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“Reinventing itself for the 21st Century”

Fact Book 2009-2013 Office of Institutional Planning, Research and Effectiveness Edward Waters College 1658 Kings Road Jacksonville, FL 32209 (904) 470-8261

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Message from the President Founded in 1866 as the oldest private institution of higher learning in Florida, Edward Waters College has a lush history of educating students to become future leaders of society. Since its inception, the College has attracted students from throughout the country, and abroad, by offering a rare trio of rich academic, cultural and spiritual experiences to shape its scholars into independent thinkers and impactful citizens of the world. In fact, as an alumnus of Edward Waters College, I can affirm the strong foundation that Edward Waters College provided me to rise as a leader, both personally and professionally. A holistic education is the cornerstone to expanding the capacity of one’s mind and soul. Rigorous academics, coupled with spiritual and social support, enable students to grow in and outside of the classroom. Furthermore, it instills not only the competency to solve the problems of an everevolving, globalized 21st Century economy, but also the passion to serve the underserved and to guide the misguided. Through the process of acquiring a holistic education at Edward Waters College, students have numerous opportunities to ignite their curiosity, foster new ideas, grow in their faith and give back to the community. As the 29th President, I am committed to growing Edward Waters College into an internationally recognized institution, renowned for its unique programs, research and student support systems. However, our most important goal is to produce graduates that will be noted for elevating the standards of professional excellence and servant leadership in order to contribute to the betterment of the world in which we live. Sincerely,

Nathaniel Glover, Jr. President

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Contents Preface ...........................................................................................................................................................................4 Section I General Information .......................................................................................................................................5 Institutional Profile ....................................................................................................................................................5 History of the College ................................................................................................................................................6 Our Mission ............................................................................................................................................................... 7 Our Vision .................................................................................................................................................................7 Our Core Values* ......................................................................................................................................................7 Strategic Goals 2009-2014 ........................................................................................................................................7 Historical Highlights ..................................................................................................................................................8 List of EWC Presidents ........................................................................................................................................... 10 Governance .............................................................................................................................................................. 11 Accreditations and Affiliations ................................................................................................................................ 12 Administration ......................................................................................................................................................... 13 Section II Academic Affairs ........................................................................................................................................ 14 New Student Data .................................................................................................................................................... 14

First Time in College by Gender Fall 2011 to Fall 2013 ................................................ 15 First- Time in College Retention Rates ................................................................................ 16 Enrollment by Gender ........................................................................................................... 17 Enrollment by Ethnicity ........................................................................................................ 18 Enrollment by Full-Time and Part-Time .............................................................................. 18 Enrollment by State of Residency......................................................................................... 19 Enrollment by Major ............................................................................................................. 19 Section III Degree Completion .................................................................................................................................... 21 Graduation Rate Trends ........................................................................................................................................... 23 Graduation Rates- 3 Year Comparison .................................................................................................................... 24 Section IV Student Achievement Outcomes ............................................................................................................... 24 Section V Faculty and Staff ......................................................................................................................................... 25 FACULTY DATA ................................................................................................................................................... 25 By Ethnicity Fall 2009 to Fall 2011......................................................................................................................... 28 Section VI Student Financial Services ......................................................................................................................... 29 Section VII Facilities ................................................................................................................................................... 29 Section VIII Athletics .................................................................................................................................................. 33

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Preface This is the 2009-2013 edition of the Edward Waters College Fact Book. This publication presents important facts and statistical information about Edward Waters College. Most of the information presented in this book is considered to be official data as released to the various organizations such as IPEDs, ICUF and others. In some instances however, data presented has been collected from Power Campus our ERP system, EWC website, academic and non-academic units across the college. Data acquired from other sources are otherwise indicated. Please share your suggestions and comments with us regarding the inclusion of additional information to the document. Also contact us about details we should include to better serve you. Acknowledgements We wish to extend our appreciation to each EWC staff who dedicated a great deal of their time and effort on the production of this document. Bernice Parker-Bell, Director Institutional Planning, Research and Effectiveness 1658 Kings Road Jacksonville, FL 32209 Phone: (904) 470-8261 Email: bparkerbell@ewc.edu

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Section I General Information Institutional Profile Campus Address: 1658 Kings Road Jacksonville, Florida 32209-6199 President’s Office: (904) 470-8010 Fax: (904) 470-8039 Web Address: www.ewc.edu Admissions Address: 1658 Kings Road Jacksonville, Florida 32209 Main Office: (904) 470-8200 Fax: (904) 470-8040 Toll-free: (888) 898-3191 Location: Located along the Kings Road corridor in Jacksonville, Florida, the third largest city in the state with approximately one million people in population; approximately 15 minutes from the Jacksonville International Airport, five minutes northwest from downtown Jacksonville; 30 minutes from the Beaches; 20 miles from the Georgia state line; served by the city’s mass-transit bus system; several museums and cultural exhibits within 15 minutes of the College. “On the Rise” President - Nathaniel Glover, Jr. Religious Affiliation: African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church Edward Waters College is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097; phone 404.679.4501) to award the baccalaureate degree Private, Coeducational, Residential Enrollment Fall 2013 – 862 students 2.5 High School GPA for admissions EWC, the oldest private institution of higher education in the State of Florida, was founded in 1866 to educate freed slaves EWC is an HBCU(Historically Black College and University) Member of the United Negro College Fund School colors: Orange and Purple School mascot: Tiger

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History of the College Edward Waters College is, distinctively, Florida’s oldest independent institution of higher learning as well as the state’s first institution established for the education of African Americans. Edward Waters College (EWC) began as an institution founded by blacks, for blacks. In 1865, following the Civil War, the Reverend Charles H. Pearce, a presiding elder of the African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church, was sent to Florida by Bishop Daniel Alexander Payne. Observing the fast-paced social and political changes of the Reconstruction era, Rev. Pearce immediately recognized the need for an education ministry, as no provision had yet been made for the public education of Florida’s newly emancipated blacks. Assisted by the Reverend William G. Steward, the first AME pastor in the state, Pearce began to raise funds to build a school. This school, established in 1866, was to eventually evolve into Edward Waters College. From the beginning, EWC was faced with both abject poverty and widespread illiteracy among its constituents resulting from pre-war conditions of servitude and historical, legally enforced non-schooling of African Americans. However, the school met the needs of its community by offering courses at the elementary, high school, college, and seminary levels. Construction of the first building began in October 1872 on ten acres of land in Live Oak. Further support for this new educational institution came from numerous friends, including railroad magnate General M.S. Littlefield, State Treasurer, Simon Conaber, and LieutenantGeneral William Gleason. In 1892, the school’s name was changed to Edward Waters College in honor of the third Bishop of the AME Church. In 1901, the City of Jacksonville was destroyed by fire and Edward Waters College was reduced to ashes. In 1904, the Board of Trustees purchased the present site of the school on Kings Road with the imperative from Bishop MB Salter that Edward Waters College must be rebuilt. Under the continued visionary leadership and direction of great Bishops of the AME Church and twenty-nine focused presidents, Edward Waters College was indeed “rebuilt.” In May of 2010, the College welcomed a Jacksonville native son and alumnus, Nathaniel Glover, as President who continues the work of his predecessors by focusing on educating students to be successful in the 21st Century global economy and ensuring that they matriculate in a safe environment. With a history beginning in the dark yet hopeful days of Reconstruction, today’s Edward Waters College is living, thriving proof of the power of education and the resilience of deeply rooted educational institutions. The College continues to experience the triumphs and challenges characteristic of its rich history and the bold dynamic future to which it aims.

