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5 oktober 2011


INDEX Page

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Index

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PowerWolf

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Atreyu

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PAIN

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8

In Flames

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10

Dir en Grey

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12

Children of Bottom

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13

Carolina Liar

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14

CD Reviews

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16

16

8

12

Miyavi

10

6

5


Powerwolf

Blood of the Saints

Trans-European “werewolf-metal” combo Powerwolf have begun preparing the world for the arrival of their upcoming album Blood of the Saints: they’ve set up a new web page dedicated to the project, and they’re now streaming the record’s first single, “Sanctified with Dynamite.” . Come in and get your wolf on hailing from all across Europe, Powerwolf base a lot of their music on Romanian werewolf legends, and from the artwork and song titles alone, it’s obvious they’re continuing the tradition on their fourth full-length release. The awesome art was actually created by the band’s co-founder and lead guitarist Matthew Greywolf, who describes the new material as “a striking balance of mighty melodic stuff and some serious wolfish metal madness, all dressed up in some highly catchy tunes... It’s been a hard piece of work, but it was so goddamn worth it. Blood of the Saints hits North American shores on July 29th

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Atreyu Atreyu is an American metalcore band from Orange County, California, formed in 1998. The band consists of vocalist/lyricist Alex Varkatzas, guitarists Dan Jacobs and Travis Miguel, bassist Marc McKnight and drummer/vocalist Brandon Saller. The band was originally named “Retribution”, but later changed their name to “Atreyu” (after the character of the same name from the fantasy book/movie The Neverending Story), when they found out that another band from Hemet, California had been using their original name. Since their formation the band have since released five studio albums: Suicide Notes and Butterfly Kisses, The Curse, A Death-Grip on Yesterday, Lead Sails Paper Anchor, and Congregation of the Damned. In 2008, they were on the Projekt Revolution tour with Linkin Park and headlined the smaller Revolution Stage along with 10 Years, Hawthorne Heights, and Armor for Sleep.

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Alf Peter Tägtgren(born June 3, 1970) is a Swedish musician and producer. He is the founder, main songwriter, lead vocalist, and guitarist of the death metal band Hypocrisy as well as the industrial metal band PAIN. After the release of his new album with pain : you only live twice we sad down with him to ask him a few questions. Q: How’s the tour going so far? This is your second US tour this year A: Well, it’s been intensive for sure. In a year we’ve done two European tours, two American tours and also went to Russia andGreece so it’s just been playing and playing. Q: Your latest album Virus came out last year and it’s a strong following to your best albums. How do you manage to stay so creative and original over the years? A: I don’t know, I guess I’ve seen a lot of bands stay in the same place, doing the same album all over again and for me that’s not really interesting. And those are bands that I really like... So I try to make it more interesting... for myself. Because if I don’t think it’s interesting, then who else is gonna think it’s interesting? You gotta write what you want to hear, that’s what I’m trying to do.

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Q: Are you working on any new material? A:Only with my other band, Pain. As far as Hypocrisy, we’re gonna try to get a headlining American tour. I mean, only in the major cities, like three and a half, four weeks tops. Q: So this is already in the works? A: Yeah, they’re trying to work on it now but I don’t wanna promise because I promised before and it didn’t happen. But that’s the plan. Q: I’m curious, as a producer, how do you choose which bands to work with? A: Well, anything that feels interesting. Someone calls up and if the music sounds interesting, I do it. Before I did it just to learn, get more experience and build up my studio. And now, I don’t want to do it for money anymore, I wanna do it just because it’s fun. Q: And do you feel that having you as a producer helps sell the album a lot better? A: It used to be like that in the past. That was one of the reasons why I closed down [ The Abyss Studio]. I don’t know if it sold more or not but they always used my name as a selling point. Q: You got tired of it? A: Yeah, I didn’t really care for that Q: Many years ago I read in a magazine how you described working with different bands in The Abyss studio and it was pretty much “ great guys, we got really drunk together”. How do you remember this period- was it more fun or more hard work? A: [laughs] Yeah, I mean, we didn’t get drunk every night. On the weekends, around 8 o’clock at night on Friday, we would start drinking and kept on recording. Usually on Saturday around noon when we came back [ to the studio] we had to redo everything we did when we started drinking [ laughs]. We just had a lot of fun Q: Many people in the press call you a workaholic. Has your lifestyle ( constant touring, recording) taken a toll on your personal life? A: Well, that is my life. I’m totally dedicated. I’m divorced for the second time now. That’s my life, you know- on the road Q: How do you see the future of metal? A: I think as long as there’s something interesting coming out, there’s going to be a following Q: Do you think it was better, say, ten years ago? A: Nah, I don’t think so Q: I don’t know, I’m starting to feel nostalgic A: Well, it’s always like that. I mean, people want to hear an old song because everybody was younger then [ laughs] Q: If you’re headlining, can you please play Apocalypse. I always wanted to see it live A: Hey, if we’re headlining, sure. Now we only have 40 mins and we’re trying to cram in as much as possible. When we get a headline tour, we do one and a half hours so we can do it then Q: Thank you for your time. Any last words to your fans? A: As I said, I hope to be back and be headlining bacause it’s about time for us [ laughs]

