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volume 8

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TABLE OF CONTENTS 02

LETTER FROM THE EDITORS

04

Renaud Lafrenière DIS-MOI DES BELLES CHOSES

06

Michael Vince Kim THE KOREANS OF KAZAKHSTAN

08

Hui Hsien Ng THE WEIGHT OF AIR

10

Sooj Heo EVEN IN THE DARKEST HOUR

14

Gaia Squarci MARS ON EARTH

18

Jason Koxvold BLACK-WATER

20

Patrick Tombola NOT FREE TO BE YOUNG

22

Daniel Rodrigues THE IRON TRAIN

24

Filippo Venturi MADE IN KOREA

28

Driely S. PORTRAITS

32

PORTFOLIO OF ONE: Benedict Evans


volume 8

1

EMERGING PHOTOGRAPHER

LETTER FROM THE EDITORs This issue marks the fourth edition of Emerging Photographer since its re-launch. In it, we highlight the work of another group of photographers new to the portrait, fine-art, travel and documentary photography fields. This magazine is juried, with each submission reviewed and discussed by the Emerging Photographer team, in addition to editors from our parent magazines, PDN and Rangefinder. Our conversations about each entry usually come back to the question: What makes a strong body of work? It’s easy to say that you’re drawn to a particular style of shooting or type of theme, but we look at how the concept is carried through a multi-image series, too. Are the images cohesive and ordered in a way that feels resolved? Is the sum greater than its parts, or is there a single image that can stand on its own? We don’t always agree on which images to publish until we see them laid out on the page, and then something clicks. We grow attached to the photography we work with, and we love when we see the work published elsewhere, in a different edit, or with new images, as the work gains a broader audience. Photography is a living thing, and a series of images is never static as it is presented in new ways through new outlets. We hope you enjoy the work of these ten outstanding photographers. We’d also like to thank B&H Photo for contributing prizes, and CoEdit Collection, whose founders will be providing a platform for select photographers in this issue to sell prints of their work. The submission period for Winter 2016 will open in July. Enter at emerging.pdncontests.com. —Jacqui Palumbo & Taryn Swadba

SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, PHOTO+ John McGeary VICE PRESIDENT/PUBLISHER, PHOTO+ Lauren Wendle MANAGER, CUSTOM MEDIA & EVENTS Moneer Masih-Tehrani MANAGING EDITOR Jacqui Palumbo ASSOCIATE EDITOR Taryn Swadba COPY EDITOR Elissa Hunter DESIGNER Mauricio Vargas CONTRIBUTORS Amy Touchette, Brienne Walsh PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Daniel Ryan CIRCULATION Lori Golczewski SUBMISSION SUPPORT Brad Arshinoff, Brad Kuhns, Reiko Matsuo EMERGING PHOTOGRAPHER JURY Moneer Masih-Tehrani, Jacqui Palumbo, Taryn Swadba Libby Peterson (Senior Editor, Rangefinder), Conor Risch (Senior Editor, PDN), Rebecca Robertson (Photo Editor, PDN) ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Mark Brown (646) 668-3702 SALES DIRECTOR Mike Gangel (646) 668-3717 SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Lori Reale (858) 204-8956, Jon McLoughlin (646) 668-3746 ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Dennis Tyhacz (646) 668-3779

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— Renaud Lafrenière —

DIS-MOI DES BELLES CHOSES


4 5

The French phrase dis-moi des belles choses roughly trans-

Lafrenière didn’t take the images with the intention of cre-

lates to “tell me beautiful things,” an apt name for a series

ating a body of work—he only saw their potential when he

about a love affair that photographer Renaud Lafrenière had

reviewed them after his trip. It was at Concordia University in

while traveling in France in the summer of 2015. He won’t

Montreal—where he is studying to receive his BFA in photog-

give many details about the love story itself; instead, he

raphy—where he developed them into a cohesive series. “I

wants viewers to see universal themes of travel, discovery

felt that there was more to them than souvenirs,” he explains.

and intimacy in the work. “I want the images to open up for

“I realized I could create a story with the pictures, one that is

the viewer,” he says. “I want to let him or her see what they

different from the story I lived while I was there.”

want to see.” From a total of 200 images, he chose 36 photographs for the Taken with color film on a Nikon F60 and a Mamiya 7 II, the

final series, which he plans on self-publishing in an edition

photographs are evocative of summer love. Dreamy and

of 100 books. He says: “I have a strong story, and I feel like

softly lit with natural light, they focus on seemingly insig-

if I keep it for myself, it’s not useful. I want to share it with

nificant details that together, tell a story of both place and

people.”

experience. Images of a family gathered around neon green and white sailboats are combined with close-ups of rings on

–Brienne Walsh

a hand, a sheer pink curtain over a window and a pretty girl smoking a cigarette.

