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remain. Two Rivers felt a sigh of relief. He had suffered a brief moment of doubt concerning whether or not the bird would complete the assigned role – as ordained by the Great Spirit. But now, as he saw the Raven draw near his lingering questions disappeared and he became satisfied that the Raven would stay with him to the very end. “We have seen so much of this world. It was you who taught me to fly without ever leaving the ground.” The canoe approached a crooked rock that jutted up from the cold waters. Two Rivers shrugged off sore muscles, took in the morning chill, relaxing in the knowledge that he had arrived. Now he could select a spot to prepare. “I know that my proximity to the island will give me a better view of my friend in the sky, he thought to himself. The silhouette of the Raven drifted earthward. The bird also yearned for rest because he had grown tired of making use of frayed feathers and narrowing quills in order to get closer to the man. Two Rivers used his paddle as a rudder and turned the canoe so that it glided towards the Northeast side of the island. His course brought him within a couple of inches from a wall of rock where it drifted in the gusts so that the swell of wind and water pinned it firmly in place. Now only the rocking motion hinted of the storm. The Raven alighted on a thin Poplar. He selected a part of the tree that would give a firm perch on a branch, hanging only ten feet above the man. The bird looked down and gazed intently into the wizened face of the elderly Shaman, and with a flap of his black wings, he mentally imploring the man below to ignore the approaching storm and look into his avian eyes. Although the sight that remained in the man’s one good eye was very poor and in some respects as feeble as his body, he still believed he saw a flicker of ready-resignation in the stare of the bird. “There will be no second thoughts or chances for either of us this time. It looks like he too has decided the end is near. This feathered being was indeed as clever and resourceful as it had always proven to be,” Two Rivers thought. The intelligence of animals had never come as a surprise to the Shaman, nor did he find their connection with the spirit world the least bit unusual. Two Rivers had always thought that – much like his father, “I have more in common with the beasts and birds of the forest. Their roles as either predator or prey, does nothing to dull the brotherhood they all share.” 28

Hunters & Hearts Excerpt  

The adventures of legendary University of Minnesota and Chicago Blackhawk Hockey Coach, Emil Iverson, an Ojibwa Shaman named Two Rivers, and...

Hunters & Hearts Excerpt  

The adventures of legendary University of Minnesota and Chicago Blackhawk Hockey Coach, Emil Iverson, an Ojibwa Shaman named Two Rivers, and...