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IN FLAMES Sounds of a playground fading In flames has been one of the big names in melodic death metal for years now since 3 years they finaly released an album and ofcourse we went to look if it was any good

First things first, let’s read the opening couple sentences from the press release for this album: “At this point of their career, when In Flames release a new album the question is no longer about wether they’ll finally get back to the melodic death metal sound that made them famous almost 20 years ago…their fans wait in fascination and (in some cases) fear of what’s coming next.” It could possibly be put more accurately or bluntly. Given that both A Sense Of Purpose and Soundtrack To Your Escape were both colossal flops (Come Clarity, however, was awesome), it was rather hard to imagine coming in that this would really be a return to In Flames’ dominant ways of the metal scene. Needless to say, this isn’t the In Flames of old, nor will it ever be. The next question to ask, is this even really melodic death metal anymore? No, not really.

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This time around In Flames has strayed well off the beaten path and treaded their way onto some more progressive and at times very radio-friendly. The guitar leads, the vocal hooks, the superpolished production, and the string-filled bridge of “A New Dawn” are all nods to the band’s new pop-friendly sound. That being said, they haven’t totally abandoned the metal riff, pounding drums, and roaring vocals during the verse. The challenge comes when they start mixing the extra pop sections with the pure metal sections, a line that’s incredibly difficult to straddle. Unlike on A Sense Of Purpose, In Flames doesn’t fail miserably at doing so. In Flames does, however, find themselves with a collection of thirteen random songs that don’t really have much cohesiveness.

All things considered, Sounds Of A Playground Fading isn’t a bad album, and it is certainly better than I expected (probably better than most people would expect). A disjunct album full of pretty cool moments that don’t really fit together, all wrapped up nicely in one super-produced package. Great for people who really didn’t hate A Sense Of Purpose, bad for people who didn’t really like Come Clarity. Safe to say In Flames are off to bigger and (hopefully) better things. At the very least, they’ve

A few good riffs, a decent solo or two, some good vocals, mediocre lyrics and that’s pretty much all you have–except the album’s saving grace: brilliant songwriting. Sounds Of A Playground Fading is certainly better than the sum of its parts due to Jesper Strömblad leaving the band, meaning Björn Gelotte took the lion’s share of songwriting duties. Though there isn’t a ton of vari ance in the song structures, they all do a great job at showcasing the best parts of each song.

At times many of the songs feel very dull (such as “All For Me”) with moments of brilliance (such as “Enter Tragedy”). Thankfully In Flames have decided to add a bit more aggression to the mix, certainly more so than they did on A Sense Of Purpose. Thematically this isn’t very true, but much of the guitar work and vocals have gained an edge that In Flames has been missing in recent years, and it is really nice to hear.

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Dir en Grey De japanese metal band Dir en Grey is not unknown in the Netherlands anymore. It only existed, at first, among the fans from Japanese Music. But that all is changed by now. Dir en Grey is well know and respected in the whole world by now and also in The Netherlands the barriers seem to fade away. The band just got a new Album, named ‘Dum Spiro Spero’, who gets amazing reviews everywhere. Just before their performance in Tivoli Utrecht, in the Netherlands, we had the chance to interview the drummer Shinya about their new album, Wacken Open Air and more! First of all, thank you for his interview and welcome back to the Netherlands. Have you had the time to enjoy the city? Shinya: Well, last time when we were here in Utrecht, I had the chance to walk around the venue. Utrecht is really pretty and I really enjoyed it. But this time I haven’t had much chance to walk around, so unfortunately I can’t say that I have enjoyed it.

