Page 1

EMERGING P H OTO G R A P H E R

volume 7

1


02

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

04

Stuart Palley "TERRA FLAMMA: WILDFIRES AT NIGHT"

06

Garrett Baumer "RESTRICTED ACCESS"

08

Sinziana Velicescu "ON THE PERIPHERY"

10

Guillermo Hernandez "WHEN IN TEXAS"

12

Justin Tsucalas "POST COLLEGIATE"

15

Lyndi Bone "ROBOT FRIEND"

16

Amanda Leigh Smith "PORTRAITS OF HER"

18

Kasper Løftgaard "HOME, ONCE"

22

Charles Mosteller "CONCRETE COWBOYS"

26

Irina Popova "IF YOU HAVE A SECRET"

30

Kristina Varaksina "ABANDONED"

32

PORTFOLIO OF ONE: Adam Birkan

Photo © Lyndi Bone

TABLE OF CONTENTS


EMERGING

2 2

PHOTOGRAPHER SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, PHOTO+ John McGeary

Hu

rley

VICE PRESIDENT/PUBLISHER, PHOTO+ Lauren Wendle

te

r Photo ©

Pe

MANAGER, CUSTOM MEDIA & EVENTS Moneer Masih-Tehrani

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

MANAGING EDITOR Jacqui Palumbo DESIGN Kelly O'Leary, Ami Pourana, Fred Shallcrass CONTRIBUTORS Amy Touchette, Brienne Walsh

Summer in New York City brings with it some of my favorite things: food trucks lined up in Hanover Square, daytime rooftop gatherings, fireworks on Coney Island and a new issue of Emerging Pho-

PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Daniel Ryan

tographer.

CIRCULATION Lori Golczewski

In this issue, you'll find the work of eleven rising photographers with diverse backgrounds, concepts and voices: Stuart Palley's blazing

SUBMISSION SUPPORT Brad Arshinoff, Brad Kuhns, Reiko Matsuo

California wildfire landscapes (page 4); Garrett Baumer's meticulously built security-site sets (page 6); Justin Tsucalas's tongue-in-cheek chronicle of post-collegiate life (page 12); Charles Mosteller's striking portraits of urban cowboys in Philadelphia (page 22); and Irina Popova's honest depiction of her home country, Russia (page 26), to name a few. We've also brought back Adam Birkan from the last issue to discuss his new work on the end page (page 32). For this issue, our team and editors from our parent magazines, PDN and Rangefinder, reviewed more than 1,300 submissions over the

EMERGING PHOTOGRAPHER JURY Jessica Gordon (Senior Editor, Rangefinder), Moneer Masih-Tehrani, Jacqui Palumbo, Libby Peterson (Associate Editor, Rangefinder) Matthew Ismael Ruiz (Managing Editor, PDN) ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Mark Brown (646) 668-3702 SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Mike Gangel (646) 668-3717 Lori Reale (858) 204-8956

course of four days. We put together Emerging Photographer to put new talent on your radar, and we hope you find their work as memorable as we do. We're looking forward to the next submissions period, which will open in August 2015 at www.emerging.pdncontests.com. Until then! —Jacqui Palumbo

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Noah Christensen (646) 668-3708 Dennis Tyhacz (646) 668-3779 Jon McLoughlin (646) 668-3746

EMERGING PHOTOGRAPHER 85 Broad Street, 11th floor New York, NY 10004

ON THE COVER: Emerging Photographer is brought to you by PHOTO+, home to PDN and Rangefinder

A PUBLICATION OF

"Shuttlecocked," from Justin Tsucalas's series, "Post Collegiate" (page 12). Taken at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City, Kansas, Tsucalas references The Wizard of Oz: "Houses aren't the only thing that might fall on you in Kansas."

volume 7

1

CEO AND PRESIDENT David Loechner

SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, OPERATIONS Lori Jenks

CFO AND TREASURER Philip Evans

SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, DIGITAL Teresa Reilly

CHIEF INFORMATION OFFICER Bill Charles

VICE PRESIDENT, MARKETING SERVICES Joanne Wheatley

VICE PRESIDENT, GENERAL COUNSEL AND SECRETARY David Gosling EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT, BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT Darrell Denny

VICE PRESIDENT, CORPORATE OPERATIONS Eileen Deady VICE PRESIDENT, FINANCE Denise Bashem


