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Disclaimer Although provisions of this catalog will ordinarily apply as stated, Edward Waters College reserves the right to change any provisions listed, including but not limited to, academic requirements for graduation without notice to individual students. While efforts will be made to advise students of any changes, it is the student’s responsibility to keep abreast of current graduation requirements by regular consultation with his/her academic advisor. Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Compliance Statement In compliance with ADA and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, Edward Waters College does not discriminate on the basis of disability in the administration or operation of its educational policies, activities and programs. In order to receive accommodations for any specific disability, a student must self-disclose his/her disabling condition, by completing the appropriate Self-Disclosure Form which must be submitted with documentation to the Office of Student Affairs. A student who has a documented disability and wishes to receive academic accommodations must contact the Office of Academic Affairs. Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) and Diversity Policy Statement In order to provide equal employment and advancement opportunities to all individuals, employment decisions at Edward Waters College will be based on merit, qualifications, and abilities. Edward Waters College does not discriminate against any person because of race, color, creed, religion, gender, national origin, disability, military status, marital status, age or any other characteristic protected by law (referred to as “protected status”). This nondiscrimination policy extends to all terms, conditions, and privileges of employment as well as the use of all College facilities, participation in all College-sponsored activities, and all employment actions such as promotion, compensation, benefits, and termination of employment. Any employees with questions or concerns about any type of discrimination in the workplace are encouraged to bring these issues to the attention of their immediate supervisor, division head, and/or the Office of Human Resources and Administrative Services. Employees can raise concerns and make reports without fear of reprisal. Any report of such an allegation will be thoroughly investigated, with corrective action taken against any person(s) found to have engaged in inappropriate workplace conduct. It is important to note that under the guidelines established by the United States Department of Labor, “minority,” at Edward Waters College is defined as “non-Black.” Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) Pursuant to the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) of 1974, as amended, the College cannot disclose academic or personally identifiable information contained in the student’s educational records without the student’s written consent, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. students may grant any third party (e.g., parent, spouse, sponsor) permission to access student academic information by securing from and returning to the Office of the Registrar a signed original of the requisite permission form. Accreditation Edward Waters College is accredited by: Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges 1866 Southern Lane Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097 404.679.4501


The President’s Message

Welcome to Edward Waters College! Founded in 1866 as the oldest private institution of higher learning in Florida, Edward Waters College has a lush history of educating students to become future leaders of society. For most of its existence, the College provided an education to individuals that could not find it elsewhere. It has since transformed to attract all calibers of students from throughout the country by offering a rare trio of rich academic, cultural and spiritual experiences to shape its scholars into quality independent thinkers and citizens of the world. Edward Waters College seeks to deliver and sustain excellence, ethics, integrity, unity of purpose, and effectiveness practices. By striving for these goals, students will receive a college experience like no other. The College grants the tools for success, and it is through these tools that students will be holistically prepared to advance in a globally diverse society fueled by academic excellence, research, and service to humanity. As an alumnus of Edward Waters College, I have witnessed firsthand the power of an EWC education. It gave me the means to become a leader and a contributor to the advancement of Jacksonville, the College, and society at large. I thank you for selecting Edward Waters College as your alma mater, and wish you the best on your journey through education and life. It is a special time to be a Tiger. Edward Waters College is on the rise! Sincerely,

Nathaniel Glover, Ed.M. Interim President

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The Board of Trustees Bishop McKinley Young Chairperson 11th Episcopal District African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church Jacksonville, FL

Mr. Ted Pappas Chair, Institutional Advancement Committee PBV Architecture, Incorporated Jacksonville, FL

Dr. Orrin Mitchell 1st Vice-Chairperson Jacksonville Orthodontics Jacksonville, FL

Mr. Jimmie Scott Treasurer Chair, Finance and Investments Committee Mayor Lawtey, FL

Attorney Doug Milne 2nd Vice-Chairperson Law Office of Milne, Buckingham and McCorvey Jacksonville, FL

Mrs. Lovie Scott Chair, Audit Committee Penguin Painters Delray Beach, FL

The Reverend Jimmie Keel Secretary Presiding Elder, South District, East Conference African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church Jacksonville, FL

Dr. Rosa R. Simmons Chair, Board Development Committee Miramar, FL

Attorney Willie E. Gary Gary, Williams, Parenti, Finney, Lewis McManus, Watson & Sperando Attorney and Counselors at Law Stuart, FL Dr. Freddie Groomes-McLendon Chair, Academic Affairs Committee Tallahassee, FL Mr. Charles Jackson Chair, Buildings and Grounds Committee Jackson Enterprises of Brevard, Inc. Melbourne, FL Mr. Tyron Johnson Chair, Student Affairs Committee Dean of Students, Valencia Community College Orlando, FL The Reverend Carlton Jones Renaissance Design Build Group of Jacksonville, Inc. Jacksonville, FL

Mrs. Esther Snowden Lakeland, FL Mr. Charles Spencer Chair, By-Laws Committee (Ad Hoc) Executive Vice President South Atlantic, Gulf Course District International Longshoremen’s Association Jacksonville, FL Dr. Suzan Armstrong-West Faculty Representative Jacksonville, FL Mrs. Marguerite Warren Alumni Representative President, National Alumni Association Jacksonville, FL Ms. Letitia Crimes Student Representative Student Government President Edward Waters College

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Academic Calendar FALL SEMESTER 2010 JULY 2010 July 30 Friday Band Members, Football and Volleyball Teams, and Cheerleaders Arrive & Check In AUGUST 2010 August 7 Saturday Choir Members Arrive and Check In August 12-13 Thursday-Friday Faculty & Staff Institute August 14-15 Saturday-Sunday New Students Arrive & Check In August 16-18 Monday-Wednesday New-Student Orientation & Registration Assessment Exam (First-Year Students) August 18 Wednesday Returning Students Arrive & Check In August 18-20 Wednesday-Friday Registration for Returning Students August 23 Monday Classes Begin August 23-27 Monday-Friday Late Registration and Add/Drop Period SEPTEMBER 2010 September 6 Monday Labor Day (College Closed) September 17 Friday Constitution Day September 22 Wednesday Convocatum Est OCTOBER 2010 October 1 October 6-8 October 11-15 October 16 October 18-19 October 20 October 22

Friday

Last Day to Remove “I” Grades from Spring 2010 Semester Wednesday-Friday Mid-term Examination Period Monday-Friday Homecoming Week Saturday Homecoming Game Monday-Tuesday Fall Break (No Classes) Wednesday Classes Resume/Mid-term Grades Due Friday Last Day to Withdraw from Classes without Penalty (W) Graduation Applications Due for Spring 2011 Graduates

NOVEMBER 2010 November 1-19 Monday-Friday Academic Advising & Pre-registration for Spring 2011 November 11 Thursday Veterans Day (College Closed) November 15 Monday Admissions Application Deadline (Spring 2011 Applicants) November 19 Friday Last Day to Withdraw from the College (WP/WF) November 24 Wednesday Classes End for Thanksgiving Holiday (12:00 noon); Residence Halls Close for Thanksgiving Holiday November 28 Sunday Residence Halls/Cafeteria Re-open November 29 Monday Classes Resume

