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the art of sharing. global charity book


the art of sharing.

global charity book

hink

s e e w h at y o u c a n d o f o r o t h e r s 1—

There is one particular feature when you do good deeds: it's truly addictive. Once you start helping people you want to do it again and again. The Art of Sharing magazine was born to inspire. It is not a charitable organization. It is not charity as you usually think of it. Our goal is to share. Share great stories. Share inspiration. Share sacred knowledge and become the table book for daily motivation.

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We think that the true art of sharing is to give something in everyday's life. Not only money.

2:32

5-year-old Miles Scott from Siskiyou County traversed

Anything, that will make the world better. the San Francisco city, maneuvering through huge

Helping others is easy. The only thing throngs of admirers as a superhero named "Batkid"

you need — is desire.


the art of sharing.

global charity book

in every issue tags Starting point for inspiration: Opinion columns on philanthropy and not only by prominent authors. Is it really important to do good deeds? acts Editor's choice. Some happy-end stories. Totally subjective but absolutely amazing. See what others have done and how it affected the ones who had been helped. odes Revelations without cuts: table talks on philanthropy topics. sets Think of yourself as spoiled by luxury? We will teach you the art of ÂŤsmart philanthropy lifeÂť. Our bespoke guide will give you exciting ideas on how to buy luxury goods or how to travel and do charity at the same time.


the art of sharing.

global charity book

«My theory is, number one, you should give money because when you give money, it’s selfish. Nobody who gives away money says, “I feel terrible about myself.” You feel better about yourself, and when you feel better about yourself, you’re gonna live longer, because your emotional health will be better. Second, you might actually help somebody. All the times you try to do something, it doesn’t always work. But sometimes you might actually help people. And it’s a natural human instinct to help other people. Third, you might get to heaven more quickly. Now, I can’t prove that, but why would we take a chance?» david rubenstein, co-founder of the Carlyle Group net worth $2,9 billion (#209 Forbes 400)


the art of sharing.

global charity book

«We teach people how not to be selfish» egor appolonov, founder of TAOS Foundation, editor-in-chief of The Art of Sharing Magazine

taos is more than jus t t h e m ag az i n e The Art of Sharing is fully interactive publication offering innovative publishing features. Scan the page with your smart *extra

phone or tablet* to

mobile app is required.

  

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see the relating video.

is free of

The women meet us with joy rocks the village.

This is when I met Helen Apio. While most women hung back politely, Helen jumped toward me and screamed two inches from my face. Technically, it was singing. But the high-pitched shrieking was so loud and reverberated with such energy and emotion, I knew I had to talk with her.

  

installation

   We jump out of the truck and walk into a party. exuberant cheering and dancing. Pure and loud

Beautifull woman of the world, please stand up. The story of how water can change everything

D r i v i n g d o w n a b u m p y r o a d in the middle of Northern Uganda, we were kicking up dust as we headed into the rural countryside. I was traveling with teams from two other non-profit organizations to evaluate the work of our shared local partner, Joy Drilling, who was drilling wells and training communities in sanitation and hygiene. Before piling in, I made a last minute decision to jump into the truck's flatbed. The Ugandan drilling crew looked stunned that I’d do such a thing, but I didn’t care.

I have a pretty incredible job. As charity: water’s Water Project Manager, I travel to some of the most desperate places on earth in search of clean water. And while the landscape changes, there’s always one thing that remains the same: the women are always walking. Whether I’m trekking the mountains of Haiti, taking cover from a rainstorm in rural Liberia, or tramping through the jungles of Central African Republic, the women are always carrying water.

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From my vantage point in the truck, I watch women gather up their children and move to the edge of the road to let us pass. Their feet are gnarled and calloused: a result of thousands of miles walked barefoot over rocks and mud. With babies strapped to their backs, their brightly colored skirts sway and their knees quiver and brace under the weight of water and children. Most balance pails on their heads, while some grip 80 pounds of water with sweaty palms, a bright yellow 5-gallon Jerry Can in each hand.

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“I am happy now,” Helen beamed. “I have time to eat, my children can go to school”. She told me about the new freshwater well in her village. “I am happy now,” Helen beamed. “I have time to eat, my children can go to school. And I can even work in my garden, take a shower and then come back for more water if I want! I am bathing so well.”

I saw the shame in her eyes when she described how she would return from her long trek to find her two young children waiting for

A few of the men chuckled to hear a woman talk about bathing. But all I noticed was Helen's glowing face, the fresh flowers in her hair, and the lovely green dress she wore for special occasions. Touching her forearm, I replied, “Well,.”

her. They were often sent home from school

“Yes,” she paused. Placing both hands on my shoulders and smiling, she said, “Now, I am beautiful.” That really hit me. My job is to focus on sustainable development, health, hygiene and sanitation; to make sure charity: water’s projects are working in 20 years. But nowhere on any of my surveys or evaluations was a place to write, “Today.”