STR E E T

©

DENNIS KEELEY 2015

p h oto g r a p h y 2 01 5

PDN AND ACUITY PRESS PRESENT T H E S E A R C H F O R O U T S TA N D I N G S T R E E T P H O T O G R A P H Y

w w w. s t r e e t p h o t o g r a p hy 2 0 1 5 . c o m


— Stuart Palley —

TERRA FLAMMA: W I L D F I R E S AT N I G H T


4 5

Since graduating with a Master's in photojournalism from University of Missouri in 2013, Stuart Palley has covered a wide range of topics for publications such as Los Angeles Times, National Geographic and the The New York Times. But it is the wildfires that rage in California that are currently capturing his fascination. “As

a

I'm

very

documentary

photographer,

interested

how

respond

to

in

natural

humans disasters,”

he explains. Growing up in Southern California, Palley has always been exposed to the effects of wildfires, but he believes they will become worse in coming years thanks to the current drought in the region. In “Terra Flamma: Wildfires at Night,” he not only aims to capture the terrible beauty of a natural phenomenon, but also to raise public awareness. He says: “If [the public] sees more beautiful pictures about fires, they’ll do more research, and understand the work that firefighters do, and better prepare their homes for wildfire.” So far, Palley has captured more than 30 wildfires at night using long exposures (he began funding the project with a highly successful Kickstarter campaign). Depending on the situation, he either takes his images from a distance, or from the closer perspective of firefighters on the scene. Often, the latter puts him in harm’s

way—he

recently

witnessed

a

fire where two propane tanks exploded, forcing him to run away from the scene. “No

picture

is

worth

dying

over,”

he

laughs. The series has been featured in New York, TIME and The Washington Post, among others. As much as he can, Palley tries to be respectful of the fact that he is witnessing destruction—sometimes homes,

or

even

of

worse,

peoples’ their

lives.

“I try to use captions to explain what is actually going on beyond the frame,” he says. “I try to make order out of the chaos.” —Brienne Walsh Photo © Stuart Palley www.stuartpalley.samexhibit.com


— Garrett Baumer —

RESTRICTED ACCESS


6 7

nancy borowick — “cancer family, ongo ing”


series

mythology around security sites. Looking at the com-

places

positions, one feels a sense of anxiety that, at any mo-

—modern-day security bunkers, missile silos and con-

ment, they will be caught looking at something entirely

trol towers, emptied of people and poised for the im-

forbidden. “I like how quiet a photograph can be, how

minent apocalypse. In actuality, they are 4 x 4-foot sets

it can make one feel slightly uneasy without anything

Garrett Baumer builds in his studio using foam core,

actually happening,” Baumer says.

At

first

glance,

“Restricted

the

Access”

photographs appear

to

in

be

the real

Plastruct, spray paint, LED lights and studio strobes. Inspired by a pastiche of references, including Google

In his empty landscapes, Baumer materializes the

image searches of the Titan Missile Silo in Arizona, as

general undercurrent of fear in American society

well as maps and films, Baumer creates an alternate

centered around a nuclear future. Although we cannot

dimension that depicts a place that is, as he puts it,

see our stockpile of nuclear weapons, we know

“slightly worse off than we are.”

they are there—and the result of a breach would be catastrophic. “I’m not trying to be political,” he says.

In graduate school at Columbia College Chicago, Bau-

“But I know they are loaded images.”

mer worked on a series in which he used actors in various staged scenarios. Realizing that he was spending

—Brienne Walsh

the most time focusing on the visual aspects of the environment, he decided to start building sets from

All photos © Garrett Baumer

scratch to create “new unseen spaces” inspired by the

www.garrettbaumer.com

gar rett baumer — “restricted access"


— Sinziana Velicescu —

ON THE PERIPHERY

While it’s true, as Sinziana Velicescu says, that “there are

and there’s nothing that can be done to fix that,” she ex-

a million details to discover if you stay in one place long

plains. For her, the beauty of Los Angeles lies where you

enough,” the specific details she notices tend to be par-

least expect it: “around the corner, a few miles from the

ticularly extraordinary. Case in point: “On the Periphery,”

main strip, outside of one’s comfort zone”—hence the ti-

a series she developed as a way to resolve her “love-

tle of the series.

hate relationship” with Los Angeles. (“It’s a beautiful city if you ignore the traffic, the clutter and the advertising,”

Citing Joel Sternfeld, William Eggleston and Lewis Baltz

she says.)

as inspiration, Velicescu says she has “an ongoing fascination with how notions of the American Dream are

