSG) concentrations, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and malondialdehyde (MDA). Results of studies based on occupationallyexposed population, even as studies with general population have shown significant correlation between BLL, ALAD and oxidative stress markers. BLL were negatively correlated with ALAD activity. There was a significant positive correlation of BLL with MDA, CAT and SOD. GPx levels were significantly elevated in occupational lead-exposed population. Key words: lead, blood lead level, oxidative stress, ALAD. Acknowledgements: This research has been supported by Coordination for the Improvement of Higher Level -or Education- Personnel (CAPES), through Ministry of Health, Brazil.


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PREVALENCE OF METABOLIC SYNDROME AMONG ADULTS IN SOUTHERN BRAZIL Maira S. S. Bortoletto1, Ana Carolina B. A. Lopes1, Regina K. T. Souza2, Marcos A. S. Cabrera3, Alberto D. González2 1 Graduate Program in Public Health, State University of Londrina, Parana, Brazil 2 Department of Public Health Science Center, State University of Londrina, Parana, Brazil 3 Department of medicine Health Science Center, State University of Londrina, Parana, Brazil Abstract: Metabolic syndrome is a multifactorial problem. The metabolic syndrome is defined when an individual has three or more of these situations: high blood pressure levels, high levels of HDL cholesterol, high levels of triglycerides, high levels of glycemia and increased waist circumference. All these conditions are considered cardiovascular risk factors. Many argue that obesity is the most important problem in the metabolic syndrome. However, in Brazil it is necessary a deeper understanding about metabolic syndrome and their components. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components among adults in Southern Brazil. It is a cross-sectional, population-based survey, conducted in the city of Cambé, Paraná state, Southern Brazil, with a total of 92.888 inhabitants. The study population was composed by urban residents, aged 40 or more, and a total of 33.1% of the population of that city was in this age group. The size of the sample was calculated using the program Epi Info 3.5.1, considering an expected ratio of 50%, error margin of 3% and confidence interval of 95%, resulting in a sample of 1.066 subjects interviewed. Contiguous households were visited in a randomly traced trajectory, and in each domicile, a draw was made to select one dweller with more than 40 years old, until reaching the quota of people to be interviewed, according to gender and age group in each censor sector. We estimated the prevalence of metabolic syndrome using the National Cholesterol Education Program. Men and women showed similar means ages (54±10 and 57±11 years) and 48% (48% CI 48.4-58.0) and 47% (CI 41.0-51.0) had metabolic syndrome, respectively. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome components were: reduced HDL cholesterol (42.9%), hyperglycemia (48.1%), abdominal obesity (49.4%), hypertriglyceridemia (59.9%) and high blood pressure levels (69.4%).The distribution of the components of the metabolic syndrome was different between men and women. Men with metabolic syndrome showed high blood pressure levels (p=0.004) and hyperglycemia (0.008). Among women was more frequent abdominal obesity (p<0.001) and reduced HDL cholesterol (p<0.001). Compared with the literature, this study reveals high prevalence of metabolic syndrome as well as its components. The results suggested that the cardiovascular risk profile in this population is worse than that presented in the international literature. Key words: Metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular risk factors, prevalence, blood pressure. Acknowledgements: This research has been supported by Coordination for the Improvement of Higher Level -or Education- Personnel (CAPES), through Ministry of Health, Brazil.


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THE SURFACE HYDROLOGY OF THE GROUND WATERS OF THE SAUZENCINILLAS FOR HYDRODYNAMIC MODELING PURPOSES Gilberto Herrera Ponce and Adán Pinales Munguía College of Engineering, Autonomous University of Chihuahua, Circuito Universitario Campus II.C.P. 31000. Chihuahua, Chihuahua, México Abstract: The state of Chihuahua is located in northwestern Mexico and currently shares the serious condition of drought and shortage of water resources, it has an area of 245, 962 km2, where there are placed 61 aquifers in an area of 202, 188 km2 (82.2%). The aquifer of the Sauz-Encinillas is located in the central Chihuahua state and covers an area of 2,743 km2, including the geographical coordinates 28 ° 52 '07 "to 29 ° 40' 29" north latitude and 106 º 02 '19 "to 106 ° 44 '35 "in length. Groundwater extracted from the aquifers in the state of Chihuahua is hm3/year 3.521 and the recharge is 3.600 hm3/year. In the aquifer of the Sauz-Encinillas the extractions are 144.8 hm3/year and the recharge is only 80.8 hm3/year, giving a deficit of 64 hm3/year. Rainfall occurs in greater proportion in the period from June to October, while the lowest rainfall from November to May. They have about 95 vertical electrical sounding (VES's) made during the years 1985 and 1988, prepared by the National Water Commission. The descriptions of the areas that make up each of the electrical profiles are presented below: Zone A corresponds to the surface layers, including the flooring material comprises materials such as clay, silt, sand, gravel and boleos without saturation or partially saturated. Zone B is for granular materials such as sand, gravel, and cluster boleos. Zone C in this area are grouped clay materials, clay loam or sandy clay of low permeability. Zone D in this area are grouped materials that make up the basement. It includes virtually impermeable rhyolite. The objective was to estimate the aquifer recharge in five different methods by which we got these results: the recharge by the Hydroclimatological Balance method is 80.8 hm3/a, by the method of Thiessen Polygons is 45.3 hm3/a, by the method Recharge-Discharge in pristine conditions is 56.9 hm3/a, by the method of Recharge Estimation by analogy 68.2 hm3/a and estimating the recharge using a mathematical model gave 65.1 hm3 /a. All the sites in the area of study were visited in which weather information was available and found that 75% is no longer in use or abandoned. The remaining 25% is operating by INIFAP and the CAN. Because we are in a semi-arid zone and the aquifer is in balance as demand grows the vital liquid is recommended to have a network of weather stations for which historical data are generated, and increase the validity of the information and that the data can be viewed in real time, have aquifer regeneration programs and implement programs to help reduce the depletion of the same. Key Words: Aquifer, aquifer recharge, mathematical model, Chihuahua, Mexico. Acknowledgments: The authors wish to acknowledge the Junta Local de Aguas, for helping in give the information of historical precipitation of Chihuahua.


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WATER QUALITY IN GROUNDWATER WHICH IS UTILIZED AS POTABLE WATER IN THE MUNCIPALITY OF ASCENCION, CHIHUAHUA, MEXICO Lourdes Raquel Balderrama, Héctor O. Rubio, Eduviges Burrola Barraza and Rey Manuel Quintana College of Zoo technology and Ecology, Autonomous University of Chihuahua, Periferico Francisco R. Almada, Km. 1, Colonia Zootecnia. C.P. 31000. Chihuahua, Chihuahua, México Abstract: In the north of Mexico, which is an arid or semiarid ecosystem, the groundwater represents a vital resource for all sectors. The city of Ascencion is located in the Municipality of Ascencion of the State of Chihuahua and the inhabitants drink water coming from five deep wells. Hence, the quality of groundwater supplies for the Ascencion´s inhabitants is an important public health concern. The Ascencion city has an extreme arid climate with a highest temperature in summer of 44 ° C and -24° C in the winter. The annual average precipitation is scarcely 297. The objective of this study was to evaluate the water quality of the wells through physical-chemical and microbiological analysis. Water samples were obtained from the five wells and from five randomly selected households in the four seasons. The sample of summer was done in July 2011, the sample of autumn was realized in September 2011, the sample of winter was completed in December 2011 and the sample of spring was done in May 2012. Hence, a total of 40 water samples were analyzed for potential Hydrogen (pH), electrical conductivity (EC), temperature (T), dissolved Oxygen (DO), turbidity (Turb), total solids (TS), total coliforms (TC), fecal coliforms (FC) and the following metals; Al, As, B, Cd, Ca, Cu, Cr, Fe, Mg, Mn, Ni, Ag, Pb, K, Na, Se, Si y Zn. An analysis of Variance was performed to look for season differences. About 80% of the water samples tested positive for TC and FC and the less amount of coliforms was noted for the winter samples. We believed that the potential source of well contamination for TC and FC is the cemetery that is near to the town. These results are very important because is highly recognized that many waterborne diseases outbreak are cause by contaminated groundwater. The pH was different for season (P<0.01) where 8.7 was for July, 8.7 for September, 9.7 for December and 9.2 for May. The EC values were not different among seasons (P>0.01) and the T was statistically different (P<0.01) for seasons where winter has 16° C and September has 27° C. The TS was not different (P>0.01) and DO was different (P<0.01) where 15 mg L-1 were noted in September samples and 1.45 mg L-1 in May samples. The Turb parameter was not detected in any of the samples. The metal levels will be discussed in the poster session. Key words: Water quality, coliforms, physic-chemical, metals, Chihuahua, Mexico. Acknowledgments: The authors wish to acknowledge Luis Reyes, worker of the Junta Local de Aguas, for helping in getting the water samples.


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INFLUENCE OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON LIZARDS AND CACTI IN THE DESERT OF CHIHUAHUA USING MAXENT AND GARP IrmaDomínguez1, Leonor Cortés1, Octavio Hinojosa2, Oscar Viramontes1and Héctor Gadsden2 1 2

Facultad de Zootecnia y Ecología, Universidad Autónoma de Chihuahua, Chihuahua, Mexico Centro de Investigación Sobre Sequía (CEISS)

Abstract: The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of global warming on species distribution. Four species of lizards saxicolous were studied; the Sceloporus poinsettii and Crotaphytus collaris of broad distribution and the Sceloporus cyanostictus and Crotaphytus antiquues of restricted distribution. These species are restricted to small areas of the rocky hills in the Chihuahuas Desert and are subject to rapid transformation of their habitat by human impact and climate change. The cactus species with which we worked are Coryphantha macromeris and Mammillaria lasiacantha. The Chihuahuas Desert is one of richest biologically ecosystem of the world. It covers an approximate area of 630,000 km2, spanning the states of Chihuahua, Coahuila, Nuevo León, Durango, Zacatecas y San Luis Potosí in Mexico, to the southwestern United States represented for Arizona, New México y Texas. There are about 120 species of reptiles and about 30% of the world species of cacti grow in the desert. The potential distribution was estimated by two models of niche space GARP and MaxEnt. The models were designed under a climate scenario simulated (CCM A2), three time periods (2020, 2050 and 2080) and 19 climatic variables of precipitation and temperature. The results concerning the lizards indicate that extensive distribution of species may adapt more adequately to climate change remained relatively stable distribution. Species restricted distribution have ranges of temperature and precipitation close causing minor adaptation to climate change. The results on the species of cacti are representative indicates that climate change in the state affect these species in their distribution. Keywords: Modeling, Maxent, Garp, Cacti, Chihuahuan Desert Lizards, Saurians, Climate Change. Acknowledgements: We thank the Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología (CONACYT) and the Universidad Autónoma de Chihuahua for their contribution in the project.


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MAKING A HEALTHY SPORTS DRINK TO HELP FIGHT HEALTH DISPARITIES James Kelley1 and Christopher Kelley2 1 2

Health Sciences, College of Public Service, Jackson State University, Jackson, Mississippi, USA Clinton Public Schools, Clinton, MS, USA

Abstract: People in high risk categories for obesity and diabetes are characterized by poor food choices and physical inactivity. Obesity rates are rising faster in social economically disadvantaged communities and many have limited access to fresh fruits. Many times when they acquire access, they lack the motivation to make healthy choices. Sports drinks replace the fluid and nutrients the body loses during physical activity. They contain electrolytes which improve body regulation and reduce the risk of muscle cramps. The more electrolytes the faster the body restores its energy. However, many sports drinks of today contain extra sugar. An abundance of sugar in the body can contribute to obesity and diabetes. This project began as a father and son science project. We wanted to make a sports drink with more electrolytes and less sugar than commercial sports drinks. Electrolytes in a liquid can be evaluated by the amount of conductance it provides. Furthermore, this can be measured by detecting the number of milliamps in the current. We used a battery, wire, a multi-meter and various liquid solutions for our test. We tested water, two commercial sports drinks and a lemon juice mixture. We added half the sugar in the sports drinks to our mixture. The ANOVA results yielded our lemon juice mixture with the most electrolytes. Furthermore, it showed a significant difference between the commercial sports drinks and our lemon juice mixture. In conclusion, our lemon juice mixture had more electrolytes and less sugar than the two commercial sports drinks. Studies have shown that family oriented food preparation activities can encourage healthy eating choices. Many low income households may consider sports drinks as a non-essential, luxury item. However, making the sports drink is easy, inexpensive, and has the goal creating a healthy product for the war on health disparities. Key words: Obesity, sports drinks, electrolytes, diabetes Acknowledgements: Vera Kelley and Joe Whitfield


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BREASTFEEDING MAY REDUCE THE RISK OF POSTPARTUM DEPRESSION BY LOWERING MATERNAL VITAMIN A CONCENTRATION: HYPOTHESIS Anthony Mawson and Xueyuan Wang School of Health Sciences, College of Public Service, Jackson State University, 350 West Woodrow Wilson Drive, Jackson, MS 39213 Abstract: Postpartum depression (PPD) is an international public health problem affecting at least 1 in 8 mothers. A potential clue to the pathogenesis is that PPD is associated with the absence of breastfeeding or its early termination. Breastfeeding thus appears to be a protective factor against postpartum depression but the underlying mechanisms are not well understood Breast milk is rich in vitamin A and prolonged lactation reduces body stores of the vitamin. Although vital in low concentration for numerous biological functions, vitamin A (â&#x20AC;&#x153;retinoidsâ&#x20AC;?) in higher concentration can be prooxidant, cytotoxic, mutagenic and teratogenic. Pregnant women accumulate vitamin A in liver and breast tissue in preparation for lactation. Evidence is also growing that retinoids are associated with cognitive disturbances and mood disorders, including depression and suicide. We hypothesize that breastfeeding protects against PPD by maintaining potentially toxic quantities of endogenous retinoids below a critical threshold. Based on published data, we estimate that during the first six months of exclusive breastfeeding an amount of vitamin A is safely transferred from mother to infant that represents 76% of a dose expected to cause acute vitamin A poisoning if consumed by an adult. Breastfeeding may thus have evolutionary-adaptive functions for both mother and infant, transferring vital nutrients to an infant unable to feed itself and, at the same time, providing a natural means of reducing potentially toxic concentrations of vitamin A in the mother. Subject to obtaining support for the model, it may be possible to quantify the risk of postpartum depression and prevent its occurrence based on a defined threshold concentration of a retinoid compound during pregnancy. Key Words: Post-partum depression; retinoids; women; infants. Breastfeeding; milk; liver; breast


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POWER TO PREVENT: AN EFFECTIVE COMMUNITY-BASED TOOL FOR DIABETES PREVENTION Marinelle Payton and Xueyuan Wang School of Health Sciences, College of Public Service, Jackson State University,350 W. Woodrow Wilson Drive, Jackson, Mississippi, USA Abstract: Diabetes continues to increase, where it is estimated that 26 million people are living with diabetes. Of all states, Mississippi ranks No. 2 for overall prevalence of diabetes and its mortality rate increased 42% from 2007, with African Americans having a 171% higher mortality rate than whites. Therefore, effective diabetes prevention is important for African Americans. To investigate the knowledge of risk factors for diabetes and life style change between pre- and post- diabetes education using the Power to Prevent: A Family Lifestyle Approach to Diabetes Prevention curriculum. Methods: This intervention study utilized data collected by Jackson State University Institute of Epidemiology and Health Services Research using the Power to Prevent Program developed by CDC and NIH. Pre- and post- data on demographics, eating habits, and knowledge of risk factors for diabetes and diabetes prevention were collected on 390 participants. Only participants with no history of diabetes were used in the study. Chi-square was used as a test of significance. Most of the participants (N=187) were African Americans. Following intervention, there was a significant increase in knowledge of risk factors for diabetes [63(65%) vs. 85 (98%), p< 0.0001)], how to prevent diabetes [53 (56%) vs. 81 (94%), p< 0.0001], and limiting portion sizes at meals, eating three servings of fruit a day and less fried foods and sugary drinks; and knowledge of risk factors for obesity and obesity prevention were significant. Conclusion: The Power to Prevent Program is an effective educational tool for diabetes prevention. Keywords: Diabetes, Community Education


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THE DIETARY INTAKE AND LEVELS OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AMONG COLLEGE STUDENTS Jameskia Thompson, Blessing Dennis, Jung Hye Sung and Jae Eun Lee School of Health Sciences, College of Public Service, Jackson State University,350 W. Woodrow Wilson Drive, Jackson, Mississippi, USA Abstract: Research studies have shown that poor diet and exercise patterns increase the incidence of health disparities such as diabetes and obesity, while proper nutritional dietary intake and physical activity results in positive health outcomes. The authors assessed the diet and exercise habits of college students enrolled in graduate school. Data were collected and analyzed from 35 graduate students who either reside on or off campus, and are unemployed or employed, whether part time or full time. To survey physical activity, they used the Self-Reported Physical Activity scale. They used a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ), similar to the National Health and Nutrition Examination survey (NHANES) which estimates food and nutrient intake. They used exercise and food records based on a week. Participants reported diets that varied with current public health weekly recommendations set up by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) for vigorous, moderate physical, flexibility, and endurance activities, fruit/vegetable intake, and dessert; in terms of fruit/vegetable intake, muscular strength and vigorous activities, the study participants fell below these recommendations. The participants met the guidelines for amounts of endurance, moderate physical activity and dessert consumption; however, the average student in this study failed to meet current physical activity and dietary intake recommendations.


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PREVALENCE OF HYPERTENSION AMONG COLLEGE STUDENTS IN JACKSON STATE UNIVERSITY Anakor Christian, Grace O. Ochai, Jung Hye Sung and Jae Eun Lee School of Health Sciences, College of Public Service, Jackson State University,350 W. Woodrow Wilson Drive, Jackson, Mississippi, USA Abstract: Adequate control of hypertension which is adjudged a risk factor for cardiovascular disease requires management. College students in Jackson state university may experience special challenges in identifying this very common problem due to busy schedule in academic work. Hypertension can lead to irreversible damage in vital organs such as kidney, heart, brain and may cause death in adolescents and early adult age if not properly treated. An analysis of cross-sectional survey of 30 college students aged between 30-54years, predominantly blacks mainly Africanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and considered vulnerable to characterize prevalence of hypertension and its risk factors such as smoking, age, family history, overweight/obesity, lack of physical exercise. A self-administered questionnaire was used for collecting information on age, gender, smoking habits, weight, height, family history of hypertension, knowledge of hypertension and its risk factors, exercise engagement and alcohol intake. Blood pressure was determined using an electronic Omron sphygmomanometer on the right arm. Results show that 33.3% of participants were female (n=10), and 66.7% were males (n=20). Mean of age was 38.73 years and mean of BMI was 27.280. 20% 0f the participants were classified as having hypertension (n=6) and 80% classified as not having hypertension based on blood pressure of systolic equal to or more than 140/90 mmHg. It was discovered that all the participants with hypertension had BMI more than or equal to 25 and are either overweight or obese. Also 10 % of females were classified as having hypertension (n=1) and 25% of males had hypertension (n=5) and all reported a family history and alcoholic intake. Descriptive analysis, Chi-square and correlation were used on SPSS to characterize the variables. The result suggest that hypertension may be an important public health problem among this group of students and that obesity and positive family history are considered as risk factors. Hence researchers should consider this factors in future research on this vulnerable group for early detection and management.


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DOES WORKPLACE SMOKING BANS INDUCE INCREASED SMOKING BEHAVIORS AFTER WORK? Avius Carroll, Zimmerman, Edna Caston, Jung Hye Sung and Jae Eun Lee School of Health Sciences, College of Public Service, Jackson State University,350 W. Woodrow Wilson Drive, Jackson, Mississippi, USA Abstract: Our aim is to assess whether smoke free workplace policies induce increased smoking after working hours. Employers cite multiple reasons for restricting smoking in public places which include: causes acute and chronic diseases to healthy nonsmokers; majority of persons experience annoyance and discomfort from smoke exposure; employers have realized lower maintenance and repair costs, insurance costs, and higher nonsmoker productivity when smoking is prohibited in the workplace; and restricting smoking in the workplace might increase the likelihood that smokers in these settings smoke fewer cigarettes or quit smoking entirely. We surveyed 36 employees of a government agency who are current smokers. Participants were asked to identify themselves as either heavy, moderate, or casual smokers. We examined dependent variables: smoking status, cigarettes smoked per day, and attempts to quit. Descriptive statistics were used along with independent sample t-test to test the significance of the study objective. Chi-Square analysis was used to determine the relationships between work environment and work consumption. Simple Linear Regression used to determine if the amount of cigarettes smoked during work hours predicts the amount of cigarettes smoked after work. The average age of smokers in this study was 43, with a dominant female response rate. Most respondents have smoked for 6-10 years. Both male and females consume more cigarettes after work, with female consumption being significantly higher. Productivity results showed 52.8% felt the work environment was more productive; 97.2% felt it was healthier. Smokers who are employed in work places with smoking bans are likely to consume more cigarettes after working hours. Level of work and type of work environment can be a predictor in smoking behavior that was not tested in our study.


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SELF ASSESSMENT STRESS LEVEL AMONG JACKSON STATE UNIVERSITY STUDENTS AND THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN MALE AND FEMALE STUDENTS Md Elham Momtahan, Anoosh Mokhtarian, Jung Hye Sung and Jae Eun Lee School of Health Sciences, College of Public Service, Jackson State University,350 W. Woodrow Wilson Drive, Jackson, Mississippi, USA Abstract: This main purpose of this study is to estimates the level of stress among Jackson state university and the effect of stress on their behavior and their daily life. Also, this study compared male and female students in terms of stress levels and sex. This is a cross-sectional study on JSU students with a sample size of 30 students who voluntarily filled a questionnaire with 11 questions about their evaluations on stress level, symptoms, exercise, and so on. Data analyzed withSpss-18, and using a Chisquare test to show whether there is a relationship between sex and stress level. There is no relationship between sex and stress level. (P-value=0.447).the majority of students had controllable to high level of stress and anxiety. Also, students were asked about depression, their symptoms, their behavior and exercise. Students were asked about the exercise and only 30% exercised on a regular basis.16.7% said that they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t exercise at all, 20% once a week and 33.3% just exercise a few days a month. Students had their most bothering symptom while stressed, and, 43.3% had headache, 33.3% had anxiety and 6.7% complain of sleep disorder and 6.7% of upset stomach.


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ATTITUDES AND PERCEIVED BARRIERS TO ADOPTION OF A MORE PLANT-BASED PATTERN OF FOOD INTAKE Kathy L. Johnson, Jung Hye Sung and Jae Eun Lee School of Health Sciences, College of Public Service, Jackson State University,350 W. Woodrow Wilson Drive, Jackson, Mississippi, USA Abstract: Current research around the world has shown the benefits of a more plant-based diet, but the majority of Americans are not eating this way. The aim of this study is to examine attitudes and perceived barriers which may hinder adoption of a more plant-based diet by those living in the metro Jackson area of Mississippi. Thirty-three surveys were distributed with fifteen statements regarding attitudes and perceived barriers to this eating pattern. Responses varied by gender and age group. On the whole, most respondents were interested in learning more about this subject and felt they did have control over what they ate. The most common perceived barriers as a group were “it is too expensive,” “would miss favorite foods,” and “too complicated to eat out.” Males indicated they did not know how to “plan meals” this way, did not think they could get “enough protein,” and felt they would “be hungry.” Older respondents perceived more barriers with family acceptance and eating out issues than the younger respondents did. The results of this study indicated the need for a large, random survey to further identify barriers to healthy plant-based eating. Education regarding inexpensive food selection, recipe modification or substitution of favorite items, healthy restaurant food choices, explanation of protein sources other than meat, and meal planning/shopping would all be helpful at the community level. In addition, policy makers and educators can promote improvements in advertising and eating establishments.


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EFFECTS OF EXCESSIVE ALCOHOL CONSUMPTION ON ADULT MALES AND FEMALES Kelia E. Neal, Jung Hye Sung and Jae Eun Lee School of Health Sciences, College of Public Service, Jackson State University,350 W. Woodrow Wilson Drive, Jackson, Mississippi, USA Abstract: Excessive alcohol consumption appears to be increasing in America. Disproportionate consumption of alcohol has been linked to detrimental behavior and increased risks to health and safety of the consumers and society as a whole. This study analyzes alcohol consumption by adult males and females in the local Jackson area and was conducted over a two-month period among thirty total participants. This study focused on excessive alcohol composition for correlation of the effects of elevated alcohol ingestion to associated risks to health and safety among males and females. Questionnaire data was evaluated for data compilation. The effects of excessive alcohol consumption were analyzed related to alcohol motor vehicle crash involvement, associated alcohol arrests and medical assistance required due to alcohol ingestion. The study data is more comparable when striated among gender, with 60% of adult males being current alcohol consumer, as current data indicates that 62% of adult men reported drinking during the last thirty days (CDC, 2011). The same is true for adult females, as the NIAA reports that at least 60% of American women have a minimum of one drink each year and 63% of adult female study respondents stated being current alcohol consumers. Excessive alcohol consumption results in detrimental outcomes to health, safety and the physical, social, and psychological being of not only the consumer but of the family members, employers and society as a whole.


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SURVEY ON LEVEL OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY IN HEALTH CARE WORKERS IN UNIVERSITY MISSISSIPPI Maryam Yoosefi1, Ali Dehghani Firoozabadi1, Jung Hye Sung1, Ji-Young Lee2 and Jae Eun Lee1 1

School of Health Sciences, College of Public Service, Jackson State University,350 W. Woodrow Wilson Drive, Jackson, Mississippi, USA 2 Department of Psychology, University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, PA, USA Abstract: Health care workers comprise a high-risk workgroup with respect to deterioration and early retirement. There is high prevalence of obesity and many of the workers are overweight. Together, these factors play a significant role in the health-related problems within this sector. The present study evaluates the level of physical activity among males and female in health care workers in University Of Mississippi. A total number of 30 health care workers who works at University of Mississippi were participated in our study through random sampling. A questionnaire includes demographics including sex and age and the level of the physical activity in their work place and during their leisure time were distributed. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) for Windows Release 18 was used for data analysis. Among all participants 30% claim that they are active all day, 13.3% sit often more than an hour at a time and 23.3% says that they job involves mainly sitting but with some standing or walking. 26.7%are in motion more than an hour during a normal day, 43.3% about an hour and 10% less than 20 min. 26.7% were not currently engaged in regular physical activity, 20% do not do regular physical activity but plan to start in next six month, and 33.3% plan to start in next month. 6.7% have been physically active on a regular basis for a year or longer.13.3% person said that they have never engaged in any regular activity in their leisure time. 70% use their car for transportation while just 23.3% walk to their work. When asking about their reason for the exercise or desire to do, 8 person mentioned feeling good is a main reason for them to exercise, for 36.7% improving overall health, for 16.7% reduce stress was mentioned as the major motivation. Weight control was a major cause in 20% of health workers. Of the reason not exercising 36.7% mentioned lack of time as a major cause, 33% stated that they are tired and feel lack of energy to do the exercise and 20% said that do not have appropriate space, side walk area prevent them to do the exercise.35.7% of women and 18.8 of male sates that they do the exercises because they feel good which there no significant difference was. Among people who mentioned weight control as to exercise 25% were male and14.3% were female concerning about general health was a cause to exercise in 35.7% female while 37.5% male mentioned it a cause to exercise. The P=0.610 shows that there is no significant differences between men and women in this regard. (P<0.05). In our study men complaint of Lack of energy and feeling tired comparing to women; however the difference between men and women was not statistically significant. In many studies it is said that exercise can improve the feeling of being tired so the correlation between being tired and the exercise need more studies.


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SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES AND THE IMPACT ON JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI ADOLESCENTS Paulette M. Ware, Elbony Smith, Jung Hye Sung and Jae Eun Lee School of Health Sciences, College of Public Service, Jackson State University,350 W. Woodrow Wilson Drive, Jackson, Mississippi, USA Abstract This is a study of adolescents using condoms during sexual activities for protection against sexually transmitted diseases. The number of adolescents contracting sexually transmitted diseases has continued to increase significantly in the past year. To better understand if the use of condoms as a method of protection against sexually transmitted disease is effective, we administered the quantitative method of study to adolescents between the ages of 14-19. At the time of the study, 10 adolescents out of 30 had at some point contracted a sexually transmitted disease. The p value is p<0.05 for the use of condoms and sexually transmitted diseases. Therefore, we rejected the null hypothesis and concluded that condoms usages and sexually transmitted diseases are not independent. There is a relationship between condoms and sexually transmitted diseases. The fact that sexually transmitted infections can be severe if untreated and can have negative consequences, is very importance to educate our youth on prevention and bring awareness to the parents that this is happening and they should take an active role in the promotion, prevention and education of their children.


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SEXUAL ACTIVITY, MARIJUANA USE & ALCOHOL USE IN RELATION TO GENDER FOR NON ADOLESCENT STUDENTS Quotasze P. Williams, Jung Hye Sung and Jae Eun Lee School of Health Sciences, College of Public Service, Jackson State University,350 W. Woodrow Wilson Drive, Jackson, Mississippi, USA Abstract: Despite the vast research by Americans on alcohol use, marijuana use, and sexual activity in relationship to adolescents students little is known about these measurable variables in relationship to gender and individuals who are not considered adolescents but are classified as students in an undergraduate, graduate, or post graduate program. This study examined gender in its relationship to alcohol, marijuana use, and sexual activity. Thirty subjects (n = 15 males, 15 females) participated in this intervention study. Participants were surveyed to collect data that related to alcohol use, marijuana use, and sexual activity. The Harvard School of Public Health conducted three surveys between 1993 and 1999, examining the drug and alcohol use of 44,265college studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nationwide. The study found that 9 out of 10 students (91 percent) who use marijuana participate in other high-risk active. College students have more opportunities to have different sex partners and may use drugs and alcohol more often before sex (Butcher et al., 1991), it is likely that college students are at greater risk than adolescents. With increased sexual opportunities and alcohol or drug exposure, students who are not adolescents and attending college will engage in heavier alcohol or marijuana use as well as riskier sexual behaviors. This study examined one hypothesis which was that females would have a higher involvement in the marijuana use, sexual activity, and alcohol consumption. The trend toward increased use of marijuana by college students, as well as teenagers, should be recognized as problematic and addressed by institutions of higher education.