Chapel is held every Wednesday at 11:00 AM in the Milne Auditorium (Lee-Cousins Building) EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page iii


Academic Calendar DECEMBER 2010 December 2 Thursday Classes End December 3 Friday Reading Day; Major Field Exams (Fall 2010 Graduates Only) December 4-10 Saturday-Friday Final Examination Period December 11 Saturday Residence Halls/Cafeteria Close December 14 Tuesday Final Grades Due to the Registrar SPRING SEMESTER 2011

JANUARY 2011 January 3 Monday Faculty & Staff Return January 3-4 Monday-Tuesday Faculty & Staff Institute January 4-5 Tuesday-Wednesday New Students Check-In / Orientation Assessment Exam (1st Year Students) January 5 Wednesday Returning Students Arrive January 5-7 Wednesday-Friday Registration for New & Returning Students January 10 Monday Classes Begin January 10-14 Monday-Friday Late Registration and Add/Drop Period January 17 Monday Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday (College Closed) January 19 Wednesday Convocatum Est FEBRUARY 2011 February 18 Friday Last Day to Remove “I” Grades from Fall 2010 Semester February 23-25 Wednesday-Friday Mid-term Examination Period MARCH 2011 March 1 Tuesday Mid-term Grades Due March 4 Friday Last Day to Withdraw from Classes Without Penalty (W) Graduation Applications Due (Fall 2011 Graduates) March 14-18 Monday-Friday Spring Break (No Classes) March 21 Monday Classes Resume March 23 Wednesday Academic Honors Day March 28 Monday Academic Advising and Pre-registration for Fall 2011 Semester Begins APRIL 2011 April 7 Thursday Last Day to Withdraw from the College (WP/WF) April 8 Friday Academic Advising and Pre-registration for Fall 2011 Semester Ends April 8-9 Friday-Saturday Major Field Exams (Spring 2011 Graduates Only) April 13-16 Wednesday-Saturday Post CAAP Exams (Juniors) April 15 Friday Admissions Application Deadline for Fall 2011 Applicants Chapel is held every Wednesday at 11:00 AM in the Milne Auditorium (Lee-Cousins Building) EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page iv


Academic Calendar APRIL 2011 April 19-21 Tuesday-Thursday Graduating Seniors’ (Spring 2011) Final Examination Period April 22 Friday Good Friday (College Closed) April 25 Monday Easter Monday (College Closed) April 26 Tuesday Classes Resume; Graduating Seniors’ Grades Due April 28 Thursday Classes End April 29 Friday Reading Day MAY 2011 May 2-5 Monday-Thursday Final Examination Period May 6 Friday Evening Baccalaureate Service May 7 Saturday Commencement Ceremony Residence Halls/Cafeteria Close May 10 Tuesday Final Grades Due to the Registrar FALL SEMESTER 2011 JULY 2011 July 29 Friday Band Members, Football and Volleyball Teams, and Cheerleaders Arrive AUGUST 2011 August 7 Sunday Choir Members Arrive August 11-12 Thursday-Friday Faculty & Staff Institute August 13-14 Saturday-Sunday New Students Arrive August 15-17 Monday-Wednesday Orientation / Registration for New Students/ Assessment Exam (1st Year Students) August 17 Wednesday Returning Students Arrive August 17-19 Wednesday-Friday Returning Students’ Registration August 22 Monday Classes Begin August 22-26 Monday-Friday Late Registration and Add/Drop Period SEPTEMBER 2011 September 5 Monday Labor Day (College Closed) September 17 Saturday Constitution Day September 21 Wednesday Convocatum Est September 30 Friday Last Day to Remove “I” from Spring 2011 Semester OCTOBER 2011 October 8 October 12-14 October 17-18 October 19

Saturday Wednesday-Friday Monday-Tuesday Wednesday

Homecoming Game Mid-term Examination Period Fall Break (No Classes) Classes Resume/Mid-term Grades Due

Chapel is held every Wednesday at 11:00 AM in the Milne Auditorium (Lee-Cousins Building) EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page v


Academic Calendar OCTOBER 2011 October 21

Friday Oct. 31-Nov.19 Monday-Friday

Last Day to Withdraw from Classes without Penalty (W) Graduation Applications Due (Spring Graduates) Academic Advising & Pre-registration for Spring 2012

NOVEMBER 2011 November 11 Friday November 15 November 18 Friday November 23 Wednesday November 24-25 Thursday-Friday November 27 Sunday November 28 Monday

Veterans’ Day (College Closed) Admissions Application Deadline for Spring Applicants Last Day to Withdraw from the College WP/WF) Classes End for Thanksgiving Holidays (12:00 noon) Residence Halls Close for Thanksgiving Holidays Thanksgiving Holidays (College Closed) Residence Halls/Cafeteria Re-open Classes Resume

DECEMBER 2011 December 1 Thursday Classes End December 2 Friday Reading Day; Major Field Exams (Fall 2011 Graduates Only) December 3-9 Saturday-Friday Final Examination Period December 10 Saturday Residence Halls/Cafeteria Close @ Noon December 13 Tuesday Final Grades Due to the Registrar SPRING SEMESTER 2012

JANUARY 2012 January 2 Monday Faculty & Staff Return January 3-4 Tuesday-Wednesday New Students Check-In & Orientation. Assessment Exam (1st Year Students) January 4 Wednesday Returning Students Arrive January 4-6 Wednesday-Friday Registration for New & Returning Students January 9 Monday Classes Begin January 9-13 Monday-Friday Late Registration and Add/Drop Period January 16 Monday Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday (College Closed) January 18 Wednesday Convocatum Est FEBRUARY 2012 February 17 February 22-24 February 28 MARCH 2012 March 2

Friday Wednesday-Friday Tuesday

Friday March 12-16 Monday-Friday

Last Day to Remove “I” from Fall 2011 Semester Mid-term Examination Period Mid-term Grades Due Last Day to Withdraw from Classes without Penalty (W) Graduation Applications Due (Fall Graduates) Spring Break (No Classes)

Chapel is held every Wednesday at 11:00 AM in the Milne Auditorium (Lee-Cousins Building) EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page vi


Academic Calendar MARCH 2012 March 19 Monday March 21 Wednesday March 26 Monday

Classes Resume Academic Honors Day Academic Advising and Pre-registration for Fall 2012 Semester Begins

APRIL 2012 April 5 Thursday Last Day to Withdraw from the College (WP/WF) April 6 Friday Good Friday (College Closed) April 9 Monday Easter Monday (College Closed) April 11-14 Wednesday-Saturday Post CAAP Exams (Juniors) April 13-14 Friday-Saturday Major Field Exams (Spring 2012 Graduates Only) April 13 Friday Academic Advising and Pre-registration for Fall 2012 Semester Ends April 15 Admissions Application Deadline for Fall Applicants April 17-19 Tuesday-Thursday Graduating Seniors’ (Spring 2012) Final Examination Period April 23 Monday Graduating Seniors’ Grades Due April 26 Thursday Classes End April 27 Reading Day April 30-May 4 Monday-Friday Final Examination Period MAY 2012 May 4 Friday Baccalaureate Service May 5 Saturday Commencement Ceremony Residence Halls/Cafeteria Close @ Noon May 8 Tuesday Final Grades Due to the Registrar Chapel is held every Wednesday at 11:00 AM in the Milne Auditorium (Lee-Cousins Building)  

