Page 1

Leo Cinicolo Dissertation Concept 1

Dissertation Laying Out DIRECTIONs 3.indd 1

19/11/2010 12:41


9 99 999 9999 99999 999999 9999999 99999999 999999999 9999999999 99999999999 999999999999 9999999999999

Dissertation Laying Out DIRECTIONs 3.indd 2

19/11/2010 12:41


Tense and Reality The remaining question seems to be what essentially differentiates the ‘cinematic’ and the ‘photographic’? Is it time and movement or is it more than that? They both seem to be frustratingly intangible concepts and yet they are digested on a twenty-four hour basis around the world; as much a part of modern life as eating and breathing. In his essay accompanying Crewdson’s latest book “Beneath the Roses”, Russell Banks compares the photographs of that series to the “glossy stills” posted in cinema lobbies to announce forth-coming features (Page 6. Crewdson, G. 2008). Celebrating their ability to allow individual interpretation. “Movie going is essentially a passive experience… we check our imaginations at the door.” (Page 6. Crewdson, G. 2008). This may be a little sweeping considering some of the broader cinematic texts explored in this essay, however it is true for a large part of ‘conventional’ cinema.

44

Dissertation Laying Out DIRECTIONs 3.indd 3

19/11/2010 12:41


Banks describes the way that audiences cannot “plug in” their “pasts… fantasies and denials” when engaged with a film. In this way the photograph has an ambiguity that may be advantageous or hindering. Whichever, it allows the viewer to ‘read’ the photograph at their own pace as “in complete control of our rate of perception we read a novel.” (Page 6. Crewdson, G. 2008). Although artists such as Marker or Duchamp play with this notion it remains a truth that photographs remain instantaneous. They are accessible at a glance or a prolonged study. They can be carried in a pocket or hung in a gallery, and essentially they imprint themselves on the mind. The ‘cinematic’ experience is more commonly based on the theatrical. A viewing that lasts for a fixed duration. Whereas the ‘human’ experience exists always and forever in the present. This may explain why Campany’s observation that photographs exist “inextricably to the past” (Page 11. Campany, D. 2008) is what makes them so accessible to our formation of memory. When remembering a film the human brain edits together critical moments. Whereas with music, a piece can be remembered in its entirety, visually the brain compresses memories and visions into hybridised pictures, butchered out of the present narrative in which they once existed. This inescapable process favours the still image for sheer permanence of memory. It speaks out with a clear message in a visual language, and Crewdson is as fluent in this language as is possible. When asked the plot of a film an audience member will recite a chronological rendition of what they, and everyone else in the screening-theatre witnessed. Crewdon’s images however contain a deceptively simple façade, which, like one-way glass allows the viewer to look into a world, and at the same time, see themselves reflected back. Any sort of narrative or morality is brought from Crewdson’s

2 BOMB Magazine. 1997. Interview with Gregory Crewdson by Bradford Morrow http://www.bombsite.com/issues/61/articles/2090 accessed on October 12th 2009 3

Page 82. Bright, Susan. 2006. Art Photography Now. London. Thames & Hudson

Dissertation Laying Out DIRECTIONs 3.indd 4

19/11/2010 12:41


mind, the physical presence of the image, and the viewer. Bradford Morrow told Crewdson he found his work “Aesopian” (Morrow, B. 1997) as in from Aesope’s fables. They explore morals and states relevant to the entire human race; tenderness, madness, fragility. There are certainly films existing which are just as successful in their portrayal of these subjects. However the stillness and gravitas Crewdson imparts in a snap-shot works outside of narrative. It is distilled into a blend of those states, apart from time. That is the essentially ‘photographic’.

Dissertation Laying Out DIRECTIONs 3.indd 5

46 45

6 BOMB Magazine. 1997. Interview with Gregory Crewdson by Bradford Morrow http://www.bombsite.com/issues/61/articles/2090 accessed on October 12th 2009.

19/11/2010 12:41


9 99 999 9999 99999 999999 9999999 99999999 999999999

Dissertation Laying Out DIRECTIONs 3.indd 6

19/11/2010 12:41


Tense and Reality The remaining question seems to be what essentially differentiates the ‘cinematic’ and the ‘photographic’? Is it time and movement or is it more than that? They both seem to be frustratingly intangible concepts and yet they are digested on a twenty-four hour basis around the world; as much a part of modern life as eating and breathing. In his essay accompanying Crewdson’s latest book “Beneath the Roses”, Russell Banks compares the photographs of that series to the “glossy stills” posted in cinema lobbies to announce forth-coming features (Page 6. Crewdson, G. 2008). Celebrating their ability to allow individual interpretation. “Movie going is essentially a passive experience… we check our imaginations at the door.” (Page 6. Crewdson, G. 2008). This may be a little sweeping considering some of the broader cinematic texts explored in this essay, however it is true for a large part of ‘conventional’ cinema.