Shinya: Well since our new album has come out recently, we will be playing new songs but of course we will include some older songs as well. About Dum Spiro Spero. The album has been released by now, I have heard it and it sounds great, I loved it! Have you been getting the reactions you had hoped for so far? Shinya: Well it’s funny because we flew from Tokyo to Hamburg a couple of days ago, and it was actually the day after the album was released. And we have been so busy that I haven’t had the chance to check what the record sales have been like, or what the fans or press are saying about it. So I really couldn’t tell you something about that right now.

‘Dum Spiro Spero’ is an interesting latin titel. Could you explain it a little bit more? Shinya: I don’t want to explain the title of the album too much, so that people can have the freedom to interpret it how they want. But as you already know a very tragic You have played in this venue before and gave away a earthquake struck Japan in March, so maybe some of you great show. What do you expect from tonight’s show? guys will connect it to that. Also because the title itself Shinya: Last time when we were here I left with a great means that while you’re living, you can have hope. (title image from the audience because they went really wild. translation: “While I breath, I Hope”). So yeah, you can So I am expecting them to go even wilder tonight! connect the title to that fact or you can relate it to something other than that. Everyone is free to do that as well. On Twitter you mentioned that you have rehearsed some older songs for this Euro tour, which made a lot of peo- You were actually working on the new album in the studio ple even more excited for this show. What can fans expect when the earthquake happened. What kind of impact did from the show tonight and the rest of the tour?? it leave on the album? How did this affect the creative process of the record?

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Shinya: On the day the earthquake happened, some of the other guys were in the studio for some pre-production for the songs. I was in another studio, where I was practicing my drums. And when It happened, my cymbals, my drum kit, they had been shaking so I knew something was happening. I had the doors open from the studio so I could be ready to escape from there. So at that moment, I kept my safety. After the earthquake we had three weeks off because of the problems with the electricity, there were long power cuts. After that we started to record again, but we had less time to finish the album, so… Right before the release of the record you released an open letter about the situation in Japan right now, with the radiation problem and how you want to know the truth. Is there anyway that people from outside of Japan can help you with this? Shinya: In Japan now-a-days it’s hard to find the real truth you know, because the government is hiding the truth. So it’s really hard to know what is real and what is a lie. So, since you guys are living outside of Japan, maybe you can find out what the truth is. If you have any information that could help, please let us know. That’s probably the best way that you guys can help us with, to find out the truth.

ment for us because it changed our lives. From ‘Jealous’ to ‘Dum Spiro Spero’, your sound has changed so much and you have grown so much as a band, as performers and music wise. How do you look back on your first release now? Shinya: You are right, we are very different right now haha. But when I look back on the ‘Jealous’ era, I am still very proud of it, because I still like the album. And also because the CD shows what we were back then. It really captures the very first energy of the band, the first motivation. So I am still really proud of it. What are your musical influences at this moment? Shinya: Nothing special now- a-days. I’m not the kind of guy who’s getting all the new CD’s all the time. But I haven’t found any new music lately that has influenced my style. What are the future plans for Dir en grey? Shinya: We really don’t set goals for the future. So we have no particular goal for the future. But at this moment we are concentrated on playing new songs on the road. As you already know, ‘Dum Spiro Spero’ has just come out recently, so the tour to promote it will continue for many months from now. We’re really trying to let the new songs grow for now during the tour.

Ok, now back to the album again. What was the real starting point for the new album cycle? Shinya: You know the song “Hageshisa to, Kono Mune no Naka de Karamitsuita Shakunetsu no Yami”. It was a song for a single but it was also a starting point for the And my final question, do you have any message for your recording process and the sound of the album. So that was fans? the very first song for the album. Shinya: Of course. I can’t promise you guys when we will be coming back to Holland for another show. But for You’re latest single was ‘Different Sense’, which was an everyone that finds us by reading this interview please be awesome, diverse single. For people who haven’t heard it ready for the next time! yet, could you tell us more about the song and why everyone should listen to it? Shinya: It’s hard to say why…but, the song “DIFFER- Special thanks to Mr. Masuda for translating the interview and to ENT SENSE” is really what Dir en grey is all about right Shinya from Dir en grey for taking the time to do the interview. now. So it’s a good point to start to listen and a hint to un- Jessica Santiago Lopez op 17-08-2011 derstand what the band is all about at this moment. You have been around for over 10 years, since 1998, as Dir en grey. What have been the most memorable things along the way? Shinya: One big moment for us as Dir en grey would be 2005. We played in Berlin and then we also played at Rock Am Ring in Germany. It was the very first time for us to have played outside an Asian country. At that time I thought, we’re just a band from Osaka, and now a band from Osaka has opened a door to play at many other countries. That was what I though and so that was a very memorable mo-