In “On the Periphery,” Velicescu essentially “crops out”

manufactured and constructed in the West.” Up next: a

what she doesn’t like about her hometown and puts to

photo series that moves “’beyond the periphery,’” she

the fore her own partly fictionalized abstract version

says, “by exploring the beige stucco landscapes of

instead. “I photograph mostly walls and buildings,” she

more recently developed cities surrounding the Greater

says. “To me, they hold as much life and expression as

Los Angeles Area.”

the average human being.” —Amy Touchette Made during “chance encounters [with the city] and a substantial amount of wandering,” her process is in-

All photos © Sinziana Velicescu

extricably linked to the winds of inspiration at any

www.sinzianavelicescu.com

given moment: “Some days the city doesn’t speak to me


— Guillermo Hernandez —

WHEN IN TEXAS


10 11

A wide cultural audience has been introduced to the world

start talking to me.” By the time the game started, they would

of Texas high-school football by the book, film and television

forget he was there, allowing him the freedom to capture in-

show Friday Night Lights; the larger-than-life sport imbues

timate moments between not only the players, but also the

the culture of Texas's cities and towns. In his series, “When

coaches and fans—some of whom had been following the

in Texas,” Guillermo Hernandez explores the legacy of the

team for more than seven decades. “They know the kids,

sport, shooting in different towns throughout the Lone Star

they know that Johnny lives over there, and is playing line-

State. His series shows that the weekly football game is not

backer now,” he says. “It’s really heartfelt, the support these

merely about winning or losing, but about keeping the social

communities give to the kids.”

fabric of small communities intact over many generations. Hernandez

has

been

circulating

“When

in

Texas”

gradu-

within the photography-competition circuit (he recent-

ate of the University of Texas, returned to Austin af-

ly placed in the 2015 PDN Photo Annual sports catego-

ter photo assisting and researching for Golf and Sports

ry), and the series garnered him a staff job at Spring-

Hernandez,

a

dual

journalism

and

history

Illustrated in New York City. He spent the fall of 2014 driving

field News-Leader in Springfield, Missouri, where he is

to different towns in Texas every Friday morning—the far-

currently based.

thest he drove was eight hours to El Paso—trying to arrive early enough to have lunch in town.

—Brienne Walsh

“I have long hair and piercings, and [the locals] were like,

All photos © Guillermo Hernandez

‘You’re not from here,’” Hernandez says. “But they would

www.guillermo-hernandez.com


— Justin Tsucalas —

P O S T C O L L E G I AT E


12 13


As Justin Tsucalas captured the moments that would

“always drawn to the older photographers like Diane

eventually compose the series “Post Collegiate,” cre-

Arbus, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Walker Evans and Robert

ating a complete body of work was not at the forefront

Frank—black-and-white darkroom-type stuff,” he says.

of his mind. Tsucalas began habitually photographing

He’s advanced a lot since those days, but he hopes to

his friends while they were enrolled at Goucher Col-

build a miniature darkroom at his new business ven-

lege in Baltimore and continued after they graduated

ture, Plaid Photo, so he can relearn those darkroom

and transitioned further into adulthood. At the time,

processes. “I love the variety that comes with my ca-

Tsucalas said the pictures were “mainly just used for

reer and the constant feeling of physically being in

our amusement,” but an editor from Wonderful Ma-

places that I wouldn't/shouldn't be had it not been for

chine, Morgan Kazanjian, helped him to develop the

my camera,” he says. “I shoot a wide range of subjects

concept. “[She] flushed this story out while she was

professionally and personally and hope to maintain

doing an audit on my commercial portfolio. It opened

that variety as my career moves forward.”

my eyes to the possibilities these images and others like them can have,” he explains.

—Amy Touchette

“Post Collegiate” is playful and tongue-in-cheek, yet

All photos © Justin Tsucalas

carries a sense of nostalgia. It was Tsucalas’s first ex-

www.plaidphoto.com

ploration of color photography; growing up, he was

justin tsucalas — “post collegiate"


— Lyndi Bone —

R O B OT F R I E N D

As a single mom, Lyndi Bone wanted to start a practical ca-

the pair is depicted doing things like lighting firecrackers,

reer, enrolling at Utah Valley University with accounting in

selling lemonade, eating cotton candy and skating in a roller

mind—but quickly realized that career path was not for her.