44

Dissertation Laying Out DIRECTIONs 3.indd 7

19/11/2010 12:41


Banks describes the way that audiences cannot “plug in” their “pasts… fantasies and denials” when engaged with a film. In this way the photograph has an ambiguity that may be advantageous or hindering. Whichever, it allows the viewer to ‘read’ the photograph at their own pace as “in complete control of our rate of perception we read a novel.” (Page 6. Crewdson, G. 2008). Although artists such as Marker or Duchamp play with this notion it remains a truth that photographs remain instantaneous. They are accessible at a glance or a prolonged study. They can be carried in a pocket or hung in a gallery, and essentially they imprint themselves on the mind. The ‘cinematic’ experience is more commonly based on the theatrical. A viewing that lasts for a fixed duration. Whereas the ‘human’ experience exists always and forever in the present. This may explain why Campany’s observation that photographs exist “inextricably to the past” (Page 11. Campany, D. 2008) is what makes them so accessible to our formation of memory. When remembering a film the human brain edits together critical moments. Whereas with music, a piece can be remembered in its entirety, visually the brain compresses memories and visions into hybridised pictures, butchered out of the present narrative in which they once existed. This inescapable process favours the still image for sheer permanence of memory. It speaks out with a clear message in a visual language, and Crewdson is as fluent in this language as is possible. When asked the plot of a film an audience member will recite a chronological rendition of what they, and everyone else in the screening-theatre witnessed. Crewdon’s images however contain a deceptively simple façade, which, like one-way glass allows the viewer to look into a world, and at the same time, see themselves reflected back. Any sort of narrative or morality is brought from Crewdson’s

2 BOMB Magazine. 1997. Interview with Gregory Crewdson by Bradford Morrow http://www.bombsite.com/issues/61/articles/2090 accessed on October 12th 2009 3

Page 82. Bright, Susan. 2006. Art Photography Now. London. Thames & Hudson

Dissertation Laying Out DIRECTIONs 3.indd 8

19/11/2010 12:41


mind, the physical presence of the image, and the viewer. Bradford Morrow told Crewdson he found his work “Aesopian” (Morrow, B. 1997) as in from Aesope’s fables. They explore morals and states relevant to the entire human race; tenderness, madness, fragility. There are certainly films existing which are just as successful in their portrayal of these subjects. However the stillness and gravitas Crewdson imparts in a snap-shot works outside of narrative. It is distilled into a blend of those states, apart from time. That is the essentially ‘photographic’.

Dissertation Laying Out DIRECTIONs 3.indd 9

46 45

6 BOMB Magazine. 1997. Interview with Gregory Crewdson by Bradford Morrow http://www.bombsite.com/issues/61/articles/2090 accessed on October 12th 2009.

19/11/2010 12:41


Dissertation Laying Out DIRECTIONs 3.indd 10

19/11/2010 12:41


Tense and Reality The remaining question seems to be what essentially differentiates the ‘cinematic’ and the ‘photographic’? Is it time and movement or is it more than that? They both seem to be frustratingly intangible concepts and yet they are digested on a twenty-four hour basis around the world; as much a part of modern life as eating and breathing. In his essay accompanying Crewdson’s latest book “Beneath the Roses”, Russell Banks compares the photographs of that series to the “glossy stills” posted in cinema lobbies to announce forth-coming features (Page 6. Crewdson, G. 2008). Celebrating their ability to allow individual interpretation. “Movie going is essentially a passive experience… we check our imaginations at the door.” (Page 6. Crewdson, G. 2008). This may be a little sweeping considering some of the broader cinematic texts explored in this essay, however it is true for a large part of ‘conventional’ cinema.

Page 82. Bright, Susan. 2006. Art Photography Now. London. Thames & Hudson

Dissertation Laying Out DIRECTIONs 3.indd 11

44

3

19/11/2010 12:41


Banks describes the way that audiences cannot “plug in” their “pasts… fantasies and denials” when engaged with a film. In this way the photograph has an ambiguity that may be advantageous or hindering. Whichever, it allows the viewer to ‘read’ the photograph at their own pace as “in complete control of our rate of perception we read a novel.” (Page 6. Crewdson, G. 2008). Although artists such as Marker or Duchamp play with this notion it remains a truth that photographs remain instantaneous. They are accessible at a glance or a prolonged study. They can be carried in a pocket or hung in a gallery, and essentially they imprint themselves on the mind. The ‘cinematic’ experience is more commonly based on the theatrical. A viewing that lasts for a fixed duration. Whereas the ‘human’ experience exists always and forever in the present. This may explain why Campany’s observation that photographs exist “inextricably to the past” (Page 11. Campany, D. 2008) is what makes them so accessible to our formation of memory. When remembering a film the human brain edits together critical moments. Whereas with music, a piece can be remembered in its entirety, visually the brain compresses memories and visions into hybridised pictures, butchered out of the present narrative in which they once existed. This inescapable process favours the still image for sheer permanence of memory. It speaks out with a clear message in a visual language, and Crewdson is as fluent in this language as is possible. When asked the plot of a film an audience member will recite a chronological rendition of what they, and everyone else in the screening-theatre witnessed. Crewdon’s images however contain a deceptively simple façade, which, like one-way glass allows the viewer to look into a world, and at the same time, see themselves reflected back. Any sort of narrative or morality is brought from Crewdson’s