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Our Mission Edward Waters College is a small private, Christian, Historically Black, Urban, Liberal Arts College that offers quality baccalaureate degree programs. The College strives to prepare students holistically to advance in a global society through the provision of intellectually stimulating programs and an environment which emphasizes high moral and spiritual values in keeping with the African Methodist Episcopal Church. Edward Waters College seeks to develop excellence in scholarship, research and service for the betterment of humanity.

Our Vision Edward Waters College will become a national model for a dynamic, globally diverse learning centered community that champions academic excellence through innovative teaching and learning strategies under-girded by a spirit of servant leadership.

Our Core Values* Christian Principles –Ethics and doctrines predicated on the AME Church theology “GOD our Father, CHRIST our Redeemer, MAN our Brother”. Excellence – Superiority, eminence, distinction and quality in scholarship, leadership and citizenship. Social Responsibility – Embracing a burden of obligation to collective society, both the immediate as well as the global. Civic Engagement – Dedication to addressing issues of public concern. Cooperation – Fostering the concept of teamwork as a means to success. Customer Service – Employing the Biblical tenant Matthew 7:12; “Therefore all things whatsoever ye would that men should do to you, do ye even so to them: for this is the law and the prophets.” Professionalism – Practicing proficiency, skill and expertise in all that we undertake. Student Engagement – Cultivating within our students a thirst for education, a desire for higher level thought processes and a willingness to persevere despite challenges. Scholarship – Creating a culture of erudition through a nurturing spirit. Diversity – Endeavoring to celebrate the uniqueness of all cultures with appreciation and understanding. *Approved by the Edward Waters College Board of Trustees October 18, 2008

Strategic Goals 2009-2014 Goal I: Enhance recruitment, retention and graduation rates. Goal II: Enhance the effectiveness of the college through research, planning and assessment. Goal III: Maintain a fiscal and physical infrastructure, including building and information technology that enhance academic programs, business operations and student life. Goal IV: Optimize philanthropic support and advance college image, resources and relationships. Goal V: Improve academic standards and competitiveness of the college. Goal VI: Strengthen and support the social, cultural and spiritual development of students. Goal VII: Identify EWC as an African Methodist Episcopal Church related institution of learning. 7


Historical Highlights As verified by Soul of America http://www.soulofamerica.com/colleges/jackv_waters.html 1865

Following the Civil War, the Reverend Charles H. Pearce, presiding Elder of the AME Church, was sent to Florida to establish the African Methodist Episcopal Church by Bishop Daniel Alexander Payne, the Church’s sixth Bishop. Reverend Pearce observed the need for an educated ministry for newly emancipated blacks in the State. Aided by the Reverend William G. Steward, the first AME pastor in the State, he raised funds to establish a school.

1866

The school was founded. Courses were first offered at the elementary, high school, college, and seminary levels.

1870

Florida's Tallahassee Conference of the AME Church passed a resolution to set aside church funds to expand the offerings of the school. The Conference proceeded to name its educational organization the Brown Theological Institute.

1872

The Brown Theological Institute was chartered by the state legislature in 1872. It then purchased ten acres of land in Live Oak where construction of the first building was undertaken. Further support for the effort came from numerous friends, including railroad magnate General M.S. Littlefield, State Treasurer Simon Conaber, and Lieutenant-General William Gleason. The name was changed to Brown University. Financial difficulties arose from an embezzlement scheme, awarding both school properties to creditors. Consequently, the school ceased to function for a decade. There followed a series of name changes, adjustments in program offerings, and eventually changed locations.

1883

The school reopened as the East Florida Conference High School and later the East Florida Scientific and Divinity High School.

1892

The school’s name changed to Edward Waters College in honor of the third bishop of the AME Church. Waters (1780-1847), a native of West River, Missouri, was a licensed preacher in Baltimore, MD and was consecrated as a bishop in 1836.

1901

The rebuilding process was interrupted by a fire that completely destroyed the College and much of the city of Jacksonville. Then followed several years in rented quarters.

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Historical Highlights (Cont.) 1904

Edward Waters College acquired the present Kings Road site and began to develop it under the leadership of Bishop M.B. Salter.

1912 - 1966

Substantial expansion occurred in 1912-1928, beginning with the construction of Hurst Hall, a three-story dormitory for males. More buildings followed, including the Centennial Building (constructed in 1916) and the B. F. Lee Theological Seminary (constructed 1925) which now serves as the College's administration building. During the Great Depression the high school, junior and senior years of the College were discontinued as the organization assumed the role of a two-year junior college.

Following 1930’s

The building program resumed with the construction of a cafeteria and women's dormitory. The H. Y. Tookes Building was completed in 1945 and served as the central library until 1979, when the Centennial Building was renovated for that purpose.

1955

The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools accredits Edward Waters College as a junior college.

1958

The school expanded to offer senior college work.

By the 1960s

The college restored its four-year curriculum and granted the bachelor's degree.

1979

SACS approved the school’s accreditation as a four-year college.

1985

The College grew to an average full-time enrollment of 650 students and became the 43rd member of the United Negro College Fund.