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Table of Contents Key Offices and Telephone Numbers Official Campus Communication

ix x

About the College Mission Statement and Core Values Institutional Goals Accreditation and Recognized Professional Memberships Governance History Campus and Buildings Location Campus Visits Alumni Association Institutional Advancement Title III & Special Programs ROTC Outcomes Assessment

1 2 2 3 3 4 5 8 8 9 9 9 10 10

Admissions Admissions Philosophy Basis of Selection Applying for Admissions High School Applicants Transfer Applicants Readmitted Students GED Recipients Non Degree Seeking Students International Applicants Post Baccalaureate Students Transient Students Admission Review Committee

11 12 12 12 12 13 15 16 16 17 18 19 20

Registration Registration Information Course Load Course Drop/Add Overload Policy Course Cancellation Transcripts Withdrawal from Course Records Locations Information Release Grading System Grade Change Policy Grading Policy

21 22 22 22 23 23 23 23 23 24 25 26 27

Incomplete Grades 27 Independent Study 28 Course Repeat Policy 28 Academic Bankruptcy 28 Academic Standing 29 Standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) 30 Academic Greivance Policy 32 Grade Appeals 34 Academic Honors 35 Graduation Requirements 36 Catalog Agreement 38 Financial Services 39 General Information 40 Student Accounts 40 Payment of Tuition and Fees 40 Calculating Tuition and Fees 40 Tuition Costs 41 Overload Fee 42 Late Registration Fee 42 Collections 42 Refunds of Tuition and Fees 43 Financial Aid Information 43 Satisfactory Academic Progress for Federal Student Aid 49 Student Affairs and Enrollment Management 53 Housing 54 Cafeteria 54 Post Office 55 Bookstore 55 EWC Library 55 Computer Centers 56 Textbooks 56 Lost and Found 57 Counseling 57 Health Services 57 Campus Ministry 57 Career Planning and Placement 57 Residence Life 58 Student Activities 58 Student Government 58 Fraternities and Sororities 59 Organizations and Clubs 59 Athletics 60 EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page viii


Traditional EWC Events 61 Student Conduct 62 EWC Dress Code 65 Student Rights and Responsibilities 67 Records Locations 68 Information Release 69 Academic Affairs 70 Vision & Mission Statement 71 Academic Support Programs-Center for Excellence in Teaching & Learning (CETL) 71 Developmental Learning Programs 72 TRIO Academic Support Services 73 General Education Requirements 75 EWC Mission Requirements 76 Major Course / Supportive Course Requirements 77 Graduation Competencies 77 Academic Degrees 77 Degree Plans and Academic Departments 79 Course Descriptions 101 Organization and Staff 147 Appendix 157 Campus Map  158

KEY OFFICES & PHONE NUMBERS Area Code: 904

Information 470-8000 Campus Security 470-8888 Academic Advising 470-8054 Academic Affairs 470-8050 Admissions 470-8200 Alumni Affairs 470-8251 Athletics Director 470-8277 Athletics Department 470-8276 Football 470-8282 Black Male College Explorers Program 470-8001 Business and Finance Office 470-8150 Bookstore 470-8159 Cafeteria 470-8160 Campus Ministry 470-8056 Career Planning and Placement 470-8218 Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning (C.E.T.L.) 470-8780 or 470-8054 C.L.I.M.B. Program 470-8075 Community Resource Center (Schell-Sweet Center) 470-8140 Counseling Center 470-8990 Financial Aid (Student Financial Services) 470-8190 Focused Academics Motivating Excellence (F.A.M.E.)Program 470-8780 Human Resources and Administrative Services 470-8151 Institutional Advancement 470-8251 Library 470-8080 Mail Room 470-8159 President’s Office 470-8010 Registrar (Transcripts) 470-8100 Residential Life 470-8300 Director of Residential Life 470-8300 Dot Street Residential Complex 470-8303 Honors Housing 470-8733 Morris Cone A 470-8212 or 470-8213 Morris Cone B 470-8225 Salter Hall 470-8304 Tiger Landing Residential Complex 470-8224 Student Accounts (BILLING) 470-8195 Student Activities 470-8210 Student Affairs and Enrollment Management 470-8211 TRIO Program 470-8220 Upward Bound Program 470-8129

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OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT ATTENTION: Students, Faculty, and Staff Please be advised that the College’s electronic mail (e-mail) system is our formal and recognized method of communicating. It is imperative that individuals read emails daily to keep apprised of important information pertaining to College operations. EWC’s Acceptable Use Policy is available on MOODLE. EWC OHR 4-2010

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Many colleges claim excellence, pointing for evidence to the superior quality of students admitted or to the vast quantity of resources consumed. But, whether colleges contribute value to people is another matter. True excellence lies in an institution’s ability to affect its students and staff favorably, to enhance their intellectual and scholarly development, to make a positive difference in their lives. The most excellent institutions have the greatest impact on learners’ knowledge and personal development. --Alexander W. Astin (1991)

About the College

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EDWARD WATERS COLLEGE “Sustaining Excellence & Ethics Through Unity Of Purpose, Integrity & Effectiveness Practices”

Our Vision

Edward Waters College will become a national model for a dynamic, globally diverse learning centered community that champions academic excellence through innovative teaching and learning strategies under-girded by a spirit of servant leadership.

Our Mission

Edward Waters College is a small private, Christian, Historically Black, Urban, Liberal Arts College that offers quality baccalaureate degree programs. The College strives to prepare students holistically to advance in a global society through the provision of intellectually stimulating programs and an environment which emphasizes high moral and spiritual values in keeping with the African Methodist Episcopal Church. Edward Waters College seeks to develop excellence in scholarship, research and service for the betterment of humanity.

Our Core Values

Christian Principles –Ethics and doctrines predicated on the AME Church theology “GOD our Father, CHRIST our Redeemer, MAN our Brother”. Excellence – Superiority, eminence, distinction and quality in scholarship, leadership and citizenship. Social Responsibility – Embracing a burden of obligation to collective society, both the immediate as well as the global. Civic Engagement – Dedication to addressing issues of public concern. Cooperation – Fostering the concept of teamwork as a means to success. Customer Service – Employing the Biblical tenant Matthew 7:12; “Therefore all things whatsoever ye would that men should do to you, do ye even so to them: for this is the law and the prophets.” Professionalism – Practicing proficiency, skill and expertise in all that we undertake. Student Engagement – Cultivating within our students a thirst for education, a desire for higher level thought processes and a willingness to persevere despite challenges. Scholarship – Creating a culture of erudition through a nurturing spirit. Diversity – Endeavoring to celebrate the uniqueness of all cultures with appreciation and understanding.

Our Institutional Strategic Goals Goal I

Increase recruitment, retention, and graduation rates.

Goal II

Improve the effectiveness of the College through research, planning, and assessment.

Goal III

Maintain a fiscal and physical infrastructure, including information technology, that strengthen academic programs, business operations, and student life.

Goal IV

Optimize philanthropic support and advance college image, resources, and relationships.

Goal V

Improve the academic standards and competitiveness of the College.

Goal VI

Strengthen and support the social, cultural, and spiritual development of students.

