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charging towards him with a spear held as a jouster. Winter Fox countered the strike by deftly side-stepping and causing the trust to miss him. The spear was way off-target. The razor sharp point ended up being wedged firmly into a narrow V-shaped tree trunk; which stood very low to the ground. The spear was pinned so tight, that try as he might Gray Wolf found it impossible to yank loose. Winter Fox dropped his club and used both hands to snap the shaft in half. Flipping the longest piece into the air he caught it and jabbed the splintered part into Gray Wolf's throat. "Another kill, another scalp." The Ojibwa surge into the Iroquois ranks gained impetus. Their strategy of hit and hide, combined with surprise, gave them all the advantage they needed. Stone clubs and arrows might have seemed to be inadequate against muskets, steel knifes and tomahawks. However, when arrows are notched into quivers of perseverance, and stones are lashed to handles of fortitude, then the balance shifts to those with weapons forged of the intangible. Winter Fox heard the voices of dead Chiefs again, the sounds echoing out from Dream Mountains. "Of all the Algonquin tribes it was the Ojibwa who had the fiercest reputation. We never avoided confrontation when others tried to take our food or furs. The Ojibwa drove the Iroquois from their lands and our plan of striking fast and disappearing even faster was used over and over. We attacked our enemies like ghosts and because we came and went like Wind … our way would break the enemy spirit and cause dissention in the in the hearts of all you came to take what is ours." The Ghostly Chief’s words went on to say … "The Ojibwa way of fighting from concealment, never standing in formation, and staying out of the open, was said to be cowardly by the Whites. "They could not understand that the Ojibwa method of fighting. We never met a larger force head on … we used the night and stormy weather to conceal movement, and then melted away before the enemy could recover. It is the Ojibwa way that saved countless lives and always gave them victory." The Spirits of the Woodlands had opinions all their own about the European method of fighting. “Dress in bright colours, amass together in a straight line, and don’t retreat or move when musket balls cut 21

Hunters & Hearts Excerpt  

The adventures of legendary University of Minnesota and Chicago Blackhawk Hockey Coach, Emil Iverson, an Ojibwa Shaman named Two Rivers, and...

Hunters & Hearts Excerpt  

The adventures of legendary University of Minnesota and Chicago Blackhawk Hockey Coach, Emil Iverson, an Ojibwa Shaman named Two Rivers, and...