2001

Football was reestablished after thirty four years. The Centennial Building was refurbished with funding from the Jessie Ball Dupont Foundation. Construction for the John Hurst Adams/Jimmy R. Jenkins Community Sports and Music Center was scheduled for completion in spring 2006. Groundbreaking of the $2.6 million Criminal Justice Education Facility and Police Substation

2004 2013

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List of EWC Presidents 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29

Reverend William P. Ross Reverend J. C. Waters Reverend J. H. Welch Prof. B. W. Arnett Reverend J. R. Scott, Jr. Reverend D. J. Jordan Reverend J. P. O. Wallace Reverend J. L. H. Watkins Prof. A. St. George Richardson Reverend A. Henry Attaway Reverend John A. Gregg Prof. John C. Wright Reverend A. B. Cooper Reverend C. A. Gibbs Reverend L. F. Morse Prof. C. S. Long, Jr. Dr. Howard D. Gregg Reverend R. E. Lamb Reverend A. J. White Dr. W. B. Stewart Dr. Paul J. Driver (Acting) Dr. Samuel Tucker Dr. Cecil Cone Dr. Robert Mitchell Dr. Jessie Burns Dr. Jimmy R. Jenkins, Sr. Dr. Oswald P. Bronson, Sr. Dr. Claudette H. Williams Nathaniel Glover

1885-1886 1886-1888 1888-1890 1890-1892 1892-1895 1895-1896 1896-1897 1897-1898 1898-1909 1909-1913 1913-1920 1920-1924 1924-1930 1930-1932 1932-1934 1934-1940 1940-1942 1942-1946 1946-1951 1951-1972 1972-1973 1973-1976 1977-1990 1990-1995 1995-1997 1997-2004 2004-2007 2007-2010 2010-Present

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Governance Edward Waters College, located in Jacksonville, Florida, is the oldest historically Black institution of higher education in the state. EWC is a four-year liberal arts, co-educational institution, and is affiliated with the African Methodist Episcopal Church. The College is governed by a Board of Trustees and each member serves a three-year term. The current composition of the board consists of one student, one faculty representative, and six lay persons. The remainder of the board is comprised of representatives from the Eleventh Episcopal District of the African Methodist Episcopal Church from the Jacksonville, Florida area, the state of Florida, and southeastern United States. The Presiding Bishop of the Eleventh Episcopal District of the African Methodist Episcopal Church is the Chairman of the Board of Trustees. The Board of Trustees appoints the President to guide EWC and carry out its mission. Board of Trustees 2013 Edward Waters College Board of Trustees Bishop Adam Richardson – Chairman of the Board of Trustees President Nathaniel Glover Edward Waters College Alphabetical Listing

Rev. John L. Bodison Rev. Ronnie Clark Rev. Victor D. Cole Dr. W. Goldsby, Sr. Reverend Henry E. Green Dr. Freddie Groomes-McLendon Rev. Dr. R.B. Holmes Mr. Eric Johnson Rev. Jimmie Keel Rev. Dr. Julius H. McAllister,Jr. Ms. Demetria Merritt-Bell Rev. Joyce Moore Mr. Ted Papas

Rev. Clifton Riley Mr. Jimmie Scott Dr. Rosa Simmons Dr. Roy Singleton Mrs. Esther Snowden Mr. Charles Spener Rev. Dr. Falecia Williams Rev. Elizabeth Yates Mr. Roland Young

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Accreditations and Affiliations Edward Waters College is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools to award Baccalaureate degrees. Edward Waters College is licensed by the State Board of Independent Colleges (SBIC), and is approved for training veterans under Public Law 94-502 and the Florida Department of Education. Edward Waters College business administration department is accredited by the International Assembly for Collegiate Business Education (IACBE) Affiliations National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU) Florida Association for Colleges of Teacher Education (FACTE) Florida Association for Colleges and Universities (FACU) Independent Colleges and Universities of Florida (ICUF) United Negro College Fund (UNCF) National Association for Equal Opportunity in Higher Education (NAFEO) American Council on Education (ACE) Council for Independent Colleges (CIC) Council for the Advancement and Support of Education (CASE) National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA) National Association for Academic Advising (NACADA) Council of Colleges of Arts and Sciences (CCAS) International Association of Colleges of Business Education (IACBE)

12


Administration

LEE COUSINS BUILDING circa 1927

The President employs five Vice Presidents (Executive Vice President, Academic Affairs, Student Affairs and Enrollment Management, Business and Finance, and Institutional Advancement) to assist with planning and implementation. Further guidance comes from the President's Cabinet including the vice presidents, assistant vice presidents, Director of Human Resources and Administrative Services, Athletic Director, Director of Sponsored Programs and Research, Director of Information Technology and Director of Institutional Planning, Research, and Effectiveness. Edward Waters College- President’s Cabinet President Executive Vice President/COO Vice President for Academic Affairs Vice President for Business and Finance Vice President for Student Affairs/Enr Management Vice President for Institutional Advancement Director of Human Resources & Administrative Services Special Assistant to the President Director of Athletics

Nathaniel Glover, Jr. Dr. Anna Hammond Dr. Marvin Grant Mr. Randolph Mitchell Dr. Eric Jackson Mrs. Wanda Willis Mr. Arthur Bendolph, Jr. Mr. George Dandelake Mr. Johnny Rembert

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Section II Academic Affairs New Student Data Information in the New Student Data section reports statistics on First-Time-In College Students who applied for admissions to the college. The data presents a funnel showing the numbers of students who were admitted to the college and subsequently enrolled. Data provided by gender and ethnicity was extracted from the IPEDS Fall enrollment Report and the Institutional Characteristics Surveys. As can be seen the number of First Time in College Students (FTIC) that were enrolled from admitted decreased significantly in 2012 (42%) compared to 62% in 2011.

Admissions Statistics First Time in College - Data Comparisons 2500 2000 1500 Applied

1000

Admitted 500 0

Enrolled Fall 2011

Fall 2012

Fall 2013

Applied

1611

2147

1907

Admitted

365

591

521

Enrolled

180

224

208

Source- IPEDS, POWERCAMPUS SCT

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Fall 2013 Applied-Admitted-Enrolled 208 521

Applied Admitted

1907

Enrolled

First Time in College by Gender

Fall 2011 to Fall 2013

Male Enrollment Enrollment Fall 2011 Fall 2012 Fall 2013

59% 66% 62%

Female 41% 34% 38%

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First- Time in College Retention Rates First -Time In College Retention Rates Fall 2009 to Fall 2012 56% 53%

54% 52%

54%

51%

50%

48%

48% 46% 44% Fall 2009

Fall 2010

Fall 2011

Fall 2012

Source IPEDS- Fall Enrollment

Estimated First Time In College Fall 2012 to Fall 2013

Fall 2012 54%

Fall 2013 51%

16


Enrollment by Gender The percentage of women and men has been consistent around 42%-45% women and 54%-58% men for the past 4 years. Enrollment by ethnicity has remained constant for the past few years with an average of 93% African American followed by 2% white and 5% other ethnicities.