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THE FREQUENCY OF ASPIRIN USE IN A STRESS RELATED ENVIRONMENT Shernica Ferguson, Roderick Hughes, Jung Hye Sung and Jae Eun Lee School of Health Sciences, College of Public Service, Jackson State University,350 W. Woodrow Wilson Drive, Jackson, Mississippi, USA Abstract: After almost 90 years of clinical use, aspirin remains one of the world's most extensively used over-the-counter drugs, and it is still recognized as the standard analgesic /anti-inflammatory agent by which newer drugs are assessed. Aspirin is in a group of drugs called salicylates, these chemicals work by reducing substances in the body that cause pain, fever, and inflammation. Aspirin can be used to: relieve minor aches and pains, prevent strokes and heart attacks and relieve the signs and symptoms of Rheumatologic disease. Stressors have adverse effects on the mind, body, and behavior and have been linked to Tension-type headaches, depression obesity and diabetes. Aspirin uses have been proven to be effective for easing these tension type headaches. This study should help identify some causes for headaches and focuses on the uses of aspirin and pain relievers and why it is being used for tension headaches and other stressors in occupational settings. The Frequency of aspirin use was conducted at the University of Mississippi Medical Center and Jackson State University, School of Public health. The association between aspirin use and tension headaches within a stressful environment was examined used the Chi-Square test. Significance was constructed using the 95% confidence interval limits. Among most of the variables employed, there were no associations to aspirin consumption (P >0.05). An association did exist (P<0.05) between the frequency of alcohol beverage consumed between aspirin (AS) groups and non-aspirin (NAS) groups. An association between baseline characteristics and AS were observed, 27.3% of participants who consumed <1 alcoholic beverage weekly, 45.5% consumed 23 beverages weekly and 27.3% consumed 3-4 beverages weekly. The findings were not explained by Gender, occupation, employment, employment status, frequency of headache, marital status, brand of aspirin, number of dependents, amount of physical activity, alternatives to stress, and magnitude of stress. There were no significance among these variables and the dependent variable employed. Stress and aspirin use were two independent variables, we feel that this conclusion is inconsistent based on the unforeseen limitations, unmeasured confounding and bias associated with the respondent questionnaires skewed the data in this study.


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HPLC-MS ANALYSIS OF ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANTS IN WATER SAMPLES Cassandra McCullum, Yiming Liuand Paul Tchounwou Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Jackson, State University, 1400 Lynch Street, Jackson, MS, USA, 39217, USA Abstract: Pollutants have been shown to be present in the water compartment, mainly due to the inefficient removal in wastewater treatment plants (WWTP). Water pollution is the contamination of water bodies such as lakes, rivers, oceans, aquifers and groundwater. Water pollution occurs when pollutants are discharged directly or indirectly into water bodies without adequate treatment to remove harmful compounds. Contaminants may include organic and inorganic substances. Water pollution affects plants and organisms living in these bodies of water. In almost all cases the effect is damaging not only to individual species and populations, but also to the natural biological communities. Water pollution is a major global problem which requires ongoing evaluation and revision of water resource policy at all levels (international down to individual aquifers and wells). It has been suggested that water pollution is the leading worldwide cause of deaths and diseases, and that it accounts for the deaths of more than 14,000 people daily. The specific contaminants leading to pollution in water include a wide spectrum of chemicals, pathogens, and physical or sensory changes such as elevated temperature and discoloration. While many of the chemicals and substances that are regulated may be naturally occurring (calcium, sodium, iron, manganese, etc.) the concentration is often the key in determining what is a natural component of water, and what is a contaminant. Water pollution may be analyzed through several broad categories of methods: physical, chemical and biological. Most involve collection of samples, followed by specialized analytical tests. Thus, in general, complicated, time consuming extraction and purification processes, usually based on the application of solidâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;liquid extraction, are performed before final determination by immunoassay, high-performance liquid chromatography, or gas chromatography, very often coupled with mass spectrometry. This paper reviews the High Performance Liquid Chromatography coupled with Mass Spectrometry (HPLC-MS) analysis of environmental pollutants in water samples which are currently of importance in natural and wastewaters. Discussion of the main steps, from sampling up to analysis, and the techniques most commonly used in the determination is presented. Keywords: Pollutants, contaminants, HPLC-MS Acknowledgement: This research is supported by Title III, RCMI, and GM089557


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Fe , Fe , Mg , and Pb -INDUCED CYTOXICITY AND GENOTOXICITY IN PC-12 CELLS Talia Sanders1, Yi-Ming Liu2 and Paul B. Tchounwou1 1

Department of Biology and 2Department of Chemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA Abstract: Previous studies have indicated that heavy metal exposure can have an effect on the central nervous system. However, research has been inadequate to fully support this claim. The aim of this work was to determine the toxic effects of heavy metal ions including Fe2+, Fe3+, Mg2+, and Pb2+ on nerve cells (e.g. PC-12). PC-12 cells were incubated with the metal ions at two concentrations, i.e. 16.7 and 166.7 M at an 18-hour incubation period. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay was used to assess the cytotoxicity of selected metals. LDH is an enzyme present in most cells that is released into the cell culture medium upon damage of the cytoplasmic membrane. PC-12 cells showed signs of cytotoxicity to all metal ions. A comet assay was done to determine whether DNA damage was a factor after an 18hour incubation period. There was an increase in DNA damage at both 16.7 µM and 166.7 µM exposures. Western blot analysis also showed oxidative stress for all metal ions at both concentrations. Our results indicate that exposure to Fe2+, Fe3+, Mg2+, and Pb2+ at a concentration as low as 16.7 µM induces cytotoxic and genotoxic effects in PC-12 cells, and its toxicity may be mediated through oxidative stress. Further studies are underway to investigate their mechanism of toxicity. Key words: Heavy metal, oxidative stress, cytotoxicity, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay, monoamino neurotransmitters


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EXPLORATION OF BINDING MODES BETWEEN p300 AND CHETOMIN BY Zn EJECTION USING DFT and PROTEIN-LIGAND DOCKING Mike Cato1, Megan Peach2, Marc Nicklaus1 and Jerzy Leszczynski1 1

Jackson State University, Interdisciplinary Center for Nanotoxicity, Jackson, MS 39217, USA Chemical Biology Laboratory, National Cancer Institute at Frederick, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702, USA 2

Abstract: The analysis of the interaction between the zinc-finger transcription factor p300 and a class of small molecules called epipolythiodioxopiperazines (ETPs) is determined. These compounds appear to unfold p300. This phenomenon is significant for cancer because if p300 is unfolded it disrupts the HIF pathway; consequently tumor cellsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; ability to function under hypoxic conditions becomes limited. Density Functional Theory (DFT) and Docking methods (GLIDE) were used to determine structural characteristics, binding modes, and a possible mechanism of action between Chetomin and p300. Our calculations reveal the tetrahedral geometry remains intact after p300 binds with Chetomin, an approximate barrier energy exists of 5 kcal/mol for the binding of Chetomin to p300 and orbital interactions illustrate that stabilization of the p300-Chetmoin complex prior to Zinc Ejection is the result of back donation of Zinc electrons to the empty d-orbitals of the Sulfur atoms in Chetomin.


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QSAR MODELING AND MOLECULAR DOCKING OF FULLERENE ANALOGUES AS POTENTIAL HIV-1 PR INHIBITORS: A COMPUTATIONAL STUDY Lucky Ahmed, Bakhtiyor Rasulev, Malakhat Turabekova and Jerzy Leszczynski Interdisciplinary Center for Nanotoxicity, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA Abstract: The discovery of fullerene (C60) in 1985 by Kroto et al. and subsequent enormous progress and development of various carbon-based nanostructures have started renaissance of designing new functional nanomaterials. This study is devoted to investigations of interactions of C 60 derivatives with HIV-1 protease, which is an important target enzyme for anti-acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) drug design. Fullerene and its derivatives are shown a great promise as new drugs and drug delivery agents. A series of 49 C60 derivatives have been taken into consideration to analyze anti-HIV properties of them and to find out the binding affinity with the HIV-1 PR active site. In order to investigate the binding affinity, a quantum-mechanical analysis has been performed, followed by QSAR model development. The best QSAR model (the dataset was split to training set=43 and test set=6) yielded a cross validated r2 value of 0.733. In addition, the protein-ligand docking calculations are performed. Docking calculations indicate that some of the fullerene derivatives form strong hydrogen bonds with the amino acid residues in the catalytic site of HIV-1 PR, in addition to hydrophobic interactions of the fullerene core. The strengths and challenges of applied approaches will be discussed, and comparative analysis of them will be presented.

Keywords: Fullerene (C60) derivatives, HIV-1 PR, QSAR, Protein-Ligand docking


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION A [STUDENTS]

89 | P A

AN ELECTROCHEMICAL HYDROGEN PEROXIDE SENSOR BASED ON MnO2/SINGLE WALLED CARBON NANOTUBE-NAFION NANOCOMPOSITE MODIFIED GLASSY CARBON ELECTRODE A. B. M. Zakaria1, Danuta Leszczynska2 and Corneliu Bogatu2 1

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA 2

Abstract: Since hydrogen peroxide is commonly used as an oxidizing agent in biochemical, pharmaceutical, clinical, industrial and environmental fields, its analytical determination becomes a great challenge. There are many traditional techniques like chemiluminescence, titrimetry, spectrometry, fluorescence and electrochemical method to detect hydrogen peroxide. Among them, electrochemical method is attractive due to its high sensitivity and selectivity, low cost, operational simplicity and possible real time detection. The aim of our study was to develop a hydrogen peroxide sensor, which could be used as accurate and reliable determination of it in the areas of environment, biology, food, industry and clinical laboratory. Sensor has been developed electrochemically by immobilizing MnO2 nanoparticles on SWCNT-Nafion nanocomposite coated on glassy Carbon Electrode. The preparation of electrode included a synthesis of SWCNT-Nafion nanocomposite (1mg-1mL), followed by the deposition of 3µL onto the surface of glassy carbon electrode. Then MnO2 nanoparticles were electrodeposited on that surface turning it into sensitive platform of the MnO2/SWCNT-Nf/GCE. Cyclic voltammetry and amperometry were used to study the electrochemical behavior of this modified electrode. The preliminary results have shown that the MnO2/SWCNT-Nf/GCE exhibited excellent electrocatalytic activity towards H2O2. The analytical parameters, such as amount of MnO2, applied potential and pH value were optimized for the calibration curve. The linearity range of calibration curve was found from 2.0  10-5 to 5.0  10-4Mand the detection limit was 2.4  10-6M. Key words: Sensor, Amperometry, H2O2, SWCNT, MnO2, Nafion Acknowledgements: The authors would like to acknowledge financial support from the national Science Foundation, award NSF EPSCoR # 362492-190200-01\NSFEPS-0903787


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION A [STUDENTS]

90 | P A

IMPACT OF NANOPARTICLES AND HUMAN HEALTH: INFLUENCE OF DISINFECTION ON THE BEHAVIOR OF SINGLE-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBES (SWCNTS) Trey Parker, Danuta Leszczynska and Corneliu Bogatu Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, Jackson, MS 39217, USA Abstract: Since their discovery carbon nanotubes (CNTs) presented a great interest from many points of view, due to their specific properties. But, there is also possible that some amounts of CNTs to be discharged in natural waters. Chlorine is widely used in water and waste water treatment. This is the reason to investigate possible interactions between CNTs and chlorine in aqueous media. The objective of this research was to study the interactions between single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) not functionalized and chlorine in form of sodium hypochlorite in distilled water. Conventional surface water treatment plants are operated based on some assumptions: the influent water source contains only naturally chemicals; the pollutants from water can be removed by treatment consisting of some steps: coagulation-flocculation-filtration-disinfection. In recent years the treatment of natural water has become more difficult due to the increasing discharge of different pollutants. The evolution of chlorine concentrations in the presence of SWCNTs suggests the following interactions: a dynamic equilibrium between adsorption and desorption processes of chlorine on SWCNTs, during 1-2 h after reagents mixing; adsorption is followed by chemical interactions between chlorine with SWCNTs; Chemical interactions are pH dependent: at pH about 7 the maxima due to formation of hydroxyl (C-OH), carbonyl (C=O), and carboxyl (COOH) groups were determined; at pH 9 and 4.1 the presence of C-OH, C=O groups only was observed. The results showed that important interactions take place between SWCNTs and chlorine in water: these may also happened during water and waste water treatment systems with the formation of new by-products. Key words: Carbon nanotubes, single-walled carbon nanotubes, coagulation, flocculation, filtration, disinfection Acknowledgments: This research was supported through student support by a grant from the Department of Defense (DoD) Center of Excellence in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Education (CESTEME) at Jackson State University (JSU).


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION A [STUDENTS]

91 | P A

BEHAVIOR OF SINGLE-WALL CARBON NANOTUBES DURING STANDARD DISINFECTION OF WATER TREATED FOR DRINKING PURPOSES Trey Parker, Corneliu Bogatu and Danuta Leszczynska Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA Abstract: Conventional surface water treatment plants are operating based on assumptions that the source of influent water contains only common substances, and the majority of pollutants can be removed by typical treatment unit train, such as coagulation-flocculation-filtration-disinfection. In recent years the treatment of natural water has become more difficult due to the increasing discharge of diverse contaminants. New additions to the pool of recent pollutants found in water are carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Production of CNTs is exponentially growing, and at the same time, their presence in natural water is growing as well. The objective of this research was to study possible interactions between single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and chlorine in the form of sodium hypochlorite, which represented disinfection/oxidation chemical, routinely used for disinfection. Tests aimed to understand conditions, in which inert SWCNTs were becoming active and interactive with other pollutants. We have studied influence of pH of water (4.1; 7.0 and 9.0) and different doses of chlorine. The evolution of chlorine concentrations in the presence of SWCNTs suggested the following interactions: (a) a dynamic equilibrium between adsorption and desorption processes of chlorine on SWCNTs, during 1-2 h after reagents mixing; (b) adsorption is followed by chemical interactions between chlorine with SWCNTs; and(c) Chemical interactions are pH dependent. Those finding are very important for design of water treatment with chlorine as disinfectant, because activation of CNTs may cause formation of new toxic by-products, previously not seen after this type of treatment. Key words: CNTs, disinfection, sodium hypochlorite, chemical activation, surface of SWCNT Acknowledgements: The authors would like to acknowledge financial support from Department of Defense, award W911NF-11-1-0123, Center of Excellence in Science, Technology & Mathematic Education, and from the National Science Foundation, award NSF EPSCoR # 362492-19020001\NSFEPS-0903787


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION A [STUDENTS]

92 | P A

SELECTIVE DETECTION AND PHOTOTHERMAL THERAPY OF CANCER CELLS USING IRON CORE GOLD SHELL NANOPARTICLES: SWCNT HYBRID NANOSTRUCTURES Bhanu Priya Viraka Nellore and Ashton T. Hamme II Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Jackson State University, 1400 JR Lynch St., Jackson, Mississippi, USA Abstract: Due to the fact that gold nanoparticles possess unique optical properties and are considered to have low toxicity toward humans, the use of gold nanoparticle based biological detection devices and therapeutic agents are very attractive. Multifunctional nanomaterials can potentially be even more superior because more than one physical property can be exploited to target or separate a particular biological agent. Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) arrayed with iron core gold shell nanoparticles have the potential to be used for medical diagnosis via MRI because of the magnetic properties of the iron core, and the plasmonic gold shell can be useful for photothermal therapy through irradiation at a specific wavelength or cancer detection through surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy. After synthesizing the desired iron oxide nanoparticle, a specific synthetic protocol was used to encase the iron nanoparticle with a gold nanoparticle thereby creating a gold nanoshell. Confirmation of the encapsulation of the iron nanoparticles with gold nanoparticles was realized through a combination of UV, Raman spectroscopy, and TEM. These iron core gold shell nanoparticles were then anchored onto a functionalized SWCNT through the formation of a sulfur carbon bond. TEM images provided evidence of the gold shell/iron core nanoparticle decorated SWCNTs. Keywords: Photothermal Therapy, Iron Core Gold Shell Nanoparticles, Single Walled Carbon Nanotube (SWCNT) Acknowledgments: We thank the National Science Foundation (PREM NSF DMR-633156 and HBCU-RISE: HRD-1137763) and the National Institutes of Health RCMI program (G12RR13459 (Analytical CORE facilities)).


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION A [STUDENTS]

93 | P A

APPLICATION OF 1,3-DIPOLAR CYCLOADDITION TOWARD SWCNT FUNCTIONALIZATION AND SUBSEQUENT ATTACHMENT OF GOLD NANOPARTICLES Yunfeng Lin and Ashton T. Hamme II Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, Mississippi, USA Abstract: Similar to other allotropes of carbon, single walled carbon naonotubes (SWCNTs) are insoluble in a variety of solvents. A number of synthetic methods have been used to add non-carbon functional groups to SWCNTs in order to make them soluble in organic solvents. Among those synthetic techniques is 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition. Due to the fact that a SWCNT is essentially a rolled up graphene sheet, SWCNTs have pi orbitals that can react as a dipolarophile toward 1,3-diples. In our studies, we used a synthetic protocol that incorporated the use of pyridinium ylides, which were generated from Krohnke salts, as 1,3-dipoles that reacted with the SWCNTs in a [2+3] fashion when heated via conventional methods or microwave promotion. In order to confirm that cycloaddition was realized, FTIR was used to identify the salient carbonyl functional group of the desired product. Reaction of the ester functional group of the SWCNT with cysteamine under microwave conditions formed the targeted thiol capped SWCNT where the presence of the thiol functionality was determined through Raman Spectroscopy. After the thiol capped SWCNT was reacted with gold nanoparticles, TEM was used to verify that the gold nanoparticle successfully attached to the SWCNT. Key words: Gold Nanoparticles, Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes, 1,3-Dipolar Cycloaddition, TEM, FTIR. Acknowledgments: We thank the National Science Foundation (HBCU-RISE: HRD-1137763) and the National Institutes of Health RCMI program (G12RR13459 (Analytical CORE facilities)).


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION A [STUDENTS]

94 | P A

CNT/GOLD NANOPARTICLE HYBRID SURFACE ENHANCED RAMAN PROBE FOR SELECTIVE AND ULTRASENSITIVE MELAMINE DETECTION Willie Wesley and Paresh C. Ray Nanotechnology and Nanoparticle Synthesis Laboratory, Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 John R. Lynch Street Jackson, Mississippi, USA Abstract: Melamine (1,3,5-triazine-2,4,6-triamine) is and organic base used in production of various amine resins, fertilizers and plastics. Melamine has been reported to be toxic and results in renal disease and death in pets that consume food contaminated by it. In spite of this information melamine was found to be an adulterant in pet food in North America in 2007 and in milk products in the 2008 in China. In response to the call for more sensitive and selective methods of melamine detection by the FDA and Pharmaceutical industry, we have developed a Carbon Nanotube (CNT)/Gold nanoparticle Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) hybrid probe for selective and ultrasensitive detection of melamine in raw materials. In this work single walled CNTs were functionalized with various gold nanoparticles which were then modified with mercaptoundecanoic acid to be selective for melamine. Detection is based on the melamine Raman signal increasing due to its interaction with the hybrid probe. Multiple gold nanoparticle morphologies will be tested to determine which provides the most sensitive probe. Operating principles and possible mechanisms of our SERS assay are discussed. Ultimately, this nanotechnology driven hybrid probe could have vast potential application in rapid, on-site selective and highly sensitive detection of melamine as well as numerous other adulterants in products designed for consumption. Key words: Melamine, SERS, CNT/Gold hybrid, renal disease Acknowledgements: This work is supported by grants from NSF-PREM grant # DMR-0611539, NSFCREST grant # HRD-0833178 and NIH-SCORE grant # S06GM 008047.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION A [STUDENTS]

95 | P A

A GOLD NANOCAGEâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;CNT HYBRID FOR TARGETED IMAGING AND PHOTOTHERMAL DESTRUCTION OF CANCER CELLS Rajashekhar Kanchanapally, Sadia Afrin Khan, Zhen Fan, Lule Beqa, Anant Kumar Singh, Dulal Senapati and Paresh Chandra Ray Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA Abstract: Cancer disease is the greatest challenge in public health care and costs nearly 1 trillion dollars each year. It is accounted for 13% of all worldwide deaths in 2007 and projected 12 million deaths in 2030. Early detection and effective targeted treatment are the keys for saving millions of lives and billions of dollars each year. Driven by the need, we developed a design of gold nanocage attached SWCNTs as a novel hybrid material for targeted imaging and photothermal destruction of human prostate cancer cells.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION A [STUDENTS]

96 | P A

POPCORN SHAPE GOLD NANO PARTICLE MEDIATED SERS PROBE FOR LOW LEVEL SELECTIVE DETECTION AND PHOTOTHERMAL NANOTHERAPY OF MULTIDRUG RESISTANCE BACTERIA FROM VEGETABLES Sadia Afrin Khan, Anant Kumar Singh, Dulal Senapati, Zhen Fan, Paresh Chandra Ray Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA Abstract: In recent days multidrug resistance bacteria (MDRB) is an immense risk worldwide. In this condition a novel approach which does not depend on traditional methods for the selective detection and targeted killing is an urgent need. Driven by the need, herein I am presenting Rh-6G taggedS-PS8.4 RNA aptamer conjugated popcorn shape gold nanotechnology driven Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) technique to selectively detect and photothermally destroy drug resistant Salmonella typhimurium from infected romaine lettuce. In the presence of S.typhimurium, aptamer conjugated popcorn shape gold nanoparticlesare forming several hot spots which allows getting the SERS signal, making it possible to detect the bacteria with higher sensitivity and when these are exposed to radiation almost all bacteria are killed due to local photothermal lysis. We believe this nanotechnology based assay will open up a new possibility for the detection and killing of MDRB from food samples.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION A [STUDENTS]

97 | P A

CHARACTERIZATION OF SPUTTER DEPOSITED GOLD COATINGS USING AFM AND SEM Sirak M. Mekonen Department of Physics, Atmospheric Science, and Geoscience, Jackson State University, 1400 J.R. Lynch Street, Jackson, MS 39217, USA Abstract: The morphology of sputter coated gold coatings on silicon wafer was analyzed by using different characterization techniques. A sputter coating technique was used to deposit gold on silicon substrate. During the process, depositions were performed using varying plasma coatings times and voltages. The gold coatings were then analyzed using the Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The AFM and SEM data revealed that the coating surface morphology was dependent upon deposition conditions.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION A [STUDENTS]

98 | P A

VISUALIZATION OF NUMERICAL SIMULATION FOR A WIND DUST EVENT William Parks, Christopher Luke and Duanjun Lu Department of Physics, Atmos. Sci. & Geoscience, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, Jackson, Mississippi, USA Abstract: Soil-derived dust represents one of the major components of the natural atmospheric aerosols. Arid and semiarid areas with unpaved and unvegetated land cover are particularly vulnerable to windblown dust, which results in high particulate matter pollution. To understand, predict, and mitigate the impact of dust aerosol on air quality and climate, it is necessary to parameterize the emission rate of dust particles from the wind erosion processes accurately. However, windblown dust emission is still poorly represented in existing air quality models. A windblown dust emission model has been built based on a parameterization of threshold wind friction velocity depending on the roughness of surface, vegetation type, soil type, soil moisture content and on the size distribution of aerosols. The proposed dust model incorporates into a region air quality modeling system to simulate a North American dust storm episode occurring near the border of southwestern United States (US) and northwestern region of Mexico on 23 February 2007. We will demonstrate data analyses from observations and numerical simulations using visualization software, VAPOR (Visualization and Analysis Platform for Ocean, Atmosphere, and Solar Researchers). This method of demonstration will help us to understand the insight of the process and dispersion mechanism of particulate matter (PM) including PM10 and PM2.5. We will also display the simulation of the model that is in good agreement of the dust spatial patterns matching with the dust cloud patterns appearing on satellite images. Key words: Visualization, numerical simulation, VAPOR Acknowledgements: This research was supported by the NOAA Educational Partnership Program with Minority Serving Institutions (EPP/MSI) under grant number of Grant NA17AE1623 through the NOAA Center for Atmospheric Sciences (NCAS).


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION A [STUDENTS]

99 | P A

EFFECTS OF PARTICLE SOLUBILITY AND SIZE ON TOXICITY OF Zn AND ZnO NANOPARTICLES ON ARTEMIA SALINA LARVAE James Daniels1, Mehmet Ates1, Zikri Arslan1, Ibrahim O. Farah2 and Hilsamar FĂŠlix Rivera3 1

Departmentof Chemistry and Biochemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, Mississippi 39217, USA Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson, Mississippi 39217, USA 3 Department of Chemistry, University of Puerto Rico-Mayaguez, Mayaguez, PR, 00681, USA 2

Abstract: Brine shrimp (Artemia salina) larvae were exposed to different sizes of zinc (Zn) and zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) to evaluate their toxicity in marine aquatic ecosystems. Acute exposure was conducted in seawater with 10, 50 and 100 mg L-1 concentrations of the NPs for 24 h and 96 h. Phase contrast microscope images confirmed the accumulation of the NPs inside the guts. Artemia were unable to eliminate the ingested particles, which was thought to occur due the formation massive particles in the guts. Although the suspensions of the NPs did not exhibit any significant acute toxicity within 24 h, mortalities increased remarkably in 96 h and escalated with increasing concentration of NP suspension to 42% for Zn NPs (40-60 nm) (LC50 ~100 mg L-1) and to about 34% for ZnO NPs (10-30 nm) (LC50>100 mg L-1). The suspensions of Zn NPs were more toxic to Artemia than those of ZnO NPs under comparable regimes. This effect was attributed to higher Zn2+ levels (ca. up to 8.9 mg L-1) released to the medium from Zn NPs in comparison to that measured in the suspensions of ZnO NPs (ca. 5.5 mg L-1). In addition, the toxicities were found to be influenced from the size of the nanopowders, although the aggregates exhibited comparable sizes in water. Smaller Zn NPs (40-60 nm) were more toxic than relatively larger Zn NPs (80-100 nm). Likewise, mortalities in the suspensions of 10-30 nm ZnO NPs were higher than in those of 200 nm ZnO NPs. Lipid peroxidation levels were substantially higher in 96 h (p<0.05) indicating that the toxic effects were due to by oxidative stress. Keywords: Zn nanoparticles, ZnO nanoparticles, Toxicity, Particle size, Solubility, Bioaccumulation Acknowledgements: This project was supported by grants from the National Center for Research Resources (5 G12 RR013459-15) and the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (8 G12 MD007581-15) from the National Institutes of Health.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION A [STUDENTS]

100 | P A

EVALUATION OF PARTICLE MORPHOLOGY ON TOXICITY OF TITANUM DIOXIDE NANOPARTICLES (TiO2 NPs) ON ARTEMIA SALINA Martha Johnson, Terriona Cowan, Mehmet Ates and Zikri Arslan Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, College of Science and Technology, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA. Abstract: Metal oxide nanoparticles are widely used in both industrial and medical applications. Understanding their properties and mechanism of the toxicity is important to prevent the detrimental effects on environment and human health. In many instances, toxic effects are mediated by the metal ions released from nanoparticles. Therefore, the detection of particular metal ion concentration is critical to elucidate the mechanism of toxicity. A particularly unknown and concerning topic is the effects of particle morphology on the physiochemical and toxicological properties of particular NP. In this study, we investigated the effect of particle morphology on the toxicity of TiO2 NPs through exposures on Artemia salina. Adult artermia were exposed to commercially available TiO2 NPs of three different morphology; anatase, rutile and a mixture of anatase and rutile. The exposure was conducted both short-term (24 h) and long-term (96 h). Cultures were examined for NP uptake and elimination through ICP-MS analysis for total titanium. Mortality rates were determined along with malondialdehyde assay (MDA) to elucidate oxidative stress induced by exposure. Mortalities increased with increasing concentration of TiO2 NPs suspensions. MDA assay also revealed increasing oxidative stress with increasing concentration. Anatase polymorph of TiO2 NPs accumulated substantially compared with rutile polymorph. The mixture of both anatase and rutile showed much larger chemical uptake then both anatase and rutile alone. Keywords: TiO2 nanoparticles, Nanoparticle morphology, Uptake, Elimination, Toxicity separation, ICP-MS, sonication, digestion, dilute acid, Artemia salina Acknowledgements: This project was partially supported by the U.S. Department of Defense through the Engineer, Research and Development Center (Vicksburg, MS); Contract #W912HZ-10-2-004, and by grants from the National Center for Research Resources (5 G12 RR013459-15) and the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (8 G12 MD007581-15) from the National Institutes of Health.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION A [STUDENTS]

101 | P A

CHEMICAL VAPOR GENERATION USING TRANSITION METAL CYANIDES: APPLICATION TO DETECTION OF CADMIUM BY ICP-MS LaKeysha Rose, Vedat Yilmaz, Zikri Arslan, Maria Little Department of Chemistry, College of Science and Technology, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA Abstract: Generation of cadmium (Cd) vapor is a challenging task. Difficulties mainly associate with the poor efficiency, instability of Cd vapor, and interferences of transition metal ions, such as Cu, Ni and Pb. Chelating or complexing agents have been utilized to alleviate the interferences. Nonetheless, vapor generation has not become a robust approach for determination of Cd because of the inherent difficulties necessitating the use of either standard additions analysis or control of matrix precisely for accurate results. In this study, the performances of cyanide complexes of several transition metal ions, including Ti, V and Cr were examined for generation of cadmium vapor from acidic sample solutions. Studies were conducted with off-line and on-line approaches. In the former, cyanide complexes of particular metal ions were prepared and reacted with the acidic sample solutions. In the latter, aqueous solutions of the metal ions were reacted with potassium cyanide solution and then interacted with acidic sample solution. Cadmium vapor was generated by reaction of the reaction contents with NaBH4. Experimental variables, including sample acidity, concentrations of metal ions and potassium cyanide solution, sodium borohydride solution were examined. The results indicated that cyanide complexes of Ti, V and Cr performed better than those of Co, Mn and Ni. An improvement up to a factor 20-30 was achieved. The interferences from transitions metals ions including, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn were not significant at 0.5 Îźg/mL levels. No interferences were observed from alkali and alkaline earth elements up to 1000 Îźg/mL levels. The method was applied to the determination of Cd from seawater and various calcium-rich samples by ICP-MS.