rink. They transmit not a specific time or place, but rather nos-

Instead, she turned her focus to the photography department,

talgia for the American Dream.

where professors pushed her to explore her creativity. “The series gave me a good excuse to make a roShe found herself most inspired by the juxtaposition be-

bot costume,” Bone says, laughing, when asked why

tween technology and nostalgia. The youngest of six

she used a robot rather than an iPhone or a comput-

children, Bone grew up in the 1980s. She spent her child-

er to represent technology. The feel of the images, she

hood mostly outdoors, playing with friends and siblings.

hopes, transmits both a sense of humor and a collective

Watching her own kids grow up in the era of online inter-

yearning for returning to simpler times—one that her kids

action, she began to wonder how their nostalgia would

might not recognize now, but will likely relate to in the future.

be different from hers. “Instead of imaginary friends, they have online friends they've never met,” she says.

—Brienne Walsh

This led her to create “Robot Friend,” a series that features her

Photo © Lyndi Bone

son interacting with a human—usually one of Bone’s friends—

www.lyndibone.com

dressed up in a robot costume. In the lighthearted series,


16 16

nancy borowick — “cancer family, ongo ing”


17 17

— Amanda Leigh Smith —

PORTRAITS OF HER

Look at any of Amanda Leigh Smith’s editorial portraits and it’s likely that a strong sense of freedom will come over you. Whether it’s from the wide-open vistas she chooses on location, her playful compositions or the pensive, expansive expressions

of

her

subjects,

Smith’s

liberated take on life shines through. Raised in Cypress, Texas, Smith has explored a variety of disciplines already: she’s earned a BA in political science, worked in natural medicine and had jobs as a social worker and at a forestry museum. But photography, which she studied in high school, was always what made her happiest, and, as she puts it, “life is too short not to follow your dreams.” She

enjoys

capturing

her

subjects’

spirits “in a way that they feel good about” and does so largely by creating a positive and engaging environment during the shoot: making fun a priority while also challenging her subjects to push past their comfort zones. Photographing exclusively in 35mm film also helps Smith to achieve the atmosphere she seeks during shoots. She says a film camera “brings a sense of nostalgia to the shoot that people seem to feel more comfortable with in my experience.” She adds: “The sturdiness of an old camera while I’m hanging off the back of motorcycle [is also a plus].” Smith

utilizes

social

media

to

make

connections with clients; however, she’s found word of mouth from previous clients has been most effective in acquiring jobs. Her clients range from offbeat zines such as Blood of the Young to trendy fashion publications such as Cake and Nylon. But as she cuts her teeth in the magazine world,

she

hopes

to

start

shooting

campaigns for designers who inspire her and to make photojournalism stories on global issues she cares deeply about. —Amy Touchette Photo © Amanda Leigh Smith www.aleighsmith.com


18 18

nancy borowick — “cancer family, ongo ing”


19

— Kasper Løftgaard — 19

H OME , ON C E

nancy borowick — “cancer family, ongo ing”


Photography can be used to investigate an unfamiliar

subjects when they know that you’re shooting with a film

situation or to go deeper into a familiar one, and for

camera....They settle down a bit more and allow me to look

Kasper Løftgaard, making the series “Home, Once” was an

at them longer.”

opportunity for the latter. After attending a workshop with photographer and former Magnum member Kent Klich, Løft-

Originally attracted to technical aspects of photography

gaard decided to use photography to explore his long-stand-

—“cameras, lenses, lighting and all of that,” he says—in time

ing issues with his parents and his childhood in order to

“that stuff became less important and I saw that I had found

understand them better. The result: lovely, poetic images

a way to tell a lot of things without saying them.” Current-

bathed in an elegant, subdued palette that portray a range

ly studying photojournalism at the Danish School of Media

of subject matter.

and Journalism in Aarhus, Denmark, Løftgaard’s next series will portray college rodeo in Texas. He says, “I think it could

Shot in his hometown of Tvis, Denmark—where, with an

be interesting to shoot it very quietly and rather moody like

estimated population of 1,500, “everybody knows each

'Home, Once' and see what comes out of it.”

other,” he says—Løftgaard photographed the series using his Mamiya 7. “I had grown really tired of always looking at

—Amy Touchette

the screen of my digital camera and always shooting things in a hurry,” he explains. “Medium format forced me to slow