Enrollment by Gender 925

1000 831

769

800 600 400

527

479 352

751

353

416

336

415

398

200 0

Fall 2009

Fall 2010 Women

Women Men Total Enrollment

Men

Fall 2011

Fall 2012

Total Enrollment

Enrollment by Gender Fall 2009 Fall 2010 352 353 479 416 831 769

Fall 2011 336 415 751

Fall 2012 398 527 925

17


Fall 2013 Total Student Enrollment: 862 Student by Gender Male: 53%, Female: 47% Ethnicity African American Hispanic Indian Multi-Racial Resident Alien White Unknown Totals

Number 778 18 2 14 1 22 27 862

Percent 90.0% 2.0% 0.2% 1.6% 0.1% 3.0% 3.0% 100%

Source- POWER CAMPUS SCT

Enrollment by Ethnicity Enrollment By Ethnicity Ethnicity Black or African American White Other Totals

Fall 2009 92% 2% 6% 100%

Fall 2010 92% 2% 6% 100%

Fall 2011 94% 1% 5% 100%

Fall 2012 94% 2% 4% 100%

Enrollment by Full-Time and Part-Time EWC Enrollment by Full-Time and Part-time Enrollment Status

2009

2010

2011

2012

Full Time Students

97%

99%

98%

99%

Part Time Students

3%

1%

2%

1%

18


Enrollment by State of Residency

Enrollment by Residence Virgin Islands Texas Maryland Florida Alabama 0

200

400

600

District Marylan South of Alabama Florida Georgia Columbi d Carolina a Fall 2012 9 10 789 53 12 10

800

Texas

Other States

Virgin Islands

5

33

4

Fall 2011

4

10

603

54

9

10

4

55

2

Fall 2010

6

10

614

53

8

21

7

41

9

Fall 2009

5

10

638

65

12

30

13

58

Enrollment by Major Enrollment by major show Business Administration, Criminal Justice and Elementary Education are the top three academic programs for students attending Edward Waters College. However, the majority of the students report being undecided in terms of choosing a major course of study.

19


Enrollment by Major Fall 2009 to Fall 2012

1200 1000 800 600 400 200 0 Biology

Business Elementar Communic Criminal Administr y ations Justice ation Education

Math

Music

Psycholog Undecided y

Fall 2012

70

161

45

128

80

22

23

70

326

Fall 2011

50

97

31

117

73

9

7

47

320

Fall 2010

78

137

32

158

85

10

20

54

195

Fall 2009

83

145

34

156

90

13

18

64

228

Fall 2009

Fall 2010

Fall 2011

Fall 2012

Fall 2013 Enrollment By Major Major Biology Business Administration Communications Criminal Justice Elementary Education Mathematics Music Psychology Undecided Totals

Enrollment 67 138 22 138 71 28 22 53 327 862

 MOST POPULAR MAJORS  BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION  CRIMINAL JUSTICE  ELEMENTARY EDUCATION

20


Section III Degree Completion

“Every man and woman is born into the world to do something unique and something distinctive; and if he or she does not do it, it will never be done.” - Benjamin E. Mays-

Academic Programs Offered (2013) DEGREES BACHELOR OF ARTS BACHELOR OF SCIENCE BACHELOR OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Academic Programs 2013 Communication Music Psychology Criminal Justice Biology Elementary Education Mathematics Business Administration

21


Degrees Awarded by Major Degrees Awarded by Major

2010-2011

2011-2012

2012-2013

Biology/Biological Sciences, General

2

10

15

Business Administration and Management, General

24

19

26

Communications

4

2

6

Criminal Justice/Safety Studies

16

19

19

Elementary Education and Teaching

3

6

3

Mathematics, General

5

2

4

Music, General

2

1

1

Psychology, General

13

12

15

Totals

69

71

89

22


There has been a marginal increase in the graduation rate over a seven year period. The most significant improvement experienced between Fall 2011(18%) and Fall 2012 (23 %) resulting in an increase of 27%. Graduation Rate Trends Fall AY 2006/2007 to AY Fall 2012/13 25 20 15 10 5 0 1

Percentage

1 11

2

3

2 9

4

3 11

5 4 12

6

7 5 15

6 18

7 23

Source IPEDS and POWER CAMPUS SCT Fall 2006 Fall 2007 Fall 2008 Fall 2009 Fall 2010 Fall 2011 Fall 2012 Fall 2013

11% 9% 11% 12% 15% 18% 23% 20%

23


Graduation Rates- 3 Year Comparison Between EWC and Aspirational Institutions 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

Bethune Cookman University

Claflin University

Dillard University

Florida Memorial University

Edward Waters College

2009

36

53

41

34

12

2010

37

46

28

36

15

2011

37

40

24

42

18

Source- National Center for Educational Statistics (NCES)

Section IV Student Achievement Outcomes Course Completion Summary Report Number of As Number of Bs Number of Cs Number of Ds Number of Fs Total Number of Passing Grades Total Number of Failing Grades Overall Total Number of Grades Number of Classes offered Percentage of Passing Grades Percentage of Failing Grades

Fall 2010 1035 1399 1370 435 636 4240

Spring 2011 730 958 925 364 388 2877

Fall 2011 833 1207 1171 246 515 3457

Spring 2012 458 609 570 138 246 1775

Fall 2012 1081 1136 1051 328 693 3596

Spring 2013 1031 951 818 232 620 3032

636

388

515

246

693

620

4876

3265

3972

2021

4289

3652

135

144

118

87

146

148

87%

88%

87%

88%

84%

83%

13%

12%

13%

12%

16%

17%

24


Job Placement Report Cohorts/Graduates

Num Job In Field

Num Grad School

Total Num Grads

Per obtaining jobs within one year

2006(May) 2007 (May) 2008 (May) 2009 (May)

8 10 9 5

4 10 5 1

40 45 38 11

20% 22% 23% 45%

Per att Grad School with one year 10% 22% 13% 9%

Per with no info other or unemployed 70% 56% 65% 45%

Graduate School Attendance 2006 to 2008 Cohort

2006 2007 2008 Totals Nat Ave 20082012

Number of Undergraduate Graduates May, Aug & December 40 45 38 123

Number in Graduate School

Others

Percent in Graduate School

Percent Other

4 10 6 19

36 35 33 104

10% 22% 13% 15% 29%

90% 78% 87% 85% 71%

Section V Faculty and Staff FACULTY DATA FALL 2013 – FULL TIME TEACHING FACULTY Teaching Faculty (Full Time) …..…… 45 Full Time Faculty Student Ratio ……. 1:19

25


Fall 2013 Full Time Faculty By Gender

Female 51%

Male 49%

Full-time and Adjunct Faculty, Number of Majors and Full-time Faculty to Student Ratio by Academic Program Fall 2013 Major