Key words: Cadmium, Chemical vapor generation, Transition metal cyanide, ICP-MS Acknowledgements: This research is supported by grants from NIH-RCMI Program (Grant No G12RR013459) and NIH-RISE Program (2R25GM067122) to Jackson State University.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION A [STUDENTS]

102 | P A

THEORETICAL CALCULATIONS OF THE IONIZATION POTENTIALS AND ELECTRON AFFINITIES OF GUANINE, CYTOSINE, ADENINE AND THYMINE Noel Matthews-Gardner, David Magers and Glake Hill, Jr. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry; Jackson State University; Jackson, Mississippi 39217, USA Abstract: A number of reports have focused on the ionization energies of DNA bases and indicated guanine as the most likely site for the hole in irradiated DNA. Also, experimentalists have found that the C5 site on the cytosine atom is a promutagenic methylation site. The N3 site of adenine is thought to be the next favored site of methylation and is considered to be play a paramount role in toxicity by a methylating agent. Yet, few investigators have considered the effects of ionizing radiation of the tautomers of the DNA and methylated DNA bases despite their confirmed importance in mutagenic activity. In this work, the energetic and structural properties of DNA have been investigated by examining the electron affinities (EA) and ionization potentials (IP) of guanine, cytosine, adenine, thymine and several related compounds using the B3LYP density functional hybrid. We tested the hypothesis that electron attachment and removal play key roles in stability, structure and dipole moments of the guanine, cytosine, thymine and adenine tautomers. Using the 6-311++G(df,pd) basis set, all non-methylated guanine, cytosine, thymine and adenine structures show slightly negative adiabatic electron affinities whereas the methylated DNA compounds are relatively stable with respect to dissociation. All density functional (DFT) quantum-chemical calculations were accomplished using the Gaussian-03 and 09 software. Geometries of the thirty-six model compounds were established by full optimization of all geometric parameters in the following order of level/basis sets: B3LYP/6311G(d,p), B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p), B3LYP/6-311++G(df,pd). Single point calculations were carried out on the cation, anion, and neutral radicals with the geometries obtained from the aforementioned optimizations at the corresponding basis set. The adiabatic and vertical electron affinities of the methylated guanine and cytosine tautomers show a major difference in susceptibility due to electron attachment than that of the guanine and cytosine tautomers. In addition, structural and electronic distribution changes upon electron removal and attachment lead to decreased and increased dipole moments, respectively. Our goal in this study is to determine which tautomers remain structurally sound with the removal and addition of an electron to further our research by stacking and pairing DNA bases. We plan to continue our research by pairing guanine: cytosine and adenine: thymine major tautomers to determine how stability and susceptibility changes. Keywords: Ionization potential, electron affinity and B3LYP Acknowledgements: This research is supported by a grant from the National Institute of Health (Grant No.1G12RR13459), through the NCRR-RCMI Center for Environmental Health at Jackson State University (JSU). Calculations were performed at the Mississippi Center for Supercomputing Research.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION A [STUDENTS]

103 | P A

COMPARATIVE HALIDE BINDING BY A P-CYANO BASED DIPODAL BISUREA RECEPTOR: A HIGHLY SELECTIVE RECEPTOR FOR FLUORIDE Abdallah Gana1, Avijit Pramanik1, Frank R. Fronczek2 and Md. Alamgir Hossain1 1 2

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA Department Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803, USA

Abstract: Among various important anionic analytes, fluoride is one of the most significant anions due to its critical role in dental care and treatment of osteoporosis; therefore. Fluoride binding and recognition by synthetic receptors is attracting a growing interest. Fluoride is found more frequently in different sources of water but with higher concentrations in groundwater due to the presence of fluoridebearing minerals. Because of duplicitous nature of fluoride, it is important to design the artificial receptor for extracting, removing and separating this particular anion from fluoride-bearing minerals or fluoride containing systems. During this study, we have synthesized a new p-cyano based bis-urea receptors from the reaction of 2,2'-Diamino-N-methyldiethylamine with p-cyano isocyanate under refluxed condition in CH2Cl2. In the solid state, the bis-urea urea are bonded with halide through NH路路路halide interactions. In solution, the host bind halides with an order of I-<Br-<Cl-<<F-. In this poster, the detailed studies of this receptor for halides will be discussed. Acknowledgement: The National Science Foundation is acknowledged for a CAREER award (CHE1056927) to MAH. This work was supported by the National Institutes of Health (G12RR013459).


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION A [STUDENTS]

104 | P A

SYNTHESIS OF A THIOPHENE-BASED MONOCYCLIC RECEPTOR AND ITS ANION BINDING STUDIES IN SOLUTION AND SOLID STATES Musabbir A. Saeed1, Frank R. Fronczek2, Douglas R. Powell3 and Md. Alamgir Hossain1 1

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Jackson State University, USA, Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, USA, 3 Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Oklahoma, USA 2

Abstract: Design and synthesis of selective receptors for anions are important from the view of both of environment and biological aspects. Polyamine based macrocycles are attractive receptors for binding of anions. Neutral polyamines are capable of encapsulating metal ions through traditional coordination bonds, whereas the protonated polyamines bind anions through hydrogen bonding interactions of protonated amine groups. A macrocycle with thiophene spacers has been synthesized and studied for anions in solution. Several complexes of the macrocycle in presence of inorganic anions have been isolated and analyzed by X-ray crystallography. Structural analysis of the sulfate complex shows that the encapsulation of sulfate inside the cavity through multiple hydrogen bonds to form a monotopic complex. However, ditopic binding was found for halides and perchlorates. As investigated by the 1H NMR titrations in D2O at pH 2.0, the ligand was found to form a 1:1 complex for each anion investigated where higher selectivity was found for sulfate. In this poster the details of synthesis, binding studies in solid and solution states will be presented. Acknowledgement: National Science Foundation is acknowledged for a CAREER award (CHE1056927) to MAH. The work was supported by the National Institute of health (G12RR013459). The NMR instrument used for this work was funded by the National Science Foundation (CHE-0821357).


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION A [STUDENTS]

105 | P A

PHOSPHATE BINDING WITH THIOPHENE-BASED POLYAZA MACROCYLCES IN WATER Rainier S. Berkley, Musabbir A. Saeed and Md. Alamgir Hossain Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Jackson State University, USA Abstract: Phosphate is a fundamental building block of living systems. For example, it is key component of nucleic acids, nucleotides and nucleosides, and plays a crucial role in many biochemical processes. Selective recognition of phosphates with synthetic receptors has been an increasing interest in the field of anion binding; however, it still remains a challenge in particular in water due to the high free energy of hydration (ΔG0 = −465 mol–1). In this study, monocyclic and bicyclic receptors with different dimensionalities with thiophene spacers have been synthesized and studied for phosphate in solution by 31P NMR titrations. In this poster the details of synthesis, binding studies in solution states will be presented. Acknowledgement: National Science Foundation is acknowledged for a CAREER award (CHE1056927) to MAH. The work was supported by the National Institute of health (G12RR013459). The NMR instrument used for this work was funded by the National Science Foundation (CHE-0821357). NSF is also acknowledges for summer REU program.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION A [STUDENTS]

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SELF-ASSEMBLY OF WATER AND FLUORIDE IN A NOVEL THIOPHENE BASED EXTENDED MONOCYCLIC RECEPTOR: A HIGHLY SELECTIVE RECEPTOR FOR FLUORIDE Syed Ataul Haque1, Musabbir A. Saeed1, Avijit Pramanik1, Douglas R. Powell2 and Md. Alamgir Hossain1 1 2

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019, USA

Abstract: Design and synthesis of receptors for anions are important from the view of both of environment and biological aspects. Protonated polyamines with specified cavities are attractive receptors for binding of anions in both solution and solid states. A fluoride, which is the smallest anion on the halide series and highly electronegative, exists as a hydrated state in water; however, structural evidence of hydrated fluoride is indeed rare. During this study, we synthesized a new expanded macrocycle, and invested for its anion binding ability by 19F NMR and 1H NMR spectroscopies in D2O, indicating the binding of the anionic species in the cavity. In addition, we isolated a crystal of fluoride complex, showing the self-assembly with four fluoride and four water inside a box formed by two macrocycles. The existence of assembled fluorides is also identified in solution by high dilution and concentration dependent 1H NMR studies. In this poster, we will present the details of solution and solid state binding studies of this new receptor. Acknowledgements: The National Science Foundation is acknowledged for a CAREER award (CHE1056927) to MAH. This work was supported by the National Institutes of Health (G12RR013459).


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION A [STUDENTS]

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A NEW DINUCLEAR NICKEL (II) COMPLEX FOR ANION BINDING IN AN AQUEOUS MEDIUM Jala M. Morrow, Md. Mhahabubur Rhaman and Md. Alamgir Hossain Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Jackson State University, MS 39217, USA Abstract: Anions are important not only in the living system, but also in the environment. As a result, supramolecular chemists are developing different types of receptors such as azamacrocycles, amides, thioamides, ureas, thioureas and etc. Among these receptors, moncyclic polyamines are excellent agents exhibiting chelating capabilities and structural flexibilities that can incorporate two transition metal ions at two poles. During this study, a new p-xylyl-based polyamine macrocyclic receptor has been synthesized from the reaction terephthalaldehyde and N'-methyl-2,2â&#x20AC;&#x2122;-diaminodiethylamine in methanol under high dilution conditions at low r]temperature followed by reduction with NaBH4. The structure of the compound has been characterized by 1H NMR and mass spectroscopies. The compound was then converted to nickel (II) complex [LNi2(NO3)4.4(H2O)] by reacting with Ni(NO3)2 in water at 1:2 ratio. The structure of that complex has also been solved by X-ray crystallography, showing two metal ions in the cavity of the receptor. That nickel (II) complex has been investigated for anion binding by UV-Vis spectroscopy and colorimetric studies. Among the various anions included in this study, acetate and sulfate show a sharp color change. In this poster, we will present the details of anion binding results. Acknowledgement: National Science Foundation is acknowledged for a CAREER award (CHE1056927) to MAH. The work was supported by the National Institute of Health (G12RR013459). The NMR instrument used for this work was funded by the National Science Foundation (CHE-0821357)


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION A [STUDENTS]

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NUCLEOTIDE BINDING AND DNA CLEAVAGE STUDIES WITH TRANSITION METAL COMPLEXES OF A MACROCYCLE Md. Mhahabubur Rhaman, Mercy Pilate and Md. Alamgir Hossain Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Jackson State University, MS 39217, USA Abstract: Transition metal chelates play a key role in bio-organic chemistry which represents the basic model for active sites in many biologically important compounds. Metal chelation is an alternative way to extend the lipophilic character of the organic compounds, increasing the binding ability for large molecules. In particular, an interaction of nucleic acids with other molecules is a fundamental issue in biological systems and associated with several important processes including the replication, transcription and gene mutation. During this study, a polyamine macrocycle has been converted into copper (II) and nickel (II) complexes and their structures of have been determined by X-ray crystallography. These compounds have been employed for nucleotides binding and their interactions have been studied by indicator displacement assay (IDA) using a commercially available dye. They have been also used for phiX174 plasmid DNA cleavage by gel electrophoresis at physiological pH. Such compounds could be useful in the design of anti-cancer compounds targeting a specific DNA species of a cancer cell. In this poster, we present the results of the binding and cleavage studies. Keywords: Molecular recognition, nucleotide binding, fluorescence titration, anion chemistry. Acknowledgement: National Science Foundation is acknowledged for a CAREER award (CHE1056927) to MAH. The work was supported by the National Institute of health (G12RR013459). The NMR instrument used for this work was funded by the National Science Foundation (CHE-0821357).


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION A [STUDENTS]

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COLORIMETRIC AND SPECTROSCOPIC STUDIES OF TREN-BASED THIOUREA RECEPTORS FOR ANIONS Maryam Emami Khansari, Avijit Pramanik and Md. Alamgir Hossain Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA Abstract: Development of new molecular receptors capable of recognition of anions through noncovalent interactions has emerged into considerable research interest due to their biological and environmental relevance. Tripodal receptors bearing urea/thiourea functional groups could be employed in the binding of anions due to the directional conformation of two NH groups that favors the formation of a stable hostâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;guest complex.Because of the enhanced acidity of sulfur atom compared to oxygen atom, a receptor with the thiourea functionality is expected to bind an anion strongly. During the course of this study, we have synthesized three novel thiourea receptors; tris[2-(4nitrophenylthioureaethyl]amine, tris[2-(3-nitrophenylthioureaethyl]amine and tris[2(pentafluorophenylthioureaethyl]amine and studied the anion bindings by a variety of techniques. Herein, we report the solid state evidence for full encapsulation of a sulfate anion within a dimeric capsule of a pentafluorophenyl substituted thiourea-functionalized tripodal receptor, via multiple Hbonding interactions with the six thiourea groups. We also report the complexation of fluoride with 4nitrophenyl substituted tripodal thiourea receptor which is stabilized by six H-bonds within the cavity. The details of the solid state structures and solution studies will be discussed during the presentation. Keywords: Colorimetric studies, Tren-based Thiourea receptor, Host-guest complex, Encapsulation. Acknowledgement: The National Science Foundation is acknowledged for a CAREER award (CHE1056927) to MAH. The work was supported by the National Institute of health (G12RR013459). The NMR instrument used for this work was funded by the National Science Foundation.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION A [STUDENTS]

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SPECTROSCOPIC AND COLORIMETRIC INVESTIGATION OF AN ACYCLIC THIOUREA-BASED RECEPTOR FOR ANIONS Nya A. Williams, Maryam Emami Khansari and Md. Alamgir Hossain Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA Abstract: Anions can be recognized by either positively charged or neutral receptors. Molecules containing thiourea functionalities are neutral receptors which can bind anions by hydrogen-bonding interactions. They also benefit from the presence of two H-bond donors in a single functional group and the presence of acidic sulfur atom, making them potential receptors to complex with anions. A tripodalbased receptor, 3-nitrophenylthiourea, has been synthesized from the reaction of tris(2aminoethyl)amine and 3-nitrophenyl isothiocyanate in dichloromethane, and used for a variety of common anionic species. The binding affinity of the receptor for anions has been measured by 1H NMR titrations in DMSO-d6. The receptor also displays visual color change for several anions including fluoride, phosphate and acetate in solution. Keywords: Colorimetric investigation, Hydrogen-bonding interactions, Thiourea-based receptor. Acknowledgement: The National Science Foundation is acknowledged for a CAREER award (CHE1056927) to MAH. The work was supported by the National Institute of health (G12RR013459). The NMR instrument used for this work was funded by the National Science Foundation.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION A [STUDENTS]

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SYNTHESIS AND ANION BINDING STUDIES AN AZAMACROCYCLE Toyketa Horne1, Frank R. Fronczek2 and Md. Alamgir Hossain1 1 2

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39212, USA Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803, USA

Abstract: The synthesis of an expanded azamacrocycle L containing four secondary and two tertiary amines was investigated by 1H NMR titrations in D2O at pH 1.7 for its binding ability towards tetrabutylammonium chloride, bromide, iodide, sulfate, nitrate, and perchlorate salt anions. The results suggest that the ligand is capable of forming a complex with each of the anions examined, with high selectivity for sulfate in water. X-ray diffraction analysis of the perchlorate complex of L suggests that the ligand is tetraprotonated and is involved in interacting anions from both sides forming a ditopic complex with strong NH路路路O bonds. The packing diagram confirms that the macracycles and external perchlorates are alternatively linked through hydrogen bonds forming an ID chain. Acknowledgement: National Science Foundation is acknowledged for a CAREER award (CHE1056927) to MAH. The work was supported by the National Institute of health (G12RR013459). The NMR instrument used for this work was funded by the National Science Foundation (CHE-0821357).


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION A [STUDENTS]

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REEFS AND THEIR EVOLUTION OVER GEOLOGIC TIME Ruth de Oliveira1,2and Ezat Heydari1 1

Department of Physics, Atmospheric Sciences, and Geosciences, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, P. O. Box 17660, Jackson MS 39217, USA 2 Department of Geology – Faculty of Sciences, Agostinho Neto University, Av. 4 de Fevereiro, 7 – Luanda, Angola Abstract: The aim of this research is to conduct an approach of reefs and their evolution through geologic time in light of the intense research carried out by the geoscientists. An example is the research of Newel (1971) and Cooper (1988, 1989).Theyanalyzed and studied the development of the reefs, through changes, high diversity and evolution among intervals of low diversity that followed high extinction episodes associated with global climatic cooling and the oceanic regression (Sheehan, 1985). They concluded “reef – building organisms” have experienced six primary phases through earth history: Early Cambrian (570 M.A.), Silurian-Devonian (435-395 M.A.), Permian (280 M.A.), Triassic (230 M.A), Cretaceous (140 M.A.), and Eocene-Recent (65 – 0 M.A.). Finally in 1992, both scientists James and Bourque published an idealized stratigraphic column representing geological time, which illustrates the periods when there were either reefs or mounds. The reefs of the second Eon (Phanerozoic) from 570 M.A. till 50 M.A. are classified as “ancient reefs” or “fossil reefs” (James and Geldsetzer, 1988). After that time there is not practically evolution, but a similarity among “modern reefs” (James and Bourque, 1992).The reefs ecosystem exist over 3.5 B.A., beginning in the first Eon – Precambrian, till the course of world time. Due the no existence of paleomaps to consult, they were analyzed looking at similar “modern reefs” facies characteristics of carbonated platforms. For this research was chosen as a real reef example, a carbonated stromatolite buildup of Leba Formation, Angola from Mesoproterozoic interval. Scientists in multidisciplinary fields go on to study and protect reefs from damages; they are one of the richest systems of the blue Planet. So, they are looking for more answers in Sciences, Health, Economics, and Recreation and so on. Key words: Reefs, Mounds, stromatolites, Precambrian and Phanerozoic Eons Acknowledgements: Supported by 1- Dept. of Physics, Atmospheric and Geosciences JSU. 2- Sciences Faculty of Agostinho Neto University, Angola. 3 - SONANGOL, Oil Company 4 – ESSO, Angola. Dr. Ezat Heydari is thanked for his advice.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION A [STUDENTS]

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GEOSPATIAL DYNAMIC MAPPING TECHNIQUE FOR EVALUATING TOXIC RELEASE EMISSIONS IN MISSISSIPPIâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S REGIONAL PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT DISTRICTS Chuck Patrick and Mukesh Kumar Department of Urban and Regional Planning, College of Public Service, School of Policy and Planning, Jackson State University, 3825 Ridgewood Road, Jackson, MS 39211 Abstract: This study presents geographic information systems and dynamic mapping techniques for evaluating environmental and atmospheric conditions of toxic release emissions within Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s planning and development districts. From multidisciplinary fields of study to generally simplistic mapping and navigational processes; geospatial solutions provide a collaborative and integrative aspect towards understanding structured and unstructured data types. This provides initial geographical insight towards understanding environmental and ecological problems, and it identifies potential threats that may impact the general public. This effort establishes an integrated approach for geographically representing non-geospatial and geospatial data structures within a geodatabase management system to geographically display estimated toxic release emissions from point-source emissions facilities throughout the study region. Through comparative analysis and geo-processing emissions data, highvolume emission facilities over a ten-year period were geographically projected, and emission types associated with point-source locations were identified and displayed as reported by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Geographic information systems dynamic mapping tools used were proximity analysis and multi-ring buffering schemes to evaluate geographic conditions potentially impacting local natural habitat, environmental landscape, ecosystem, land-use land-cover (LULC), and general public. Proximity analysis and buffering schemes were also used to establish measurable distances for analysis and evaluation purposes. This aided towards identifying potential indicators impacting environmental conditions caused from emissions released into the atmosphere. Output data from atmospheric dispersion models were integrated within the geodatabase management system to project trajectory and concentration pathways of dispersed emissions. Key words: Geographic information systems, dynamic mapping, toxic release emissions Acknowledgements: Special thanks to the Trent Lott Geospatial and Visualization Center (TLGVRC) for providing technical support, and to the United State Environmental Protection Agency (EPS) for providing the research data.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION A [STUDENTS]

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APPLICATION OF WRF-CHEM MODEL FOR THE SIMULATION OF SURFACE OZONE OVER URBAN JACKSON Swatantra R. Kethireddy1, Paul B. Tchounwou1, Anjaneyulu Yerramilli2, Venkata B. Dodla2, Srinivas Desamsetti2 and John H. Young2 ¹Department of Biology, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 JR Lynch Street, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi, USA ²Trent Lott Geospatial Visualization and Research Centre, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, Mississippi e-Center, 1230 Raymond Road, Jackson, Mississippi, 39204, USA Abstract: The vehicular emissions, power plants, refineries and other industrial effluents react chemically in the presence sunlight to form Ozone (O3) which is a harmful air pollutant at ground level. Exposure to O3 may increase the risk of premature death and respiratory disorders in general population. Assessment of spatial and temporal variability in the surface O3 and its precursors (NOX& VOC’s) is an important environmental issue under growing urbanization. Simulation of surface O3 concentrations at high spatial resolution (1km) would provide its local scale variations over Jackson MS metropolitan area and this will be helpful to identify vulnerable regions within the urban locality. The daily AQI data (Air Quality Index) of 8-hour surface O3 over Jackson MS for the period of 2000-2011 was analyzed and episodes of elevated values (AQI>100 = exceeding the National Ambient Air Quality Standard of 75 ppb) were identified. During the 11 year period, 42 number of episodes occurred and the episodes with recent highest AQI value of 124 that occurred on 08/19/2011 is chosen for the present study. A fully coupled weather chemistry online WRF/Chem (Weather Research & Forecasting-Chemistry) model is used to simulate the spatial and temporal variation of O3 and its precursor pollutants for a three day period from 0000 UTC 17 August 2011 to 0000 UTC of 20 August 2011. Pollutant concentrations and population data is overlaid on the study area using GIS (Geographical Information Systems) tools. GIS analysis of collating O3, pollutant sources and population data led to identification of vulnerable areas with elevated O3 levels, mobile transport sources and impacts of O3 on population health. The integrated approach of applying WRF/Chem, GIS and demographic data will be of great help to identify the sensitive population like children (<12 years) and older adults (>65 years) who have higher susceptibility. Key words: Surface Ozone, Air Quality, WRF/Chem, GIS


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION A [STUDENTS]

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CORRELATION OF GROUND LEVEL OZONE AND CURRENT PREVALENCE OF ASTHMA IN SIX STATES OF USA Swatantra R. Kethireddy1, Paul B. Tchounwou1, Hafiz A. Ahmad2, Anjaneyulu Yerramilli3, John H. Young3 and Srinivas Desamsetti3 ¹Department of Biology, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 JR Lynch Street, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi, 39217 USA ²Biostatistical Support Unit and Consulting center, Jackson State University, 1400 JR Lynch Street, Jackson, Mississippi, 3921, USA ³Trent Lott Geospatial Visualization and Research Centre, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, Mississippi e-Center, 1230 Raymond Road, Jackson, Mississippi, 39204, USA Abstract: Ozone (O3) is innate at upper stratosphere but is also a secondary pollutant in lower troposphere. The toxic gas (O3) is formed from the reaction of oxides of nitrogen (NOX) and volatile organic compounds (VOC’s) in the presence of sunlight. Ground level O3 is particularly a summer time problem in United States. Due to the strong oxidative nature, it causes irritation in the respiratory tract. O3 is believed to cause adverse health effects, such as aggravation of asthma, respiratory illnesses, and cardiovascular diseases in general population. The biochemical mechanism that triggers the toxic action in asthmatic patients is still unknown. The present study has analyzed the correlation of O3 concentration in central and southeast United States of America (Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia and Florida) to the current prevalence percent of Asthma in general population. Both, pollutant (O3) and Asthma health risk county data were collected and analyzed for six year period from 2005 to 2010. The 4th max daily average O3 concentrations data in parts per billion (ppb) were collected from United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) monitor values report. Respective asthma prevalence and health risk county data for the study region were collected from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) - Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). Statistical analysis was performed between the two variables of surface O3 and health risk data with a maximum r value of 0.9. Improvements in the data analysis can be a useful measure to correlate the concentrations and corresponding adverse health effects on populations. Key words: Ozone, Asthma, Prevalence, Correlation


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION A [STUDENTS]

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ASTHMA PREVALANCE IN MISSISSIPPI AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF A COMPREHENSIVE ASTHMA SURVEILLANCE INSTRUMENT Rob Channell, Daniel Sarpong and Ramzi M. Kafoury Department of Biology and Environmental Science Ph.D. Program, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi, USA Abstract: Asthma is a serious chronic disorder that is estimated to be affecting approximately 300 million people worldwide and causing as many as 250,000 deaths annually. It is estimated that 39.9 million Americans, or 132.5 per 1,000 persons, have been diagnosed with asthma by a health professional within their lifetime. In the state of Mississippi, a statewide asthma survey reports that approximately 10.4% of Mississippi children ages ( 17 years) and 7.5% of Mississippi adults ( 18 years) currently have asthma. Asthma is a chronic disorder of the airways that is complex and characterized by variable and recurring symptoms, airflow obstruction, bronchial hyper-responsiveness, and an underlying inflammation. Current surveillance instruments show disparity among data and lack comprehensive information of the many environmental factors that may contribute to the etiology of asthma. In the present study, we developed and tested a Comprehensive Asthma Surveillance Instrument (CASI) and compared it to the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Asthma has been shown to be a product of gene-environment interaction; however, NHANES does not gather data on environmental factors that can promote asthma expression. CASI is divided into 5 different groups; Diagnostic, Demographic, Environmental, Family History, and Prescription Medication. The Diagnostic section exhibited several significant variables that could aid in the discrimination of asthmatics from non-asthmatics. These significant diagnosis factors included allergies (p < .0001), asthma attack (p < .0001), diagnosed asthma (p < .0001), wheezing (p < .0001), frequent cough (p = 0.0254), hay allergy (p < .0001), magnitude of wheezing (p < .0001), respiratory illness (p <.0001), chest tightness (p = 0.0071), shortness of breath (p < .0001), wheezing from physical activity (p < .0001), dust allergy (p < .0001) , and allergy to pollen (p < .0001). The Demographic factors that were significant individually were age, gender, and income with age (p = 0.047) and income (p = 0.0030) factors showing the highest significance in the stepwise regression model. Family History of asthma indicated a significant link between mothers diagnosed with asthma and asthma in children (p = 0.0253). Also, family history (p < .0001), siblings with asthma (p  0.05), and great grandparents (p  0.05), indicated a significant relationship with childhood asthma. The environmental factors that displayed significant correlation in the individual stepwise regression model were exposure to diesel exhaust (p  0.001), living in the proximity of dirt roads (p = 0.0137), age of home (p = 0.0208), painting the home (p = 0 .0057), , water leak in the home (p = 0.0243), mold in the home (p = 0.5903), owned home vs. rented one (p = 0.0167), proximity to highway (p = 0.0319) proximity to agricultural land (P = 0.0035), riding the bus to school (p < .0001), rugs in the home (p = 0.0127), time since observed paint chips (p = 0.0101), and time spent outdoors (p = 0.0014). The descriptive statistics indicate a role for many environmental factors in the exacerbation of asthma. For example, 35 % of the children had asthma and lived within 200yd of a major road or highway, whereas only 15% of the children who had asthma lived at greater than 200yd from the highway. Moreover, 49% of the children who had asthma rode the bus compared to 13% of the asthmatic children who did not ride the bus to school. The results of the present study indicate the significance of the newly developed CASI in providing information regarding environmental as well as genetic factors that may contribute to our understanding of the complex etiological variables underlying asthma and its exacerbation. Key Terms; Asthma, Gene-environment interaction, Allergy, Chronic, NHANES, CASI


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION A [STUDENTS]

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MODELING THE PROBABILITY OF DETECTING CADMIUM TELLURIDE (CDTE) COATED NANO-PARTICLES BY THE TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY (TEM) Shontrice Garrett, David Muhammad, Deunte Sheard and Tor A. Kwembe Department of Mathematics, Jackson State University,1400 John R. Lynch Street, JSU Box 17610, Jackson, MS 39217, USA Abstract: Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) is a crystalline compound made from cadmium and tellurium to form a semiconductor (Quantum Dot). It has wide applications ranging from optical to biological fluorescent labeling. As specimen markers, CdTe is used to electronically isolate nano-particles and passivate the surface state. Once the solution is prepared, optical instruments such as the Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) are used for analytical detection of the presence of CdTe quantum dots. TEM examination of the particles from freshly prepared colloid show the presence of nano-particle distribution. In this study, we showed that the search for the presence of CdTe coated nano-particles by TEM is governed by the three dimensional Schrödinger equation. We thus, assume that the particles are present in a 3-D space and use the time dependent Schrodinger equation with natural boundary conditions as a model to determine the probability density functions of detecting CdTe nano-particles at varying Energy levels En which depends on the Principal quantum numbers n, where n is a positive integer. The wave function  ( x, y, z, t ) describing the physical state of the particle located at position ( x, y, z ) at time t is given by  ( x, y, z, t ) 

C  e n n

i

En t 

and the probability density functions by

 ( x, y, z, t )   C nn , where  n satisfies the time independent Schrodinger equation Hn  Enn 2

2

n

and H is the corresponding Hamiltonian. Key words: Cadmium telluride, modeling, nano-particles, probability density functions, quantum dots, transmission electron microscopy, schrodinger equations Acknowledgements: This research is partially supported by JSU Center of Excellence in Science, Engineering, Technology, & Mathematics Education (CESTEME) funded by US Department of Defense grant #58995-RT-REP, Agreement Number W911NF-11-1-0123 and a BYU CURM minigrant funded by the NSF grant #DMS-0636648.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION A [STUDENTS]

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A GIMBALED PLATFORM FOR MICRO AERIAL VEHICLE AUTOPILOT SIMULATION AND CALIBRATION Kamal S. Ali, Justin L. Shumaker, Lamarious Carter and Jordan Barber Department of Computer Engineering, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA Abstract: A gimbaled platform that can be used to calibrate small autopilots or inertial measurement units (IMUs). This platform can also double as a flight simulator on which an autopilot can be evaluated and developed. The platform is controlled by five stepper motors, two for pitch, two for roll, and one for yaw. The stepper motors have a resolution of 0.18° per step using micro stepping technology. To complement the stepper motors, optical shaft encoders are affixed to all three axes. The shaft encoders supply accurate readings of the platforms attitude. By placing the autopilot on the platform while actuating the platform to simulate flight, IMU data and the corresponding shaft encoder data may be collected. This data can be used to fine-tune the contribution from each of the IMUs sensors to minimize overall error. Furthermore, the data can also be utilized in the training of neural networks or any other type of filter to further minimize IMU error. The platform can also be configured as a synchronization tool, e.g., synchronizing IMU and video images for target geolocation. This is accomplished by placing both the video camera and autopilot on the platform where they are synchronized with the optical shaft encoders. The exact IMU data corresponding to each video frame can then be obtained, thus rendering the target geolocation system more accurate. This platform has been integrated with X-Plane, a Federal Aviation Administration-approved flight simulator. This software was chosen to handle the flight dynamics calculations and provide data to both the platform and autopilot. New flight surface positions can be generated by the autopilot or interface module, which are then passed back to X-Plane, where the resulting change in airframe attitude is rendered. This new attitude data is also passed to the platform’s motor control system, updating the platforms attitude. In this configuration, global positioning system (GPS), as well as barometric and wind speed data generated by X-Plane, is supplied to the autopilot. For these sensors to operate correctly, additional hardware not yet integrated into the platform is required. Therefore, using the platform as a flight simulator will require modifying the autopilot code to accept the aforementioned data directly from XPlane. Nevertheless, using the platform as a flight simulator will allow the evaluation of an autopilot’s control algorithms using different airframes, as well as performance testing under different weather conditions at the click of a mouse button. Key words: platform, gimbal, control, MAV, autopilot, calibration, IMU, X-Plane Acknowledgements: This research is supported by a grant through the Army Research Laboratory and Center of Excellence In Science Technology Engineering Mathematics Education at Jackson State University.