All photos © Kasper Løftgaard

down, and somehow it’s more natural to work slowly with

www.loftgaard.com

kasper løftgaar d — “home, once"


www.pdnthelook.com

CATEGORIES Advertising Editorial/Celebrity Still Life/Accessories Personal Work/Fine Art Runway/Street Scenes Beauty Debut/Student Motion

PRIZES One grand-prize winner will receive: $3,500 cash prize A $500 B&H gift card A one-page profile in PDN Seven first-place winners will receive: $100 B&H gift card All winners will receive: A PHOTO+ Basic Membership A place in the print/online PDN winner's gallery

ENTRY FEE Professionals: $35/image or series Students: $20/image or series Members*: $24.50 *30% discount on all contests with a PHOTO+ membership

DE ADLINE: JUNE 30, 2015

PRESENTS

PHOTO Š NADYA WASYLKO

where fashion meets art

SPONSORED BY


— Charles Mosteller —

C O N C R E T E C O W B OY S


28 29

Nothing quite illustrates “less is more” like wellexecuted

black-and-white

photographs.

The stripped-down nature of marrying light and dark can—at times—have a much more powerful impact than any spectrum of color can; a terrific example is “Concrete Cowboys,” a series by Philadelphia-based photojournalist Charles Mostoller. Esthetically bold and emotive, “Concrete Cowboys” portrays two teenagers, Shahir Drayton and Abdurrahman “Man-Man” Early, riding and caring for horses in the city of Philadelphia. The teens are two of several whom Malik Divers, the owner of the horses, “recruits to care for them as a way of teaching the teens work ethic and responsibility,” Mostoller explains. Mostoller’s

meeting

with

the

Concrete

Cowboys was lucky—he’d seen them on horseback around the city and happened to meet them one afternoon—but establishing trust took the tried-and-true method: perseverance. “They all thought I would be gone after one afternoon but I kept coming back week after week and they began to open up to me,” he says. Mostoller also grew up around horses and stables (his mother was a semi-professional equestrian), so the teens respected his knowledge. Shot with a Nikon D4 and D3, Mostoller trailed his subjects mostly by bicycle. “Photographing a group of kids racing through urban streets on horseback is hard,” he says; the bicycle gave him the speed and maneuverability he needed. Influenced by James Nachtwey’s Inferno and Larry Burrows' Vietnam, Mostoller plans to “keep telling hopeful stories about Philadelphia that get beyond the stereotypes so often associated with inner-city life.” —Amy Touchette All photos © Charles Mostoller www.charlesmostoller.com


24 24

nancy borowick — “cancer family, ongo ing”


24 25

charles mostoller — “concrete cowboys"


— Irina Popova —

I F Y O U H AV E A S E C R E T


28 29

When Russian-born photographer Irina Popova was

In Popova’s opinion, Russia used to be an open-

a child, she played a game that involved hiding a

minded, warm place. Much of this has vanished in the

“secret” in a glass jar, then burying it underground.

current political climate, which Popova describes as

She references that game in “If You Have a Secret,”

“very radical, very conservative and very nationalistic.”

a series of images taken in her homeland. “[It] is a metaphor for going away from Russia,” explains

In displaying photographs that reflect reality rather

Popova, who left the country after Putin was first

than

elected, and is currently living in Holland. “[Russia]

responsibility to protect her subjects. “[Russians] are

is a little secret, which I come back to find again, and

living in a dangerous time,” she says. “People can

to show to other people.”

get arrested just by being recognized in my images.”

propaganda,

Popova

realizes

she

has

a

At the same time, she wants to be honest in her Culled from an archive of almost one million

depiction, saying that Russians deserve to be seen

images, the photographs in the series capture both

in an ordinary light. “There is no barrier between

the inherent joy and sadness of life in a nation

them and the rest of the world.”

Popova loves deeply. Her images are raw and direct; subjects include a funeral dinner in Yarkino, a home-

—Brienne Walsh

less couple sleeping in a cellar in St. Petersburg and an elderly couple standing in front of the house they built in Tver.