Biology Business Administration Communications Criminal Justice Music Mathematics Psychology Teacher Education

Number of Fulltime Faculty 4 6 3 3 7 4 4 6

Number of Adjunct Faculty 1 13 1 4 1 4 4 5

Percent Full-time Faculty 80% 32% 75% 43% 88% 50% 50% 55%

Number of majors Fall 2012 70 161 45 128 23 22 70 80

Full-time Faculty to Student Ratio 1/18 1/26 1/15 1/42 1/3 1/5 1/17 1/13

Source: Faculty Load Report Fall 2013

Faculty Credit Hour Production Spring and Fall 2013

Program Biology Business Administration Communications Criminal Justice Music Mathematics Psychology Teacher Education Total

Hours taught by Full-time Faculty # of Student % of Student Credit Hours Credit hours 1339 80% 2220 67% 507 78% 1296 77% 399 97% 1483 74% 1680 83% 1541 64% 9,465 77.5%

Hours Taught by Adjunct Faculty # of Student % of Student Credit hours Credit hours 331 20% 1101 33% 147 22% 384 23% 12 3% 101 26% 336 17% 876 36% 3,288 22.5%

Source: Faculty Load Report Spring 2013 and Fall 2013

26


Fall 2012 FACULTY TO STUDENT RATIOS- PEER COLLEGE COMPARISONS Institution Edward Waters College Rust College Paine College Bennett College

Enrollment 925 1,102 837 766

FT Faculty 43 48 53 56

Ratio 1/21 1/22 1/15 1/13

Source: Common Data Set (2012)

FULL TIME EMPLOYEES FALL2010 TO FALL 2013

Full Time Employees Fall 2010 to Fall 2013 146

144

139 101

Series1

Fall 2010

Fall 2011

Fall 2012

Fall 2013

146

144

139

101

Source- EWC Human Resources and IPEDS

27


FULL TIME EMPLOYEES BY GENDER FALL 2009 to FALL 2011 EWC Full Time Employees by Gender 60.00% 50.00%

55.63% 48.63%

52.08%

51.37% 47.92%

44.37%

40.00% 30.00% 20.00% 10.00% 0.00%

2009 N=142

2010 N=146 Men

2011 N=144 Women

By Ethnicity Fall 2009 to Fall 2011 EWC Full Time Employees by Ethnicity 6% 3%

Race and ethnicity unknown Two or more races White

1% 1%

Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander

10% 8% 8%

2011 80% 84% 85%

Black or African American 3% 7% 4%

Asian American Indian or Alaska Native Hispanic/Latino

1%

Nonresident alien 0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

50%

60%

70%

80%

90%

28

2010 2009


Full Time Employees by Ethnicity Ethnicity Nonresident alien Hispanic/Latino American Indian or Alaska Native Asian Black or African American Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander White Two or more races Race and ethnicity unknown

2009 0 0 0 5 121 1 11 0 4

2010 0 1 0 10 123 0 12 0 0

2011 0 0 0 4 115 2 15 0 8

Total Full Time Employees

142

146

144

Source: All Faculty and Staff Information provided by Academic Affairs and Human Resources.

Section VI Student Financial Services

Total Cost of Attendance 18,500 17,950

18,000

17,586

17,500 16,944

17,000 16,500

16,464

16,000 15,500 Fall 2009

Cost of Attendance

Fall 2010

Fall 2011

Fall 2012

Fall 2009

Fall 2010

Fall 2011

Fall 2012

Fall 2013

Tuition & Fees

9,990

10,470

10,994

11,358

11,325

Room & Board

6,474

6,474

6,592

6,592

7,156

Total Cost

16,464

16,944

17,586

17,950

18,481

Section VII Facilities Campus and Buildings 29


The EWC campus today consists of approximately 46.8 acres of land situated on both sides of US 23, Kings Road, between Whitner and Spires Streets, Ella Street and West 3rd Street, five minutes from downtown Jacksonville, FL. The College campus is a mixture of historic and modern buildings with facilities constructed or substantially renovated since 1968. The majority of the buildings provide modern restroom facilities for the handicapped as well as elevator service to upper floors. In addition, other educational facilities located around Jacksonville are utilized as needed to take EWC into the community. Adams-Jenkins Community Sports and Music Complex The newest building at Edward Waters College, the Adams-Jenkins Community Sports and Music Complex was built in 2005 and renovated in 2010, and houses the Department of Music and Fine Arts and the Athletic Programs. The Complex measures approximately 50,000 square feet. The ground floor includes a 1,800 seat gymnasium primarily designed for basketball and volleyball use. It has concession stands, and men’s and women’s locker rooms. The ground floor also has classrooms, and choir and band rooms. The second floor of the building was completed in 2010 and features a sky box, offices for faculty, conference rooms, classrooms, a state-of-theart music technology lab, and a piano lab. Admissions Building Built in 1955, this building was renovated in 2003 to house the Office of Admissions. The building is a two-story, masonry block building. Assessment Center This building was constructed as a residence in 1929 and renovated in 1994. It is a brick and wooden two-story house adjacent to the Lee-Cousins Administrative Building and the Tookes Building. The building provides office space for Institutional Advancement, Alumni Affairs, and the Office of Planning, Research and Institutional Effectiveness. Athletic Offices This modular building contains athletic coaches’ offices. Auxiliary Services Office This building was built in 1955. The building is a masonry block building. The building houses several units, primarily Shipping and Receiving Unit. Black Male College Explorers Building This two-story block masonry building was constructed in 1959 and renovated in 2003. It is located across the street from the Morris-Cone Dormitory Complex. The Black Male Explorers Program is housed in this building.