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Children Of Bodom Relentless Reckless Forever Every time I look at a yearly CD release sheet and see Children of Bodom’s name, I get a little excited. You see, I find it impossible to even imagine anyone hating CoB; even if you don’t dig the overall music, you have to appreciate the utter insanity of their atomic-like guitar work (Alexi Laiho just kicks your ass with every shred, lick and destructive riff). Relentless Reckless Forever feels like another CoB album, which is both a good and bad thing. In terms of the good, you’ll know exactly what you’re getting and the standard of musicianship is phenomenal (if you’re a guitarist, you’ll drool over the fret-burning solos and punishing riffs of tracks such as the title track, ‘Cry of the Nihilist’ and ‘ Northpole Throwdown’). The biggest problem is that the album doesn’t stand out and makes me feel the same way I did about its predecessor (2008’s Blooddrunk), which also didn’t possess the majesty of previous records such as Hate Crew Deathroll and Are You Dead Yet?. RRF isn’t really anything different and just feels like it’s there. Look, it’s not stale, but it lacks the evolution or boundary-pushing attitude to make a significant dent. I’ll probably still listen to Relentless Reckless Forever on occasion, but it is far from the band’s best album (or even second or third best for that matter). I’d recommend checking it out, but don’t harbour too many expectations.

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Carolina Liar

Wild Blessed Freedom When you’re young, it’s hard to decide what you want to be when you grow up. Everything sounds up for grabs. Fortunately, there’s plenty of time to decide and figure that all out. When you’re in a band, however, you’re faced with that same question before you lay down your first track. It’s a serious “come to Jesus” moment, because odds are the genre you choose will stick with you as long as you continue to record. And once you make your decision, it’s even harder to stray away from it, especially if you have a following. Carolina Liar‘s second album, Wild Blessed Freedom, lacks an answer to that aforementioned question. Sure, there’s plenty to enjoy here: catchy songs with strong messages (“Miss America”) and vibrant, lush instrumentation (“Beautiful”). Yet there’s a lack of focus. The band attempts to incorporate too many musical styles into one disc. The alt-rock single “Drown” is reminiscent of their breakout hit “I’m Not Over” (off their 2008 debut, Coming to Terms). Right next to that are a couple of less than stellar dance tracks (“All That Comes Out of My Mouth”, “Daddy’s Little Girl”) that both seem very out of place. Vocalist Chad Wolf is strong throughout the effort, but his vocals are better suited to ballads and choruses than dance tunes. Sticking to a single genre or sound would behoove Carolina Liar and build them an even bigger following. The tools are all there, whichever direction they choose. They just need to make that decision and then finally grow.


CD Revieuws Hatesphere The Great Bludgeoning It’s hard not to listen to a band like Hatesphere and at least feel a slight shiver of intimidation – the unease you might feel when eavesdropping on your abusive neighbor as he’s threatening his trembling wife with a beer bottle clenched in one hand and a lead pipe in the other. There’s some-

thing about the volatile combination of thrash and death metal that produces such vulnerable apprehension, unlike the (I can’t believe I’m saying this) safety of absurd, cartoonish death (Cannibal Corpse) or stoic, seasoned thrash (Testament). That feeling is present in spades on “The Great Bludgeoning,” along with a subliminal message from Hatesphere ordering me to man up and absorb what they intended all along in its brutally violent glory. Like their fellow Danes in Raunchy, Mnemic, and The Arcane Order, the ranks of Hatesphere are shrewd genre mixers that manage to narrowly avoid allowing their otherwise accessible music to be easily pigeonholed. The blending of multiple extreme metal genres, together with sparkling production sheen, gives the band an identity at once current and timeless. They’re not trying to “be” anyone but Hatesphere, and while “The Great Bludgeoning” won’t reinvent the genre, it boldly cements its makers’ vicious brand.