Photos © Renaud Lafrenière renaudlafreniere.ca


— Michael Vince Kim —

T H E KO R E A N S O F K A Z A K H S TA N


6 7

In 1937, almost 172,000 Koreans who had settled in the

pelled to meet this community and tell their story, and to see

Russian Far East were forcibly deported to Kazakhstan and

how their culture and their language had diverged from the

Uzbekistan during the rule of Soviet Union leader Joseph

roots that we shared.”

Stalin, under the guise of preventing Japanese espionage in the region. Around 40,000 people died during the peril-

Armed with a Rolleiflex and medium-format film—Kim’s

ous journey and the harsh Kazakh winters that followed the

camera of choice for more than ten years—he began pho-

forced relocation, and those who survived were forbidden to

tographing “The Koreans of Kazakhstan,” an ongoing long-

speak their own language.

term project that won Magnum Photos' “30 Under 30” award for young photographers. Currently extending the series

While researching sociolinguistic variations in the Korean

to Uzbekistan and other neighboring countries, as well as

language, U.S.-born Korean photographer Michael Vince

South Korea, Kim says: “The issue of migration, displacement

Kim came across the direct result of this mass deportation:

and identity within the Korean diaspora is something I’ve

Koryo-mar, a now near-extinct language spoken by ethnic

been interested in for most of my life, and photography has

Koreans in the former Soviet Union. Kim was immediately

been a medium that allows me to explore it visually.”

fascinated by this Soviet-Korean dialect, which comprises archaisms that don’t exist in modern Korean, and began

– Amy Touchette

researching its history. Photos © Michael Vince Kim/INSTITUTE “[I was] shocked to find that this tragic episode of Korean history is largely untold and unknown,” Kim says. “[I] felt com-

michaelvincekim.com


— Hui Hsien Ng —

THE WEI G HT OF A I R


Spurred by a “personal search for quiet,” photographer Hui

of the region, she says: “I was led to contemplate questions

Hsien Ng obtained a one-month artist residency in Iceland

related to the relationships between oneself and the envi-

to create her series “The Weight of Air.” Trained in sociolo-

ronment, and how one lives and loves.”

gy, with both a bachelor’s and a master’s degree from the National University of Singapore, Ng turned to photography

Using a medium-format film camera and both a digital com-

just a few years ago to fill a void that she felt existed in her life.

pact and film compact camera, Ng says she created “The Weight of Air” to uncover what “arises in moments of solitude

During her residency in Iceland, Ng took the time to be truly

when one is simply present.” Ng is self-publishing a book

alone with nature, absorbing the various sights and sounds

of the project, and hopes to foster an intimate relationship

in solitude. “While I was walking through parts of Iceland,

between reader and images through “the tactility of a physi-

estranged from family and friends at the other side of the

cal book and the personal act of reading.”

world, geologically active landscapes revealed themselves to constitute a living, breathing ecosystem with its own set

– Amy Touchette

of rules,” she explains. Experiencing the “hostility” of Icelandic snowstorms, the “magic” of the Northern Lights and the

Photo © Hui Hsien Ng

bright skies that linger in the long summer daylight hours

huihsien.com


— Sooj Heo —

EVEN IN THE DARKEST HOUR


10 11


12 12

When Sooj Heo moved home to South Korea during a sab-

The resulting images—which Heo took with a 25-year-old

batical from her studies at Parsons School of Design in New

Canon film camera her father had gifted her in high school—

York City, she began to have issues with sleeping. “I became

seem to suggest that what is visually revealed in nothing-

such an insomniac—it got really bad,” she says. “Whenever

ness are moments of pure, ephemeral magic: puffs of smoke,

I couldn’t sleep, I went outside with my camera and start-

floating flowers, the shocked faces of animals and people

ed shooting whatever I saw.” This led to the creation of her

caught unaware in the darkness.