Goal VII

Identify EWC as an African Methodist Episcopal Church related institution of learning.

“Reinventing itself for the 21st Century” EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 2


ACCREDITATION, NATIONAL AND STATE AFFILIATIONS Edward Waters College is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools and is fully licensed by the State Board of Independent Colleges (SBIC), and is approved for training veterans under Public Law 94-502 and the Florida Department of Education. Further, EWC maintains formal membership with the following professional organizations: • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

American Council on Education (ACE) Council for Independent Colleges (CIC) Council for the Advancement and Support of Education (CASE) Council of Colleges of Arts and Sciences (CCAS) Florida Association for Colleges and Universities (FACU) Florida Association for Colleges of Teacher Education (FACTE) Independent Colleges and Universities of Florida (ICUF) International Association of Colleges of Business Education (IACBE) National Association for Academic Advising (NACADA) National Association for Developmental Education (NADE) National Association for Equal Opportunity in Higher Education (NAFEO) National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU) National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA) United Negro College Fund (UNCF)

GOVERNANCE Edward Waters College, located in Jacksonville, Florida, is the oldest historically Black institution of higher education in the state. Edward Waters College is a four-year liberal arts, co-educational institution, and is affiliated with the African Methodist Episcopal Church. The College is governed by a Board of Trustees and each member serves a three-year term. The current composition of the board consists of one student, one faculty representative, and six lay persons. The remainder of the board is comprised of representatives from the Eleventh Episcopal District of the African Methodist Episcopal Church from the Jacksonville, Florida area, the state of Florida, and southeastern United States. The Presiding Bishop of the Eleventh Episcopal District of the African Methodist Episcopal Church is the Chairman of the Board of Trustees. The Board of Trustees appoints the President to guide Edward Waters College and carry out its mission. The President employs five Vice Presidents (Executive Vice President, Academic Affairs, Student Affairs and Enrollment Management, Business and Finance, and Institutional Advancement) to assist with planning and implementation. Further guidance comes from the President’s Cabinet including the vice presidents, assistant vice presidents, Director of Human Resources and Administrative Services, Athletic Director, Director of Sponsored Programs and Research, Director of Information Technology and Director of Institutional Planning, Research, and Effectiveness,

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HISTORY OF THE COLLEGE Edward Waters College is, distinctively, Florida’s oldest independent institution of higher learning as well as the state’s first institution established for the education of African Americans. Edward Waters College (EWC) began as an institution founded by blacks, for blacks. In 1865, following the Civil War, the Reverend Charles H. Pearce, a presiding elder of the African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church, was sent to Florida by Bishop Daniel Alexander Payne. Observing the fast-paced social and political changes of the Reconstruction era, Rev. Pearce immediately recognized the need for an education ministry, as no provision had yet been made for the public education of Florida’s newly emancipated blacks. Assisted by the Reverend William G. Steward, the first AME pastor in the state, Pearce began to raise funds to build a school. This school, established in 1866, was to eventually evolve into Edward Waters College. From the beginning, EWC was faced with both abject poverty and widespread illiteracy among its constituents resulting from prewar conditions of servitude and historical, legally enforced non-schooling of African Americans. However, the school met the needs of its community by offering courses at the elementary, high school, college, and seminary levels. Construction of the first building began in October 1872 on ten acres of land in Live Oak. Further support for this new educational institution came from numerous friends, including railroad magnate General M.S. Littlefield, State Treasurer, Simon Conaber, and Lieutenant-General William Gleason. In 1892, the school’s name was changed to Edward Waters College in honor of the third Bishop of the AME Church. In 1901, the City of Jacksonville was destroyed by fire and Edward Waters College was reduced to ashes. In 1904, the Board of Trustees purchased the present site of the school on Kings Road with the imperative from Bishop MB Salter that Edward Waters College must be rebuilt. Under the continued visionary leadership and direction of great Bishops of the AME Church and twenty-eight focused presidents, Edward Waters College was indeed “rebuilt.” In May of 2010, the College welcomed a Jacksonville native son and alumnus, Mr. Nathaniel Glover, as Interim President. Mr. Glover continues the work of his predecessors by focusing on training students to be successful in the 21st Century global economy and ensuring that they matriculate in a safe environment. With a history beginning in the dark yet hopeful days of Reconstruction, today’s Edward Waters College is living, thriving proof of the power of education and the resilience of deeply rooted educational institutions. The College continues to experience the triumphs and challenges characteristic of its rich history and the bold dynamic future to which it aims.

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CAMPUS BUILDINGS The EWC campus today consists of approximately 50 acres of land situated on both sides of US 23, Kings Road, between Whitner and Spires Streets, Ella Street and West 3rd Street, five minutes from downtown Jacksonville, FL. The college campus is a mixture of historic and modern buildings with facilities constructed or substantially renovated since 1968. The majority of the buildings provide modern restroom facilities for the handicapped as well as elevator service to upper floors. In addition, other educational facilities located around Jacksonville are utilized as needed to take EWC into the community. Adams-Jenkins Community Sports and Music Complex The newest building at Edward Waters College, the Adams-Jenkins Community Sports and Music Complex was built in 2005 and renovated in 2010, and houses the Department of Music and Fine Arts and the Athletic Programs. The Complex measures approximately 50,000 square feet. The ground floor includes a 1,800 seat gymnasium primarily designed for basketball and volleyball use. It has concession stands, and men’s and women’s locker rooms. The ground floor also has classrooms, and choir and band rooms. The second floor of the building was completed in 2010 and features a sky box, offices for faculty, conference rooms, classrooms, a state-of-the-art music technology lab, and a piano lab. Admissions Building Built in 1955, this building was renovated in 2003 to house the Office of Admissions. The building is a twostory, masonry block building. Assessment Center This building was constructed as a residence in 1929 and renovated in 1994. It is a brick and wooden twostory house adjacent to the Lee-Cousin Administrative Building and the Tookes Building. The building provides office space for Institutional Advancement, Alumni Affairs, and the Office of Planning, Research and Institutional Effectiveness. Athletic Offices This modular building contains athletic coaches’ offices. Auxiliary Services Office This building was built in 1955. The building is a masonry block building. The building houses several units, primarily Shipping and Receiving Unit. Black Male College Explorers Building This two-story block masonry building was constructed in 1959 and renovated in 2003. It is located across the street from the Morris-Cone Dormitory Complex. The Black Male Explorers Program is housed in this building. George N. Collins Student Center (Student Union Building) This building was completed in 1972 and is a modern two-story masonry block structure housing offices of student affairs, counseling, student government, the mail room and the College cafeteria. In its central campus location, it provides large and private dining rooms, a student lounge, a game room, several conference rooms and a separate banquet facility. The cafeteria provides breakfast, lunch, dinner and weekend brunch for residents and others. The post office (available weekdays) and mailboxes (available daily) with hours posted, (UPS service available), are also located in the center. The building was completely renovated in 1998.