Absu - Abzu Frontman/drummer Proscriptor McGovern lets the falsetto fly to get the sea of Absu flowing to follow up their 2009 self-titled opus. Hearing his take on King Diamond’s high voice is a welcome sign; it adds character to an alreadyindividualistic group among a herd of followers. It also super charges an album that works at unheard-of speeds. The falsetto is a rare treat on “Abzu,” as Proscriptor opts for a more common black metal shriek for most of it. He possesses a grandiose vocal range, but the flash of his drum sticks are the true driving force behind this album.

Warbringer War Without End After repeat spins this album just keeps getting better. The aggressive nature is infectious and the forceful thrash assault, vicious vocals, and shred solos hold true for all of “War Without End.” Tracks like “Total War,” “Beneath The Waves,” and “Dread Command” are classic thrash songs that will have you banging your head, mercifully for no longer than four minutes at a time. Ode to Satan “At the Crack of Doom” gives us some diversity with an acoustic intro, but bar that the band has one message and one only -- violent, energetic thrash metal in the name of warfare. For young metalheads looking to experience real thrash, this is one hell of a good place to start, and for all others, this is one war you do not want to miss.

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Meden Agan Erevos Aenaon Without a doubt Meden Agan has come up with a chimerical album of symphonic metal with “Erevos Aenaon.” Sailing the seas of symphonic metal in 2011 is akin to scaling the wall of water on the Bering Sea with little more than an inner tube. After treading water for the past five years, releasing one fulllength LP, demos, and promo EP’s to attract label interest, this Greek quintet has found the formula and the timing to make a huge impact. Meden Agan has nixed the sophomore jinx that plagues so many bands. On top of that noteworthy achievement, the band has also braved the sea of symphonic acts to stand apart and carve a name alongside the greats in the upper echelon of the genre.

Premonition 13 13 After dazzling with his unplugged solo debut, “Adrift,” earlier this year, doom metal icon Scott “Wino” Weinrich plugs back in with “13,” the debut album from his new collaboration, Premonition 13. Wino and fellow guitarist Jim Karow bring plenty of tasty licks to the table, even if some of the songs feel a little sparse otherwise. Sure, the album basically treads territory that’s been the same since early ‘70s Sabbath, but within those bounds, there’s a lot of interesting stuff going on here. The album’s agonizingly slow (in the best possible way) opener, “B.E.A.U.T.Y,” takes a while to kick in, but when it does, it’s absolutely crushing, barely letting up for a few moments of quiet beauty. Though the guitars are great, the disc is held back a bit by the rhythm section. Matthew Clark’s drumming at its best is merely adequate, and his limitations are laid bare when the band picks up the pace. Still, by and large, Wino’s come up with another winner. Whether you’re a fan of his work in Saint Vitus, the Obsessed and other outfits, or just a doom metal fan in general, you’re likely to find something to love on Premonition 13’s “13.”

Saligia Sic Transit Gloria Mundi This album sounded intriguing when it was revealed that it is Norwegian black metal in the purist vein. Saligia tout themselves as ritualistic and old-school, so upon listening to their debut “Sic Transit Gloria Mundi,” one comes into the experience expecting to hear classic 90’s nihilistic raw power. As a twopiece (Azhari on voices and strings and Adonai on drums), visions of Bathory minimalism may abound. Saligia is aiming for a sound that is less musically pleasing and more in the occult realm. They have achieved that and will probably strike the right note with hordes of black metal purists. However, there is not nearly enough variety, production or songwriting caliber for “Sic Transit Gloria Mundi” to pique the interest of most black metal fans.


Dead Horse Trauma Tellus Hodiernus Caducus A major step up from debut album “Infestation,” and a sure stop on the band’s stated goal of global domination, Dead Horse Trauma’s “Tellus Hodiernus Caducus” is an improvement in nearly every way from past efforts. Continuing to melt together metal, hardcore, and a bit of rock, the band’s latest album has ratcheted up the heaviness and taken the in-your-face attitude even farther than before. There are still instances of a nu-metal aesthetic that probably won’t please metal elitists (“Disbelief” featuring Myke Terry of Bury Your Dead having the most in common with the last album), and the heavy feedback sound on the screamed vocals does occasionally make songs sound overly similar, but the overall package here is completely headbang-worthy. “Tellus Hodiernus Caducus” makes huge strides forward for Dead Horse Trauma, and can appeal either to fans who want groove or metalheads who need a heavier musical assault.