series “Even in the Darkest Hour,” a series of stark black-andSuch magic has universal appeal. Ever since receiving

white photographs.

her BFA with honors from Parsons in 2014, Heo has had She was drawn to the infinite space that the nighttime creat-

work from this series featured in Neptún, an Icelandic art

ed, which only seemed to expand as she walked. It brought

magazine, and has shown in exhibitions at Milk Gallery in

her to consider the Buddhist concept of mu, or nothingness,

New York City, the Philadelphia Photo Arts Center and the

which directly contrasted with the cult of self she had been

Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg, Russia.

imbued with since moving to the U.S. to receive a Western education. “Once people understand that ultimate reality is

–Brienne Walsh

nothingness or emptiness, they gain a different perspective on their mundane existence,” she explains of the concept.

Photos © Sooj Heo soojheo.com

sooj heo — “even in the darkest hour"


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— Gaia Squarci —

MARS ON EARTH


14 15


What would it be like to live on Mars? Photographer Gaia

ally a reenactment of their simulation, as they were walked

Squarci only had to travel 7,900 miles—as opposed to 35-

through their daily activities inside of the dome.

50 million miles—to answer that question through her series But true to her style, the series is imbued with mystery and

“Mars on Earth.”

ambiguity, allowing viewers to draw their own conclusions; HI-SEAS is a series of missions, each progressively longer,

disbelief is temporarily suspended by the visual cues of the

that monitors the psychological effects of humans in pro-

crater’s reddish ground and the presence of space suits, yet

longed isolation. It takes place in a dome nestled on the

it feels as if the setting’s artifice, much like the ending of the

slope of the Mauna Loa volcano in Hawaii. Writer Laurence

film The Truman Show, will be revealed.

Cornet became fascinated by the missions and “dragged” Squarci into the story with her; it was the perfect project for

“Mars on Earth”—which has been published in Newsweek

the two. “We have in common the predilection for surreal,

and The Guardian, among other publications—intends to

specific stories that can open a conversation on broader

play upon the motifs of science fiction that we are all familiar

themes,” Squarci says.

with, Squarci explains: “It was important for us to convey the human sense of the story: [a] sense of loneliness, [a lack] of

Squarci had no idea what to expect going in. The mission,

points of reference, and the need to call somewhere ‘home.’”

HI-SEAS III, kept the six crew members intentionally isolated for eight months, and Squarci and Cornet scheduled their

–Jacqui Palumbo

trip from Milan to coincide with the crew’s “arrival” back to Earth on June 13, 2015. The two were part of the first group

Photos © Gaia Squarci

that met with the researchers, who’d had no outside human

gaiasquarci.visura.co

contact since October. Squarci’s photo essay is quite liter-

gaia squarci — “mars on earth"


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— Jason Koxvold —

B L A C K - WAT E R

Brooklyn-based photographer Jason Koxvold was research-

permission from the U.S. military’s Public Affairs department

ing Kuwait on Google Earth when he first got the idea for

to photograph foreign bases. He embedded with the military

his series “BLACK-WATER.” He explains: “I could see that a

in Kabul and Bagram, Afghanistan, first, then went on to pho-

significant part of the country was occupied by U.S. military

tograph Creech Air Force Base in Indian Springs, Nevada,

facilities,” he says—and he wanted to photograph them.

and the National Training Center in Barstow, California. He has plans to travel to bases in Qatar and Arizona to continue

After working for many years as a creative director for

the series.

advertising agencies and design firms, he decided in 2014 to become a full-time freelance photographer. Photography had

“BLACK-WATER” shows neither patriotism nor violence, but

been a lifelong passion; even while working a full-time job, he

instead, the visual iconography of contemporary war and

had cultivated an impressive online following for his images.

the absurd amount of money that has been invested in it.

He had also worked with editorial clients including WIRED,

“[War] is a huge undertaking, and it benefits private indus-

Wallpaper* and National Geographic Traveler.

try more than it benefits the military itself,” Koxvold says. He has plans to self-publish a book of the work, with an essay

“BLACK-WATER” is a double entendre that refers both to

by esteemed photographer and writer Stanley Wolukau-

the military contracting company formerly used by the U.S.