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Dot Street Residential Complex This apartment complex was built in 1959 and currently houses faculty offices. The building was completely renovated in 2001 and is a two-story, ten building masonry block structure. Family Practice Medical Center This building built in 1949 was renovated in 2001. This one-story brick structure houses the EWC Health Center. Grunthal Street Maintenance Building This building was constructed in 1961 and renovated in 1991. It is a two-story block structure, scheduled for comprehensive renovations in the near future. Hatcher-Stewart Building This building was completed in 1968 and is a two-story, modern masonry block building. It houses academic departments, classrooms, faculty offices, and laboratories serving the natural sciences. It was named in honor of the presiding Board Chairman and President holding office at the time of its completion. The building was completely renovated in 1998. Honors Residential Housing Complex This apartment complex was built in 2000. It is a wood structure and houses honor students. Jones House This building was built in 1954. The building is a concrete block building. The Black Psychology Program is housed in this building. Lee-Cousins Building Constructed in 1925 and renovated in 1993, it is a distinguished National Register Site on our campus. The four-story brick structure contains the Milne Chapel-Auditorium recently renovated in 2003, and named after its most generous benefactor, Mr. Doug Milne. The building also contains the offices of the President, Academic Affairs, Financial Aid, Student Accounts, Business and Finance, the Registrar and the CLIMB Program. Library The Centennial Building houses the College’s Library; which serves as the college’s information portal while providing access to the networked world of knowledge resources. As educators, the librarians facilitate the acquisition of the information literacy skills needed to operate effectively in the modern complex technological environment. The library further strives to provide students, faculty, and staff with relevant, contemporary and widely circulated books, periodicals, and multimedia collections. The Library serves as a commons to bring together the various constituencies of the campus and community as it endeavors to stimulate and encourage the development of a lifelong habit of learning. The Library’s collections include reference and general book collections, periodical collection, juvenile book collection and the non-print (VHS, CD, and DVD) media collection. Martin Luther King, Jr., Building This building constructed in 1954 is a small one-story facility adjacent to the Student Union Building and Centennial Library. The building completely renovated in 2000, and currently provides office and space for the physical education program, including the weight and fitness center.

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Morris-Cone Residential Complex This building, completed in 1982, is an all-masonry, two-unit, 192-bed residential facility. Morris-Cone A houses freshmen males and Morris-Cone B houses freshmen females. Named after the College president and AME Bishop, the buildings offer a total of approximately 40,000 square feet with concrete floor systems and central heating. Each floor includes a lounge area for student activities and the rooms are double-occupancy. Polly Brooks Building This building was constructed in 1919 and renovated in 1933. It is a brick and wooden two-story house across from the Morris-Cone Dormitory Complex and adjacent to the Print Shop. Major repairs and renovations were completed on the building in 1999. Additional renovations are scheduled to begin in the later part of 2010. Upon completion of the renovation, the building will house the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning (CETL). Print Shop This building was completed in 1950 and renovated in 1990 and 2001. The building currently houses the College’s Print Shop. The building is an all-masonry block structure adjacent to the Polly Brooks Building and across the street from the Morris-Cone Dormitory Complex. M.B. Salter Hall Residential Complex This building completed in 1950 is a two-story brick dormitory for women. The building was completely renovated in 1998 and provides a reception lounge on the first floor suitable for gatherings and lounging for residents and their guests. Schell-Sweet Community Resource Center This building constructed in 1995 serves as a community resource center which houses offices from local, state and federal departments as well as doctors’ offices. Also located in the CRC is the Senior Wellness Center, which offers a variety of services for seniors including computer classes. Sheehee Maintenance Building This building was constructed in 1960, is a one story block masonry building located directly north of the Martin Luther King Jr. Building, the tennis courts, and Centennial Library. It provides space for the College’s Facilities Management Department. Teacher Education Center (TEC Building) This building was built in 2003, and consists of ten (10) classrooms and four (4) offices. The building is a modular unit. Tiger Landing Residential Complex This apartment complex built in 1968 currently houses male students. The building received complete renovation in 2001. It is a two-story, four building masonry block structure. Susie E. Tolbert House This two-story wood structure was built circa 1912 and is a locally designated historical site. The building will be used as a museum to store art and artifacts that are currently stored on the College campus. The project is scheduled for completion in the later part of 2010. Henry Y. Tookes Building This building was completed in 1945 and is a one-story brick structure adjacent to the Lee-Cousins building. The facility, which originally served as the College library, was completely renovated in 2001. It currently houses classrooms and offices for Campus Security and Information Technology and Telecommunications. EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 7


LOCATION Located on the Kings Road corridor, U. S. Highway 23, Edward Waters College is located five minutes from downtown, in the urban hub of Jacksonville, Florida, along what is called the country’s historic “First Coast” in memory of its 16th century Spanish settlers. The St. Johns River is the focal point and the Atlantic Ocean is only 12 miles east of the city. One can enjoy 50 miles of white-sand beaches collectively at Jacksonville, Neptune, and Atlantic beaches. Boating, swimming, fishing and golf are among the year-round amenities enjoyed locally by many citizens and a portion of the famed Okefenokee Swamp lies only a short distance to the west. Jacksonville is the largest city in land area in the contiguous United States, covering 841 square miles. With a metropolitan area population exceeding 1,000,000, the city is one of Florida’s major cultural, financial, industrial, transportation, medical, and commercial centers. The famous Jacksonville Landing, a favorite tourist and business center on the downtown riverfront, is often filled with open-air concerts and diverse foods. Edward Waters College students have opportunity to participate in a wide variety of cultural events such as the Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra, the Arts Center, the Kumba African Arts Festival, the Jacksonville Jazz Festival, community theater groups and the annual Edward Waters College Spring Concert which features nationally renowned recording artists. Students may also enhance their quality of life by attending The Ritz Theatre & LaVilla Museum, Jacksonville Museum of Modern Art, the Museum of Science and History, and the Museum of Southern History. Other attractions include Barnett’s Art and Frame Gallery, the Jacksonville Zoological Park, the Alexander Brest Planetarium, Black Heritage Trail, Karpeles Manuscript Library, Irene Parfums and Cosmetiques Laboratory/Fine Arts Gallery, and the Cummer Museum of Art and Gardens. The city’s cultural environment is further enhanced by the Arts Series sponsored by Florida Community College at Jacksonville, Jacksonville University, the University of North Florida, the Riverside Fine Arts and the Beaches Fine Arts Centers. Spectators as well as participants can enjoy sports and recreation year-round. Jacksonville is the home of the Jacksonville Suns AA baseball club, the NFL Jacksonville Jaguars, PGA Golf Tour, World Headquarters, the Greyhound Dog Racing Track, and the world champion women’s football team, the Jacksonville Dixie Chicks. CAMPUS VISITS Prospective students and other interested persons are invited to visit the EWC campus to experience firsthand a nurturing, student-centered environment of which alumni, students and staff, are proud. For a campus visit and tour, contact the Admissions Office, in advance, to arrange for suitable introductions and a guided tour. • From north of Jacksonville, FL, travel south on U.S. 95, exiting before the St. Johns River on the right at Kings Road/Edward Waters College exit. • From south of Jacksonville, FL, travel north on U.S. 95, crossing the St. Johns River to exit on the right at Kings Road/Edward Waters College exit. • From west of Jacksonville, FL, travel east on U.S.10, turning north on U.S. 95 before reaching the St. Johns River; heading north on U.S.95, cross the St. Johns River and exit right at Kings Road/Edward Waters College exit. • On Kings Road, travel northwest past the main U.S. Post Office for Jacksonville approximately 1.5 miles arriving at EWC between Tyler and Whitner Streets. There is parking available in convenient lots in and around the campus. The campus is an easy 15-20 minute drive south from the Jacksonville International Airport and an easy 20-30 minute drive west from the Jacksonville Beach and Mayport Naval Station areas on the Atlantic coast. EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 8