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QUANTIFYING STORM SURGE HAZARDS WITH ADVANCED HIGH RESOLUTION NUMERICAL MODELS Justin Griffin1, Hoonshin Jung2 and Himangshu Das1 1

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Jackson State University, Jackson, 1400 Lynch Street, Jackson, MS 39217, USA 2 Center for Natural Disasters, Coastal Infrastructure and Emergency Management, Mississippi eCenter, Jackson State University, 1230 Raymond Road, Jackson, MS 39204, USA Abstract: Strom surge hazards are caused by the destructive forces from hurricanes or tropical cyclones. High winds are normally associates with severe inundations which impacts the life and wellbeing of people within the impacted zone. It also creates health risks due to prolonged ponded water which attracts water borne diseases. The risk escalates particularly in area where proper infrastructures are not available to tackle this hazard. Thus the objective of this research is to analyze data on major cyclones in the Bay of Bengal region which is located in the northeastern tip of the Indian Ocean that consists of the South Asian nations of India, Bangladesh, and Myanmar. The purpose of this investigation was to gain understanding and knowledge of the dynamics of cyclones and the destruction and damage caused by them in this particular region. The main objective was to setup and test a high resolution storm surge model for the Bay of Bengal in order to analyze risks due to storm surge in that area. High resolution circulation model (ADCIRC) and wave model (SWAN) were used to quantify storm surge hazards. Track data from two well-known cyclones were used to run the numerical simulations. The cyclones were Sidr, which struck Bangladesh in 2007 killing 3,500 people and caused 4.4 billion USD in damage, and Nargis, which struck Myanmar in 2008 killing 135,000 people and caused up to 6 billion USD in damage. The results from our simulations showed the path of development and destruction of cyclones from the middle of the bay to inland areas where they impacted. The numerical setup will help to manage future storm surge related hazards in that area. Key words: Hazard, storm surge, cyclone, numerical model Acknowledgements: This research was supported through student support by a grant from the Department of Defense (DoD) Center of Excellence in Science Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Education (CESTEME) at Jackson State University (JSU).


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION A [STUDENTS]

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INVESTIGATING TECHNIQUES TO DETECT FAKE REVIEWS IN SOCIAL MEDIA Amber Johnson and Xifeng Yan Computer Science Department, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA Abstract: Online reviews are popular among consumers because it allows them to rate businesses or products based on their personal experiences. Positive reviews can help generate more business as can negative reviews cause clientele loss. Unfortunately, this has been abused due to alternative motives such as the gain of profit and fame. Products, hotels, and restaurants are main targets for online review deception. This paper studies fake review detection techniques to discover deceptive reviews in social media. We compare three algorithms to classify texts and determine the most effective method with one being a Support Vector Machine (SVM), a supervised learning algorithm that analyzes and recognizes patterns in data, Our training data set consists of 400 truthful and deceptive reviews extracted from actual review websites. Choosing features such as bigrams, part of speech, and removal of stop words, we are able to build a SVM classifier with an 86% accuracy rate for fake review detection.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION A [STUDENTS]

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RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN MINERALOCORTICOID RECEPTOR ANTAGONIST, CAVEOLIN-1, AND INSULIN RESISTANCE C. Cezar1, G. K. Adler2 and L. Pojoga3 1 2

Tougaloo College Jackson Heart Study Program, Jackson, MS, USA Harvard University STARS Program, Brigham Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA, USA

Abstract: Insulin resistance, impaired functioning of the insulin receptor, is a major medical problem leading to cardiovascular injury and type II diabetes. The insulin receptor and the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) are found in caveolae where they associate with caveolin-1 (Cav-1). Previous data show that caveolin-1 knockout (KO) mice have insulin resistance and do not show improvements in glucose metabolism with a MR antagonist as occurs in wild type (WT) mice. So our hypothesis stated that a MR antagonist, Eplerenone, improves glucose metabolism in WT animals by modulating Cav-1 levels. We used 14 wild type mice fed a sodium diet were randomized to receive either placebo or eplerenone for 14 days. Intraperitoneal (IP) glucose tolerance tests (GTT) were performed on day 14 and mice were also killed afterwards. RNA was extracted from liver tissue samples and cDNA was made from each sample. RT-PCR was performed to determine gene expression levels for Caveolin-1. Associations between cav-1 mRNA and the glucose levels during the IP GTT (area under the curve (AUC)) were assessed. Data was analyzed by Fisher exact and regression analyses. Results show that there was no significant difference in the amount of Caveolin-1 mRNA in livers from animals treated with Eplerenone (0.96± .52[mean± standard deviation (SD)]) vs. mice receiving placebo (0.98± .10[mean± SD]). In WT mice treated with eplerenone, liver cav-1 mRNA levels tended to correlate with the glucose AUC during the GTT (r2=0.51, p=0.068). There was no association between caveolin-1 mRNA and glucose AUC in mice receiving placebo (p=0.3). It was concluded that the MR antagonist, Eplerenone, does not alter liver caveolin-1 mRNA levels. However, in WT mice treated with eplerenone, there was an association between glucose AUC and liver caveolin-1 mRNA levels. Thus, the ability of MR blockade to modulate glucose metabolism may involve changes in expression of caveolin-1


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION B [FACULTY/SCIENTISTS]

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ROLE OF FRUCTOSE DIPHOSPHATE (FDP) AND GLYCEROL ON THE DIFFERENTIAL SURVIVAL OF MRC-5 AND A549 CELL LINES Ibrahim O. Farah, Veshell L. Lewis, Wellington K. Ayensu and Joseph A. Cameron Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA Abstract: Lung cancer is a one of the most prevalent and deadly cancers in United States. Research has shown that cancer cells exhibit higher glycolytic rates than normal cells. In attempting to exploit this unique cancer-dependent ATP generation phenomenon, we hypothesize that exposure of cancer cells to organic inhibitors of glycolysis would have a negative impact on their survival and will alter their growth and viability due to a vast decrease in their essential glycolytic ATP production with the resultant energetic collapse and that no negative consequences will be seen on normal lung cells. The human lung fibroblast cell line MRC-5 and the human alveolar epithelial cell line A549 were used in this study as models for normal lung and lung cancer in vitro. Using standard methods, both cell lines were maintained and exposed to FDP and glycerol reagents at concentration levels ranging from 31.32,000 Îźg/ml in 96 well plates in quadruplets and experiments were repeated at least three times using MTT, and cell counting (T4 Cellometer) assays as well as phase-contrast photo-imaging. Our results indicate that exposure of both cell lines to these organics resulted in concentration dependent cell destruction/cell survival depending on the cell line exposed. FDP and glycerol showed statistically significant (p<0.05) differential negative effects on the A549 line in comparison to its unexposed control as well as to their effects on the MRC-5 cell line, presenting promising indicators for their cancer therapeutic potential.

Acknowledgement: This research is supported by a grant from the National Institutes of Health (Grant No.1G12RR13459), through the NCRR-RCMI Center for Environmental Health at Jackson State University (JSU).


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION B [FACULTY/SCIENTISTS]

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THERAPEUTIC IMPLICATIONS OF THE WARBURG EFFECT: ROLE OF OXALATES AND ACETATES ON THE DIFFERENTIAL SURVIVAL OF MRC5 AND A549 CELL LINES Ibrahim O. Farah, Veshell L. Lewis and Wellington K. Ayensu Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA Abstract: Lung cancer is a one of the most prevalent and deadly cancers in United States. Research has shown that cancer cells exhibit higher glycolytic rates than normal cells. In attempting to exploit this unique cancer-dependent ATP generation phenomenon, we hypothesize that exposure of cancer cells to organic inhibitors of glycolysis would have a negative impact on their survival and will alter their growth and viability due to a vast decrease in their essential glycolytic ATP production with the resultant energetic collapse and that no negative consequences will be seen on normal lung cells. The human lung fibroblast cell line MRC-5 and the human alveolar epithelial cell line A549 were used in this study as models for normal lung and lung cancer in vitro. Using standard methods, both cell lines were maintained and exposed to oxalic acid and zinc acetate reagents at concentration levels ranging from 31.3-2,000 Îźg/ml in 96 well plates in quadruplets and experiments are repeated at least three times using MTT, and cell counting (T4 Cellometer) assays as well as phase-contrast photo-imaging. Our results indicate that exposure of both cell lines to these organics resulted in concentration dependent cell destruction/cell survival depending on the cell line exposed. Oxalic acid and zinc acetate showed statistically significant (p<0.05) differential negative effects on the A549 line in comparison to its unexposed control as well as to their effects on the MRC-5 cell line, presenting promising indicators for their cancer therapeutic potential. Acknowledgement: This research is supported by a grant from the National Institutes of Health (Grant No.1G12RR13459), through the NCRR-RCMI Center for Environmental Health at Jackson State University (JSU).


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION B [FACULTY/SCIENTISTS]

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MOLECULAR APPROACH TO MICROBIOLOGICAL EXAMINATION OF WATER IN THE GRAND BAY NATIONAL ESTUARINE RESEARCH RESERVE (NERR) IN MISSISSIPPI S. S. Kishinhi, P. B. Tchounwou, I. O. Farah and J. Lukasik Environmental Microbiology Research Laboratory, Department of Biology, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, Box 18540, Jackson, MS 39217, USA Abstract: Grand Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve (NERR) is an important ecosystem in the Mississippi Gulf Coast. The GBNERR may be a source for contamination with anthropogenic bacterial pathogens that may play a significant role in the causation of human diseases. The objective of this study was to evaluate the microbiological quality of water in the Grand Bay NERR and determine quantitative levels and potential source(s) of human fecal pollution. Water samples were collected aseptically from Bayous Heron and Cumbest, Point Aux Chenes Bay and Bangs Lake. Enterococci were concentrated from water samples by membrane filtration. Filters were incubated on mEI Agar (Difco), according to the methodology outlined in USEPA Method 1600. After incubation, DNA was extracted from enterococcal colonies on membrane filters by using QIAamp DNA extraction kit according to manufacturerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s instructions (Qiagen, Inc.). Primers specific for the ESP gene in Enterococcus faecium were purchased from DNA Integrated Technologies (IDT). Water samples were also tested for the presence of traditional indicator microorganisms including: heterotrophic plate counts (HPC), total coliforms (TC), fecal coliforms (FC) and enterococcus bacterial counts (ENT) using membrane filtration method, APHA protocol 9215D, 9222B, and 9222D and USEPA Method 1600 respectively. The marker ESP gene was detected in one site of bayou Cumbest; an area where human population resides. In other sites of the Grand Bay NERR the gene was not detected. Data from this study indicates significant variability (p < 0.0001) in mean bacteria concentrations between sites. The data also indicates significant numbers of indicator bacteria in Bayou Heron and Bayou Cumbest when compared with federal/State guidelines. Presence of ESP marker and high numbers of indicator bacteria suggest public health concern for shellfish users and other water contact activities. Hence control strategies should be developed and implemented to prevent further contamination of the Grand bay NERR waters. Acknowledgement: This research is supported by a grant from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Grant No. NA17AE1626; ECSC-FAMU through Jackson State University (JSU).


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION B [FACULTY/SCIENTISTS]

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GENOTOXICITY OF SILVER NANOPARTICLES IN VICIA FABA: A PILOT STUDY ON THE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING OF NANOPARTICLES Anita K. Patlolla1, Ashley Berry1, 2, LaBethani May1,2, 3 and Paul Tchounwou1 1

Molecular Toxicology Research Laboratory, NIH-RCMI Center for Environmental Health, College of Science Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS, USA 2 Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS, USA 3 Murray High School student-SEPA Program, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS, USA. Abstract: The use of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in commercial products has increased significantly in recent years. Although there has been some attempt to determine the toxic effects of AgNPs in mammalian and human cell-lines, there is little information on plants which have a vital role in ecosystems. The study reports the use of Vicia faba root-tip meristem to investigate the genotoxicity of AgNPs under modified GENE-TOX test conditions. The root tip cells of V. faba were treated with four different concentrations of engineered AgNPs dispersion to study toxicological endpoints such as mitotic index (MI), chromosomal aberrations (CA) and micronucleus induction (MN). For each concentration, five sets of microscopy observations were carried out. The results demonstrated that AgNPs exposure significantly increased (p<0.05) the number of chromosomal aberrations, micronuclei, and decreased the MI in exposed groups compared to control. From this study we infer that AgNPs might have penetrated the plant system and may have impaired mitosis causing CA and MN. The results of this study demonstrate that AgNPs are genotoxic to plant cells. Since plant assays have been integrated as a genotoxicity component in risk assessment for detection of environmental mutagens, they should be given full consideration when evaluating the overall toxicological impact of the nanoparticles in the environment. Keywords: Silver nanoparticles, chromosomal aberrations, mitotic index, Vicia faba, genotoxic, micronucleus Acknowledgement This research was supported by grants from NIH-SEPA (Grant No. RR020405-02) and National Institutes of Health-RCMI Center for Environmental Health (Grant No. 2G12RR01349-12) at Jackson State University.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION B [FACULTY/SCIENTISTS]

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GREEN SYNTHESIS OF SILVER NANOPARTICLES, THEIR CHARACTERIZATION AND APPLICATION FOR ANTIBACTERIAL ACTIVITY Florence Okafor, Afef Janen and Tatiana Kukhtareva Biological and Environmental Sciences and Physics, Chemistry and Mathematics Departments, Alabama A&M University, 4900 Meridian Street, Normal, Alabama, USA Abstract: Nanoparticles are an area of great interest because of their various applications in life sciences. Recent development in nanotoxicology has shown that colloidal silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have toxicological properties due to their anti-bacterial activity. Silver nanoparticles are the most widely used nanomaterials for different purposes such as photography, catalysis, biological labeling, photonics, optoelectronics and Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) detection. Our recent research was focused on developing AgNPs and their characterization, which can be applied in medical research and environmental cleaning applications. Extracellular biosynthesis of AgNPs has been developed in an environmentally friendly manner. In this study, live plants such as Magnolia grandiflora, Geranium, Aloe â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Tingtinkieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; leaves broth, Actaea racemosa (black cohosh), and Eucalyptus angophoroides extracts were used as reducing agents to produce nanoparticles. Synthesis of colloidal AgNPs was performed by UV-Visible spectroscopic analysis. UV-Visible spectrum showed a peak between 417-425 nm corresponding to the plasmon absorbance of the AgNPs that were formed within several minutes. The characterization of the AgNPs such as their size and shape was performed by Atom Force Microscopy (AFM), Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) techniques which indicated a size range of 5 to 10 nm. The anti-bacterial activity of AgNPs was investigated at various concentrations (2-15ppm). Staphylococcus aureus and Kocuria rhizophila (Gram positive organisms); Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Salmonella typhimurium (Gram negative organisms) were exposed to AgNPs using Bioscreen C to measure bacterial growth. The results indicated that AgNPs at a concentration of 2 and 4 ppm, significantly inhibited bacterial growth. Further studies will be carried out to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration of AgNPs for bacterial growth. Our future work is to investigate the cytotoxicity of biosynthesized AgNPs on normal and cancerous cells. Key words: Cytotoxicity, Silver Nanoparticles (AgNPs), Bacterial growth Acknowledgements: "We would like to acknowledge the support and assistance from Alabama Agricultural & Mechanical University's College of Agricultural, Life and Natural Sciences."


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION B [FACULTY/SCIENTISTS]

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A VISUAL ANALYTIC DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEM FOR TRACKING IMPACT OF PUBLIC HEALTH BENEFITS OF MERCURY EMISSION REDUCTIONS: INTERDISCIPLINARY STRATEGIES TO ADVANCE FROM DISPARITY TO REFORM Wellington Ayensu1,2, Raphael Isokpehi1,2 and Ibrahim Farah3 1

Department of Biology & RCMI-Center for Environmental Health, Jackson State University, NIHCenter for Environmental Health, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi, USA 2 Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA 3 Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA Abstract: A major challenge in policy formulation as well as tracking the public health impacts is the daunting volumes of datasets required for decision making. Tracking the impacts on health disparities such as Asthma and COPD from the reduction of heavy metals and acid gases emitted by coal and oilfired power plants we extracted diverse datasets from EPA provided Regulatory Impact Analysis document. Data for 48 states and the District of Columbia (DC) included methylmercury sensitivity watersheds for USA. Subsequently visual analytics techniques were applied on the datasets to identify patterns that can help with decision support. We identified areas of high methylmercury sensitivity in the Gulf coast states. These areas appear to correlate with regions of diseases linked with health disparities among segments of the population. In addition, we identified states (for example Indiana and Louisiana) that share estimates of reduction in premature deaths and/or economic gains. The estimates of reduction in premature deaths by 2016 for Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi and Texas were 360, 730, 290, 240 and 1200. We continue to integrate county-level incidence of diseases with datasets from the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards in the context of a visual analytics decision support systems. The user-defined, interactive system can assist in tracking the impacts of incidence of health disparities especially in the Gulf Coast of the United States. Key words: Visual analytics, impact, decision support, regulation, health benefits Acknowledgements: This work was supported in part by the Mississippi IDeA Network for Biomedical Excellence, (NIH-NCRR-P20RR016476); Arkansas IDeA Network for Biomedical Excellence (NIHNCRR-P20RR016460); Research Centers in Minority Institutions (RCMI)â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Center for Environmental Health at Jackson State University (NIH-NCRR G12RR013459); Pittsburgh Supercomputing Centreâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s National Resource for Biomedical Supercomputing (T36GM095335); National Center for Integrative Biomedical Informatics, University of Michigan (NIH-U54DA021519) and Sylvia Leggette, Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, JSU.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION B [FACULTY/SCIENTISTS]

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DETERMINATION OF ARSENIC IN DRINKING WATER ASSESSMENT OF PM2.5 FROM MODIS-AOT DATA OVER MISSISSIPPI GULF COAST USING REGRESSION ANALYSIS Anjaneyulu Yerramilli, Srinivas Desamsetti, Venkata B. Dodla, Julius Baham, John Young and Chuck Patrick Trent Lott Geospatial & Visualization Research Center, Jackson State University, 1230 Raymond Road, Mississippi@e-Center, Jackson, MS 39204, USA Abstract: PM2.5 (particulate matter with less than 2.5 micrometers in diameter) sourced from industrial and combustion activities, is one of the major air pollutants with high health risk as these fine particles when inhaled cause severe lung and respiratory problems. In particular anthropogenic aerosols are considered to have major human health implications, and numerous studies have reported associations between mortality and morbidity and PM2.5. Air quality is generally assessed through a network of ground monitoring stations and robotic network which constrains the spatial and temporal resolution. More so, the assessment of PM2.5 is restricted due to its large temporal and spatial variability and difficulties in sampling. Remote sensing methodology provides the advantages of monitoring in remote and data sparse areas covering large areas and satellites have the capability of measuring the radiances reflected/ emitted from ground. PM2.5 is not directly measured by satellites and has to be estimated indirectly using the radiance measurements. Though satellite remote sensing of air quality has limitations, acquiring radiance data under non/less cloudy condition, the availability of one time observation per day, provides an important tool to monitor aerosols as they provide very good spatial coverage. Aerosol optical thickness (AOT), a parameter retrieved from satellites radiances, is the vertical columnar measurement of aerosol implying higher AOT values mean higher column aerosol loading. The aerosol optical depth or optical thickness is the integrated extinction coefficient (fractional depletion of radiance per unit path length) over a vertical column of unit cross section. AOT product can be used for many applications e.g., air quality, earthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s radiation budget and climate change. Several studies have attempted to use the satellite derived AOT to assess the air pollution from aerosols. MODIS (MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) onboard Terra and Aqua satellites provide two daytime observations (10:30 a.m. from Terra and 1:30 p. m. from Aqua) of AOT at 10 km spatial resolution. Statistical regression analysis was performed to establish the relationship between AOT and PM2.5 for different station locations over Mississippi Gulf Coast region (28.2-33N, 84.6-93W). MODISAOT data from NASA LAADS Web and hourly PM2.5 concentrations from US EPA at different stations within the study region were for 10 years (i.e.) from 2002 to 2011was considered for analysis. AOT data was retrieved from MODIS Data (spatial data) at the EPA PM2.5 monitoring stations using two methods, (i) the neighboring grid box method and (ii) the radial distance methods and separate relationships were derived for both the methods. Results indicate that there is a positive relationship between MODIS-AOT and surface PM2.5 and the correlation coefficients are significant with values in the range of 0.23-0.5 with 99% statistical significance. This study demonstrates the applicability of satellite AOT data for assessing temporal and spatial variations of PM2.5 over large study region using regression analysis. Key words: air quality, MODIS, aerosol optical thickness, surface PM2.5


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION B [FACULTY/SCIENTISTS]

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ENVIRONMENTAL MODELING AND PREDICTION FOR CLIMATE FLUCTUATIONS OVER GRAND BAY OF GULF OF MEXICO R. Suseela Reddy1, Paulinus Chigbu2 and Paul Tchounwou3 1

Department of Physics, Atmospheric Sciences and Geosccience,1400 J.R. Lynch Street, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS, 39217, USA 2 University of Maryland Eastern Shore, MD 21853, USA 3 College of Science, Engineering and Technology, 1400 J.R. Lynch Street, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS, 39217, USA Abstract: The Gulf of Mexico region is prone to severe weather events throughout the year and is affected due to environmental changes over the coastal regions (ex. flooding and sea breeze circulations, tropical cyclones/hurricanes, ENSO etc.). Understanding, modeling and predicting weather/climate dynamics and meteorological coastal processes for the Gulf region is important for agriculture, fisheries and forestry management as this region is of interest for the countryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s economy and social aspects. Our goal is to investigate the seasonal patterns of meteorological parameters in order to predict their impacts on ecosystem and fish populations over the Grand Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve (GBNER) area using the Penn State/NCAR Mesoscale Model (MM5). In the present study, the MM5 version 3 Weather/Environmental model was run using data assimilation techniques where non-conventional data from various sources are fed into the model as initial and lateral boundary conditions to simulate seasonal variations of surface features and precipitation. Other simulation parameters include sea surface temperature, sea level pressure and surface wind magnitude. The climatic and seasonal fluctuations of these parameters have important implications for the GBNERR ecosystem. Keywords: Grand Bay, environmental modeling, seasonal climate prediction, ecosystem, fish population


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION B [FACULTY/SCIENTISTS]

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SEPARATE AND JOINT EFFECT OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS (PAH) AND POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS (PCB) ON AROMATASE CYP19A TRANSCRIPTION LEVEL OF ATLANTIC TOMCOD (MICROGRADUS TOMCOD) Adam Tulu1, Ali Ishaque1, Egbe Egiebor1, Christopher Chambers2 and Rosemary Jagus3 1

Department of Natural Science, University of Maryland, Eastern Shore, Princess Anne, MD 21853, USA 2 NOAA-Fisheries, 74 Magruder Rd., Highlands, NJ 07732, USA 3 Center of Marine Biotechnology, University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute.701 E Pratt St. Baltimore, MD 21202, USA Abstract: Ovarian cytochrome 19A (CYP19A) expression is recognized as a useful biomarker for exposure of fish to environmental contaminants such as PAHs and PCBs. In this study, a laboratory approach using Microgradus tomcod (Atlantic tomcod) from the Hudson River was used to evaluate the additive or interactive effect s of PAH and PCB with respect to their relative effect on reproduction. The PAH used was benzo[a]pyrine, and the PCB used was Aroclor 1242 both at 0.1 ppm (low), and 1.0 ppm (high) concentration via DMSO for embryo and contaminated food source (Artemia) for larvae. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) was used to evaluate the expression level of the ovarian aromatase CYP19A mRNA level as a biomarker to assess reproductive stress in Atlantic tomcod. Expression of aromatase CYP19A was significantly upregulated only at high level of the PCB exposure, but no effect was observed with benzo-a-pyrene (B[a]P) treatment. In the PCB/PAH combined treatment, Low-PCB and both low/high levels of PAH treatment groups have no significant effect on aromatase CYP19A transcript levels compared with the controlled group. Gonadosomatic Index (GSI) of reproductively matured females showed that only high-PCB treatment group has significant (P<0.05) gonadal loss. The results showed that transcription of both PCB and PAH were expected to be upregulated since they both exert their toxic effects through the aryl hydrocarbons receptor (AHR) pathway. It is possible that Hudson River tomcod population have their AHR pathway compromised for PAH exposure. Keywords: Aromatase, biomarkers, pollutants, biotransformation, endocrine disruption


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION B [FACULTY/SCIENTISTS]

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MOLECULAR MECHANISMS OF VERNONIA AMYGDALINA AS NOVEL BOTANICAL AGENT FOR THE TREATMENT OF BREAST CANCER Clement G. Yedjou1, Ernest Izevbigie2 and Paul B. Tchounwou 1,3 1

Cellomics and Toxicogenomics Research Laboratory, NIH-Center for Environmental Health; 2Cellular Signaling, Phytoceuticals, and Cancer Prevention and Therapies; 3Environmental Toxicology Research Laboratory College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, Jackson, Mississippi, USA Abstract: Breast cancer (BC) is the leading cause of death of women between 40 and 55 years of age and is the second overall cause of death of women. Fortunately, the mortality rate from BC has decreased in recent years due to an increased emphasis on early detection and more effective treatments. Despite early detection and conventional methods of treatment, about 7% of women diagnosed with BC still die every year. Therefore, novel therapeutic agents are needed to improve the clinical outcome of this disease. The development of new drugs from natural products is considered important. Previous studies from our laboratory show that a novel natural product, extracts of Vernonia amygdalina (VA) leaf exerts DNA-damaging anticancer activities against BC. Therefore, the central goal of this research was to determine the therapeutic mechanisms of VA leaf extracts in breast cancer cells. To achieve this goal, cell viability, live and death cells were determined by the means of the MTT assay, trypan blue test, and propidium iodine assay, respectively. Cell apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry analysis of phosphatidylserine externalization (Annexin V assay) and caspase 3 activity, and by DNA laddering assay. Data obtained from the MTT assay indicated that VA significantly reduced the viability of MCF7 cells a dose-dependent response. On one hand, the Trypan blue dye exclusion test demonstrated the integrity of the membrane of untreated cells in culture. On the other hand, the trypan blue dye exclusion test demonstrated a loss of viability in VA-treated cells due to membrane damage. The result of the propidium iodine demonstrated a significant (p<0.05) increase of necrotic cell death in VA-treated cells, indicative of membrane rupture by VA. Flow cytometry data showed a strong dose-response relationship between VA exposure and Annexin-V positive MCF-7 cells. These results were confirmed by data of DNA laddering assay showing a clear evidence of nucleosomal DNA fragmentation in VA-treated cells. A statistically significant was recorded with regard to caspase 3 activity in MCF-7 cells. Taken together, our research demonstrated that VA represents an apoptosis-inducing agent and its apoptotic mechanisms involve phosphatidylserine externalization, activation of p53 tumor suppressor gene and caspase-3, and nucleosomal DNA fragmentation. Keywords: Vernonia amygdalina, MCF-7 cells, breast cancer, cellometer vision, flow cytometry Acknowledgements: This research was financially supported by a grant from the National Institutes of Health (Grant No. G12RR013459-14), through the RCMI-Center for Environmental Health.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION B [FACULTY/SCIENTISTS]

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VERNONIA AMYGDALINA: A NOVEL BOTANICAL AGENT FOR THE TREATMENT OF BREAST CANCER Clement Yedjou1, Lecia Gresham2, Ernest Izevbigie2 and Paul Tchounwou1 1

Cellomics and Toxicogenomics Research Laboratory, NIH-RCMI Center for Environmental Health; Cellular Signalling, Phytoceuticals, Cancer Prevention and Therapies, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi, USA 2

Abstract: Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer related deaths of women in the United States. Fortunately, the mortality rate from BC has decreased in recent years due to an increased emphasis on early detection and more effective treatments. Although great advancements have been made in the treatment and control of cancer progression, significant deficiencies and room for improvement remain. The central objective of this research was to determine the in vitro mechanisms of Vernonia amygdalina (VA) leaf extracts as an anticancer candidate for the treatment of breast cancer. To achieve our objective, MCF-7 cells were treated with different concentrations of VA for 24 and 48 h. Cell viability, live and death cells were determined by the means of both trypan blue exclusion test and propidium iodine (PI) assay using the cellometer vision. Cell apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry assessment using annexin V/PI kit. Data obtained from the trypan blue test demonstrated that VA treatment reduce cell viability in a dose-and time-dependent manner. The flow cytometry assessment showed a strong dose-response relationship with regard to VA exposure and annexin V/PI positive cells. The result of the PI assay showed a gradual increase in the proportion of necrotic cell death (fluorescence positive cells) in VA-treated cells compared to the control (fluorescence negative cells). Our finding demonstrates that VA-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in MCF-7 cells involve phosphatidylserine externalization, and secondary necrotic cell death. This finding indicates that VA may be a valuable botanical therapeutic agent for the treatment of breast cancer. Keywords: Vernonia amygdalina, MCF-7 cells, cell viability, apoptosis, necrosis Acknowledgements: This research was financially supported by a grant from the National Institutes of Health (Grant No. G12RR013459-14), through the RCMI-Center for Environmental Health.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION B [FACULTY/SCIENTISTS]

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ARSENIC TRIOXIDE INDUCED TRANSCRIPTIONAL ACTIVATION OF STRESS GENES AND PROGRAM CELL DEATH OF HUMAN LEUKEMIA CELLS Sanjay Kumar, Clement G. Yedjou and Paul B. Tchounwou Molecular Toxicology Research Laboratory, NIH-Center for Environmental Health, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, P.O. Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi, USA Abstract: Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) has recently been successfully used to treat all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) resistant relapsing acute promyelocytic leukemia. However, its molecular mechanisms of action are poorly understood. In the present study, we used the human leukemia (HL-60) cell line as a test model to study the cellular and molecular mechanisms of anti-cancer properties of As2O3. We hypothesized that As2O3-induced expression of stress genes and related proteins may play a role in the cellular and molecular events leading to cell cycle modulation in leukemic cells. To test this hypothesis, we performed Western blot analysis to assess the expression of specific cellular response proteins including p53, c-fos, RARE, Cyclin A, and Cyclin D1. Densitometric analysis was performed to determine the relative abundance of these proteins. Western Blot and densitometric analyses demonstrated a strong dose-response relationship with regard to p53 and RARE expression within the dose range of 0-8μg/mL. Expression of c-fos was slightly up-regulated at 2μg/mL, and down-regulated within the dose-range of 4-8 μg/mL. A statistically significant down-regulation of this protein was detected at the 6 and 8 μg/mL dose levels. No statistically significant differences (p>0.05) in Cyclin D1 expression was found between As2O3-treated cells and the control. Cyclin A expression in As2O3-treated HL-60 cells was up-regulated at 6μg/mL, suggesting that it is required for S phase and passage through G2 phase in cell cycle progression. Taken together, these results indicate that As2O3 has the potential to induce cell cycle arrest through activation of the 53-kDa tumor suppressor protein and repression of the c-fos transcription factor. Up-regulation of RARE by As2O3 indicates that its cytotoxicity may be mediated through interaction/binding with the retinoic acid receptor, and subsequent inhibition of growth and differentiation. We will also check the signaling mechanism involved in As2O3 - induced cell death of HL-60 cells. Key words: As2O3, cyclin D1, RARE, c-fos, p53, Bax, Bcl2, HL-60 cells. Acknowledgements: This research supported by a grant from the National Institutes of Health (Grant N0.1G12RR13459), through the NCRR-RCMI Center for Environmental Health at Jackson State University (JSU).