Wanambwa.

government and the appearance of crude oil, which has a reflective surface. “In 15 years of war, we see more of our-

–Brienne Walsh

selves reflected back at us than we do the enemy,” explains Koxvold. As an accredited member of the press, he sought

Photos © Jason Koxvold koxvold.com


— Patrick Tombola —

N OT F R E E TO B E YO U N G

Tired of working in an office as a legal researcher, Patrick Tombola realized that pursuing his dream—photography—"was the only way forward," he says. Born in Australia, but raised primarily in Venice, Italy, Tombola turned to the medium in 2008 after earning degrees in political economy, law and journalism. Two years later, he began working full time on longterm projects, and he hasn't looked back since. "Not Free to Be Young" is a project Tombola started after an assignment with Welt am Sonntag, a German magazine, that required following a forensic detective throughout El Salvador for a week. "Often while [the detective] dug up corpses of young people, relatives were standing nearby frozen in pain and disbelief,” Tombola recalls. “I quickly realized the issues confronting this small country of 6 million people were devastating for its citizens and the broader region." Tombola says he peels back layers of the story in his work, trying to understand and convey the complexity of the relationship between the violence in El Salvador and the country’s youths—young Salvadorians account for many of the daily homicides in the region, and many attempt the tough migration to the U.S. in search of better opportunities. Both gang-affiliated and unaffiliated youths, he explains on his website, are just trying to lead normal lives. Packed with powerful compositions, Tombola's heart-wrenching images, published in TIME last year, were made over the course of seven weeks and are part of a broader series about violence in Central America's Northern Triangle. Currently following a retired gang member, Tombola has begun "digging deeper into the complex play of elements that pushes some young people to commit unspeakable acts." –Amy Touchette Photo © Patrick Tombola patricktombola.net


— Daniel Rodrigues —

THE IRON TRAIN

The Iron Train, which starts its journey in Nouadhibou and

are poor, and use this dangerous mode of transportation to

ends in Zouérat, travels more than 405 miles through

visit relatives or to transport goods, such as live animals.

the Sahara Desert over the course of 20 hours. The extreme shifts in temperature from day to night make for uneasy travel

Inspired by the likes of Elliott Erwitt, Don McCullin and

conditions, but "the worst,” photographer Daniel Rodrigues

Sebastião Salgado, Rodrigues produces both thoughtful,

says, “is the dust produced by wagons full of iron minerals.”

well-researched documentary work—which has been rec-

The minerals come from a Zouérat mine and are unloaded in

ognized by World Press Photo, Best of Photojournalism and

cargo boats in the port of Nouadhibou, he explains.

Pictures of the Year International—and more spontaneous travel and street photography. This body of work will be part

Rodrigues, a graduate of the Portuguese Institute of

of a larger ongoing project about the many different trains

Photography, first became interested in the massive 1.5-mile-

that exist in the world and how they are used. Rodrigues

long train after encountering it in Mauritania while following

says: “It’s one thing I want to [photograph] throughout life.”

a humanitarian mission that was en route from Portugal to Guinea-Bissau. Captivated by its story, Rodrigues returned to

–Amy Touchette

the area this year to photograph the Iron Train and the people who use it as a mode of transportation. Many of its riders

Photos © Daniel Rodrigues danielrodriguesphoto.com


— Filippo Venturi —

M A D E I N KO R E A


26 27

Italian photographer Filippo Venturi was reading a tour-

The compositions in his body of work are strongly linked to

ism dossier on South Korea when he developed a curios-

these motifs. Venturi looked for formality, tidiness and pre-

ity about the country. This curiosity eventually led to his

cision when framing his images of both places and people.

series “Made in Korea,” an exploration of the country’s rapid

Venturi’s clean, graphic approach was well matched for the

advancements in technology and its economic growth. But at

orderliness of cities like Busan and Seoul.

the time, he didn’t know much about Korean culture. “Every [aspect] of South Korea is little known in Italy, especially in

While Venturi usually creates reportage-style photography

the field of photography,” he explains.

and video, he frequently pursues personal projects that he finds interesting. “Made in Korea” is one of these projects,

Venturi began researching and gathering contacts in 2014,

and it has garnered a few prizes since its creation: second

and by the summer of 2015 he was ready to travel to Korea.

prize at the Sony World Photography awards, winner of the

His route took him from Seoul to the North Korean border,

New Talent section at the Fondazione Fotografia Modena

then southeast to Busan before returning to Seoul.

in Italy, and third prize at the Moscow International Foto Awards.