George N. Collins Student Center (Student Union Building) This building was completed in 1972 and is a modern two-story masonry block structure housing offices of student affairs, counseling, student government, the mail room and the College cafeteria. In its central campus location, it provides large and private dining rooms, a student lounge, a game room, several conference rooms and a separate banquet facility. The cafeteria provides breakfast, lunch, dinner and weekend brunch for residents and others. The post office 30


(available weekdays) and mailboxes (available daily) with hours posted, (UPS service available), are also located in the center. The building was completely renovated in 1998. Dot Street Residential Complex This apartment complex was built in 1959 and currently houses faculty offices. The building was completely renovated in 2001 and is a two-story, ten building masonry block structure. Family Practice Medical Center This building built in 1974 was renovated in 2009. This one-story brick structure houses the EWC Health Center. Grunthal Street Maintenance Building This building was constructed in 1961 and renovated in 1991. It is a two-story block structure, scheduled for comprehensive renovations in the near future. Hatcher-Stewart Building This building was completed in 1968 and is a two-story brick building. It houses academic departments, classrooms, faculty offices, and laboratories serving the natural sciences. It was named in honor of the presiding Board Chairman and President holding office at the time of its completion. The building was completely renovated in 1998. Honors Residential Housing Complex This apartment complex was built in 2000. It is a wood structure used for student housing and office space. Jones House This building was built in 1954. The building is a concrete block building. The Black Psychology Program is housed in this building. Lee-Cousins Building Constructed in 1925 and renovated in 1993, it is a distinguished National Register Site on our campus. The four-story brick structure contains the Milne Chapel-Auditorium recently renovated in 2003, and named after its most generous benefactor, Mr. Doug Milne. The building also contains the offices of the President, Academic Affairs, Financial Aid, Student Accounts, Business and Finance, the Registrar, and the CLIMB. Library The Centennial Building houses the College’s Library; which serves as the College’s information portal while providing access to the networked world of knowledge resources. As educators, the librarians facilitate the acquisition of the information literacy skills needed to operate effectively in the modern complex technological environment. The library further strives to provide students, faculty, and staff with relevant, contemporary and widely circulated books, periodicals, and multimedia collections. The Library serves as a commons to bring together the various constituencies of the campus and community as it endeavors to stimulate and encourage the development of a lifelong habit of learning. The Library’s collections include reference and general book collections, periodical collection, juvenile book collection and the non-print (VHS, CD, and DVD) media collection.

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Martin Luther King, Jr., Building This building constructed in 1954 is a small one-story facility adjacent to the Student Union Building and Centennial Building. The building was completely renovated in 2000, and currently provides office and space for the physical education program, including the weight and fitness center. Morris-Cone Residential Complex This building, completed in 1982, is an all-masonry, two-unit, 192-bed residential facility. Morris-Cone A houses freshman males and Morris-Cone B houses freshman females. Named after the College President and AME Bishop, the buildings offer a total of approximately 40,000 square feet with concrete floor systems and central heating. Each floor includes a lounge area for student activities and the rooms are double-occupancy. Polly Brooks Building This building was constructed in 1919 and renovated in 1933. It is a brick and wooden two-story house across from the Morris-Cone Dormitory Complex and adjacent to the Print Shop. Major repairs and renovations were completed on the building in 1999. Additional renovations are scheduled to begin in the later part of 2010. Upon completion of the renovation, the building will house the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning (CETL). Print Shop This building was completed in 1950 and renovated in 1990 and 2001. The building currently houses the College’s Print Shop. The building is an all-masonry block structure adjacent to the Polly Brooks Building and across the street from the Morris-Cone Dormitory Complex. M.B. Salter Hall Residential Complex This building completed in 1950 is a two-story brick dormitory for women. The building was completely renovated in 1998 and provides a reception lounge on the first floor suitable for gatherings and lounging for residents and their guests. Schell-Sweet Community Resource Center This building constructed in 1995 serves as a community resource center which houses offices from local, state and federal departments as well as doctors' offices. Also located in the CRC is the Senior Wellness Center, which offers a variety of services for seniors including computer classes. Sheehee Maintenance Building This building was constructed in 1960, is a one story block masonry building located directly north of the Martin Luther King Jr. Building, the tennis courts, and Centennial Library. It provides space for the College's Facilities Management Department. Teacher Education Center (TEC Building) This building was built in 2003, and consists of ten (10) classrooms and four (4) offices. The building is a modular unit. Tiger Landing Residential Complex 32


This apartment complex built in 1968 currently houses male students. The building received complete renovation in 2001. It is a two-story, four building masonry block structure. Susie E. Tolbert House This two-story wood structure was built circa 1912 and is a locally designated historical site. The building will be used as a museum to store art and artifacts that are currently stored on the College campus. The project is scheduled for completion in the later part of 2010. Henry Y. Tookes Building This building was completed in 1945 and is a one-story brick structure adjacent to the LeeCousins building. The facility, which originally served as the College library, was completely renovated in 2001. It currently houses classrooms and offices for Campus Security and Information Technology and Telecommunications. Health Disparities Center This building was completed in 2013 and is a one-story brick structure adjacent to the LeeCousins building. Criminal Justice/Police Substation Building This building was completed in 2013 and is a two-story brick structure adjacent to the Salter Hall Dorms.

Section VIII Athletics Membership Edward Waters College holds membership in the the NAIA Division II and the Gulf Coast Athletic Conference are vital for developing advanced motor, physical skills, social skills, emotional control, sportsmanship, school spirit, and self-reliance. Edward Waters College abides by the rules and regulations of the NAIA for all sports. Competitive, scheduled sports with teams from other colleges with membership in the NAIA Division I and the Gulf Coast Athletic Conference are vital for developing advanced motor, physical skills, social skills, emotional control, sportsmanship, school spirit, and self-reliance. Edward Waters College abides by the rules and regulations of the NAIA for all sports. 33


Men: Baseball, Basketball, Cheerleading, Cross Country, Football, Golf, Track and Field

Women: Basketball, Cheerleading, Cross Country, Golf, Softball, Track and Field, Volleyball

Teams Men’s Sports Baseball

Head Coach: Reginald A. Johnson, II Assistant Coach: Robert Cantrell Assistant Coach: Elliot Maysonet Assistant Coach: Charles Thomas Team Manager: Cory Cooper Team Manager: Cameron Perry Team Members

34


Basketball Head Coach: Frank Burnell Assistant Coach: Danny Pearson Assistant Coach: Shawn Taylor Team Members

Cross Country/Track & Field Head Coach: Archie Gallon Assistant Coach: Marilyn Mack 35


Team Members

Football Head Coach: Alvin Wyatt Assistant Coach: Lamont Turner Offensive Coordinator: Gregory Ross, Sr. Defensive Coordinator: Alvin Wyatt A-Backs Coach: Christopher Brown B-Backs Coach: Karey Gee Wide Receivers Coach: Antonio Bellamy Defensive Ends Coach: Dennis Clemons Interior Defensive Lineman Coach: Mike Grissom Defensive Backs Coach: Arthur Mallory Linebackers Coach: Dan Miles Head Athletic Trainer: Chris Aubrey, ATC Team Members 2013 Tigers Football Roster No

First

Last

Class

Pos.

Ht’

Wt.

Hometown/High School

1

James

Reese

Fr

DB/QB

6’2

180

Orlando Fl/Agape HS

2

Ralph

Shuler

A-Back

5’8

165

Apopka, FL/Apopka HS

3

Ray

Dukes

Sr. RSSo.