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION B [FACULTY/SCIENTISTS]

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TIME-COURSE GENE EXPRESSION IN HUMAN SKIN CELLS EXPOSED TO ARSENIC TRIOXIDE Udensi K. Udensi, C. Galindo, Paul B. Tchounwou and Raphael D. Isokpehi College of Science, Engineering & Technology, Jackson State University, Jackson Mississippi 39217, USA Abstract: Inorganic arsenic is a carcinogen of public health importance. Time course microarray experiments for gene expression were conducted to elucidate the global alterations in gene expression of arsenic trioxide exposed long-term culture cells due to chronic toxicity. HaCaT Keratinocyte cells were exposed to arsenic trioxide 0.5 mcg/ml up to 10 passages. The chronic cells were further exposed to 0.5 mcg/ml and total RNA was extracted for gene expression profiling on Day 2, 5, 8 and 15, in both arsenic-treated cells and untreated cells (passage control) using Human OneArray platform. A total of 4,150 gene probes were differentially expressed between controls and treatments for at least one time point. The general trend was approximately half the gene probes were up-regulated upon treatment and the other half down-regulated. Genes that affect the skin physiology were extracted from the microarray analysis results. This set included Aquaporin-3 (AQP3), Kallikrein (KLK) 1, Kallikrein-related peptidase 3 (KLK3), KLK3, KLK5, KLK7, KLK11, Peptidase inhibitor 3, skin-derived (PI3), WAP four-disulfide core domain 3 (WFDC3) and WFDC12. The results of the analysis of time course microarray indicated that the transcriptional pattern of the genes were specific to time-dependent arsenic treatment, as opposed to a more general transcriptional response caused by cell culture or other unwanted biological or technical variability. Genes that affect the skin physiology were prioritized. Further research is planned on the structural and functional interactions of arsenic with the disulfide bonds in the peptidase and peptidase inhibitors. Acknowledgment: This project was supported by grants from the National Center for Research Resources (5 G12 RR013459-15) and National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (8 G12 MD007581-15) from the National Institutes of Health.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION B [FACULTY/SCIENTISTS]

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ATO MEDIATES INTRINSIC PATHWAYS OF APOPTOSIS IN COLON CANCER CELLS Jacqueline J. Stevens1, Alice M. Walker2, Halima Stringer1, Faith Sherman1 and Paul B. Tchounwou2 1

Molecular and Cellular Biology Research Laboratory, NIH-RCMI Center for Environmental Health, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 JR Lynch Street, Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi, USA 2 Molecular Toxicology Research Laboratory, NIH-RCMI Center for Environmental Health, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 JR Lynch Street, Box 18540, Jackson, Mississippi, USA Abstract: Arsenic trioxide (ATO) induces apoptosis in a wide variety of solid tumors and leukemia cells, and is highly effective in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia. Although its mode of action is still not fully understood, ATO is known to induce cell apoptosis via generation of reactive oxygen species and activation of caspases. We have previously shown that ATO is cytotoxic and caused genotoxicity as revealed by the significant increase in DNA damage in HT-29 cancer cells. The aims of this study were to investigate oxidative stress and the expression of stress and apoptotic proteins. Using human colon cancer cells (HT-29) cells as a test model, oxidative stress was assessed by lipid peroxidation assay. The effects of arsenic trioxide on expression of apoptotic and stress-related proteins were determined by Western blotting. There was a dose-dependent increase in MDA production which indicated that colon is sensitive to arsenic-induced oxidative stress or inflammatory reactions. There was an up-regulation of Hsp70, cfos, and TNF-Îą expressions. This is indicative of the cells undergoing stress. In addition, there were an up-regulation in caspase 3, cytochrome C, and Bax expressions. ATO activated the intrinsic (mitochondrial) pathway of apoptosis which involved disrupting mitochondrial membrane potential in which increased protein levels mediated by a dose-dependent effect of ATO. In summary, our studies suggest that ATO toxicity may be mediated through oxidative stress inducing apoptosis. The effects of ATO may be important to further understand the mechanisms of ATO-induced toxicity. Keywords: Arsenic trioxide, HT-29 cells, oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, apoptosis Acknowledgements: This research supported in part by a grant from the National Institutes of Health (Grant NO. 2G12RR013459) through the NCRR-RCMI Center for Environmental Health and in part by a grant from Minority Access to Research Careers/Undergraduate Student Training in Academic Research (MARC/U*STAR) Program (Grant NO. 5T34GM007672-31) at Jackson State University.


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BACTERIAL GROWTH ON A LEAD- AND EDTA-AMENDED NUTRIENT BROTH MEDIUM Gloria Miller, Yasmin Partee, Terry Wilborn, Maria Begonia and Gregorio Begonia Department of Biology, P.O. Box 18540, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Jackson State University, 1400 J.R. Lynch, Jackson, MS 39217, USA Abstract: Lead (Pb) is one of the heavy metals responsible for soil pollution. Reports have shown that long- and short-term responses to toxic metals can cause a large reduction in microbial activities. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of Pb and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) on the growth of bacterium Wautersia metallidurans in lead-and EDTA-amended nutrient broth medium (NBM). Flasks containing NBM, previously amended with different concentrations of Pb and EDTA, were inoculated with cells of W. metallidurans and grown in the shaker for 3 days at 35째C. Broth cultures were sampled periodically and analyzed for bacterial growth (absorbance and plate counts). Our results showed that growth of W. metallidurans increased with increasing incubation periods across all metal concentrations. In the absence of Pb, growth was higher in the medium lacking EDTA than with EDTA, indicating the lethal effect of EDTA to the bacterial cells when used alone. Plate counts were not significantly different at 10 and 40 ppm Pb, but significantly different at 70 ppm after 72 hours of incubation. In the presence of EDTA, growth was generally higher in the NBM amended with 10, 40, and 70 ppm Pb than in the medium lacking EDTA. These data indicate that EDTA can alleviate the toxic effects of Pb to the bacterial cells due to the formation of Pb-EDTA complex which is less toxic than a free protonated Pb. Key Words: Wautersia metallidurans, growth, lead, EDTA, nutrient broth Acknowledgements: This research was made possible through support provided by the NASA through The University of Mississippi (No. NNX10AJ79H/11-05-084; M.B., PI/PD) to Jackson State University. The opinions expressed herein are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of NASA or The University of Mississippi.


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DISCOVERY DASHBOARD FOR EXPLORING HEALTH DISPARITIES ON BLOOD LIPIDS TRAITS Yachi Spencer, Victoria D. Gilmore, Kayla A. Echols and Raphael D. Isokpehi Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson Mississippi 39217, USA Abstract: Serum concentrations of Low-Density Lipoprotein (LDL-C), High-Density Lipoprotein (HDL-C), Total Cholesterol (TC) and Triglycerides (TG) are known traits associated with cardiovascular disease. The single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with 95 loci for blood lipid traits across global populations including African Americans was recently elucidated yielding datasets to be analyzed for ethnic-specific traits. The purpose of the reported research was to develop an interactive discovery dashboard for multiple data points for the 95 loci. Datasets were extracted from PubMed-indexed article (20686565). Visual analytics software was used to design views that will facilitate discovery of novel relationship from the datasets including candidate loci and SNPs relevant to African America populations. The discovery dashboard is available at http://public.tableausoftware.com. We identified 62 SNPs including pairs of SNPs that map to loci associated with multiple lipid traits. For example SNPs rs1084651 and rs1564348 for loci LPA [lipoprotein(a)] are linked to abnormal HDL-C and LDL-C levels. Visual analytics of cardiovascular datasets can help make sense of heterogeneous datasets of biological, clinical and population relevance. Further research will provide visual analytics modeling tools for integration and mining of cardiovascular datasets for health disparities investigations. Acknowledgements: RCMI Center for Environmental Health [National Center for Research Resources (5 G12 RR013459-15), National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (8 G12 MD00758115)]. Mississippi INBRE [National Center for Research Resources (5P20RR016476-11); National Institute of General Medical Sciences (8 P20 GM103476-11) from the National Institutes of Health]; ELIMINATING HEALTH DISPARITIES THROUGH MULTI-TRANS-DISCIPLINARY APPROACHES project at Jackson State University (1P20MD006899-01).


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PHYSICOCHEMICAL PROPERTIES AND MODELED STRUCTURAL FEATURES OF SCHISTOSOMA MANSONI GUANOSINE TRIPHOSPHATE BINDING PROTEIN Andreas N. Mbah1, Henri L. Kamga2, Omatayo R. Awofolu3 and Raphael D. Isokpehi 1 1

Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson Mississippi 39217, USA 2 Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Buea, P.O. Box 63 Buea, South West Region, Cameroon 3 Department of Environmental Sciences, College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, University of South Africa, P. O Box 392, UNISA, 0003, South Africa. Abstract: Schistosoma mansoni is a dioiceous trematode and one of the etiologic agents of schistosomiasis, the second most significant tropical disease after malaria in public health significance. The purpose of the reported research was to determine drug exploitable distinctive structural features of Schistosoma mansoni Smp_058340.1 protein, which has been identified as an attractive drug target in the S. mansoni genome. Smp_059340.1 is predicted to be a member of the G protein alpha-s subunit responsible for regulating the adenyly cyclase activity of S. mansoni in an energy-producing pathway for parasite movement associated with serotonin receptors. The availability of diverse structural bioinformatics tools provides opportunities to determine drug exploitable distinctive structural features of Smp_059340.1 protein. We achieved this objective by relating the protein physicochemical properties and protein domain organization to metabolic pathway function. We hypothesize that determining the physicochemical features and conserved protein domain organization of Schistosoma mansoni Smp_059340.1 protein will help identify putative new functional biomarkers and regulatory points of the parasite’s adenylyl cyclase activity. The quality of the modeled Smp_059340.1 structure measured in terms of reliability using the QMEAN4 score was 0.68 in range of 0 to 1. According to the reliability of the modeled protein structure, the key residues regulating Smp_059340.1 function were predicted to be Ser53, Thr188, Gly210 and Asp207 respectively. These conspicuous structural and functional biomarkers in Smp_059340.1 encoded protein will add impetus in biological experimental design particularly site–directed mutagenesis experiments on Smp_059340.1 during the developmental stages of S. mansoni. The data from physicochemical properties and modeled structural features present simplistic understanding on how protein domains of Smp_059340.1 interact as a molecular network. The modeled protein structure, the binding interfaces and their residues could be used as starting points for selective modulations of interactions within the pathway using small molecules, peptides or mutagenesis based on the model quality. Acknowledgements: Research and Training in the Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology are sponsored by National Institutes of Health (NIH-NCRR G12RR13459; NIH-NIGMS T36GM095335; NIH-NIMHD 1P20MD002725-01; NIH-NCRR-P20RR016476; NIH-NIGMSP20GM103476-11; NIH-NCRR-P20RR016460; U54DA021519); National Science Foundation (EPS0903787; NSF-DBI-0958179; DBI-1062057); US Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate (2009-ST-062-000014; 2011-ST-062-000048). Disclaimer: “The views and conclusions contained in this document are those of the authors and should not be interpreted as necessarily representing the official policies, either expressed or implied, of the funding agencies”.


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COMPARATIVE GENOMICS FOR STRESS RESPONSIVENESS IN GENOMES OF THE METABOLICALLY VERSATILE RHODOPSEUDOMONAS PALUSTRIS Shaneka S. Simmons, Andreas N. Mbah and Raphael D. Isokpehi Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson Mississippi 39217, USA Abstract: Comparative genomics is a branch of bioinformatics that allows for the comparison of functional relationships existing between genomes of different species. Computational tools for comparative genomics provided by publicly available microbial genomic databases aid in large-scale investigation of gene conservation existing between genomes and the functions encoded in proteins. Genes encoding proteins that contain the universal stress protein domain (Pfam Accession: PF00582) are described as members of the Universal Stress Protein (USP) family. The USP genes are known to provide organisms from the three domains of life with the ability to respond to various environmental stresses including nutrient starvation, drought, high salinity, extreme temperatures and exposure to toxic chemicals. Despite their importance in survival the USP genes have not been extensively characterized. Furthermore, the ability of USP genes to provide stress response in biofuel-relevant prokaryotic systems (microbes), such as the metabolically versatile, purple non-sulfur bacteria Rhodopseudomonas palustris, which includes an electricity-producing strain, presents abundant research opportunities. The increasing availability of genomic sequences of biofuel-relevant microbes along with high-throughput bioinformatics tools and a plethora of genomic databases provide new opportunities for investigating uncharacterized gene families central to stress response in prokaryotes whose functional roles have not been elucidated. A total of 7 finished genomes sequences are available for Rhodopseudomonas palustris from strains BisA53, BisB5, BisB18, CGA009, DX-1, HaA2 and TIE-1. Collectively 62 Usp genes are found in the genomes, representing the highest number of USP-containing genomes and genes in microbes identified as important to the Department of Energyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mission for bioenergy production. USPs within finished R. palustris genome sequences were retrieved from IMG system and analyzed to characterize the functional and biochemical roles of the USP domain. To infer commonalities and diversity existing amongst R. palustris genes encoding universal stress proteins, we determined the ligand-binding coordinates through use of visual analytics. The ligand-binding residues can provide functional insights into the most likely role of Usp-containing sequences. Acknowledgements: RCMI-Center for Environmental Health, Jackson State University; National Institutes of Health (NIH-NCRR G12RR13459; NIH-NIGMS T36GM095335; NIH-NIMHD 1P20MD002725-01; NIH-NCRR-P20RR016476; NIH-NCRR-P20RR016460); National Science Foundation (EPS-0903787; NSF-DBI-0958179; DBI-1062057); and US Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate (2007-ST-104-000007; 2009- ST-062-000014; 2011-ST062-000048). Disclaimer: The views and conclusions contained in this document are those of the authors and should not be interpreted as necessarily representing the official policies, either expressed or implied, of the funding agencies.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION B [FACULTY/SCIENTISTS]

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IRON TRANSPORT GENE NEIGHBORS OF STRESS-RESPONSIVE MAJOR FACILITATOR IN THE GENOME OF BIOENERGY RELEVANT RHODOPSEUDOMONAS PALUSTRIS Shaneka S. Simmons and Raphael D. Isokpehi Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson Mississippi 39217, USA Abstract: Gene clustering properties have been used to predict gene functions based on annotation of its gene neighborhoods, with the assumption that conserved gene sets are proximally arranged along the chromosome, are dependent on each other, and that conserved neighbors with similar functions are preserved between several genomes. In bacterial species occupying highly complex and unstable environments, gene order conservation is shaped by the relative importance of genes for cell survival and by interference from various selective pressures imposed upon genome stability, affecting different genes and operons or putative operons. Furthermore, remnants of gene order conservation can be found as highly conserved clusters across very distantly related taxonomic lineages, suggesting that selective processes maintain gene organization in various genomic regions. Through the use of bioinformatics tools available in the Integrated Microbial Genome (IMG) systems, we identified the gene specific chromosomal cassette for R. palustris major facilitator fused Universal Stress Protein domain based on the presence/absence of genes within the neighbor of organisms containing a similar chromosomal cluster. The UspA domain (Pfam accession number PF00582) has been shown to respond to a variety of stressors including those causing oxidative stress. One Usp gene (RPC_3634 or UniProt Q210L7) encodes a 565 aa protein that in addition to the USP domain contains a carbohydrate transport Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS_1) domain. The fused gene is present only in the genome of strain BisB18. The Pfam functional annotation of the upstream gene cluster of RPC_3634 also revealed genes encoding transporters of iron. Genes (RPC_3632, RPC_3631, and RPC_3630) were predicted to be in a transcription unit in the BioCyc database. Chromosomal cassette alignment using RPC_3631 as gene of focus was performed to determine other prokaryotes with the iron transport cluster. The Usp domain may mediate co-regulation and co-functionality of neighboring genes that are involved in various biochemical pathways in an effort to combat environmental stress. Acknowledgements: RCMI-Center for Environmental Health, Jackson State University; National Institutes of Health (NIH-NCRR G12RR13459; NIH-NIGMS T36GM095335; NIH-NIMHD 1P20MD002725-01; NIH-NCRR-P20RR016476; NIH-NCRR-P20RR016460); National Science Foundation (EPS-0903787; NSF-DBI-0958179; DBI-1062057); and US Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate (2011-ST-062-000048; 2007-ST-104-000007; 2009- ST062-000014). Disclaimer: The views and conclusions contained in this document are those of the authors and should not be interpreted as necessarily representing the official policies, either expressed or implied, of the funding agencies.


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ASSESSMENT OF EFFICACY AND SAFETY OF GARLIC-BASED MODERN TRADITIONAL MEDICINE ON CUTANEOUS ULCER E. Sekela Kabamba, J. Ndelo-di-Phanzu and H. Egboki Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo Abstract: In DRC, many patients suffer from cutaneous ulcers which are wounds taking too much time to heal up or don’t heal up at all. Never mind their origin, cutaneous ulcer lead to impaired mobility and bring significant economic and social cost. Congolese Traditional Medicine comprises many plants used against wounds. Among those plants, is the garlic, well known all over the world and used against numerous other diseases? This paper concerns a trial conducted in Kinshasa, on 30 patients suffering from cutaneous ulcers, assessing the efficacy and the safety of a garlic-based modern traditional medicine, called VeromiplaieR. The protocol of the study has been beforehand submitted to the Ethics Committee of the School of Public Health of the University of Kinshasa and every patient enrolled in the study had prior to sign the informed consent. The trial was conducted in two hospitals: “Centre de Santé Mixte et d’Anémie SS” in the Township Kalamu and “Centre de Santé des Soeurs de Charité de Calcutta” in the Township Matete in Kinshasa from February 2011 to May 2012. The objectives of the study were: To treat the ulcers with “Veromiplaie”, to fix the conditions of use, to establish the rate of success, to list the rate of therapeutic failure, and to assess the safety of the treatment. The trial included a survey to collecting information about: age and gender of patient, overall condition of the patient, type origin and duration of the ulcer. In addition, swabs have been taken for the identification of bacteria and the assessment of their sensibility to antibiotics. In each hospital, the treatment was supervised by a doctor and conducted by experienced nurses. The evolution was evaluated every ten days. Every time, following details have been collected: condition of the wound: area, depth, presence of pus, color, pain and overall condition of the patient. The results show that all the 30 wounds have been healed up in less than 180 days although some of them had more than 7 years of duration. The best conditions of use have been fixed and the safety assured. Key words: Garlic, Allium sativum, wound, Cutaneous ulcer, Clinical trial, Kinshasa, DR Congo, Africa.


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HELICOBACTER PYLORI RESPONSIBLE OF POISONING SUSPICION IN THE DEMOCRATI REPUBLIC OF CONGO: ABOUT 56 CASES J. Ndelo-di-Phanzu, Mputu Malolo, P. Ndelo Matondo and Y. Nuapia Laboratory of Toxicology, University of Kinshasa, DR Congo Abstract: As many sub-Saharan countries, the Democratic Republic of Congo experiences actually a Middle Ages Europe toxicological pattern, with: Crazy rumors about poisons and their use, Real concern among the population: from the bottom to the top of the society , Capitalization of the situation by different sorts of charlatans, Recourse to crazy or ridiculous measures and remedies against poisons, No or insignificant modern means against poisons. In that big country, there is only one laboratory of toxicology, which, ill-equipped, works just as teaching aids for the students of the faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences of the University of Kinshasa since its setting up in 1974. However, taking in count the increasing and insistent atmosphere of poisoning suspicion, it has been decided to open the laboratory to the public, since 2010. The present paper exposes an unexpected observation made from the results of the toxicological analysis of biological specimens received in the frame work of poisoning suspicion, from September 2010 to May 2012. A retrospective survey has been conducted on laboratory records concerning toxicological analysis of biological specimens performed by the laboratory from September 2010 to May 2012. The survey methodological procedure can be summarized as followed: Selection of laboratory records, Data collection, Interpretation of results. Data collection has principally concerned following parameters: Date of receipt of the biological specimens, Date of analysis, Reason of the analysis request, Symptoms felt by the patient, Toxicological tests conducted, Biological tests, As principal result, from September 2010 to May 2012, 65 specimens have been received for toxicological analysis and 56 of them (86%), were surprisingly contaminated by Helicobacter pylori! Symptoms felt by the different patients were very varied and their scope seemed to be beyond of which described in the literature. The classic treatment of H. pylori cleared those symptoms. Those results raise many issues which deserve to be examined. Key words: Poisoning, H. pylori, Sub-Saharan country, toxicology, rumors, poisons, DRC, Kinshasa


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION B [FACULTY/SCIENTISTS]

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ASSESSMENT OF BACTERIOLOGICAL AND FUNGAL QUALITY OF A TRADITIONAL MEDICINE DAILY CONSUMED IN KINSHASA J. Luboma Mayinda, C. Mputu Malolo, P. Ndelo Matondo, Y. Nuapia and J. Ndelo-di-Phanzu Laboratory of Toxicology, University of Kinshasa, DR Congo Abstract: The efficacy of African medicinal plants against various diseases has already been well established. Unhappily, the traditional plants’ formula, are often done by non-expert people, kept and sold in non-hygienic conditions. They are then very often microbiologically contaminated and can be source of alimentary intoxication. The present modest work has been done to appreciate the validity of that affirmation and to overview the nature of possible germs involved in. It did concern 60 specimens of aqueous solution of ginger, a very popular medicinal plant, daily used in Kinshasa, to relieve hemorrhoid and fatigue. The work consisted in bacteriological and fungal analysis of the specimens, collected in three main markets of Kinshasa, Central market, Gambela market and Liberty market, at the rate of 20 specimens by site. After sampling in suitable conditions, the specimens have been submitted to bacteriological and fungal culture in various following growing media: Isolation and count media : Eosine-Methylene Blue, Mac Conkey, Bloed Gelose, Manitot Salt Agar, Slanetz’Gelose, Plat Court Agar, Sabouraud Nutrient media : Peptone Water, Selenite Bouillon, Lactose Bouillon Identification media: Hajna-Kliger, Simmons’citrate, Manitol-mobility, Indol-Urease-Mobility. The results were very worrying and even tragic. Indeed, all the specimens submitted to the study were bacteriological contaminated by at least two germs, in great number varying from 2.105 to 107. The bacteria involved in are: Citrobacter, Enterobacter, E. coli, Staphylococcus, Salmonella, Seratia, Pseudomonas, Klebsiella. In fungal terms, the contamination is far less, of order of 10%. Those contaminations reduce notably the efficacy of the medicinal plant in concern and lead to microbiological diseases and alimentary intoxication. The results suggest to extending the study to other medicinal plants. Key words: Medicinal plant, Microbiological contamination, Kinshasa, DRC, Africa.


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PHENOL PHOTOOXIDATION IN THE PRESENCE OF HYDROGEN PEROXIDE AND SWCNTs Danuta Leszczynska1, Corneliu Bogatu1, Anna Rabajczyk2, Dina Yegorova3 and A. B. M. Zakaria1 1

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Interdisciplinary Center of Nanotoxicity, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA 2 Independent Department of Environment Protection and Modelling, UJK Kielce, Poland 3 Ukrainian State Chemical-Technological University 49005, Dnepropetrovsk Ukraine Abstract: Phenolic compounds are refractory and toxic and may be found in industrial and municipal waste waters. The presence of their derivatives like alkyl phenols and bisphenol A in waste waters is a matter of concern because of potential endocrine disrupting effects. Biological, physico-chemical and photochemical methods are applied for the oxidation of organic compounds from waste waters. During hydrogen peroxide photolysis the formation of hydroxyl radical takes place. There are a few ways for this radical to attack organic molecules: by radical addition to organic compound, by hydrogen abstraction, electron transfer and radical combination. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of single walled carbon nanotubes in the process of phenol photooxidation in water samples. Samples containing phenol were prepared in distilled water at pH=7.05 using buffer and at pH = 2.953.2 with sulfuric acid. Experiments were realized using a low pressure mercury lamp (254 nm). Photooxidation process was monitored by recording of UV spectra of samples against reaction time, using Cary UV-VIS instrument. The progresses of phenol and reaction by-products were determined using analysis of UV spectra with Unscrambler 10.1 software. During phenol oxidation with hydrogen peroxide and UV light (254 nm), catechol, hydroquinone and benzoquinone were identified as reaction by-products, both in neutral and acidic medium. There was an increasing of UV absorptions between 190-240 nm during 90 minutes after reagents mixing, due to the formation of hydroquinone, benzoquinone and aliphatic acids. Then, their intensity decreased due to oxidation both of phenol and of by-products. The analysis of FT-IR spectra for single walled carbon nanotubes showed the formation of surface bound groups like C-O, C-OH and C=O, simultaneously with photooxidation of phenol. To determine the influence of these groups during phenol photooxidation there are necessary further studies. At neutral pH there was not an important difference between yields of phenol oxidation in the absence and presence of SWCNTs. But, at pH = 2.95-3.2 the oxidation yield in the absence of nanocarbon was 18.95% and in its presence 52.15%, 15 minutes after reagents mixing. Also, the formation of catechol in higher concentrations in the beginning of the process was determined. Key words: Phenol, photooxidation, single-walled carbon nanotubes, by-products


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PREDICTING TOXICITY OF NANOPARTICLES: DISCUSSION OF NOVEL COMPUTATIONAL NANOTOXICOLOGY APPROACHES AND RECENT RESULTS Bakhtiyor Rasulev1, Danuta Leszczynska2 and Jerzy Leszczynski1 1

Interdisciplinary Nanotoxicity Center, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA 2 Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA Abstract: Recent advances and progress in nanotechnology have resulted in extensive applications of nanomaterials in industry and in human-related products. Because of their intrinsic properties, nanoparticles are commonly employed in electronics, photovoltaic, catalysis, environmental and space engineering, cosmetic industry and â&#x20AC;&#x201C; finally â&#x20AC;&#x201C; in medicine and pharmacy. However, the same properties that make these materials interesting to nanotechnology may also influence their biological reactivity and hence their toxicity. Biological effects of nanomaterials, with a focus on toxicity should receive great attention since commercial products increasingly utilize them. Recent studies have shown evident toxicity of some nanoparticles to living organisms (toxicity), and their potentially negative impact on environmental ecosystems (ecotoxicity). Lack of available data and low adequacy of experimental protocols prevent comprehensive toxicity assessment. Certainly, there is a need for new methods to quickly test the toxicity of these materials. Because experimental evaluation of the safety of chemicals is expensive and time-consuming, computational methods have been found to be efficient alternatives for predicting the potential toxicity and environmental impact of new nanomaterials before mass production. Here we present the current state of the art advances of available computational approaches to assess the toxicity of nanomaterials and recently results. We show that computational methods, such as quantum-mechanical and quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) methods commonly used to predict the physicochemical properties of chemical compounds can be applied to predict the toxicity of various nanomaterials, particularly, metal oxide nanoparticles.


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CYTOTOXICITY OF CARBON NANOPARTICLES TOWARDS CELLS IMMUNITY SYSTEM M. Turabekova1,2, B. Rasulev1, M. Theodor3, J. Jackman3, D. Leszczynska2 and J. Leszczynski1 1

Interdisciplinary Center for Nanotoxicity, Department of Chemistry, Jackson State University, 1400 J. R. Lynch Street, P. O. Box 17910, Jackson, MS 39217, USA 2 Interdisciplinary Nanotoxicity Center, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Jackson State University, Jackson MS, USA 3 Applied Physics Laboratory, The Johns Hopkins University, Laurel, Maryland, MD, USA Abstract: Toxicological risk assessment of occupational exposures to manufactured carbon nanoparticles is very complex and requires contributions from researchers representing many disciplines. Recent studies showed carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and fullerenes showed a certain level of toxicity in mammals, and particularly in humans. Some studies indicate that carbon nanostructures effect on immunity system and induce pro-inflammatory activity. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) belong to macrophages pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) and play crucial role in triggering innate immune responses as they recognize pathogen-derived molecules. Up to date, the extracellular domain (ECD) crystal structures of several vertebrate TLRs have been reported. The TLR ECDs are leucine-rich repeat (LRR) protein family and are known to be involved in diverse physiological functions via proteinprotein, as well as protein-ligand interactions. Although, each TLR is characterized by distinct ligandbinding area, they all form “m”-shaped homo- or heterodimers, thereby supporting hypothesis of such dimerization invoking subsequent activation of intracellular TIR domains. While few crystallographic structures of TLR ECDs with bound antagonist/agonist molecules have been reported, no further information on target interaction sites is available for the remaining large group of compounds, including carbon nanostructures. For the last decade, a big deal of attention is being devoted to study inflammatory response upon exposure to multi/single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and different fullerene derivatives. In particularly, the exposure of these carbon nanoparticles in alveolar and bronchial epithelial cells, epidermal keratinocytes, cultured monocyte-macrophage cells etc. inevitably provokes substantial inflammation. In this study we performed an experimental investigation of SWCNTs and C60 effects on cytokine assays. In parallel, theoretical studies on 5,5 armchair SWCNT of 11-carbon atom layers and C60 fullerene interactions with the species representing available x-ray structures of TLR homo- and heterodimer extracellular domains were carried out. The assumption was based on the fact, that similarly to the known TLR ligands CNT and fullerene induce in cells secretion of certain inflammatory protein mediators, such as interleukins and chemokines. These proteins are observed within inflammation downstream processes resulted from ligand molecule dependent inhibition or activation of TLRs –induced signal transduction. Acknowledgements: The authors would like to thank for support from the Johns-Hopkins University (Laurel, Maryland) for the funding grant No. 956126 “Theoretical Modeling of Nanotoxicity”, National Science Foundation for the RISE grant "JSU-RISE: Research Infrastructure and Student Development through the Chemical Design of Multifunctional Carbon Nanotubes" HRD-1137763. This research was also supported in part by the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE) by National Science Foundation grant number OCI-1053575 and XSEDE award allocation number DMR110088.