EWC ALUMNI ASSOCIATION The purpose of the Edward Waters College Alumni Association is to promote the financial development and academic growth of Edward Waters College; to promote effective public relations; and, to recruit students to enroll in EWC. Former students of the College who have accumulated 45 credit hours, and graduates of the College are entitled to membership in the association. Alumni and friends of EWC are invited to contact the Institutional Advancement Office to arrange support for the college. INSTITUTIONAL ADVANCEMENT The Institutional Advancement Division’s mission is to develop support among its primary external constituencies, students, alumni, faculty and staff, trustees, parents and community leaders, the AME Church, corporate and foundation organizations, and friends for the College’s vision, goals, programs, and activities. The three central units to the College’s development enterprise are Institutional Advancement (fundraising, development services, and sponsored programs), College Relations (marketing and communications), and Alumni Affairs. These offices report to the Vice President for Institutional Advancement. The activities of the Institutional Advancement unit range from fundraising through leadership gifts, planned giving, and annual giving programs; marketing and communications programs involving news and media visibility, publications and visual designs, as well as electronic media initiatives that enhance the stature of the institution; and alumni relations programs that seek to involve graduates in the ongoing life of the institution and bring new constituencies into the fold. The Office of Institutional Advancement at Edward Waters College reaches out to alumni and subsets of alumni whose interests form around specific identities and who may not have a formal relationship with the College but wish to be involved. Beyond, alumni, friends, trustees, and the news media, the constituencies of the Institutional Advancement operation include nearly everyone outside the institution who is in a position to influence its prospects for success. These audiences include business, industry, prospective students and their families, legislators, government officials, the national academic community, various professional communities, opinion leaders, the global community, as well as the general public. TITLE III AND SPONSORED PROGRAMS The mission of the Edward Waters College Office of Sponsored Programs is to provide its administrators, faculty, staff, and students with guidance and technical assistance during the pre-award process in order to secure external sponsored funding that furthers the college’s overall mission, and to provide post-award administration to ensure that all activities and expenditures and reporting are in compliance with the terms of the award. In general, a Sponsored Program is any externally funded grant, contract, or cooperative agreement in which the sponsor requires financial reporting, invoicing or auditing. All government awards are considered Sponsored Programs as well as many corporate and foundation awards. Sponsored Programs are situations where the College agrees to specific conditions and/or to perform a defined scope of work as defined by the sponsor. • An investigator-initiated project that specifies proposals for research, training, and/or service activities to an outside entity. • The proposed project binds the College to a specific scope of work. • A formal agreement for a specified term is established and signed by an officer of Edward Waters College and the sponsoring agency. • The project involves disposition of property, whether tangible or intangible, that may result from the project (e.g. equipment, records, inventions, copyrights, or rights in data). • The sponsor requires invoices for cost reimbursement and/or a financial report is required.

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ROTC AT EDWARD WATERS COLLEGE Edward Waters College, in partnership with the University of North Florida, is proud to offer Army Reserve Officers Training Corps (ROTC). ROTC is a rigorous program that prepares students to become commissioned officers in the United States Army. Widely considered one of the best leadership training programs in the world, ROTC prepares cadets to lead both in the military and civilian world. ROTC offers many benefits, including tuition assistance (in the form of ROTC scholarships), leadership skills, and career training. Students that enroll in the program should be prepared to do physical training at least three times a week. In addition to their regular college courses they also take leadership courses. Cadets that complete the program are commissioned as Second Lieutenants in the United States Army upon graduation. Students interested in joining ROTC or obtaining more information should contact Captain John J. Glasco at (904) 620-3930. Additional information may be found at http://www.rotc.com/us_army/. Some information taken from www.rotc.com. OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT Edward Waters College is committed to accountability to our students, faculty, staff and external stakeholders. Accordingly, the College actively participates in the ongoing process of assessment as mandated by the College’s Strategic Plan. Every fiscal year, each College unit develops an operational plan noting two or three important goals each unit wants to achieve during that year. At the end of the fiscal year, those units submit a report indicating if performance targets were or were not met, and how the units plan to improve quality delivery of services to our students during the upcoming year. At the beginning of the academic year, each academic unit submits an additional document called an ‘assessment plan.’ The College uses the plan to determine if students are meeting stated program goals, program learning outcomes and student learning outcomes in individual classes. In short, the assessment process asks, “Are our students learning what we say they are learning?” Edward Waters College uses a number of measures to help answer that question, including the analysis of pretest and post test scores, the evaluation of student work products from courses and performance on nationally standardized instruments like, The Collegiate Assessment of Academic Proficiency (CAAP), The Standardized Assessment of Information Literacy Skills (Project SAILS), The Major Field Test (MFT) and The Area Concentration Achievement Test (ACAT). Additionally, the College evaluates students’ experiences in the classroom through the nationally standardized Student Instructional Report (SIR II). The SIR II allows the College to compare the teaching effectiveness of our professors to professors at colleges and universities across the nation. Edward Waters Colleges uses the results of the SIR II to help improve the instructional delivery systems and overall learning environment. The College also measures students’ overall experiences on our campus through nationally standardized instruments like The Beginning College Student Survey of Student Engagement, The National Survey of Student Engagement and the Faculty Survey of Student Engagement. A number of “home grown” instruments are also used to determine the extent to which the College is delivering on the promises made to students in the Edward Waters College mission statement.

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ADMISSIONS

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ADMISSION PHILOSOPHY Edward Waters College is devoted to serving and assisting students who are qualified for admission and who will benefit from the College’s academic and social experiences. The College is especially well-equipped to support students who see value in our academic opportunities.

BASIS OF SELECTION New students are eligible for admission at the beginning of fall and spring semester sessions. Applications are reviewed on a rolling basis. Edward Waters College does not discriminate against any student on basis of age, race, creed, religion, handicap, gender, nationality, ethnic origin or any other unrelated characteristics.

APPLYING FOR ADMISSION Application for Admission You have two options to complete the application for admission. 1. Use this URL to complete and submit the web-based form: https://iqweb.ewc.edu/iqweb/Secure/Guest/ onlineapp.asp 2. Contact the Office of Admissions to have an application mailed to you. Priority Application Deadlines • Fall April 15 • Spring November 15 Application Fee • $25.00 The application fee is non-refundable. Two Recommendations Required for All Applicants • Recommendations from Edward Waters College faculty and/or staff cannot fulfill this requirement. • As appropriate, acceptable recommendations include those provided by school officials (i.e. teacher, guidance counselor, professor, administrator); religious leaders, and/or community leaders. • Recommendations should be type-written on official letterhead, include recommender’s contact information and should provide insight regarding your ability to complete college-level work, adjust to the college setting, work in teams, manage multiple tasks simultaneously and contribute to the academic community.