A-Back

5’9

160

Jacksonville, FL/William M. Raines HS

4

Khalid

Marshall

Fr

DB

5’10

170

Miami Fl/Miami North Western HS

5

Kameron

Mitchell

Jr.

DB

6’1

190

Ocala,Fl/Belleview HS

6

Marquis

Davis

So.

LB

6’0

220

Lake City, FL/Columbia HS

7

Reymond

Berhane

Sr.

QB

6’2

180

Miami, FL/Everglades HS

8

Taron

Williams

Fr.

QB

6’0

170

Pinellas Park, FL/Pinellas Park HS

9

Demarko

Huntley

RS-Jr.

DB

6’0

190

Atlanta, GA/Frederick Douglass HS

10

Lorenzo

Capehart

RS-Sr.

DB

5’8

185

Dothan, AL/Dothan HS

12

Joshua

Bess

Fr.

LB

6’1

220

Jacksonville, FL/Edward H. White HS

13

Mike

Love

So.

A-Back

5’8

170

Jacksonville, FL/Edward H. White HS

14

Kennard

Bright

Fr.

WR

5’10

180

Jacksonville, FL/First Coast HS

11

15

36


16

Cedric

Bryant

Jr.

QB

6’0

203

Apopka, FL/Apopka HS

17

Ryan

Davis

So.

QB

5’11

200

Daytona Beach, FL/Mainland HS

18

Sean

Adkison

So.

QB

6’2

205

Jacksonville, FL/Baldwin HS

19

Suwayne

Hylton

Jr.

WR

5’10

175

Miami, FL/Norland HS

20

Rhoshaun

Goff

RS-Fr.

DB

5’9

180

Bradenton, FL/Manatee HS

21

Bernard

Dawson

Sr.

LB

5’11

210

Jacksonville, FL/Andrew Jackson HS

22

Darryl

Campbell

So.

B-Back

5’8

185

Jacksonville, FL/Jean Ribault HS

23

Lenard

McKenzie

So.

DB

6’1

180

Ft. Lauderdale, FL/Dillard HS

27

Aaron

Strickland

So.

DB

5’8

150

Pensacola, FL/Booker T. Washington HS

28

Cleve

Williams

So.

B-Back

5’9

185

Plantation, FL/Plantation HS

29

Chaninn

Ragland

So.

DB

5’11

185

Jacksonville, FL/Nathan B. Forrest HS

31

Troy

Hamilton

Fr.

DB

5’10

162

Miami, FL/Palmetto HS

32

Akeem

Mahone

Fr

A-Back

5’8

185

Jacksonville,Fl/Nathan B.Forrest HS

33

Justin

Richardson

So.

A-Back

5’10

180

Arcadia, FL/Desoto HS

25 26

30

2013 Tigers Football Roster 34

Dijon

Mujahid

Sr.

DB

5’8

175

Orlando, FL/Lyman HS

35

Joshua

Connor

Fr.

B-Back

5’11

200

Hilliard, FL/Hilliard Middle-Senior HS

36

Xavier

Payne

So.

A-Back

5’10

185

Arcadia, FL/Desoto HS

37

Diondre

Wynn

So.

B-Back

5’10

215

38

Jerry

Martin

Sr.

PK

6’1

205

Decatur, GA/Columbia HS Ft. Lauderdale, FL/Chaminade-Madonna Prep.

39

Yvon

Thegeniste

Fr

WR

6’0

185

Brooklin NY/Boys/Girls HS

40

Bernard

Agurs

Sr.

LB

5’11

200

Morrow, GA/Morrow HS

41

Christopher

Simpson

Fr.

DB

5’8

155

Chicago, IL/Hales Franciscan HS

42

Aundray

Wright

Fr.

DB

6’0

225

Jacksonville, FL/Nathan B. Forrest HS

43

Rodney

Williams

RS-Fr.

DB

5’11

150

Jacksonville, FL/Middleburg HS

44

Savion

Phillips

Fr.

DB

5’10

185

Jacksonville, FL/Nathan B. Forrest HS

45

Nitaveous

Smith

Jr

DL

6’5

280

Montgomery,Al/Sidney Lanier HS

46

Alexander

Doyle

Fr.

DB

6’1

180

Miami, FL/Miami Beach Senior HS

47

Christian

Moore

Fr.

DB

5’10

180

Jacksonville, FL/Edward H. White HS

48

Ja’Tavius

McCardell

Sr.

DB

5’10

180

50

Johnathan

Hewitt

Fr

LB

5’7

180

Houston, TX/C. E. King HS Washington Dc/Paul Lawrence Dunbar HS

51

Preston

Haines

Fr.

LB

6’2

225

Winter Park, FL/Lake Howell HS

53

Rashard

Marshall

Fr

DL

5’10

240

Pompano Bch,Fl/Blanche Ely HS

54

Devon

Knight

So.

LB

5’9

200

Tallahassee, FL/Amos P. Godby HS

55

Jerell

Bess

RS-Fr.

DL

6’2

260

Jacksonville, FL/Edward H. White HS

56

Anthony

Hanner

DL

6’5

270

Miami Fl/Robert E. Lee HS

57

Alex

Hernandez

Rs-Fr RSSo.

OL

6’3

260

Jacksonville, FL/Sandalwood HS

58

Randy

Wimberly

So

DL

6’1

280

Ft.Lauderdale,Fl/Plantation HS

52

37


59

Kendall

Hunter

Fr.

DL

5’8

275

Ft. Lauderdale, FL/Dillard HS

60

Christopher

Pettaway

Sr.

OL

6’2

290

Miramar, FL/Miramar HS

61

Marcus

Grani

Fr.

OL

6’1

275

Orlando, FL/Maynard Evans HS

62

Wakeem

Whipper

Fr.

DL

6’2

290

Port Orange, FL/Atlantic HS

63

John

Holt

Fr

OL

6’3

280

Tallahassee Fl/Leon HS

64

Holly

Dolcine

Fr.

OL

6’2

285

Pompano Beach, FL/Blanche Ely HS

66

Darrian

Carmichael

Sr.

OL

6’0

270

Morrow, GA/Morrow HS

67

Nathaniel

Branford

Sr.

OL

5’11

285

Houston, TX/C. E. King HS

68

Andre

Wiggins

Fr.

OL

6’2

265

Orange Park, FL/Oakleaf Sch.

70

Joseph

Allen

Fr.

OL

6’1

270

Callahan, FL/West Nassau HS

72

Aaron

Adkins

Fr.

OL

6’3

305

Daytona Beach, FL/Mainland HS

74

Marcus

Taylor, Jr.