All photos © Irina Popova www.irinapopova.net

ir ina popova — “if you have a secret”


JOIN THE MOST EXCLUSIVE PHOTO COMMUNIT Y > SUBSCRIPTIONS to PDN and Rangefinder magazines in print and online

B E N E F I T S I N C LU D E :

> EARLY REGISTRATION and discounts to PhotoPlus Expo and WPPI Conference & Expo > 30% DISCOUNT on entry fees to all PDN, WPPI and Rangefinder photo contests > CERTIFICATION with partner New York Institute of Photography

Photo Š Lou Mora

W W W.P H O T O S E R V E .C O M /M E M B E R S H I P


— Kristina Varaksina —

ABANDONED

Although

Kristina

Varaksina’s

30 30

series,

“Abandoned,” was directly inspired by Let the Right One In—a 2008 Swedish film about a child vampire and her bond with her bullied 12-year-old neighbor—it also reflects her own experiences growing up in Russia. “With aging, you learn to live with yourself and people around you, but when you are a teenager the feeling of being abandoned, being different from everybody else can be overwhelming,” she explains. “These sorts of feelings have always been with me.” Depicting beautiful, languid young women in bare rooms lit by television sets and the starry night sky just beyond the windows, the images capture feelings of jealousy, ennui and self-loathing so difficult to put into words—and even more difficult to visualize. Cast with two models from an agency in New York City, the girls often seem otherworldly. A sense of alienation is heightened by the pallid glow of the women’s skin—an effect achieved both by the makeup artist who worked with Varaksina on set and lighting from a blue gel placed on a strobe that mimicked the twilight feel of a blinking television screen. The images echo themes seen throughout Varaksina’s work, in which she explores “women going through major changes, children creating their own worlds around them and teenagers and young adults going

through

social

conflicts,”

she

explains. Her hyper-real style and filmlike color palettes place her subjects just beyond our world without sacrificing the feeling of a shared human experience.

—Brienne Walsh All photos © Kristina Varaksina www.kristinavaraksina.com

nancy borowick — “cancer family, ongo ing”


30 31


PORTFOLIO OF ONE

PRESENTED BY

Could you define your work with a single image? Bangkok-based photographer Adam Birkan gives it a tr y. Adam Birkan’s series “Hanoi” developed organically—just the way

extremes of yesterday and today, a city rich with history and tra-

he likes it. Birkan, who is currently based in Bangkok, but must leave

dition that has become one of the fastest-growing metropolises in

Thailand periodically to renew his visa. Led by his “predisposition to

the world.

wanderlust,” Birkan spends the time in various Southeast Asian citFinding the quiet moments and small details among the bustle of

ies; his time in Hanoi, Vietnam, fostered a new body of work.

extremely populated cities like Hanoi is a challenge that often inIn Hanoi, Birkan noticed an aspect of contemporary society that

spires Birkan’s photography. Entering a complex social landscape

often occupies his eye: economic disparity and the relentless, ev-

and emerging with “a moment that seems to defy expectations” is

er-quickening pace of change. For Birkan, Hanoi is a “case study

deeply meaningful to him and the reason he chose this image (pic-

in emerging economies,” a distillation of the complexity of the

tured) to define his work. The photograph, captured during a peace-

world as globalization takes hold. “In few places is the past and

ful moment on Hanoi’s chaotic, motor-scooter-packed streets, is a

the present so viscerally evident,” says Birkan. He adds that while

“juxtaposition that shows both where we are, where we are going

“’progress’ is an unstoppable force,” the city is “the proverbial fork

and where we have been,” he says. “I guess you could say quiet

in the road.”

moments are the decisive moments of chaos.” —Amy Touchette

Of course, humankind has always been evolving, but today, techno-

Photo © Adam Birkan, www.adambirkanphoto.com

logical advances have sped up life so that connections to the past are declining in a new, more severe way. Hanoi is a menagerie of

Adam Birkan was previously featured in Emerging Photographer Vol. 6, No.1.

ADVERTISEMENT


T H E U LT I M AT E E X P E R I E N C E I N P H O T O G R A P H Y, F I L M M A K I N G A N D D I G I TA L I M A G I N G

PHOTOPLUS EXPO CONFERENCE: O C TO B E R 2 1 – 2 4 E X P O : O C TO B E R 2 2 – 2 4 J AV I T S C E N T E R , N Y C

SAVE THE DATE!

ON LI NE R E GISTRAT ION O PE NS I N JU LY

2K 15 30% PHOTO+ MEMBERS

PHOTO © MAURIZIO DI IIORIO

SAVE ON CONFERENCE SEMINARS, CONTESTS AND MUCH MORE!

#PPE15

WWW.PHOTOPLUSEXPO.COM

Emerging Photographer Vol. 7, No. 1  

The Summer 2015 issue, by PHOTO+, parent group of Photo District News and Rangefinder featuring Stuart Palley, Garrett Baumer, Sinziana Veli...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you