HIGH SCHOOL APPLICANTS High School Transcript • Admission consideration is given to applicants with standard high school diplomas. • Request an official copy of your high school transcript showing at least six semesters of work, or at least through the completion of your junior year. • Transcripts are considered official when received directly from the issuing institution in a sealed envelope with the school’s seal and/or official signature. • Six-semester transcripts can be used to evaluate your admissibility. Your enrollment for the application term is based upon review on your final eight-semester transcript with graduation date. Minimum Requirements • GPA: Candidates who have earned at least a 2.50 cumulative grade point average are considered for regular admission. EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 12


• ACT: No minimum score requirement • SAT: No minimum score requirement SAT I and ACT Scores • There is no minimum score requirement, but you should submit either the SAT I or ACT score report. • Edward Waters College SAT code: 5182 • Edward Waters College ACT code: 0724 • Scores reported on your high school transcript can be used to evaluate your admissibility. High School Curriculum Admission consideration is given to applicants who have completed a minimum of the following: • English 4 years or units • Mathematics 3 years or units, including Algebra, Geometry and Algebra II • Social Science 3 years or units • Natural Science 3 years or units Application Fee Waivers Fee waivers are accepted if both of these criterion are met 1. Applicant must submit ALL required application documents with the fee waiver form, AND 2. Applicant must submit fee waiver form by the priority application deadline for the application term. Edward Waters College participates in the College Board Fee Waiver Program.

TRANSFER APPLICANTS Who is Eligible to Transfer • Transfer admission is granted to applicants at all class levels. • No minimum credit hours or units are required. • Transfer consideration is given for all academic terms. Official Transcripts Transcripts are considered official when received directly from the issuing institution in a sealed envelope with the school’s seal and/or official signature. College Transcripts • Official academic transcripts are required from all college and/or universities you have attended, regardless of grade point average or number of hours completed. High School Transcripts • You must submit an official high school transcript if you have attempted less than 24 college hours. Minimum Requirements • College GPA: Applicants earning at least a 2.50 cumulative GPA in all college coursework are considered for regular admission • Academic Standing: Good academic standing and/or eligibility to return to previous institution for full-time study is required for admission consideration. • High School GPA: If a high school transcript is required to complete your admission file, you must have earned at least a 2.50 cumulative GPA. • SAT I or ACT: May be required if you have attempted less than 24 college hours.

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SAT I and ACT Scores • If you have taken the SAT I or ACT and would like your scores reviewed for admission consideration or course placement please submit official scores from either The College Board (SAT) or ACT. • Edward Waters College SAT code: 5182 • Edward Waters College ACT code: 0724 Evaluation of Transfer Credits • An official transcript is required for formal credit evaluation. At the discretion of College personnel, unofficial transcripts may be used for advising or counseling. • We make every effort to match your transferable courses to our General Education and academic discipline coursework. • In most cases, coursework from regionally accredited institutions for which you’ve earned at least a “C” or better is transferable, if comparable coursework is offered at Edward Waters. Standardized Course Placement Assessment All new students are required to take the ACCUPLACER, a standardized course placement test. The primary function of this test is to determine appropriate Reading, Mathematics and English course placement. Based on test results, students will be required to enroll in academic skill enhancement courses prior to enrolling in college-level courses. Students who enter with the following SAT and/or ACT scores will automatically place into college-level English, Reading and/or Mathematics courses. However, completion of the ACCUPLACER test is still required unless the student can provide official evidence of having successfully completed college-level mathematics and/or English courses with grades of “C” or above. Cut-Off Scores for College-Level Reading, Mathematics and English SAT Verbal Score of 440 or higher SAT Math Score of 440 or higher ACT Reading Score of 18 or higher ACT English Score of 17 or higher ACT Mathematics Score of 19 or higher Exemption from the standard placement assessment is granted to applicants who have completed at least six (6) semester hours in English Composition and/or six (6) hours in college-level mathematics, with grades of “C” or higher. Transferring with an Associate’s Degree • Edward Waters is one of 14 private colleges and universities in Florida that signed a formal articulation agreement with the State Board of Community Colleges in 1992. • Under the terms of this agreement, graduates of Florida community colleges with a transferable Associate of Arts degree and without formal matriculation into another college or university, are guaranteed admission to upper-division status as juniors or seniors subject to departmental and degree requirements. • If you have not completed the equivalent of Edward Waters’ 47-48 credit core general education requirements are required to do so. • You may transfer a maximum of 72 combined credit hours from all accredited colleges attended.

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READMITED STUDENTS Priority Application Deadlines • Fall April 15 • Spring November 15 Application Fee A non-refundable $25.00 fee is required to process your application. CLIMB Reinstatement Fee If you are applying for readmission to the CLIMB program, an additional $125 is required. Application for Admission Complete the Application for Readmission from the web or submit the downloadable form. Mail completed form to: Edward Waters College Office of Admissions 1658 Kings Road Jacksonville, FL 32209 or fax completed form to: 904.470.8048 Review of Applications Readmission applications are reviewed and evaluated by several College units before decisions are rendered. Applicant files are reviewed for issues related to, but not limited to: 1. satisfactory academic progress; 2. academic standing; 3. student judiciary concerns; and 4. satisfactory financial status. 5. Official transcripts are required from any college or university attended since last enrolled at Edward Waters. Long-Term Absence from Edward Waters • If your study at Edward Waters is interrupted for two semesters or more, you may be required to fulfill the terms of the current catalog at the time of readmission. • If your study at Edward Waters is interrupted for five years or longer, all earned credits are subject to review by the Office of Academic Affairs. EWC Statute of Limitation Policy Effective fall 2010, a full-time student who is pursuing a baccalaureate degree must complete all degree requirements for graduation within seven (7) academic calendar years from the date they were admitted to the College. Students will not receive credit hours toward graduation for courses taken more than seven years prior to graduation, unless those courses were approved and accepted by EWC as transfer credits upon the student’s admission to the College. Courses older than seven years must be repeated by the student. Students who are not enrolled at the College for seven (7) years or more will be required to meet all degree requirements of the departmental curriculum in effect at the time of their readmission. Further, such students will be subject to the terms, conditions and requirements of the College Catalog edition in force at the point of readmission. Part-time students must complete all degree requirements for graduation within ten (10) academic calendar years from the date they were admitted to the College. The same credit hour/course conditions stipulated above for full-time students apply similarly for part-time students, except the conditions are based on a ten-year limit and not a seven-year limit. EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 15


GED RECIPIENTS Official GED Transcript and Score Report • Request an official copy of your GED transcript and score report. • Transcripts are considered official when received directly from the issuing institution in a sealed envelope with the school’s seal and/or official signature. Minimum Requirements • Individual Score 410 standard score • Average Score 450 average of the five subject areas • Total Score 2250 combined score of the five subject areas • ACT Optional. • SAT Optional. SAT I and ACT Scores • If a student has taken the SAT I or ACT and would like the scores reviewed for admission consideration or course placement, the student must submit official scores from either The College Board (SAT) or ACT. • Edward Waters College SAT code: 5182 • Edward Waters College ACT code: 0724 NON-DEGREE SEEKING STUDENTS Who is a Non-Degree Seeking Student? • Students wish to take courses for personal growth and development and/or individual learning goals, but do not wish to enroll in a degree program. • Non-degree students may enroll in a maximum of 12 credit hours • Non-degree students may enroll in courses in any academic division. • Credits earned may be counted toward degree requirements should you later decide to pursue a degree. • Financial aid is available on a limited basis. International Students International students on F-1 Visas are not eligible for admission as non-degree students. Priority Application Deadlines • Fall April 15 • Spring November 15 Application Fee • $25.00 The application fee is non-refundable. High School Transcript • Admission consideration is given to applicants with standard high school diplomas. • Request an official copy of your final high school transcript. It must include your graduation date and diploma type. • Transcripts are considered official when received directly from the issuing institution in a sealed envelope with the school’s seal and/or official signature.