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SYNTHETIC STUDIES TOWARD THE 11-DEOXYFISTULARIN-3 NATURAL PRODUCT Ashton T. Hamme II1, Prasanta Das1, Erick D. Ellis1 and Edward J. Valente2 1 2

Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, Mississippi, USA Department of Chemistry, University of Portland, Portland, Oregon, USA

Abstract: A series of natural products isolated from the sponge of Verongida have been intensively studied due to the presence of alkaloids with one, or more bromotyrosine residues. Many of these alkaloid metabolites show interesting bioactivity and cytotoxic properties in tumor cell lines. 11deoxyfistularin-3 is cytotoxic against human breast carcinoma cell line MCF-7. The purpose of this project was to find a synthetic methodology that will be applied towards the total synthesis of the 11deoxyfistularin-3 and other spirocyclic isoxazolines. Aromatic ring and ester containing nitrile oxides reacted with disubstituted geminal alkenes in a 1,3-dipolar fashion to afford the analogous 5,5isoxazolines which were then used to construct the corresponding spiroisoxazolines through an intramolecular cyclization/methylation reaction in one reaction vessel. Due to the fact that the methylation process yields two regioisomeric spiroisoxazolines, other methods were investigated to selectively methylate one enolate oxygen over the other. Subsequent bromination of the spiroisoxazoline affords a product that is a few steps away from the natural product core. The synthesis, mechanistic details, and isolated yields for the reported spirocyclic isoxazoline compounds will be discussed. Keywords: Natural Products, Heterocycles, Cycloaddition Acknowledgments: The project described was supported by Award Numbers SC3GM094081 and G12RR13459 (NMR and Analytical CORE facilities) from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION B [FACULTY/SCIENTISTS]

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SYNTHESIS OF SPIRO-ISOXAZOLINES VIA INTRAMOLECULAR CYCLIZATION Prasanta Das1, Ann O. Omollo1, Eric McClendon1, Lungile Sitole1, Edward J. Valente2 and Ashton T. Hamme II1 1 2

Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, Mississippi, USA Department of Chemistry, University of Portland, Portland, Oregon, USA

Abstract: Psammaplysins A-E are a family of natural products that were isolated from marine sponges of the order Verongida. Many of these natural products display antiviral and antineoplastic activities. The most interesting structural motifs of the psammaplysins are the oxepin and isoxazoline moieties which are connected in a spirocyclic array. The synthesis of this type of ring system was accomplished in two steps. These synthetic processes involve a 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition and an intramolecular ring closure of a pendant alcohol or carboxylic acid onto an activated isoxazole. The 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of an alkyne with an Îą-chlorobenzaldoxime derivative afforded the desired isoxazole. Intramolecular cyclization was achieved through the reaction of the isoxazole ring with a pyridinium tribromide (PTB) and potassium carbonate in dichloromethane. The proposed mechanism of intramolecular cyclization involves the activation of the isoxazoline ring with PTB to form a bromonium ion. Neighboring group participation of the oxygen can cause an opening of the bromonium ion intermediate and thereby give rise to an oxonium ion. Intramolecular attack of the alkoxide or carboxylate oxygen onto the oxonium ring system and loss of a proton can then afford the spiroisoxazoline. The synthesis, mechanistic details, and isolated yields for the reported spiro-isoxazoline compounds will be discussed. Key words: Spiro-isoxazolines, Cycloaddition, Regioselectivity, and Heterocycles Acknowledgments: We thank the National Institutes of Health RCMI program (G12RR13459 (NMR and Analytical CORE facilities)).


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION B [FACULTY/SCIENTISTS]

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DETERMINATION OF PARTITION COEFFICIENTS OF VARIOUS SILVER NANOPARTICLES IN OCTANOL/WATER SYSTEM Husniye Imamoglu1, Zikri Arslan1, Oliva M. Premira-Pedrozo2 and Mehmet Ates1 1 2

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, Mississippi 39217 USA School of Science and Technology, Universidad Metropolitana (UMET), San Juan, PR 00926 USA

Abstract: Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) exhibit attractive properties for health-care products, disinfectants, therapeutics, and biosensors. The release of toxic Ag ions from Ag NPs, however, raises concerns for human health. The aim of this study was to investigate the solubility and stability of various Ag NPs in neutral, acidic and alkaline media. Octanol/water system was used as a model to elucidate distribution of Ag NPs between organic and aqueous media. Effects of pH and coating were examined with uncoated (20-30 nm), PVP-coated (20-30 nm) and oleic acid-coated (30-50 nm) Ag NPs. Stock NPs were suspended in pure octanol. Treatments were prepared by taking small samples of the stock NP and re-suspending in equal volume of water/octanol mixture (total 5 mL). pH was varied from pH 2 to 10 with sodium carbonate buffer. Samples were gently shaken for 1, 6, 12, 24 48 h and portions from water and octanol were analyzed for Ag concentration. Additional samples from water phase filtered to determine Ag ion content. ICP-MS analysis showed that Ag NPs were primarily in octanol and did not extract into water significantly. NPs were stable in octanol, but did aggregate in water substantially. At low pHs, Ag ions were released to some extent, but not in neutral and alkaline pHs. The results indicated that Ag NPs were unstable in water. Nonetheless, ions were released that was mediated mainly by the pH of medium. Keywords: Silver nanoparticles, Solubility, Partition Coefficient, Octanol/Water System Acknowledgements: This project is supported by the U.S. Department of Defense through the Engineer, Research and Development Center (Vicksburg, MS); Contract #W912HZ-10-2-0045 and by grants from the National Center for Research Resources (5 G12 RR013459-15) and the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (8 G12 MD007581-15) from the National Institutes of Health.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION B [FACULTY/SCIENTISTS]

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DETERMINATION OF LEAD BY HYDRIDE GENERATION ICP-MS: AFFECTING PLUMBANE (PbH4) FORMATION BY POTASSIUM HEXACYANO MANGANATE (III) Vedat Yilmaz, Zikri Arslan, LaKeysha Rose and Maria Little Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, College of Science and Technology, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA Abstract: Heavy metals, such as cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) are toxic to biological systems even at trace levels. Accurate determination necessitates the use of highly sensitive instrumentation and analytical chemistry methodologies. Hydride generation (HG) is a very sensitive technique for determination of lead (Pb) by atomic spectrometry. When coupled to ICP-MS, HG generation affords detection of Pb at parts per trillion levels (ppt) levels in complex biological samples. Generation of plumbane (PbH4) is difficult affected from numerous factors. To date, the most effective regent is potassium hexacyanoferrate(III), K3Fe(CN)6. Alternative methods have been sought but they have not been comparable to potassium hexacyanoferrate(III). In this study, we investigated the performance characteristics of potassium hexacyanomaganate(III) (K3Mn(CN)6), for generation of PbH4 and determination by ICP-MS. The conditions were optimized with hydrochloric acid (HCl), potassium hexacyanomaganate(III) and sodium borohydride. To affect the hydride generation, acid concentration of the sample solutions were varied from 0 to 10% v/v HCl. Solution were on-line reacted with 0.5% m/v K3Mn(CN)6 followed by reaction with 2% m/v NaBH4 solution. Optimum sample acidity was between 1 and 3% v/v HCl. The detection limits were about 2-3 ng/L (ppt). The effects of various transition metals and hydride forming elements were investigated. Copper interfered strongly and suppressed generation of PbH4. Effects of nickel was marginal. No interferences were observed from other metals and hydride forming elements. The method was successfully applied to determination of Pb in various certified reference samples. Key words: Lead, hydride generation, potassium hexacyanomanganate(III), ICP-MS Acknowledgements: This research is supported by grants from NIH-RCMI Program (Grant No G12RR013459) and NIH-RISE Program (2R25GM067122) to Jackson State University.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION B [FACULTY/SCIENTISTS]

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A NOVEL DIQUINOLINE UREA RECEPTOR: ANION COMPLEXATION STUDIES IN SOLUTION AND SOLID STATES Joyce Williams1, Avijit Pramanik1, Douglas R. Powell2 and Md. Alamgir Hossain1 1 2

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019, USA

Abstract: Anion coordination chemistry has become one of the most demanding areas in the field of chemistry and biology. However, this area is still at its early stage. Among the various synthetic receptors, receptors with urea groups are known to effectively bind anions in under neutral conditions. In the present study, we have synthesized a new diquinoline urea receptor from the reaction of 8 amino qulinoline and triphosgene in CH2Cl2 solvent. The host has been complexed with several anions in solid state, and their structures have been determined by X-ray crystallography. Furthermore, the binding studies were evaluated for all anions through 1H NMR, UV-Vis, Fluorescence spectroscopies. In this poster, we will present detailed solid and solution state binding studies of the newly synthesized receptors for halides and oxoanions. Acknowledgement: The National Science Foundation is acknowledged for a CAREER award (CHE1056927) to MAH. This work was supported by the National Institutes of Health (G12RR013459).


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION B [FACULTY/SCIENTISTS]

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COMPARATIVE BINDING AND RECOGNITION STUDIES OF SULFATE ION WITH P-CYANO FUNCTIONALIZED DIPODAL AND TRIPODAL UREA RECEPTORS Avijit Pramanik1, Douglas R. Powell2 and Md. Alamgir Hossain1 1 2

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019, USA

Abstract: In nature, phosphate and sulfate (tetrahedral oxo-anion) binding proteins recognize the anions through multiple hydrogen bonds. Artificial receptors utilize hydrogen bonding as the main binding force for the recognition of these oxoanions, was observed in nature,. In particular, sulfate is a wellknown for permanent hardness of water and trouble species in the nuclear waste hampering the treatment processes. In nature, sulfate binding protein (SBP) is present in a family of gram-negative bacterium salmonella typhimurium and was structurally characterized in 1985 by Pflugrath and Quiocho, in which amino acid residues are involved in H-bonding interaction to form seven coordinated anion complex. Depends the pH of the medium, sulfate can exist two different species (HSO4- and SO42) . In the present study, we have investigated the comparative sulfate and bisulfate binding with two novel p-cyano functionalized dipodal bis-urea and tripodal tris-urea receptors. In solid state, both the receptors formed sulfate complex 1:3 (L:A) ratio whereas, in solution phase receptors shows 1:1 (L:A) binding. The dipodal bis-urea sulfate complex shows eleven coordination through seven N-H····N, three CH····O and one N-H····O interactions whereas tripodal tris-urea sulfate complex shows thirteen coordination contain ten N-H····N, one C-H····O and one N-H····O interactions. From the NMR spectra, we observed tripodal receptor shows high binding affinity than bipodal analogue due to more NH urea moieties in tripodal system. Furthermore, FT- IR, 2D NMR spectra and job plot also support the comparative sulfate binding in solution phase. In this poster, we will explore details of comparative sulfate binding and recognition in solid and solution state. Acknowledgement: The National Science Foundation is acknowledged for a CAREER award (CHE1056927) to MAH. This work was supported by the National Institutes of Health (G12RR013459).


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION B [FACULTY/SCIENTISTS]

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WELLS OF THE MEOQUI-DELICIAS AQUIFER IN CHIHUAHUA, MEXICO Maria S. Espino1, Yaravi Barrera1, Blanca Rascón1, Ayde Dominguez1, Hector O. Rubio2 and Miguel Royo1 1

College of Engineering, Autonomous University of Chihuahua. Circuito No. 1, Campus Universitario 2. C.P. 31125. Chihuahua, Chihuahua, México 2 College of Zootechnology and Ecology, Autonomous University of Chihuahua, Mexico Abstract: Consumption of water with high level of arsenic (As) is related to cardiovascular problems, cancer, stroke, chronic lower respiratory diseases and diabetes. It is recognized that there exist mineral deposits in the arid regions of Mexico with high levels of As. This metalloid is dissolved by groundwater flowing through them. Recent research has revealed the presence of high amounts of this metalloid in the Meoqui-Delicias aquifer, in the State of Chihuahua, Mexico. In this area, groundwater is used for the supply of drinking water to the municipalities of Julimes, Meoqui, Rosales, Delicias, Saucillo, La Cruz y San Francisco de Conchos and largely for agriculture and livestock production. Samples of 96 wells were collected from localities of these municipalities to measure As concentration by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Levels detected ranged between 14 g L-1 and 277 g L-1, being 25 g L-1 the permissible maximum limit laid down in the official Mexican standard for drinking water. The As limit was exceeded in 72% of water samples, which most of them correspond to the Julimes, Meoqui, Saucillo and La Cruz municipalities. The possible source of As in water was established as related to the most relevant hydrogeological aspects in the area. That information showed a natural geogenic source of As, related to the recharge flow coming from arsenopyrite mineral deposits of surrounding mountains and the contact with sediments accumulated in the water table through time. Presently, reverse osmosis process is applied for demineralization of drinking water in the communities affected by As and other undesirable elements. Keywords: Arsenic, drinking water, Meoqui-Delicias aquifer, demineralization


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION B [FACULTY/SCIENTISTS]

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FLUORIDE IN THE GROUNDWATER OF THE MUNICIPALITY OF ROSALES, CHIHUAHUA, MEXICO WHICH IS UTILIZED AS POTABLE WATER AND ITS POTENTIAL HEALTH HAZARDS. Lourdes Villalba1, Luis Colmenero2, Adan Pinales1, Guadalupe Estrada1 and Héctor Rubio3 1

Engineering College of the Autonomous University of Chihuahua, Circuito No. 1, Campus Universitario 2. C.P. 31125, Chihuahua, Chihuahua, México 2 Basic Sciences Department, Technology Institute of Chihuahua II, 11101 Industrias Ave. P.O. Box 31310, Chihuahua, Chihuahua, Mexico 3 College of Zootechnology and Ecology, Autonomous University of Chihuahua, Chihuahua, Mexico Abstract: Mexico is home to 650 aquifers located in the states of Aguascalientes, Coahuila, Chihuahua, Durango, Guanajuato, Hidalgo, San Luis Potosí, Sonora and Zacatecas. These states have similar geographic regions and higher levels of heavy metals. Fluoride and other elements are higher in the groundwater in these states than the levels specified in the Mexican norm. Consequently, serious potential health issues may arise such as thyroid disorders and skeletal or dental fluorosis. The objective of this study was to assess the concentration of fluoride in the drinking water of the Rosales community, to calculate the exposition doses and to compare these results with the Mexican norm recommendations. Duplicated water samples of 16 wells were obtained and the fluoride content was determined using an atomic absorption spectrometry Perking Elmer 3100 with hydrouros generator. The fluoride concentration was in a range of 0.638 to 4.09 mg L-1. In 10 out of 16 wells (62%) the fluoride level was higher than the maximum level (1.5 mg L-1) specified in the Official Mexican Norm. The exposition doses were calculated in a range of 0.049 to 0.116 mg kg-1 d-1 for adults and 0.085 to 0.204 mg kg-1 d-1 for children. All calculated exposition doses were higher than those recommended by the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) of 0.06 mg kg-1d-1 for children. According to these results, young children and teenagers are potentially at risk for developing serious health issues. Key words: Fluoride, water contamination, groundwater, Chihuahua, Mexico Acknowledgements: We are deeply grateful with the Autonomous University of Chihuahua which provided financial support for the research reported here.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION B [FACULTY/SCIENTISTS]

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RADIATION LEVELS IN NATURAL SOILS NEAR THE MAIN CITIES OF CHIHUAHUA, MÉXICO Luis Colmenero-Sujo1, Lourdes Villalba2 and María Elena Montero3 1

Basic Sciences Department, Technology Institute of Chihuahua II, 11101 Industrias Ave. P.O. Box 31310, Chihuahua, Chihuahua, Mexico. 2 Engineery College, Autonomous University of Chihuahua, University Circuit, Chihuahua, Chihuahua, Mexico 3 Advance Materials Research Center, Miguel de Cervantes Blvd, Chihuahua, Chihuahua, Mexico Abstract: Natural radioactive elements such as uranium (238U), thorium (232Th) and potasium-40 (40K) are found in a number of soils. These elements emit radiation that may potentially affect the humans. Cosmic rays, inner radiation, food intake with isotopes radioactivity, radon and others are natural radioactivity sources. Radiation by anthropologic causes such as medical equipment or diagnostic uses adds to the dose total. The lymphatic and blood systems are the most radiosensitive parts of the human body. The state of Chihuahua in northern Mexico borders the states of Texas and New Mexico in the United States. There are approximately 50 uranium deposits in Chihuahua and many are near metropolitan areas such as Chihuahua (city), Nuevo, Casas Grandes, Jimenez and Aldama. The inhabitants of these areas total in the millions. The Peña Blanca Mountain, located 40 km northeast in Chihuahua City, is considered the most valuable uranium deposit in Mexico estimating 60% of Mexican uranium. Therefore, it is crucial to evaluate the radiation level from natural soils (NORM) in order to have preferential levels. The world average for 238U is 35 Bq kg-1, for 232Th it is 35 Bq kg-1 and for 40K it is 370 Bq kg-1. High-resolution gamma spectrometry was utilized in determining the concentration of 238 U, 232Th series and 40K in soil samples obtained from surrounding areas of Chihuahua State. The results demonstrated that natural radioactivity exceeds the world level. The concentration levels were as follows: for Aldama 51.1 Bq kg-1 of 238U, 61.1 Bq kg-1 of 232Th and 1,014.5 Bq kg-1of 40K; for Bocoyna 41.6 Bq kg-1 of 238U, 48.1 of 232Th and 818.5 Bq kg-1of 40K; for Nuevo Casas Grandes 41.1 Bq kg-1 of 238 U, 55.9 of 232Th and 1,013.7 Bq kg-1of 40K; for Jimenez 40.4 Bq kg-1 of 238U, 42.3 Bq kg-1 of 232Th and 930.5 Bq kg-1of 40K; and for Chihuahua 39.8 Bq kg-1 of 238U, 55.2 Bq kg-1 of 232Th and 916.6 Bq kg-1of 40 K. The average for Chihuahua state was 36.8 Bq kg-1 of 238U, 41.4 Bq kg-1 of 232Th and 805.7 Bq kg1 of 40K. These values should be considered as preferential levels in Chihuahua State concerning both the Mexican government and the Mexican Nuclear Authorities. Care must be taken to prevent serious health issues to the area’s inhabitants. Key words: NORM, Soil, Radioactivity, Chihuahua, Mexico Acknowledgments: We express a profoundly gratitude to the Technology Institute of Chihuahua and to the Advanced Material Research Center for financial help to carry out this study.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION B [FACULTY/SCIENTISTS]

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ANALYSIS OF THE MILK PRODUCT SYSTEM USING A SUSTAINABLE MODEL IN NORTHERN MEXICO Roberto Espinoza, S. E. Lujan, G. H. Aranda, R. M. Quintana, N. Callejas and N. R. Becerra College of Zootechnology and Ecology, Autonomous University of Chihuahua. Periferico R. Almada, Km. 1, Colonia Zootecnia, Chihuahua, Chihuahua, Mexico. CP:31000 Abstract: The main objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of a milk product system using a model of sustainability. This system has been operating successfully in northern Mexico since 2008. The study was conducted in the city of Delicias, state of Chihuahua, Mexico on a dairy farm with 8,000 Holstein cows in production. A Bio digester was developed to generate methane gas in order to produce clean power energy. This energy could impact the milk industry when obtaining carbon credits and analyzing rational water management. It could also make an impact on the water footprint under a scheme of Bio solids and the reuse of treated water. Cleanup activities, agricultural irrigation, compost building and environmental conservation could be influenced, generating profits and jobs in their environment. To date, this milk enterprise is considered the best in Latin America and overseas. It has resulted in over 2.4 million m3 of methane gas to generate electricity with an average of 8.159 Holstein cows, producing 31,447 liters of milk. With methane gas of 183.72 M 3/ h and an average of 555.7 Kwas/h, the production was more than 15 thousand tons. The annual compost produced has reduced pollution from chemical fertilizers applied in the agricultural process of milk production. This business model is currently in the final stage of PNA 2011, the national award, as an example of an organization using both livestock guiding principles; strategic planning as social responsibility and sustainability. Key words: Milk production, Mexico, sustainable model, bio digester


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION B [FACULTY/SCIENTISTS]

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OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE PROFILE OF Pb, Mn AND Cd IN NONFERROUS BRAZILIAN SANITARY ALLOY FOUNDRIES Tiago S. Peixe1,2, Elizabeth de S. Nascimento2, Carlos S. Silva3 and Marco A. Bussacos4 1

Department of Pathology, Clinical and Toxicological Analysis, State University of Londrina, Paraná, Brazil 2 Graduate Program in Toxicology and Analytical Toxicology, Department of Clinical and Toxicological Analysis, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil 3 Hygiene Division, Ministry of Labor, Fundacentro, São Paulo, Brazil 4 Statistics Division, Ministry of Labor, Fundacentro, Brazil Abstract: Skimming, pouring, stirring, filling, and other operations associated with foundries may cause the release of large amounts of fumes in an occupational setting. Thus, they may be released into the environment where they are used as molten metals, metal dusts - which are small solid particles in the air - and smoke, solid even in small particles. Inhalation of metal fumes is more dangerous than that of metal dust because the lungs more easily absorb metal fumes. In addition to the primary components of alloys, approximately 5% of the formulation may contain other metals, including lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), arsenic (As), manganese (Mn), iron (Fe), phosphorus (P), and nickel (Ni). Workers in the foundries are exposed to several compounds; therefore, it is important to assess the levels of injury that may reflect an additive, synergistic, or antagonistic effect caused by these compounds. The analytical methods proposed proved to be sensitive, precise, and accurate for the analysis of elements in the air of the work environment, as well as exposure indicators. The means of the environmental evaluation of the facilities range from 16.65 to 40.31 µg m-3 for Pb, 0.99 to 1.73 µg m-3 for Cd, and 0.91 to 1.70 µg m-3 for Mn. The means of the metal concentrations for furnace, mold, melting, and automatic melting activities range from 15.37 to 19.26 µg m-3 for Pb, 7.07 to 9.14 µg m-3 for Cd, and 8.83 to 16.00 µg m-3 for Mn. Biological samples were divided into two groups: control (n = 38) and exposed (n = 45). The obtained data are Pb (3.41  3.40 and 14.89  7.82 µg/dL), Cd (0.90  0.80 and 1.91  1.90 µg/g creatinine), and Mn (0.51  0.40 and 3.17  1.93µg/g creatinine). Statistical analysis showed significant differences (p < 0.05). Positive linear correlations were established between metal concentrations in the air and the biological matrixes: Pb (r = 0.68; p < 0.001); Cd (r = 0.81; p = 0.17); and Mn (r = 0.12; p < 0.03). Regression analysis showed that professional activities can interfer with element exposure profiles in occupational settings. The analysis in the event of exposure to metals in these companies allowed investigating whether the simultaneous exposure leads to biological damage even if the levels of the compounds are within the exposure limits that are considered to be safe. Keywords: lead, manganese, cadmium, ICP-OES, GF-AAS, alloy foundry, sanitary metals, nonferrous. Acknowledgements: Authors are grateful to Brazilian agencies - CAPES by the fellowship, FAPESP by the financial support n. 06/59210-0 and FUNDACENTRO by the support for sampling, and assessing the foundries.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION B [FACULTY/SCIENTISTS]

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PROTECTIVE EFFECT OF SOCIAL SUPPORT ON REDUCING ACCULTURATIVE STRESS RELATED TO DISCRIMINATION AMONG LATINO AND ASIAN IMMIGRANTS: NATIONAL LATINO AND ASIAN AMERICAN STUDY Jae Eun Lee1, Jung Hye Sung2 and Ji Young Lee³ ¹RTRN DTCC, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39204, USA ²Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA ³Department of Psychology, University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, PA, USA Abstract: Despite some evidences of an association of discrimination with stress, limited attempt has been made to investigate the protective effect of social support on reducing stress associated with discrimination. Using data of 3,268 immigrants from the National Latino and Asian Study, this study aimed to determine both the association between perceived racial discrimination and acculturative stress, and the role of social support in the association of discrimination with acculturative stress. Perceived racial discrimination was measured by a “9-item day-to-day experiences” tool asking how often the respondent experienced discrimination in the last year. Family cohesion (FC) was measured by asking about the extent of agreement for each 15 statements describing emotional support, belongings, loyalty, respect etc. Acculturative Stress was defined by the sum of 9 items designed to measure the stress felt as a result of adapting one’s own culture with a host culture. Each item had responses such as yes (1) or no (0). Items were added and higher value represents higher acculturative stress. Social network was assessed by averaging across twelve items including social support and strain among family and friends (0 = none to 3 = a lot). Higher values indicate greater social network with family and friends. Protective role was determined by the statistical interaction between family cohesion and discrimination within the hierarchical regression model controlling for age, gender, educational level, and working status. While Latino immigrants were less likely to perceive discrimination than Asian immigrants (p<0.0001), they had higher acculturative stress (p=0.0328) and higher social network (p<0.0001). There was no difference in family cohesion (p=0.7968) between Latino and Asian immigrants. Higher discrimination (p<0.0001), less family cohesion (p=0.0135), and less social network (p=0.0006) were significantly tied with higher acculturative stress. The hierarchical regression analyses demonstrated that interaction of discrimination was significant with family cohesion (p=0.0132) and not significant with social network (p=0.2064). This pattern persisted only among Latino immigrants. The findings suggested that family cohesion was found to be a protective factor in reducing acculturative stress associated with discrimination among Latino immigrants. One implication of these findings is that social programs enhancing social support may reduce acculturative stress among Latino immigrants experiencing high discrimination. Key word: Acculturative stress, family cohesion, discrimination, social network, immigrants Acknowledgement: GRANT SUPPORT: grant number U54RR022762 from NIH


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ROLES OF DATA COORDINATING CENTER IN DATA-SHARING PRACTICE Jae Eun Lee1, James Perkins1, Daniel Sarpong1 and Jung Hye Sung2 1

RTRN-Data Technology Coordinating Center, College of Science, Engineering & Technology, JSU, Jackson, MS, USA ²Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 39217, USA Abstract: Although various attempts have been made for data-sharing, their effectiveness is still questionable. Jackson Heart Study (JHS) Vanguard Center (JHSVC) at RTRN Data and Technology Coordinating Center (DTCC) may be a new concept in that the data are being shared with a research network, a reservoir of scientists/researchers. This study describes the current practices to share the JHS data through the mechanism of JHSVC. The JHS is the largest single-site cohort study to prospectively investigate the determinants of CVD among African-Americans. It has adopted a formal screened access method through JHSVC mechanism, in which only qualified scientist(s) can access to the data. The role of the DTCC was to help RTRN researchers create scientific output through customized-services such as feasibility tests, data-mining, helping manuscript proposal, and data analyses for publication. DTCC has implemented the various programs to facilitate data utility. A total of 300 investigators attended workshops and/or received booklets. DTCC provided two online and five onsite workshops and developed/distributed more than 200 copies of the booklet to help potential data users understand structure of data and access to the data. Information on data use was also provided through Website. Four manuscript proposals, 2 presentations and 2 R01 grant proposals were supported. Our data suggested that DTCC-customized services enhanced accessibility of JHS data and its utility by RTRN researchers and helped achieve the principal goal of JHSVC of scientific productivity. However, lack of DTCC personnel and budget turned to be a barrier for the practice. Key word: data-sharing practice, research network, role of coordinating center Acknowledgement: GRANT SUPPORT: grant number U54RR022762 from NIH


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION B [FACULTY/SCIENTISTS]

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GEOSPATIAL ASSESSMENT OF AGRICULTURAL LANDSCAPE VARIATIONS IN THE NORTHERN MISSISSIPPI REGION Edmund C. Merem1, Yaw Twumasi2, Joan Wesley1, Marshand Cristler1, Chandra Richardson1, Jasmine Williams1 and Daphine Foster1 1

Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Jackson State University, 3825 Ridgewood Road, Box 23 Jackson, MS 39211, USA 2 Department of Agriculture, Alcorn State University, Lorman, MS 39096, USA Abstract: The Northern region of the state of Mississippi is a major source of agricultural products. In the last several years, agricultural activities continue to generate opportunities in the area. With this came a changing agricultural landscape, the growing use of agrochemicals and other farm nutrients known to accentuate environmental degradation. Variations in the farm landscape of the region involves changes in watershed quality, gains and losses in land devoted to farming and the problems posed to the surrounding ecology from the widespread use of agrochemicals and pesticides. These impacts have environmental health implications which must be analyzed. At the same time, there have been no efforts in the literature to document the measures adopted in the farm producing counties to contain the threats posed by human activities. Regional statistics show that changing agricultural landscape of the region does not operate in a vacuum. It is attributed to several socio-economic and environmental variables. Said that, the applications of Geographic Information Systems (GIS), in analyzing these problems spatially in Northern Mississippi remains quite minimal. This paper would fill that void by using GIS and descriptive statistics in analyzing the changing agricultural landscape of the Northern Mississippi region. The emphasis is on the issues, factors and the environmental analysis of the trends using GIS. Preliminary results point to growing changes in elements associated with the agricultural landscape of the region over the years and widespread diffusion of fertilizer use across space in the counties under analysis. Keywords: GIS, agricultural landscape, change, North Mississippi, region, pesticides


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION B [FACULTY/SCIENTISTS]