The project, he says, reflects upon a few major themes. “Perfection is pursued in every aspect of [South Korean} life:

–Taryn Swadba

education, career and esthetics,” he says. “Uniformity is the key, and this causes worrying collateral effects, such as great

Photos © Filippo Venturi filippoventuri.it

psychological pressure.”

f ilippo venturi — “made in korea"


— Driely S. —

PORTRAITS


30 31

Rather than arriving at a shoot with a pre-determined idea

images her whole life. Her innate talent—and her willingness

of how it will go, Brooklyn-based photographer Driely S. lets

to go wherever an assignment takes her—has landed her

her subjects lead the way. “You kind of go with whatever

commissions from publications such as GQ, Rolling Stone

your subject is giving,” she explains.

and Vogue. Her creative vision has also earned the respect of rapper Kanye West, who hired her to shoot backstage

As a result, her portfolio—which features editorial fashion

during the Yeezy fashion show—and posed for a tintype por-

images and portraits of musicians such as Kanye West and

trait at her request.

Wayne Coyne—is a kaleidoscope of styles. Featuring images taken with digital, medium-format and Polaroid cameras, as

When asked what sets her images apart from other young

well as tintypes and wet-plate collodion negatives (Driely is

photographers trying to break into the photography indus-

a firm believer of the mantra “the best camera is the one

try, Driely is honest: “I don’t know. I’m not sure if I have the

you have in your hand”), her work looks like a thoughtful

answer for that yet. You spend your whole life asking that

Instagram feed, a slice of life both spontaneous and curated

question. You just gotta keep on shooting.”

in nature. –Brienne Walsh Born in Rio de Janeiro to parents who owned a film store, Driely moved to New York City in 2010. And although she has

Photos © Driely S.

no formal training in photography, she has been capturing

drielys.com

driely s. — “portraits"


PORTFOLIO OF ONE Could you define your work with a single image? Brooklyn-based photographer Benedict Evans gives it a tr y. When we last featured the work of Benedict Evans, he’d just begun

arrived with Evans’ assistant, most of his gear and Dano’s PR rep in

getting editorial commissions under his belt, including The Love

tow, Evans had already snapped this shot under the High Line. “I

Portfolio assignment for OUT that caught our eye. Since then, he’s

always try to remain hyper-aware of what’s happening so that I don’t

been on his hustle in New York City, building relationships with editors

miss moments like these, in which the environment, the subject’s

and shooting assignments for clients that include Esquire, National

mood [and] the lighting all come together in an unexpected and

Geographic, New York, WIRED and ESPN The Magazine, the latter of

beautiful way,” he says.

which garnered him a coveted spot in the 2016 PDN Photo Annual. This summer, OUT will publish another portfolio of Evans work, and But Evans continues to experiment with his approach, and this image

he’ll continue to navigate the fast-paced world of editorial assign-

of actor Paul Dano represents a more serendipitous side to his work.

ments. But when I ask him what’s next, he says: “I’ve no idea, to be

While he always starts with specific direction—in order to both make

honest, and I think that’s one of the reasons I got into the photogra-

the subject comfortable and the client happy—he then lets the rela-

phy game in the first place.”

tionship he builds with his subjects guide the shoot. “The relationship we’re briefly building—that is the picture,” he says. “It’s always collab-

–Jacqui Palumbo

orative to some degree.” Photo © Benedict Evans, benedictevans.com Evans went off-script during Dano’s shoot, suggesting they take a quick trip to the High Line, an elevated park built on a railroad now in disuse, after their studio time. By the time the second taxi had

Portfolio of One is presented by B&H Photo and Video. Visit their website at bhphotovideo.com.

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Emerging Photographer, Vol. 8, No. 1