2 BOMB Magazine. 1997. Interview with Gregory Crewdson by Bradford Morrow http://www.bombsite.com/issues/61/articles/2090 accessed on October 12th 2009 3

Page 82. Bright, Susan. 2006. Art Photography Now. London. Thames & Hudson

Dissertation Laying Out DIRECTIONs 3.indd 12

19/11/2010 12:41


mind, the physical presence of the image, and the viewer. Bradford Morrow told Crewdson he found his work “Aesopian” (Morrow, B. 1997) as in from Aesope’s fables. They explore morals and states relevant to the entire human race; tenderness, madness, fragility. There are certainly films existing which are just as successful in their portrayal of these subjects. However the stillness and gravitas Crewdson imparts in a snap-shot works outside of narrative. It is distilled into a blend of those states, apart from time. That is the essentially ‘photographic’.

Dissertation Laying Out DIRECTIONs 3.indd 13

46 45

6 BOMB Magazine. 1997. Interview with Gregory Crewdson by Bradford Morrow http://www.bombsite.com/issues/61/articles/2090 accessed on October 12th 2009.

19/11/2010 12:41


Dissertation Laying Out DIRECTIONs 3.indd 14

19/11/2010 12:41


Tense and Reality The remaining question seems to be what essentially differentiates the ‘cinematic’ and the ‘photographic’? Is it time and movement or is it more than that? They both seem to be frustratingly intangible concepts and yet they are digested on a twenty-four hour basis around the world; as much a part of modern life as eating and breathing. In his essay accompanying Crewdson’s latest book “Beneath the Roses”, Russell Banks compares the photographs of that series to the “glossy stills” posted in cinema lobbies to announce forth-coming features (Page 6. Crewdson, G. 2008). Celebrating their ability to allow individual interpretation. “Movie going is essentially a passive experience… we check our imaginations at the door.” (Page 6. Crewdson, G. 2008). This may be a little sweeping considering some of the broader cinematic texts explored in this essay, however it is true for a large part of ‘conventional’ cinema.

Page 82. Bright, Susan. 2006. Art Photography Now. London. Thames & Hudson

Dissertation Laying Out DIRECTIONs 3.indd 15

44

3

19/11/2010 12:41


Banks describes the way that audiences cannot “plug in” their “pasts… fantasies and denials” when engaged with a film. In this way the photograph has an ambiguity that may be advantageous or hindering. Whichever, it allows the viewer to ‘read’ the photograph at their own pace as “in complete control of our rate of perception we read a novel.” (Page 6. Crewdson, G. 2008). Although artists such as Marker or Duchamp play with this notion it remains a truth that photographs remain instantaneous. They are accessible at a glance or a prolonged study. They can be carried in a pocket or hung in a gallery, and essentially they imprint themselves on the mind. The ‘cinematic’ experience is more commonly based on the theatrical. A viewing that lasts for a fixed duration. Whereas the ‘human’ experience exists always and forever in the present. This may explain why Campany’s observation that photographs exist “inextricably to the past” (Page 11. Campany, D. 2008) is what makes them so accessible to our formation of memory. When remembering a film the human brain edits together critical moments. Whereas with music, a piece can be remembered in its entirety, visually the brain compresses memories and visions into hybridised pictures, butchered out of the present narrative in which they once existed. This inescapable process favours the still image for sheer permanence of memory. It speaks out with a clear message in a visual language, and Crewdson is as fluent in this language as is possible. When asked the plot of a film an audience member will recite a chronological rendition of what they, and everyone else in the screening-theatre witnessed. Crewdon’s images however contain a deceptively simple façade, which, like one-way glass allows the viewer to look into a world, and at the same time, see themselves reflected back. Any sort of narrative or morality is brought from Crewdson’s mind, the physical presence of the image, and the viewer. Bradford Morrow told Crewdson he found his work “Aesopian” (Morrow, B. 1997) as in from Aesope’s fables. They explore morals and states relevant to the entire human race; tenderness, madness, fragility. There are certainly films

2 BOMB Magazine. 1997. Interview with Gregory Crewdson by Bradford Morrow http://www.bombsite.com/issues/61/articles/2090 accessed on October 12th 2009 3

Page 82. Bright, Susan. 2006. Art Photography Now. London. Thames & Hudson

Dissertation Laying Out DIRECTIONs 3.indd 16

19/11/2010 12:41


existing which are just as successful in their portrayal of these subjects. However the stillness and gravitas Crewdson imparts in a snap-shot works outside of narrative. It is distilled into a blend of those states, apart from time. That is the essentially ‘photographic’.

Dissertation Laying Out DIRECTIONs 3.indd 17

46 45

6 BOMB Magazine. 1997. Interview with Gregory Crewdson by Bradford Morrow http://www.bombsite.com/issues/61/articles/2090 accessed on October 12th 2009.

19/11/2010 12:41


Dissertation Laying Out DIRECTIONs 3.indd 18

19/11/2010 12:41

LCD Dev 3  

Further development

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you