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USING WISER ON MAN-MADE AND NATURE DISASTERS Pao-Chiang Yuan Hazardous Material and Emergency Management Technology Program, Department of Technology, Jackson State University, P.O. Box 18480, Jackson, MS 39217, USA Abstract: In past decades, the world has suffered different disasters, either man-made or by natural causes. Certainly most people focus on the rescue of human life with the protection of our natural environment being secondary. Hazardous materials may be released to the environment, some of which we can identify and some we can’t. The hazardous materials release can be harmful to humans as well as the environment. Rescue workers or emergency responders need to know how to handle the materials the proper way; especially those we called WMD (Weapon for Mass Destruction) materials. Even the people like us want to know what kinds of chemicals we are dealing with. The WISER (Wireless Information System for Emergency Responder) program developed by National Library of Medicine (NLM) is a simple and fast way to identify the materials in case of emergencies. It can find chemicals according to their UN (United Nation) number from placards which are found on transportation containers, and/or the type of rail cars or road trailers used to transport the substances. For the unknown, identification can be made according to their properties, symptoms, categories and other search criteria. The program can identify 460 chemicals. Due to the terrorist attacks in recent years, the program has added 22 WMD materials include anthrax, plaque, explosive, ricin and mycotoxins. This important program is “free” to the public. WISER can be downloading as a standalone application on Microsoft Windows PCs, Apple iPhone, and iPod touch. It is also available to Android users. This program can link to other chemical emergency resources at NLM including TOXNET, TOXMAP, Radiation Emergency Medical Management (REMM), Chemical Hazards Emergency Medical Management (CHEMM), etc. This program is not only for the first-line responder, it can also be by academic students for basic research. The paper uses one WMD material and one unknown chemical to illustrate the WISER steps to assess the incident, plume move and evacuation distance by Microsoft map. Keywords: WISER, WMD, Disaster, Man-Made, NLM Acknowledgements: This presentation is supported by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security under award number: 2009-ST-062-000021 and 2011-ST-104-000039.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION B [FACULTY/SCIENTISTS]

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PAPER CURRENCY AS A FOMITE FOR BIOSURVEILLANCE OF PATHOGENS AND ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE PATTERNS IN A COMMUNITY Robert Wolff and Ann M. Stewart-Akers South University-Columbia, 9 Science Court, Columbia, S.C. 29203, USA Abstract: Our laboratory classes have sampled the bacteria from paper currency (dollar bills) for several years as a means to study an environmental fomite often considered a source of pathogens and disease. A literature search revealed very few papers on the microbial contamination of paper currency in the United States and a greater number from African countries. It is clear that potential pathogens occur on the currency and on every bill tested. We sampled the bacteria from the bills onto Nutrient Agar, MSA, EMB, and Blood Agar to identify common pathogenic bacteria. Staphylococcus aureus is almost universal on the bills, while enteric bacteria are more sporadic they are more common on bills collected on very warm days. Warm weather samples produced more bacteria in general, while cold weather days yielded low and mostly Staph colonies. We began comparing the antibiotic resistance patterns of Staphylococcus aureus bacteria from the paper currency with those from nasal samples of the students and found similarities. Various sampling times yielded from 34% to over 50% of the selected colonies showing multiply drug resistant organisms (MDROâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s). The sampling protocol and antibiotic resistance testing are both simple techniques and should be expanded into a network to watch for changes in the flora. We propose here that the method is useful as a Biosurveillance tool to discover changes in the presence of various pathogenic organisms within a community and further that the antibiotic resistance patterns of these organisms could provide an early warning system of possible epidemics and new MDRO infections. The information could guide antibiotic use by physicians if new patterns indicate changes in the community flora. The surveillance capabilities of this system could also be used to detect some types of Bioterrorism, especially that directed toward disrupting a local population or military unit with disease. Key words: Fomites, paper currency, antibiotic resistance, Biosurveillance, potential pathogens, MDRO, Staphylococcus aureus


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION B [FACULTY/SCIENTISTS]

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WINDBLOWN DUST ALGORITHM DEVELOPMENT AND NUMERICAL SIMULATION FOR A HISTORICAL CASE Duanjun Lu1, Rosa Fitzgerald2, William R Stockwell3, Remata S. Reddy1 and Loren White1 1

Department of Physics, Atmos. Sci. & Geoscience, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, Jackson, Mississippi, USA 2 Physics Department, University of Texas at El Paso, 500 W. University Avenue El Paso, Texas 79968, USA 3 Howard University Program of Atmospheric Sciences, Howard University, Washington DC 20059, USA Abstract: Soil-derived dust represents one of the major components of the natural atmospheric aerosols. Arid and semiarid areas with unpaved and unvegetated land cover are particularly vulnerable to windblown dust, which results in high particulate matter pollution. To understand, predict, and mitigate the impact of dust aerosol on air quality and climate, it is necessary to parameterize the emission rate of dust particles from the wind erosion processes accurately. However, windblown dust emission is still poorly represented in existing air quality models. In this paper, a windblown dust emission model has been built based on a parameterization of threshold wind friction velocity depending on the roughness of surface, vegetation type, soil type, soil moisture content and on the size distribution of aerosols. The proposed dust model incorporates into a region air quality modeling system to simulate a North American dust storm episode occurring near the border of southwestern United States (US) and northwestern region of Mexico on 23 February 2007. It is shown that the implementation of windblown dust model in air quality model can significantly improve model capability of capturing the dust episode. The simulation of the model is in good agreement of the evolution of dust distribution. The modeled dust spatial patterns matched with the dust cloud patterns appearing on satellite images. Implementation of windblown dust model successfully captured the time of peak particulate matter (PM) concentrations for both PM10 and PM2.5 as well as the peak value of PM2.5 concentration. The modeled results clearly demonstrate an improved ability to predict PM event by applying windblown dust emission scheme. Key Words: Windblown dust, air quality modeling, particulate matter Acknowledgements: This research was supported by the NOAA Educational Partnership Program with Minority Serving Institutions (EPP/MSI) under grant number of Grant NA17AE1623 through the NOAA Center for Atmospheric Sciences (NCAS).


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION B [FACULTY/SCIENTISTS]

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EFFECT OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANT HEXACHLOROBENZENE (HCB) ON THE NEURONAL DIFFERENTIATION OF MOUSE EMBRYONIC STEM CELLS Cynthia Addae1, Henrique Cheng2 and Eduardo Martinez-Ceballos1 1

Department of Biological Sciences and Environmental Toxicology Program, Southern University and A&M College, Baton Rouge, LA 70813, USA 2 Department of Comparative Biomedical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Abstract: It has been suggested that exposure to persistent environmental pollutants may constitute an important factor on the onset of a number of neurological disorders such as Autism, Parkinson’s Disease, and Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD). These disorders have been linked to reduced GABAergic neuronal function. GABAergic neurons produce gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), which is the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain. However, the lack of appropriate models has hindered the study of suspected environmental pollutants on GABAergic function. In this work, we have examined the effect of hexachlorobenzene (HCB), a persistent and bioaccumulative environmental pollutant, on the function and morphology of GABAergic neurons generated in vitro from mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. We observed that (1) low dose of HCB (0.5 nM) did not affect cell viability but affected GABAergic neuronal differentiation of ES cells, as shown by a decrease in β-Tubulin III expression after treatment, (2) HCB induced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and (3) HCB repressed neurite outgrowth in GABAergic neurons, but this effect was reversed by the ROS scavenger N-Acetyl-Cisteine (NAC). Our study also revealed that, although HCB interfered with neurite outgrowth, it did not significantly interfere with the function of K+ ion channels in the neuronal soma, which indicates that this pollutant does not affect the maturation of neuronal precursors but may interfere with neuronal communication. Our results suggest a mechanism by which environmental pollutant exposure may interfere with normal GABAergic neuronal function thus promoting the onset of a number of neurological disorders such as autism and ADD. Key words: Hexachlorobenzene; Encapsulation; Retinoid acid; GABAergic Acknowledgements: This project was supported by grants from the National Center for Research Resources (P20RR016456) and the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (P20GM103424) from the National Institutes of Health. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.”


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION B [FACULTY/SCIENTISTS]

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FEASIBILITY OF CITY-CLUSTER-ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT APPROACH FOR THE EASTERN PROVINCE OF SRI LANKA U. A. Chandrasena Department of Geography, University of Kelaniya, Sri Lanka, India Abstract: As one of the fast growing economies in South Asian region particularly, Sri Lanka has shown enormous potential for reaching to the middle income group of countries in future if it can compete in the international market and harness the advantages of localization and globalization effects at large. It is imperative to explore the possibilities of balanced regional development in the country through enhancing capacities and improving exiting potentials of different spatial administrative and political units of the country. The Eastern Province as one of the most retard backward and depressed economic region in the country due to thirty years or more period of conflict. After restoration of peace in the region since 2009, the major challenges of planners and policy makers for promoting sustainable livelihoods of the people have pave the way to integrate the region with national, regional and global economic trends and creating a competitive regional economy. The City Cluster Development (CCD) is an urban-led development approach that could enhance the ability of urban centers to promote economic growth creating competitiveness and create avenues for SMEs to capture opportunities in the global market. Michael Porter (2001) the proponent of “Diamond Model” of Cluster Economic Development Model argues that a firm’s productivity can be enhanced in the regional business environment characterized by a concentration of competing and cooperating firms, inputs supplying industries and Institutions etc. Present paper highlights the rationale and viability of cluster based development model in the Eastern Province and the need of spatial planning framework for promoting economic development in Eastern Province of Sri Lanka. The study is based on an analysis of available secondary and primary data to assess the key drivers of city development and competitiveness. Key words: Cluster Development, competitiveness, Diamond Model.


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION B [FACULTY/SCIENTISTS]

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PHTHALATE ESTERS IN SELECTED FOODS FROM COMMERCIAL STORES AROUND TSHWANE METROPOLIS, SOUTH AFRICA Omotayo R. Awofolu and Ntsako D. Baloyi Department of Environmental Science, College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, University of South Africa, P. Bag X 6, Florida 1710, UNISA, Roodepoort, Johannesburg, South Africa Abstract: Oral ingestion is one of the pathways by which xenobiotic toxic compounds enter human body. This can be facilitated through chemico-dynamics of the compounds from materials such as food wrappers e.g. plastics into human via food consumption. Phthalates, which are primarily used as plasticizers are not chemically bound in the plastics, hence have been found to migrate into foods with which they were wrapped. Some members of this compound have been classified as endocrine disruptors or hormonally-active agents (HAAs) because of their ability to interfere with the endocrine system in the body. Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), diisononyl phthalate (DINP), butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), di-n-butyl phthalate (DnBP), di-n-octyl phthalate (DnOP), dimethyl phthalate (DMP), and dimethyl-terephthalate (DMT) are mostly phthalate esters of concern. PEs have been reported to affect male reproductive tract development and specifically and decreased anogenital distance. Incidences of rhinitis or eczema have been traced to BBP. DEHP, DBP, DEP, DMP, and the MEHP, a metabolite of DEHP have also been reported to be responsible for premature thelarche (breast development) in young girls. Although, researches into incidences of these compounds have been carried out in developed countries, there is paucity of information in developing countries including South Africa. This article reports on incidences of Phthalate Esters (PEs) in selected foods from some commercial stores in Tshwane Metropolis, South Africa. Three food samples (Vienna, Polony and Cheese) were purchased from these stores and analysed for their Phthalate Esters content through soxhlet extraction. Clean-up of the extract was via column chromatography using Florisil adsorbent and quantification was by capillary Gas Chromatography equipped with Flame Ionization Detector (GC-FID). Good chromatographic separation of analysed compounds through instrumental optimization (0 – 10 minutes) was achieved. Detection limit of analysed PEs ranged from 0.001 – 0.005 mg/kg. Quality assurance protocol through standard addition procedure was carried out. Good and applicable recoveries were obtained. DMP recoveries were 75, 93 and 93 %; DBP: 88, 63 and 99%; DnBP: 88, 66 and 97%; BBP: 89, 94 and 99% and DEHA from 90, 95 and 69 % for Cheese, Polony and Vienna respectively. Level of phthalate esters DMP, DBP, DnBP, DEHA and BBP in Vienna samples across all sites ranged from trace – 0.816; trace – 0.133; trace – 0.120; trace and trace – 0.096 µg/kg respectively. Level of phthalate esters DMP, DBP, DnBP, DEHA and BBP in Polony samples across all sites ranged from trace – 0.241; trace – 0.314; trace – 0.057 and trace – 0.075 and trace – 0.344 µg/kg respectively. Level of phthalate esters DMP, DBP, DnBP, DEHA and BBP in Cheese samples across all sites ranged from trace – 0.215; trace – 0.209; trace – 0.047; trace and trace – 0.673 µg/kg respectively. Results showed differential pattern of incidences with about 40% detection in all analysed samples. Some detected levels could have serious toxicity and health implications with continual consumption. Keywords: Incidence, Phthalate Esters, Foods, Food wrappers, Tshwane, South Africa Acknowledgements: This research was supported by a grant (Reference No. FA2007050300023) from the National Research Foundation (NRF) of South Africa


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION B [FACULTY/SCIENTISTS]

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INCIDENCES OF ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING THE EFFECTS OF OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE TO SOME HEAVY METALS ON ORGAN FUNCTIONS, EXPRESSION OF CYTOKERATIN -19 FRAGMENTS (CYFRA211) AND RISK OF LUNG CANCER IN SOME WELDERS Bosun Banjoko1 and Olufunso Olorunsogo2 1 2

Dept of Chemical Pathology, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria Dept of Biochemistry, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria

Abstract: The welding process has been known to generate fumes which contain toxic metals; therefore in the absence of best practices, welders are at high risk of adverse health effect due to inhalation of these metals. Sixty welders (60) and fifty (50) healthy volunteers were recruited as controls after ethical approval. Interviewer styled questionnaire were administered to all participants for demographic and occupational features. 10mls of urine was obtained from all subjects for protein urinalysis and estimation of some heavy metals including iron, manganese, lead, chromium, zinc, nickel and cadmium using atomic absorption flame spectrophotometer (AAS). Blood obtained from venepuncture was used for plasma creatinine, ALT, AST, alkaline phosphatase, CK-MB, albumin, iron, transferrin, ferritin, IgG, IgM, IgA, C3 and cytokeratin -19 fragments. Results were input into the computer system and statistical analysis were carried out using statistical package for social sciences software, student T-test, MannWhitney U test for degree of significance and Pearson correlation for dose- effect relationships. The mean age of the welders and controls respectively were 42.97+ 8.75, 40.36+7.51 P = 0.100.There were statistically significant differences in the values of urinary iron, lead, zinc, nickel, manganese and chromium, p<0.05, but not in cadmium, P=0.04.There were also significant differences in plasma creatinine, unconjugated bilirubin, plasma iron, ferritin, transferrin, total iron binding capacity, transferring saturation, IgG, and C3, P<0.05. But not in ALT, AST, alkaline phosphatase, CK-MB, IgA, and total bilirubin. Furthermore iron concentrations were observed to be positively correlated with cytokeratin-19 fragments expression. Bad occupational practices in welders predispose them to exposure to higher levels of heavy metals which may lead to dysfunction of lungs, kidneys, the liver, immunity and risk of lung cancer which might be iron mediated. This underscores the necessity for health education, and periodic bio- monitoring for heavy metals exposure and effects in such welders. Key words: Heavy metals, toxicity, organ functions, risk, lung cancer, biomarkers


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research POSTER SESSION B [FACULTY/SCIENTISTS]

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HIGHER BLOOD LEAD LEVELS IN RURAL THAN URBAN PREGNANT WOMEN IN EASTERN NIGERIA Njoku Chinwendu1 and Orisakwe Orish Ebere2 1

Department of Medical Lab Science, Faculty of Science, Rivers State University of Science and Technology Port-Harcourt Rivers State Nigeria 2 Toxicology Unit, Faculty of Pharmacy University of Port-Harcourt Rivers State Nigeria, Abstract : Lead is an environmental toxin that is capable of causing numerous acute and chronic illnesses. Pregnant women with elevated blood lead levels transfer lead to the fetus since blood borne lead crosses the placenta. Through a consideration of the joint associations of maternal blood lead levels BLL, demographics, obstetrics variables and plasma enzymes levels, this study has attempted to provide data required for crafting effective public health information with respect to prenatal lead exposure in Eastern Nigeria. This work has examined the maternal blood lead level and evaluated the differences across socio-demographic subgroups/obstetrics variables and plasma enzymes levels. About 90 pregnant women attending Federal Medical Center (FMC), Owerri, Imo State, Nigeria participated in this study after informed consent. Blood lead levels of these metals were investigated using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer. Data was analysed using one-way ANOVA and Student’s t test using SPSS version 15. A two-sided p-value of less than 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. The mean BLL of subjects in rural and suburban settlements (13.5+ 1.6 and 12.8 + 1.35 µg/dl respectively) were higher than those in urban settlements (7.7 + 1.0 µg/dl). Lead was detected in 86.7% women in this study. The BLL ranged from 2 – 44.8 μg/dl and 78.9% had BLL greater than10 μg/dl. The mean BLL of the participants was 9+9μg/dl. We report here higher blood lead levels in rural than urban pregnant women in Eastern Nigeria. Given the high BLL of mothers in this study, pregnant women living in Niger Delta may be suffering from subclinical lead poisoning. This suggests that the Nigerian infants nursed by the mothers with high body burden of lead may be at risk of neurologic damage, impaired growth and development.


List of Participants & General Information


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research LIST OF PARTICIPANTS Mr. Vineet Aggarwal University of Mississippi Medical Center 107 Oakhurst Trail Ridgeland, MS 39157, USA aggarwalv@gosaints.org

Dr. Zikri Arslan Jackson State University Department of Chemistry JSU Box 17910, Jackson, MS 39217, USA zikri.arslan@jsums.edu

Mr. Chuks Agusiegbe Jackson State University Cellomics and Toxicogenomics Research Laboratory, JSU Box 18540 Jackson, MS 39217, USA constance.n.martin@jsums.edu

Dr. Mehmet Ates Jackson State University Department of Chemistry JSU Box 17910, Jackson, MS 39217, USA mehmet.ates@gmail.com

Dr. H. Anwar Ahmad Jackson State University Department of Biology JSU Box 18540, Jackson, MS 39217, USA hafiz.a.ahmad@jsums.edu

Dr. Omotayo Awofolu University of South Africa Department of Environmental Science Unisa P. Bag X6 Florida Johannesburg, Gauteng South Africa 27 awofoor@unisa.ac.za

Ms Lucky Ahmed Jackson State University Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry 1400 John R. Lynch Street Jackson, MS 39217, USA lucky.ahmed@icnanotox.org

Dr. Wellington Ayensu Jackson State University Department of Biology JSU Box 18540 Jackson, MS 39217, USA wellington.k.ayensu@jsums.edu

Mr. Winfred Aker Jackson State University Environmental Science Ph.D. Program 450 Sunnybrook Rd Ridgeland, MS 39157, USA w_aker@bellsouth.net

Dr. Mario Azevedo Jackson State University College of Public Service Jackson, MS 39217, USA mario.j.azevedo@jsums.edu Mrs. Lourdes Balderrama Autonomous University of Chihuahua Calle Mozart #3110 Chihuahua, CH 31203, Mexico lulana_12@hotmail.com

Ms. Luma Akil Biostatisticial Support Unit, NIH-Center for Environmental Health, JSU 1803 August Bend Madison, MS 39110, USA lumaakil@hotmail.com

Dr. David Bandi Jackson State University National Center for Biodefense Communications 1230 Raymond Road, Box 900 Jackson, MS 39204, USA bandi@nc-bc.net

Ms. Turquoise Alexander Department of Biology, Jackson State University 1400 Lynch Street, P. O. Box 18540 Jackson, Mississippi, USA turquoise.alexander@yahoo.com

Mr. Bosun Banjoko Obafemin Awolowo University Dept of Chemical Pathology & Institute of Public Health, Ile-Ife, Osun 23403, Nigeria bosunbanjoko@yahoo.com

Dr. Farshad Amini Jackson State University Department of Civil Engineering Jackson, MS 39217, USA farshad.amini@jsums.edu

Mr. Jordan Barber Jackson State University Center of Excellence in Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics Education 1400 John R. Lynch Street Jackson, MS 39217, USA jordanbarber@me.com

Dr. Anthony E. Archibong Meharry Medical College Department of Physiology Obstetrics & Gynecology Nashville, TN, USA aarchibong@mmc.edu

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Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research LIST OF PARTICIPANTS Mr. Jerry Beasley Jackson State University Environmental Science Ph.D. Program 670 Trickham Bridge Road Brandon, MS 39042, USA jbeasley@deq.state.ms.us

Ms. Paulette Bridges Jackson State University CSET, JSU Box 18480 Jackson, MS 39217, USA paulette.bridges@jsums.edu Ms. Erika Brown Jackson State University Department of Chemistry 3278 Woodview Drive Jackson, MS 39212, USA mserikab@bellsouth.net

Dr. Gregorio Begonia Jackson State University Dept. of Biology, P.O. Box 18540, JSU Jackson MS 39217, USA gregorio.begonia@jsums.edu

Ms. Kellie Brown Jackson State University Environmental Science Ph.D. Program 94 Leola Circle, Greenville, MS 38701, USA encybrown@bellsouth.ent

Dr. Maria Begonia Jackson State University Dept. of Biology, P.O. Box 18540, JSU Jackson MS 39217, USA maria.f.begonia@jsums.edu

Ms. Viviaune Brown Jackson State University 1400 John R. Lynch Street Jackson, MS 39217, USA clement.yedjou@jsums.edu

Mr. Rainier S. Berkley Jackson State University Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry 1400 John R. Lynch Street Jackson, MS 39217, USA r.s.berkley@spartans.nsu.edu

Dr. Randy R. Brutkiewicz Indiana University Department of Microbiology and Immunology School of Medicine 950 W. Walnut Street, Room 302 Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA rbrutkie@iupui.edu

Mrs. Anna Carolina Bertin de Almedia Lopes State University of Londrina Londrina, PR 86055-750, Brazil acalmeida0104@gmail.com Dr. Jorge L. Ble-Castillo Universidad Juarez Autonoma de Tabasco Av Gregorio Mendez 2838-A Col Tamulte, 86100 Villahermosa, Tabasco Mexico 86040 jblecastillo@hotmail.com

Hon. Phil Bryant State of Mississippi Governor, Jackson, MS USA governor@governor.state.ms.us Mr. Raven Byrd Jackson State University Cellomics and Toxicogenomics Research Laboratory JSU Box 18540, Jackson, MS 39217, USA clement.yedjou@jsums.edu

Dr. Corneliu Bogatu Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering Jackson State University 120 Norton Place Clinton, MS 39056, USA bogatucornelius@gmail.com

Ms. Anita Cain Jackson State University 51 Northtown Drive, Apt. 6A Jackson, MS 39211, USA antiacain@yahoo.com

Dr. Vincent C. Bond Morehouse School of Medicine RCMI Program Director 720 Westview Drive, SW Room 212, RCMI Program Office Atlanta, GA US 30310-1495 vbond@msm.edu

Dr. Gloria M. Calaf Columbia University Medical Center Center for Radiological Research 630 West 168th Street, Vanderbilt Clinic 11-230 New York, NY 10032, USA gmc24@columbia.edu

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Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research LIST OF PARTICIPANTS Avius Carroll Jackson State University 350 West Woodrow Wilson Jackson, MS USA jung.h.lee@jsums.edu

Dr. Hari H. P. Cohly Jackson State University Department of Biology JSU Box 18540, Jackson, MS 39217, USA hcohly2005@gmail.com

Ms. Victoria Casher Jackson State University Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, 1400 John R. Lynch Street Jackson, MS 39217, USA raphael.d.isokpehi@jsums.edu

Dr. Luis Colmenero Technology Institute of Chihuahua Ave. Industrias 11101 Chihuahua, Ch 31310, Mexico lcolmenero@uach.mx Dr. John Colonias Jackson State University Department of Technology Jackson, MS 39217, USA john.a.colonias@jsums.edu

Mr. Michael A. Cato Jackson State University Department of Chemistry JSU Box 17910 Jackson, MS 39217, USA mcato@icnanotox.org

Ms Terriona Cowan Jackson State University Center of Excellence in Science, Engineering, Technology and Mathematics Education JSU Box 18750, Jackson, MS 39217, USA constance.n.martin@jsums.edu

Dr. Jose Centeno The Joint Pathology Center Depleted Uranium and Embedded Fragment Laboratory, Malcolm Grow Medical Center 1057 West Perimeter Rd, Bldg 1050, Room GB-33 Joint Base Andrews Naval Air Facility Washington, MD 20762, USA jose.centeno@afncr.af.mil

Ms. Tammy Cox Provine High School 2400 Robinson Street Jackson, MS 39209, USA clement.yedjou@jsums.edu

Prof. U. A. Chandrasena University of Kelaniya Department of Geography, Sri Lanka uragoda299@yahoo.com

Dr. Edmond E. Creppy University Bordeaux 2 Toxicology Department 146, Rue Leo Saignat Bordeaux, Gironde 33076, France edmond.creppy@u-bordeaux2.fr

Mr. Robert Channell Jackson State University 1088 David Britt Street Wesson, MS 39191, USA rob.channell@colin.edu

Mrs. Jeanna M. Dampier Jackson State University Environmental Science Ph.D. Program 517 Silvertone Drive Madison, MS 39110, USA j2damp@yahoo.com

Anakor Christian Jackson State University 350 West Woodrow Wilson Jackson, MS USA jung.h.lee@jsums.edu

Mr. James Daniels Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry Jackson State University Box 17910, Jackson, MS 39217, USA jdaniels1979@gmail.com

Ms. Joyce Chumo Mississippi Valley State University 14000 Highway 82 West Itta Bena, MS 38941, USA padmanava.dash@jsums.edu

Dr. Prasanta Das Department of Chemistry Jackson State University JSU Box 17910, Jackson, MS 39217, USA prasanta.das@jsums.edu

Mr. Shelton L. Clerk Jackson State University 176 Hwy 8 E, Cleveland, MS 38732, USA slclerk20@hotmail.com

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Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research LIST OF PARTICIPANTS Ms. Thabitha P. Dasari Jackson State University Environmental Science Ph.D. Program 1227 Pin Oak Drive, #11 Flowood, MS 39232, USA thabitha_priyadarsani@yahoo.com

Dr. Venkata B. Dodla Jackson State University Trent Lott Geospatial Visualization Research Center, 1230 Raymond Road Jackson, MS 39217, USA venkata.b.dodla@jsums.edu

Dr. Samuel S. Dasary Jackson State University RCMI-Center for Environmental Health JSU Box 17131 Jackson, MS 39217, USA samuel.s.dasary@jsums.edu

Ms. Irma Dominguez Universidad Autonoma de Chihuahua Periferico Francisco R. Almada Km1 Chihuahua, CH 31453, Mexico evelina_p7@hotmail.com Dr. Waneene C. Dorsey Grambling State University Molecular Toxicology Research Laboratory 2500 Martin Luther King Drive Grambling, LA 71245, USA dorseywc2002@yahoo.com

Dr. Padmanava Dash Jackson State University Department of Biology JSU Box 18540 Jackson, MS 39217, USA padmanava.dash@jsums.edu

Mr. Mark Dugo Jackson State University Environmental Science Ph.D. Program P. O. Box 2844 Jackson, MS 39207, USA mark.a.dugo@students.jsums.edu

Dr. Asok K. Dasmahapatra University of Mississippi National Center for Natural Product Research University, MS 38677, USA asok@olemiss.edu Ms. Victoria Davis South University 1490 Sifly Road Orangeburg, SC 29118, USA victoriaanita21@hotmail.com

Dr. Jimmy T. Efird East Carolina University Brody School of Medicine Center for Health Disparities Research and Department of Public Health, 600 Moye Blvd. Greenville, NC US 27858 jimmy.efird@stanfordalumni.org

Ms. Ruth E. DeOliveria Jackson State University Environmental Science Ph.D. Program 958 Alta Vista Blvd. Jackson, MS 39217, USA ruth21303@yahoo.com

Ms. Adesuwa Ekunwe Clinton High School 401 Arrow Drive Clinton, MS 39056, USA raphael.d.isokpehi@jsums.edu

Ms. Evangeline Deer Jackson State University 209 Morrow Street Brandon, MS 39042, USA evangelinedeer@yahoo.com

Mrs. Maryam Emami Khansari Jackson State University 580 S. Pear Orchard Road, Apt. 110 Ridgeland, MS 39157, USA maryam.emami.khansari@students.jsums.edu

Dr. Prescott Deininger Tulane University Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Tulane Cancer Center, SL-66 1430 Tulane Avenue SL 66 New Orleans, LA 70112, US pdeinin@tulane.edu

Mrs. Alicia Epps Jackson State University Environmental Science Ph.D. Program 102 Jody Drive Canton, MS 39046, USA aliciaepps73@hotmail.com

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Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research LIST OF PARTICIPANTS Ms. Tammy Epting Jackson State University Molecular Toxicology Research Laboratory 1400 John R. Lynch Street Jackson, MS 39217, USA tepting@jackson.k12.ms.us

Dr. Robert F. Finkelman University of Texas at Dallas Department of Geosciences 800 W. Campbell Road, MS F021 Richardson, TX 75080, USA bobf@utdallas.edu

Dr. Maria Socorro Espino Universidad Autonoma de Chihuahua Madrid 1802, Col. Mirador Chihuahua, Ch 31205, Mexico msespinov27@gmail.com

Ms. Tanea Fisher Jackson State Universiy 106 Maple Circle, Vicksburg, MS 39180, USA tanea_fisher@yahoo.com Ms. Carolyn S. Fletcher Jackson State University RCMI-Center for Environmental Health JSU Box 17131, Jackson, MS 39217, USA carolyn.s.fletcher@jsums.edu

Dr. Roberto Espinoza Autonomous University of Chihuahua College of Zootechnology and Ecology Chihuahua, CH 31000, Mexico Telephone: 52 614 4231070 Email: jespinoza@uach.mx

Mr. Marlon Flowers Mississippi Valley State University P. O. Box 181, Itta Bena, MS 38941, USA mflowers781@gmail.com

Mr. Zhen Fan Jackson State University Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry 948 Bellevue Place Jackson, MS 39202, USA fanzhen568@gmail.com

Mr. Abdallah Gana Jackson State University Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry 5115 Old Canton Road, Apt. E02 Jackson, MS 39211, USA j00612142@students.jsums.edu

Dr. Ibrahim O. Farah Jackson State University Department of Biology 612 Oakleigh Place Brandon, MS 39047, USA ibrahim.o.farah@jsums.edu

Ms Shontrice Garrett Jackson State University Center of Excellence in Science, Engineering, Technology and Mathematics Education JSU Box 18750, Jackson, MS 39217, USA shontricegarrett@att.net

Dr. Ebenezer O. Farombi Drug Metabolism and Toxicology Research University of Ibadan, Nigeria Biochemistry and Molecular Toxicology Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine Ibadan, Nigeria olatunde_farombi@yahoo.com