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How Helen became beautiful is the real story.

immediately right after

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I saw the shame in her eyes when she described how she would return from her long trek.

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I’m in awe of how they manage. But of course, they have no choice. The average woman in Africa walks three miles every day for water. Often, it's water from putrid rivers or diseaseinfested swamps. Worldwide, women are more than twice as likely as men to collect drinking water. Without warning, our truck swerves off the road and up over an embankment. Dried corn stalks thump against the side of the truck as we plow through a field. My knuckles

Moments later, we find ourselves in a clearing and in the middle of a huge celebration. Esther, our photographer, pokes her head out the window, smiles, and yells back at me, “Looks like our mission’s been compromised!” I usually prefer to surprise communities by our arrival because it makes it easier to monitor how our water points are functioning without hundreds of people watching. But once you visit a few communities in the neighborhood, rumors of your presence spread like wildfire.

Before she had clean water, she would wake up before dawn, take her only two 5-gallon Jerry Cans, and walk almost a mile and a half to the nearest water point, which happened to be at a school. Because there simply wasn’t enough water for the area’s population, she’d wait in line with hundreds of other women who also valued clean water. Helen’s only other option was to skip the wait and collect contaminated water from a pond. Helen spent most of her day walking and waiting. She told me each day she’d say to herself, “How should I use this water today? Should I water my garden so we can grow food? Should I wash my children’s uniforms? Should I use it to cook a meal? Should we drink this water?” With two children, one husband and 10 gallons, Helen had to make choices. I saw the shame in her eyes when she described how she would return from her long trek to find her two young children waiting for her. They were often sent home from school because their uniforms were dirty. Helen just never had enough water. I saw now why she was so eager to scream out her joy and gratitude. She

This is the sample layout of the magazine's artice.

Piece of cake. Look at the charity list to We think that it looks absolutely amazing.

donate online: just scan the link on the page and you will be redirected to the online resource of the related organization.


the art of sharing.

global charity book

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o p e n yo u r m i n d a n d l e t t h i n g s h a p p e n 1—

One of the fathers of American philanthropy John D. Rockefeller tithed 10 percent of his income to charity ever since his first paycheck. He was always saying that the more you give, the more you recieve. Long after he passed away, he still remains the richest man ever living.

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The lastest CNBC study found that fully 89 percent of millionaires gave their time to charities (as well as their money) in 2012, with more than half of the millionaires giving more than 100 hours of their time.


the art of sharing.

global charity book

philanthropy in numbers*

1995 $1mln donations over

$19 billion

total donations

gifted by

71% 29% 0%

individuals

Russia

foundations

United Kingdom

corporations

35% 52% 13%

foundations

corporations

Middle East

32% 50% 18%

individuals

foundations

corporations

individuals

USA

22% 71% 7%

38% 3% 59%

individuals

China

foundations

corporations

individuals

foundations

corporations

*Source: Coutts 2013


the art of sharing.

global charity book

ffer

a c t to h a r m o n i z e t h e w o r l d a ro u n d 1—

Let's unite for sharing. We believe that every good deed counts. Start from little things and the world will change.

«А journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step» laozi, chinese philosopher

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The more you give, the more you receive. That is simple as that.


the art of sharing.

global charity book

«The more love for everybody you have the more of it comes back to you. It is a quid pro quo situation and this sort of equilibrium upholds everything. All gifted clowns are love generators. Otherwise they wouldn’t be getting it back». slava polunin, russian performance artist and clown. Creator of the stage spectacles Asisyai-revue, Slava's Snowshow and Diabolo

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The great thing you should know is that you can do great things with no expenses at all. Some invest their Happy people are more likely to

money. Some invest their time. Both donate and to volunteer, and those

are equal. The true Art of Sharing is who do so tend to become happier

not about how much money you give, but how much passion and... love you involve in your deeds.


the art of sharing.

global charity book

Serve transform yourself to share 1—

Not everybody will thank you. Who cares? Don’t think about gratitude. It will come from inside.

S «If you take five different items that might affect the lives of millions of people, and one of ‘em’s going to succeed, and that’s more or less your probability going in, you should not get discouraged at all about the other four». warren buffet, #2 Forbes 100, gives 99% of his wealth for charity


the art of sharing.

S

global charity book

«I believe strongly in ‘giving while living.’ I see little reason to delay giving when so much good can be achieved through supporting worthwhile causes today. . . I set out to work hard, not to get rich but to help others». chuck feeney, the founder of The Atlantic Philanthropies


the art of sharing.

S

global charity book

ta o s w o r l d w i d e

10 success stories in each issue 8 issues per year languages

English, Russian. headquarters

Moscow, Russia. NYC, USA. c o n ta c t s

+7 (903) 553-8355 ea@taosfoundation.org

TAOS Mediakit 2013/14  
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