RSSo..

OL

6’5

290

75

Gerrel

Keith-Davis

So.

OL

6’0

300

Jacksonville, FL/Terry Parker HS Jacksonville, FL/University Christian Sch.

76

Jalon

Davis

So.

OL

6’3

280

Decatur, GA/Southwest Dekalb HS

77

Andre

Posey

Sr.

OL

6’4

275

Eustis, FL/Eustis HS

78

Richard

Graham III

Fr.

OL

6’6

330

Port Orange, FL/Atlantic HS

80

Paul

Smith

So.

WR

6’2

172

Atlanta, GA/Columbia HS

81

Antonio

Pelham

Fr

WR

5’9

170

LakeCity Fl/Colmbia HS

82

Kenneth

Payne

So

WR

6’2

179

New Orleans,LA/John McDonald HS

85

Kerone

Smith

Fr

WR

6’0

180

Ashburn Ga/Turner County HS

87

Miguel

Arias

So.

WR

6’0

175

Brooklyn, NY/Midwood HS

93

Erhis

Brown

Fr.

DL

6’4

270

Jacksonville, FL/

94

Dwight

Pruitt

Fr.

DL

6’2

250

Miami, FL/Palmetto HS

95

William Anari

Newcomb Ragin

Fr. Fr

DL Dl

6’1 6’0

240 280

Lake City, FL/Columbia HS Miami Fl/Norland HS

65

69

73

99

History and Highlights of Edward Waters College Football Program In 2001 Edward Waters College football returned after a 34-year hiatus. Edward Waters College is a member of the National Athletic Intercollegiate Association (NAIA) Division I. Since the program restarted it has produced a total of seven All-Americans including: Kamau Leitner (Class of 2009), NAIA Academic All-American in 2007; Aneus Stevens (Class of 2012), NAIA All-Independent Conference Defensive Player of the Year in 2008; Jonathan Johnson (Class of 2010), 2007 and 2008 NAIA All-American; and EWC Defensive Coordinator Antwan Nicholas (Class of 2007), two-time NAIA All-American. Timetable 2001: EWC Football Program Resumes 2003: Inaugural Willie Gary Football Classic 2004: SEAC Conference Championship 2006: HBCU Classic Championship 2007: HBCU Classic Championship; Victory at the Willie Gary Football Classic against Shaw 38


University (Division II); SEAC Conference Championship; Coach Kevin J. Clark named Conference Coach of the Year; Victory at the Ralph J. Bunch Classic against Savannah State University (Division I-AA) 2008: SEAC Conference Championship; Coach Kevin J. Clark named Conference Coach of the Year 2009: Trenttonio Stewart, Senior running back, selected for pre-season NAIA First Team AllIndependent Team; three Edward Waters College football players recognized as NAIA Independent Players of the Week, two for the second week in a row. 2009 Post-Season: All-Independent NAIA First Team: Denton Thompson (Defensive End); AllIndependent NAIA Second Team: Trenttonio Stewart (Running Back), Samuel Charles (Wide Receiver), Rudy Wilson (Linebacker), Rodriguez Owens (Linebacker), and Johnathan Johnson (Special Teams); NAIA Academic All-Americans: Scott Peters, Willie Hubbard, and Markel Scott. Golf Coach: Team Members

Women’s Sports Basketball

39


Head Coach: Charmaine Wilson Assistant Coach: Steven Dwenison Team Members

Softball

40


Head Coach: Stanley Cromartie Assistant Coach: Lance Lamport Team Members

Volleyball Head Coach: Marilyn Mack Assistant Coach: Temeka Thomas Team Members

41


General Contact Information Athletic Director: Johnny Rembert Assistant AD: Stanley Cromartie Sports Information: W. Earl Kitchings, Henry Smith Phone: (904) 470-8045 / 470-8276 (Main) Managers: Kasey Russell, Macclenny, FL (Libero Statistician) Brittney Adams, Clearwater, FL (Trainer) Malia Watson, Jacksonville, FL (Home Game Statistician) Shelia Goodwin, Interlachen, FL (Away Team Statistician)

ELEGIBILITY To register for eligibility an NAIA Sport: http://www.playnaia.org Freshman Eligibility Requirements Be a graduate of an accredited high school or be accepted as a regular student in good standing as defined by the enrolling institution AND Meet two of the three following requirements. If as an entering freshman you do not meet at least two of the three standards, you cannot participate in athletics for the first full year of attendance (2 semesters, 3 quarters, or equivalent). U.S. Student-Athletes 1. Achieve a minimum of 18 on the ACT or 860 on the SAT (Critical Reading and Math only) 2. Achieve a minimum overall high school grade point average of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale 3. Graduate in the top half of your high school class. G.E.D. Student-Athletes (must meet both requirements) 1. Achieve a minimum of 18 on the ACT or 860 on the SAT (Critical Reading and Math only) 2. GED students are recognized as having met the GPA requirement. Home-Schooled Student-Athletes (must meet both requirements) 1. Achieve a minimum of 18 on the ACT or 860 on the SAT (Critical Reading and Math only) 2. Must receive the certificate (or equivalent) granted by the appropriate state verifying successful completion of home schooling requirements. If the state does not issue certificates (or equivalent) the case must go to the NAIA National Eligibility Committee. International Student-Athletes 1. Achieve a minimum of 18 on the ACT or 860 on the SAT (Critical Reading and Math only) 2. Achieve a minimum overall high school grade point average of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale 3. Graduate in the top half of your high school class. International students must provide their academic records in both the language of issue as well as a certified, word-for-word English translation. See the NAIA Eligibility Center requirements for more on submitting international academic records. Compliance-Related Tryout Information 1. Students are permitted a maximum of two days of tryouts throughout their entire career 42


The tryout cannot interfere with school time. The tryout must occur on campus. 2. If a school has a policy for reimbursing all students for such visits, the same can be applied to you as a prospective student-athlete. To participate in athletics in the NAIA, you must be admitted to the college or university under admission standards equal to or higher than those applied to the general student body. Basic Eligibility Rules for NAIA Student-Athletes 1. May compete during four “seasons of competition� within the first 10 semesters (15 quarters) A season of competition is counted when you participate in one or more intercollegiate contests whether at the varsity, junior varsity or freshman level. 2. Must be enrolled in a minimum of 12 credit hours Must be making normal progress toward a baccalaureate degree 3. Must pass 24 hours in an academic year (may only count 12 hours in summer school) 4. Must maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or higher (EWC Policy) 5. Must meet freshman and/or continuing eligibility rules

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2009-2013 EWC Fact Book