Ms. Kaelin Gates Jackson State University Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology 1400 John R. Lynch Street Jackson, MS 39217, USA raphael.d.isokpehi@jsums.edu

Ms. Shernica Ferguson Jackson State University 585 Dexter Drive, Apt. D Flowood, MS USA sferguson2@umc.edu

Ms. Kelli Gills Terry High School 235 West Beasley Road Terry, MS 39170, USA raphael.d.isokpehi@jsums.edu

Dr. Jean Magloire Feugang Mississippi State University Department of Animal and Dairy Sciences 4025 Wise Center Mississippi State, MS 39762, USA jn181@ads.msstate.edu

Ms. Victoria Gilmore Jackson State University Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology 1400 John R. Lynch Street Jackson, MS 39217, USA raphael.d.isokpehi@jsums.edu

v


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research LIST OF PARTICIPANTS Ms. Maria Gomes Jackson State University Environmental Science Ph.D. Program 958 Alta Vista Blvd. Jackson, MS 39209, USA mariabaptista2001@yahoo.com.br

Ms. Jameka Grigsby Jackson State University Environmental Science Ph.D. Program 2004 Hughway #552 Lorman, MS 39096, USA jameka072007@yahoo.com

Dr. Barbara E. Graham Jackson State University Environmental Science Ph.D. Program JSU Box 18540 Jackson, MS 39217, USA barbara.graham@jsums.edu

Ms. Brittany Hailey Jackson State University Center of Excellence in Science, Engineering, Technology and Mathematics Education JSU Box 18750, Jackson, MS 39217 USA haileybrittany3@aol.com

Mr. Joseph Grant Jackson State University Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, 1400 John R. Lynch Street Jackson, MS 39217, USA raphael.d.isokpehi@jsums.edu

Ms. Sakeli Hall Jackson State University Environmental Science Ph.D. Program 70 Woodgate Drive, Brandon, MS 39042, USA sakelihall@gmail.com

Mr. Quentin Greathree Jackson State University Center for Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, 1400 John R. Lynch Street Jackson, MS 39217, USA raphael.d.isokpehi@jsums.edu

Dr. Ashton Hamme, II Department of Chemistry Jackson State University JSU Box 17910 Jackson, MS 39217, USA ashton.t.hamme@jsums.edu

Mr. Kantave Greene Jackson State University Environmental Science Ph.D. Program 120 River Ridge Ct., Pearl, MS 39208, USA kantave.m.greene@jsums.edu

Dr. Fengxiang X. Han Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Jackson State University JSU Box 17910 Jackson, MS 39213, USA fengxiang.han@jsums.edu

Mrs. Lecia Gresham-Robinson Jackson State University Environmental Science Ph.D. Program P. O. Box 2901 Ridgeland, MS 39158, USA leciagresham@hotmail.com

Mr. Syed Haque Jackson State University Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry 1400 John R. Lynch Street Jackson, MS 39217, USA syed.acce.du@gmail.com

Mr. Justin Griffin Jackson State University Center of Excellence in Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics Education 172 Choctaw Bend Clinton, MS 39056, USA justin.m.griffin1992@aol.com

Dr. Mark G. Hardy Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Jackson State University 1400 John R. Lynch Street Jackson, MS 39217, USA mark.g.hardy@jsums.edu

Mr. Shelton D. Griffith Jackson State University Center for Bioinformatics and Computaitonal Biology 1400 John R. Lynch Street Jackson, MS 39217, USA sheltongriffith1@aol.com

Ms Johnnie Hawkins Central Mississippi Area Health Education Center Center Director Owens Health and Wellness Center 350 W. Woodrow Wilson, Suite 3320 Jackson, MS 39213, USA jhawkins@tougaloo.edu

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Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research LIST OF PARTICIPANTS Dr. Sandra C. Hayes Tougaloo College Owens Health and Wellness Center 500 W. County Line Road Tougaloo, MS 39174, USA shayes@tougaloo.edu

Dr. Ali Ishaque University of Maryland at Eastern Shores Department of Natural Sciences Backbone Road, Carver Hall Princess Anne, MD 21804, USA abishaque@umes.edu

Mr. Gilberto Herrera Autonomous University of Chihuahua Circuito 3 Culturas #71 Chihuahua, CH 31114, Mexico gil_hp@hotmail.com

Dr. Raphael D. Isokpehi Jackson State University Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, 1400 John R. Lynch Street Jackson, MS 39217, USA raphael.isokpehi@jsums.edu

Mrs. Jessica L. Hobbs Jackson State University 4946 Brookwood Pl. Jackson, MS 39272, USA dvsjess@yahoo.com

Dr. Ashok Jain Albany State University 306 ACAD Building, 504 College Drive Albany, GA 31705, USA ashok.jain@asurams.edu

Ms. Antoniesha Hollman Jackson State University Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology 1400 John R. Lynch Street Jackson, MS 39217, USA raphael.d.isokpehi@jsums.edu

Dr. Afef Janen Alabama A&M University Biological and Environmental Sciences and Physics, Chemistry and Mathematics Departments 4900 Meridian Street, Normal, Alabama, USA afef.janen@gmail.com Ms Jessica Jenkins Jackson State University 1 Justin Court, Jackson, MS 39206, USA jessica.joy.jenkins@gmail.com

Mrs. Carlene Holt-Gray Jackson State University Environmental Science Ph.D. Program 5417 Hightor Lane Memphis, TN 38125, USA holtgray@yahoo.com

Ms. Amber Johnson Jackson State University Computer Science 1400 John R. Lynch Street Jackson, MS 39217, USA

Ms. Toyketa Horne Jackson State University 1400 John R. Lynch Street Jackson, MS 39217, USA tvhhorne@yahoo.com

Hon. Harvey Johnson Mayor, City of Jackson 219 South President Street P. O. Box 17, Jackson, MS 39205, USA suzette@city.jackson.ms.us

Dr. Md. Alamgir Hossain Jackson State University Department of Chemistry JSU Box 17910, Jackson, MS 39217, USA md.a.hossain@jsums.edu

Ms. Inez K. Johnson Jackson State University Environmental Science Ph.D. Program P. O. Box 664, Bassfield, MS 39421, USA inez.k.johnson@jsums.edu

Ms Shantelle Hughes Jackson State University Environmental Science Ph.D. Program 2328 Chance Road Centreville, MS 39631, USA shanihu@yahoo.com

Ms. Kathy L. Johnson Jackson State University 350 West Woodrow Wilson Jackson, MS USA jung.h.lee@jsums.edu

vii


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research LIST OF PARTICIPANTS Ms Martha Johnson Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry Jackson State University JSU Box 17910, Jackson, MS 39217, USA sharishajohnson@gmail.com

Mr. Alexander Kessie Jackson State University Environmental Science Ph.D. Program JSU Box 18540, Jackson, MS 39217, USA alexander.kessie@jsums.edu

Mr. William Johnson Jackson State University Environmental Science Ph.D. Program 102 N. Mill Street Apt. 914 Jackson, MS 39201, USA willkjohnson@gmail.com

Mr. Swatantra Kethireddy Jackson State University Environmental Science Ph.D. Program 1100 JR Lynch Street, Apt # 309 Jackson, Mississippi 39203, USA swatan.15@gmail.com

Mr. Shaquana Jones University of Southern Mississippi 118 College Drive Hattiesburg, MS 39406, USA clement.yedjou@jsums.edu

Mrs. Sadia Khan Jackson State University Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry 1315 North Jefferson Street, Apt. 208 Jackson, MS 39202, USA sadia_afrin_2006@yahoo.com

Ms. Shanelle Joseph Southern University and A&M College Department of Environmental Toxicology Health Research Center 3409 Severn Avenue, Apt. 221 Metairie, LA 70126, USA shanelleiz@yahoo.com

Dr. Sunali Khanna Indian Academy of Oral Medicine & Radiology Nair Hospital Dental College Dr. A. L. Nair Road, Mumbai Central Mumbai, Maharashtra India 400 008 sunali3011@yahoo.com

Dr. Ramzi M. Kafoury Jackson State University Department of Biology JSU Box 18540 Jackson, MS 39217, USA ramzikafoury@gmail.com

Mr. Daniel Kibet Mississippi Valley State University 14000 5209 Highway 82W Itta Bena, MS 39217, USA daniel.kibet@mvsu.edu

Dr. Murty Kambhampati Southern University at New Orleans 6400 Press Drive New Orleans, LA 70126, USA mkambham@suno.edu

Mr. Philemon Kirui Jackson State University Environmental Science Ph.D. Program 125 Loden Place Jackson, MS 39209, USA kirui1976@gmail.com

Mr. Rajashekhar Kanchanapally Jackson State University 1400 John R. Lynch Street Jackson, MS 39217, USA raja_shekhar66@yahoo.com

Dr. Sanjay Kumar Jackson State University Environmental Science Ph.D. Program 711 Lake Harbour Drive, Apt. 1065 Ridgeland, MS 39157, USA sanjay.kumar@jsums.edu

Mr. Christopher Kelley Clinton Public Schools 105 Hartfield Place Clinton, MS 392056, USA thekelleysplace@juno.com

Mr. Wundu Kwembe Jackson State University Cellomics and Toxicogenomics Research Laboratory JSU Box 18540 Jackson, MS 39217, USA clement.yedjou@jsums.edu

Mr. James Kelley Jackson State University 105 Hartfield Pl. Clinton, MS 39056, USA jkelleyjsu@gmail.com

viii


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research LIST OF PARTICIPANTS Mr. Hilliard L. Lackey, IV Jackson State University Department of Biology 1601 Huntcliff Way Clinton, MS 39056, USA hilliard.l.lackey@jsums.edu

Dr. Mahmoud Manzoul Jackson State University Department of Computer Engineering 1400 John R. Lynch Street Jackson, MS 39217, USA mmanzoul@jsums.edu

Dr. Joseph R. Landolph, Jr. University of Southern California Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center Cancer Research Laboratory, Room 218 1303 North Mission Road Keck School of Medicine and School of Pharmacy Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA landolph@usc.edu

Mrs. Constance N. Martin Jackson State University Center of Excellence in Science, Engineering, Technology and Mathematics Education JSU Box 18750 Jackson, MS 39217, USA constance.n.martin@jsums.edu

Ms. Briana Lee Southern University at New Orleans 4421 Crowder Blvd. New Orleans, LA 70127, USA leeb117@yahoo.com

Mr. Luther Martin Jackson State University Center of Excellence in Science, Engineering, Technology and Mathematics Education JSU Box 18750 Jackson, MS 39217, USA lutherm2011@gmail.com

Dr. Jae Eun Lee RTRN Data and Technology Coordinating Center Jackson State University 1230 Raymond Road, Box 1800 Jackson, MS 39204, USA jae.lee@rtrn.net

Dr. Eduardo Martinez-Ceballos Southern University and A&M College 7621 Driftwood Drive Ventress, LA 70783, USA emcsubr@yahoo.com

Dr. Ken S. Lee Jackson State University Department of Chemistry JSU Box 17910 Jackson, MS 39217, USA ken.s.lee@jsums.edu

Ms. Diann Matthews Jackson State University Office of Strategic Initiatives Jackson, MS 39217, USA diann.matthews@jsums.edu

Dr. Danuta Leszczynska Jackson State University Department of Civil Engineering Jackson, MS 39217, USA danuta.leszczynska@jsums.edu

Mrs. Noel Matthews-Gardner Jackson State University Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry JSU Box 17910 Jackson, MS 39217, USA noelmatthews@msn.com

Dr. Jerzy Leszczynski Jackson State University Interdisciplinary Center for Nanotoxicity JSU Box 17910 Jackson, MS 39217, USA jerzy@icnanotox.org

Mr. Andreas Mbah Jackson State University JSU Box 190085 Jackson, MS 39217, USA nji41@yahoo.com

Yunfeng Lin Jackson State University Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry JSU Box 17910, Jackson, MS 39217, USA ashton.t.hamme@jsums.edu

Dr. Dora N. Mbanya University of Yaounde I FRCPath Faculty of Medicine & Biomedical Sciences Hematology Laboratory Yaounde, Cameroon dmbanya2@yahoo.co.uk

ix


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research LIST OF PARTICIPANTS Ms. Ariane Mbemi Jackson State University Cellomics and Toxicogenomics Research Laboratory, JSU Box 18540 Jackson, MS 39217, USA clement.yedjou@jsums.edu

Ms Tamara L. Medley Jackson State University Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology, Jackson, M 39217, USA twtyshea13@aol.com

Mrs. Jacqueline McComb Jackson State University Environmental Science Ph.D. Program 875 William Blvd., Apt. 1315 Ridgeland, MS 39157, USA jacqueline_mccomb@yahoo.com

Mr. Sirak M. Mekonen Jackson State University JSU Box 191175 Jackson, MS 39217, USA sirakmelaku16@gmail.com Dr. Edmund Merem Jackson State University 3825 Ridgewood Road Jackson, MS 39211, USA edmund.c.merem@jsums.edu

Ms. Cassandra D. McCullum Jackson State University Environmental Science Ph.D. Program 440 Cross Park Drive #1605 Pearl, MS 39208, USA cdmccullum@gmail.com

Dr. Carolyn W. Meyers President, Jackson State University 1400 John R. Lynch Street Jackson, MS 39217, USA carolyn.w.meyers@jsums.edu

Mr. Roderick McDowell Jackson State University Breast Cancer Research Laboratory 1400 John R. Lynch Jackson, MS 39217, USA carolyn.b.howard@jsums.edu

Dr. Gloria Miller Department of Biology Jackson State University JSU Box 18540 Jackson, MS 39217, USA gloria.s.miller@jsums.edu

Ms. Teresha McGriff South University-Columbia 1271 Locustwood Avenue Lancaster, SC 29720, USA tereshalmcgriff@hotmail.com

Mr. Trenton A. Miller Jackson State University Center of Excellence in Science, Engineering, Technology and Mathematics Education JSU Box 18750 Jackson, MS 39217, USA trentonm769@aol.com

Dr. John A. McLachlan Tulane University Celia Scott Weatherhead & Albert J. Weatherhead III Distinguished Chair in Environmental Studies Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine 1430 Tulane Avenue, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA jmclach@tulane.edu

Ms. Elham Momtahan Jackson State University 350 West Woodrow Wilson Jackson, MS, USA jung.h.lee@jsums.edu

Ms. LaFrancis McMurray Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education Mailstop 37, PO Box 117 Oak Ridge, TN 37831, USA lafrancis.mcmurray@orise.orau.gov

Dr. Loretta Moore Jackson State University Associate Vice President Division of Research and Federal Relations 1400 John R. Lynch Street Jackson, MS 39217, USA lorreta.a.moore@jsums.edu

Ms. Alicia Meadows Jackson State University Cellomics and Toxicogenomics Research Laboratory, JSU Box 18540 Jackson, MS 39217, USA clement.yedjou@jsums.edu

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Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research LIST OF PARTICIPANTS Ms. Tina Moore Jackson State University Environmental Science Ph.D. Program 10862 Nichols Blvd #16-4 Olive Branch, MS 38654, USA shirellemo77@yahoo.com

Mr. Samuel Nittala Jackson State University 26 Dickens Court Jackson, MS 39206, USA samnittala@me.com Ms. Sylvianne Njiki Jackson State University Cellomics and Toxicogenomics Research Laboratory JSU Box 18540 Jackson, MS 39217, USA clement.yedjou@jsums.edu

Ms. Shavonda Morrow Jackson State University 6216 Highway 27 Vicksburg, MS 39180, USA smorrow1920@gmail.com Ms. Jala Morrow Jackson State University 6216 Highway 27 Vicksburg, MS 39180, USA mmjsun23@gmail.com

Dr. Felix A. Okojie Jackson State University Vice President for Research Development & Federal Relations JSU Box 17057 Jackson, MS 39217, USA felix.a.okojie@jsums.edu

Dr. Kenneth Ndebele Jackson State University Department of Biology JSU Box 18540, Jackson, MS 39217, USA kenneth.ndebele@jsums.edu

Mr. Ifeanyi Chukwu Onor Southern University of New Orleans 7600 Edward Street New Orleans, LA 70126, USA ifeanyiweb@gmail.com

Dr. Jos Ndelo-di-Phanzu A l'Universite des Montagnes (Cameroun) Toxicologue forme en Sante Publique Kinshasa, DR Congo jos_ndelo@yahoo.fr

Dr. Orish Ebere Orisakwe University of Port Harcourt, Nigeria Faculty of Pharmacy Port Harcourt, PMB 5323, Nigeria eorish@aol.com

Ms. Kelia E. Neal Jackson State University 350 West Woodrow Wilson Jackson, MS USA jung.h.lee@jsums.edu

Dr. Monica M. B. Paoliello Universidad Estadual de Londrina Departamento de Patologia, Analises Clinicas e Toxicologicas President of Brazilian Society of Toxicology Londrina, Parana Brazil monibas@sercomtel.com.br

Miss Porsha Newell Jackson State University Center of Excellence in Science, Engineering, Technology and Mathematics Education JSU Box 18750 Jackson, MS 39217, USA porsha_newell@yahoo.com

Mr. Trey Parker Jackson State University Center for Excellence in Science, Engineering, Technology and Mathematics Education JSU Box 18750, Jackson, MS 39217, USA supatreyboy@yahoo.com

Dr. Patrick N. Nhigula South University 137 Caedmons Creek Drive Irmo, SC 29063, USA pnhigula@southuniversity.edu

Mr. William Parks Jackson State University Department of Physics, Atmos. Sci, & Geoscience 1400 John R. Lynch Street Jackson, MS 39217, USA wparks16@bellsouth.net

Ms. Cristina C. Nica Jackson State University Environmental Science Ph.D. Program 170 E. Griffith Street, Apt. G-5 Jackson, MS 39201, USA mcidnica@aol.com

xi


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research LIST OF PARTICIPANTS Dr. Anita Patlolla Jackson State University Environmental Science Ph.D. Program JSU Box 18540 Jackson, MS 39217, USA anita.k.patlolla@jsums.edu

Ms. Rita Presley Associate Vice President for Research & Federal Relations, Jackson State University JSU Box 17057, Jackson, MS 39217, USA epresley@jsums.edu Dr. Aramandla Ramesh Meharry Medical College Department of Biochemistry & Cancer Biology 1005 Dr. D. B. Todd Jr. Blvd. Nashville, TN 37208, USA aramesh@mmc.edu

Mr. Chuck Patrick Jackson State University 120 Dogwood Trail Brandon, MS 39047, USA chuck.patrick@jsums.edu

Dr. Bakhtiyor Rasulev Jackson State University Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry P. O. Box 17910, Jackson, MS 39217, USA rasulev@icnanotox.org

Mr. Carvey Patterson Jackson State University Environmental Science Ph.D. Program P O Box 707 Brookhaven, MS 39601, USA carvey24nphs@yahoo.com

Dr. Paresh Ray Jackson State University Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry Jackson, MS 39217, USA paresh.c.ray@jsums.edu

Dr. Marinelle Payton Jackson State University Assistant Dean for Research & Program Development, College of Public Service Jackson State University Jackson, MS 39217, USA marinelle.payton@jsums.edu

Mr. Lamar Reed Jackson State University Environmental Science Ph.D. Program Jackson, MS 39217, USA lamar.reed@jsums.edu

Dr. Tiago Peixe State University of Londrina Av Madre Leonia Milito, 1200 Apto. 301 Londrina, Pr 86050-270, Brazil tiago@uel.br

Mr. Md Mhahabubur Rhaman Jackson State University Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry 1400 Valley Street, Apt. 224B Jackson, MS 39204, USA oxinbd@yahoo.com

Dr. James Perkins Director, RTRN-Data Technology Coordinating, Center, Jackson State University 1230 Raymond Road Jackson, MS 39204, USA james.perkins@jsums.edu

Dr. Dorris Robinson-Gardner Dean, Division of Graduate Studies Jackson State University Jackson, MS 39217, USA graduate@jsums.edu

Dr. Joann B. Powell Clark Atlanta University Department of Biological Sciences Center for Cancer Research and Therapeutic Development 223 James P. Brawley Drive, SW Box 1646, Atlanta, GA 30314, USA jpowell@cau.edu

Mr. Christian S. Rogers Jackson State University Environmental Science Ph.D. Program P. O. Box 403, Tougaloo, MS 39174, USA csr57@hotmail.com Ms. Lakeysha Rose Jackson State University Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry JSU Box 17910 Jackson, MS 39217, USA ladytbonetiger@yahoo.com

Dr. Avijit Pramanik Jackson State University RCMI-Center for Environmental Health JSU Box 17131, Jackson, MS 39217, USA praavijit@gmail.com

xii


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research LIST OF PARTICIPANTS Dr. Hector Rubio-Arias Autonomous University of Chihuahua College of Zootechnology and Ecology Chihuahua, Chihuahua 31203 rubioa1105@hotmail.com

Dr. Nataliia Shtemenko National University by Oles Gonchar Department of Biophysics and Biochemistry 72 Gagarin Avenue, 49010 Dnipropetrovs'k Dnipropetrovs'k, Ukraine n.shtemenko@i.ua

Ms. Karen Saddler Jackson State University Environmental Science Ph.D. Program 445 Roosevelt Circle, Jackson, MS 39213, USA knsaddler@yahoo.com

Dr. Shaneka S. Simmons Jackson State University Environmental Science Ph.D. Program JSU Box 18540 Jackson, MS 39217, USA nekas_s@yahoo.com

Mr. Musabbir Saeed Jackson State University 1315 N. Jefferson Street, Apt. #208 Jackson, MS 39202, USA m.a.saeed@gmail.com

Ms. E. Maxine Simpson Jackson State University College of Science, Engineering & Technology 1400 John R. Lynch Street Jackson, MS 39217, USA emma.m.simpson@jsums.edu

Dr. Abhilash Samykutty Albany State University Department of Natural Sciences 504 College Drive Albany, GA 31705, USA abhilash.samykutty@asurams.edu

Ms. Jennifer N. Sims Jackson State University Environmental Science Ph.D. Student JSU Box 18540, Jackson, MS 39217, USA jen_nsims@yahoo.com

Ms. Talia Sanders Jackson State University Environmental Science Ph.D. Program 2650 Hemingway Circle Jackson, MS 39209, USA amarije02@yahoo.com

Dr. Kamaleshwar P. Singh Texas Tech University Department of Environmental Toxicology The Institute of Environmental and Human Health Lubbock, TX 79409, USA kamaleshwar.singh@tiehh.ttu.edu

Dr. Daniel Sarpong Jackson State University RTRN Data and Technology Coordinating Center 1230 Raymond Road Jackson, MS 39204, USA dsarpong@jsums.edu

Mrs. Dominique Smith-McInnis Jackson State University Environmental Science Ph.D. Program 5818 Cypress Trail Jackson, MS 39211, USA nikki05mhs@aol.com

Mr. Deuntae Sheard Jackson State University Center of Excellence in Science, Engineering, Technology and Mathematics Education JSU Box 18750 Jackson, MS 39217, USA deshmone93@yahoo.com

Dr. Karam F. Soliman Florida A&M University Neurodegeneration Research Laboratory College of Pharmacy & Pharmaceutical Science Tallahassee, FL, USA karam.soliman@famu.edu

Dr. Xianglin Shi University of Kentucky Gradute Center for Toxicology 109 V. A. Drive 306 Health Sciences Research Building Lexington, KY 40536, USA xshi5@uky.edu

Ms Shauna-Kay Spencer Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology Jackson State University, JSU Box 18439 Jackson, MS 39217, USA s.sspencer@hotmail.com

xiii


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research LIST OF PARTICIPANTS Dr. Jacqueline Stevens Jackson State University Department of Biology JSU Box 18540 Jackson, MS 39217, USA jacqueline.j.stevens@jsums.edu

Ms. Winny Tanui Mississippi Valley State University 14000 Hwy 82W PO Box 6403 Itta Bena, MS 38941, USA tanui.wj@mvsu.edu

Mr. Devin Stewart Jackson State University Center of Excellence in Science, Engineering, Technology and Mathematics Education JSU Box 18750 Jackson, MS 39217, USA drummer0693@yahoo.com

Dr. Herman A. Taylor, Jr. Director, Jackson Heart Study Jackson Medical Mall, Suite 701 350 West Woodrow Wilson Avenue Jackson, MS 39213, USA htaylor@umc.edu Dr. Paul B. Tchounwou Interim Dean, College of Science, Engineering & Technology, Jackson State University JSU Box 18750 Jackson, MS 39217, USA paul.b.tchounwou@jsums.edu

Ms. Chandra Stork-Collier Jackson State University Environmental Science Ph.D. Program 2938 Longwood Dr Jackson, MS 39212, USA chandrastork@hotmail.com

Ms. Wilma Templin-Branner Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education Mailstop 37 PO Box 117 Oak Ridge, TN 37831, USA wilma.templin@orise.orau.gov

Dr. Jung Hye Sung Jackson State University 350 W. Woodrow Wilson Drive Jackson, MS 39213, USA jung.h.lee@jsums.edu Dr. Dwayne J. Sutton Jackson State University Department of Biology 108 Moss Wood Lane Clinton, MS 39056, USA dwayne.j.sutton@jsums.edu

Dr. Billy Thomas University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Vice Chancellor of Diversity Professor of Pediatrics 4301 West Markham Street, #512 Little Rock, AK 72005, USA billyrthomas@uams.edu

Mr. Kyle Swanier Jackson State University Center for Bioinformatics and Computaitonal Biology, JSU Box 18540 Jackson, MS 39217, USA raphael.d.isokpehi@jsums.edu

Mr. Michael R. Thompson Jackson State University Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology 1400 John R. Lynch Street Jackson, MS 39217, USA raphael.d.isokpehi@jsums.edu

Mr. Shelton Swanier Assistant Dean (Retired), Office of Strategic Initiatives and Operations, CSET Jackson State University Jackson, MS 39217, USA shelton.swanier@jsums.edu

Ms. Jameskia Thompson Jackson State University 350 West Woodrow Wilson Jackson, MS USA jung.h.lee@jsums.edu

Dr. Hiroyasu Tachikawa Jackson State University Department of Chemistry Biochemistry JSU Box 17910 Jackson, MS 39217, USA hiroyasu.tachikawa@jsums.edu

Ms. Destinee Thompson Jackson State University Cellomics and Toxicogenomics Research Laboratory JSU Box 18540 Jackson, MS 39217, USA clement.yedjou@jsums.edu

xiv


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research LIST OF PARTICIPANTS Dr. Francis Tuluri Department of Technology Jackson State University 112 Baileys Ridge Circle Clinton, MS 39056, USA francis.tuluri@jsums.edu

Ms. Antrice Walker Jackson State University Environmental Science Ph.D. Program 2709 Marydale Dr Jackson, MS 39213, USA agwalker88@aol.com

Dr. Malakhat Turabekova Jackson State University Interdisciplinary Center for Nanotoxicity Jackson, MS 39217, USA malohat@icnanotox.org

Mrs. Xueyuan Wang Jackson State University 350 W. Woodrow Wilson Drive Jackson, MS 39213, USA wangxueyuan@hotmail.com

Dr. Mohammad Uddin Texas A&M Health Science Center 2401 S 31st Street Temple, TX 76508, USA mnuddin@swmail.sw.org

Ms. Paulette M. Ware Jackson State University 350 West Woodrow Wilson Jackson, MS 39213, USA jung.h.lee@jsums.edu

Mr. Udensi K. Udensi Jackson State University RCMI-Center for Environmental Health JSU Box 17131 Jackson, MS 39217, USA udensi.k.udensi@jsums.edu

Ms Phatia Wells Jackson State University Environmental Science Ph.D. Program 1350 Collier Avenue Jackson, MS 39217, USA pjwells27@yahoo.com

Miss Jheena Victorian Jackson State University Center of Excellence in Science, Engineering, Technology and Mathematics Education JSU Box 18750 Jackson, MS 39217, USA jheenavictorian-13@yahoo.com

Mr. Willie Wesley Jackson State University 345 Woodstone Road, Apt. N3 Clinton, MS 39056, USA willie.g.wesley@students.jsums.edu

Dr. Lourdes Villalba Autonomous University of Chihuahua Circuito No. 1, Campo Universitario 2 Chihuahua, Chihuahua 31125, Mexico mvillalb@uach.mx

Ms Baraka S. Williams Jackson State University Center for Bioinformatics & Computational Biology Jackson, MS 39217, USA williamsbaraka@yahoo.com

Ms. Bhanu Priya Viraka Nellore Jackson State University Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry Jackson, MS 39217,USA bhanupriyareddy.v@gmail.com

Dr. Joyce Williams Jackson State University Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry Jackson, MS 39217, USA joywilliams@jackson.k12.ms.us

Ms. BaoHan Vo Clark Atlanta University 223 James P. Brawley Drive, S.W. Atlanta, GA 30314, USA baohan.vo@students.cau.edu

Ms. Nya Williams Jackson State University 1920 Old Hwy 3, Edwards, MS 39066, USA precious_beautiful_talented@yahoo.com

Mr. Van Vu Southern University at New Orleans 2033 Hyman Place New Orleans, LA 70132, USA tiasiut@yahoo.com

Ms. Quotasze P. Williams Jackson State University 350 West Woodrow Wilson Jackson, MS USA jung.h.lee@jsums.edu

xv


Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research LIST OF PARTICIPANTS Ms. Candice Wilson Xavier University of Louisiana Center for Minority Health & Health Disparities Research and Education, 1 Drexel Drive New Orleans, LA USA cmwilson@xula.edu

Ms. Maryam Yoosefi Jackson State University 350 West Woodrow Wilson Jackson, MS USA jung.h.lee@jsums.edu Dr. Hongtao Yu Jackson State University Chair, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Jackson, MS 39217, USA hongtao.yu@jsums.edu

Dr. Robert Wolff South University Columbia 9 Science Court, Columbia, SC 29203, USA rwolff@southuniversity.edu Ms. Racquel J. Wright University of West Indies Biotechnology Centre racq.wright@gmail.com

Dr. Pao-Chiang Yuan Jackson State University Department of Technology JSU Box 18480, Jackson, MS 39217, USA pao-chiang.yuan@jsums.edu

Dr. Clement G. Yedjou Jackson State University Department of Biology Cellomics and Toxicogenomics Research Laboratory, Jackson, MS 39217, USA clement.yedjou@jsums.edu

Mr. A. B. M. Zakaria Jackson State University 850 North Jefferson Street, Apartment # M22 Jackson, MS 39202, USA abmzakaria@yahoo.com

Dr. Anjaneyulu Yerramilli Jackson State University Director, TLGVRC 1230 Raymond Road Jackson, MS 39204, USA yerramilli.anjaneyulu@jsums.edu