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approach his people would turn them into smoke where they were easily lost in the pale flaps of whiteness hanging off the birch trees. Blaming the mirage on his bad vision was more sensible. The Ghost Tribe’s disappearance left only speculation behind. “Have my wishes become illusions?” Two Rivers questioned the Sky Spirit hiding in the blue haze and cotton clouds. Thinking of the tribe, caused his body to relax, so the mind could enter a state of clarity that resided somewhere between merciful dreams and tortured delirium. Two Rivers took a deep breath of pine air that was thankfully absent of factory smoke or timber mills. He listened and from the Spirit World came a message of earth-songs and emerald-notes that rang through the rocks and above the water, “on this day your death has come.” A whispering breeze shook the last of the leaves from the trees and chimed in to make the message undeniably clear about his last days on earth. Clarity came with the arming of nature’s affirmations and gave way to morning visions which enabled him to foresee his death making him confident that he was about to revisit his ancestors. “I have no fear and am rather anxious to see my Ojibwa brothers and sisters; most of all the ones who had been driven from their lodges at gunpoint and those who had died of the Spanish Flu epidemic so many years ago,” Two Rivers thought to himself. Flashes of history continued to strike like a lightning storm raging in his brain and served to fire up another memory from the past – his people all tragically stricken from a disease brought to the tribe from far away lands. He could remember the sight of his people clutching themselves in pain. Nearly every last one of them had died and remained unburied for many years. No rituals or ceremonies were given to put their spirits at peace. That is… until his friend, a white man had led an expedition some ten winters later to find the lost village. The white man became as a brother, proving once and for all, the size and scope of his village against all government denials. The white man had also had the ability to hear the spirits of the woodland and could call on their wisdom. Two Rivers said the white man’s name in a hushed voice, “Emil Iverson.” Then he said the Ojibwa name given to the man, “Chief of Big Waters.” 26

Hunters & Hearts Excerpt  

The adventures of legendary University of Minnesota and Chicago Blackhawk Hockey Coach, Emil Iverson, an Ojibwa Shaman named Two Rivers, and...

Hunters & Hearts Excerpt  

The adventures of legendary University of Minnesota and Chicago Blackhawk Hockey Coach, Emil Iverson, an Ojibwa Shaman named Two Rivers, and...