Charred Walls Of The Damned Charred Walls Of The Damned The founder and drummer of Charred Walls of the Damned, Richard Christy, is better known for his sidekick gig on Howard Stern’s radio show. The singer, Tim “Ripper” Owens, is better known for his time in Judas Priest, among other things. Bassist Steve DiGiorgio is better known for his work across the metal pantheon, with bands including Sadus, Testament, and Death. And guitarist Jason Seucof is better known as one of the hot producers for extreme metal in the States. Put all these guys together in one band and the result is one of the best debut albums in a while; but it is by one of the most unknown all-star metal lineups in a while.

Chickenfoot Chickenfoot III Even without name-checking Led Zeppelin's "Houses Of The Holy" on the single "Big Foot," there's no denying that Sammy Hagar-fronted supergroup Chickenfoot is serving up an ample tribute to its 1970s influences on the deceptively titled "Chickenfoot III." The riffs have the muscle of Led Zeppelin, the rhythms the slink of the Rolling Stones. And all that's before you get to the mind-bending guitar solos and pop-infused choruses that recall the best of Van Halen. The production, by the band and Mike Fraser, is excellent, with everyone getting ample space in the mix. Anthony’s bass, in particular, benefits. Those who remember his thumping tone on early Van Halen tracks are going to be quite surprised by the versatility he shows here. “Chickenfoot III” finds the band fully embracing its history and influences to create an album that plays to every one of its strengths. Whether you’re a Van Halen fan looking for something to hold you over until next year, or just a fan of classic hard rock sounds, you’re going to find plenty to love here.

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Miyavi announced, lookout for

2011 World Tour

announced his - London had already been but the new tour dates show France is up next! Here’s the dates/locations thus far and be on the more to be announced!

Earlier this year, he released his album “What’s My Name?” with EMI and considers it a re-debut of himself to the world. This is definitely an artist to watch! 30/09/2011

Niigata, Japan - The PLANET

08/10/2011 14/10/2011

Sendai, Japan Osaka, Japan

WHAT’S MY NAME? WORLD TOUR 2011 -NORTH & SOUTH AMERICA CIRCUIT20/10/2011 21/10/2011 23/10/2011 24/10/2011 28/10/2011 30/10/2011 31/10/2011 02/11/2011 04/11/2011 05/11/2011 07/11/2011 08/11/2011 10/11/2011 12/11/2011

SanFrancisco, CA - Slims Los Angeles, CA - House of Blues Portland, OR - Hawthorne Theatre Seattle, WA - Showbox Chicago, IL - House of Blues Toronto, ONT - Phoenix Concert Theatre New York, NY - Irving Plaza Washington, DC - 9:30 Club Atlanta, GA - The Loft Orlando, FL - The Club at Firestone Houston, TX - Scout Bar Dallas, TX - Trees Caracas, Venezuela Centro Internacionale de Exposiciones Lima, Peru Centro Convenciones Scencia

15/11/2011 17/11/2011 18/11/2011

Buenos Aires, Argentina El Teatro Colegiales Bogota, Colombia - Teatro Ecci Mexico City, Mexico - Circo Volador

13/11/2011 14/11/2011

Santiago, Chile - Maquinaria Festiva Sao Paulo, Brazil SWU Music Arts & Festival

WHAT’S MY NAME? WORLD TOUR 2011 -TAIWAN11/12/2011

AIWAN - Riverside Live House

Also known as Miyabi, MYV, 382, DJ 382, MYV 382 TOKYO Born September 14, 1981 (age 30) Origin Konohana-ku, Osaka, Japan Genres Pop, rock, hip hop, metal (early years) Occupations Singer-songwriter, arranger, record producer, actor, dancer Instruments Vocals, guitar, shamisen, gigpig, piano Years active 1999–present

Labels PS Company, EMI Music Japan Associated acts S.K.I.N., Dué le Quartz Website myv382tokyo.com

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Red hot chili peppers I’m With you August 26th more info at: www.redhotchilipeppers.com


Aardschok Fan Edition  

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