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INTERNATIONAL APPLICANTS Priority Application Deadlines • Fall April 15 • Spring November 15 Application Fee – all fees must be in US currency • A non-refundable $75.00 fee is required to process an application. Non-Degree Status International students on F-1 Visas are not eligible for admission as non-degree students. Academic Credentials and Official Transcripts • Send official, certified, academic credentials and/or official transcripts directly to Edward Waters College. • If official academic credentials require translation and/or evaluation, this process is managed directly by Edward Waters College and its academic credential evaluation partners. • Transfer applicants must submit official transcripts from each college or university attended. Failure to provide information from all previously attended institutions may result in the immediate cancellation of your application for admission. Foreign Credential Evaluation Fees – all fees must be in US currency. These fees are in addition to the application fee. • $75.00 Evaluation of high school or secondary school transcript • $190.00 Course-by-course evaluation of all college/university transcripts High School and/or Secondary School • Applicants must be graduates of a secondary school and submit a first or second division General Certification of Education (or its equivalent for those applying from the British Commonwealth). • Basic courses in Algebra, English, Geometry, History, Natural Sciences and other academic subjects should have been taken in secondary school. The applicant should have achieved a thorough knowledge of the English language. • All school records must be certified by school officials and sent with your application. Minimum Requirements • GPA: Candidates who have earned at least a 2.00 cumulative grade point average are considered for regular admission. • ACT: Optional. Edward Waters College Code: 0724 • SAT: Optional. Edward Waters College Code: 5182 TOEFL May be required if native language of language of instruction is something other English. Minimum scores for the three versions of the exam are: • Paper Test 477 or higher • Computer Test 153 or higher • Internet Test 53 or higher TOEFL scores will be waived for applicants who are: • Graduates of high schools within the United States, or • Students whose native language or language of instruction is English, or • Students transferring to Edward Waters College after at least one year at another English language college EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 17


or university Information on the TOEFL exam may be obtained by writing to: Education Testing Service • Box 899 • Princeton, NJ 08540 • USA Financial Statement • Applicants must provide a notarized financial statement from a United States Embassy showing that the applicant has enough support for at least one year in the United States. • This statement must be submitted with the application for admission. This amount should be at least $16,944.00 to cover the cost of one year’s of tuition, fees, living expenses and other necessities. • The statement must also show who will provide the funds. • Note well, the stated dollar amount is for the 2010-2011 academic year and is subject to change. Issuing the I-20 • I-20 forms are issued once all required documents are received and admission is granted to the applicant. • The I-20, an official acceptance letter and other necessary documents are included in the acceptance materials. • The I-20 is not released to a third party. It is issued only to the applicant or mailed directly to the permanent home address listed on the application for admission. • Prior to enrollment, the student must present an original copy of the I-20 to the Designated School Official (DSO) showing Embassy authorization to enroll as a student with an F-1 Visa and the I-94 card. SEVIS I-901 Fee • Once the I-20 has been issued, the student is responsible for paying the $200 fee (U.S. currency) directly to the Department of Homeland Security. • The I-901 fee must be paid prior to the student’s scheduled Embassy appointment. Failure to pay this fee may result in denial of F-1 status. POST-BACCALAUREATE STUDENTS Who is a Second-Degree Student? • A student who at the time of application to EWC has earned a bachelor’s degree and/or graduate degree from a regionally accredited college or university Priority Application Deadlines • Fall April 15 • Spring November 15 Application Fee • $25.00 The application fee is non-refundable. Application for Admission You have two options to complete the application for admission. 1. Use this URL to complete and submit the web-based form: https://iqweb.ewc.edu/iqweb/Secure/Guest/ onlineapp.asp 2. Contact the Office of Admissions to have an application mailed to you. Required Documentation • An official transcript from the regionally accredited institution(s) which conferred the previous degree(s).

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Exemption from ACCUPLACER Second-degree candidates are exempt from the standardized ACCUPLACER placement test and other placement requirements. Exemption from EWC General Education Requirements Students seeking a second degree are not required to complete General Education courses. Such students are only required to take major courses and EWC Mission courses (African American History and Introduction to Biblical Studies). TRANSIENT STUDENTS Who is a Transient Student? • A student enrolled at a regionally accredited college or university other than Edward Waters • A student in good standing at his/her home institution • A student who does not intend to transfer to Edward Waters • A student who desires the academic record of coursework completed at Edward Waters college forwarded to his/her home institution Priority Application Deadlines • Fall April 15 • Spring November 15 Application Fee • $25.00 The application fee is non-refundable. Application for Admission o Completion of the Transient Application for Admission o The standard Application for Admission should not be used Required Documentation • An official copy of the student’s transcript from his/her home institution • Transcripts are considered official when received directly from the issuing institution in a sealed envelope with the school’s seal and official signature • Proof of good standing from the Registrar at the student’s home institution Request Your Edward Waters Transcript • Official copies of your academic transcript can be forwarded to any school and/or agency upon your official request. • Transcripts are only released when all financial obligations to the College are satisfied Initial Scholarship Offers and Appeals of Initial Offer Priority consideration for admission scholarships is given to applicants who complete the admission process by the priority deadline for the application term (April 15 for fall entry, November 1 for spring entry). Scholarship funds are limited. Applicants complete the application process after the priority deadline date, but may meet the academic requirements are not guaranteed scholarship funds. Admission scholarship offers are made only at the time of initial enrollment. If you feel you met the scholarship requirements, but were not offered the appropriate award, you may submit a written appeal to the Office of Admissions during the initial enrollment term. Admission scholarship appeals must be received prior to the last day of class during your first semester of enrollment. EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 19


Deferred Admission If you defer your admission for one semester, if funds are available, you may also defer your admission scholarship for that period. If admission is deferred for more than one academic term, you must meet the applicable scholarship requirements for the deferred entry term. ADMISSION REVIEW COMMITTEE At the discretion of the Office of Admissions, applicants who do not meet the minimum admission requirements, may be subject to a secondary review committee. This committee may require the applicant to submit additional information, provide additional supportive documentation or schedule a face-to-face or phone interview. Committee decisions are documented in the Office of Admissions.

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REGISTRATION

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Registration Information Edward Waters College expects all new students (first time and transfer students) to report to the campus on the date indicated in the Academic Calendar to begin orientation and testing in preparation for registration. All students are expected to report to class on the first class day as identified in the Academic Calendar. Pre-registration Currently enrolled students may register in advance (pre-registration) within the preceding semester. Preregistration occurs in the Fall Semester for the Spring Semester and in the Spring Semester for the Fall semester. Pre-registration is complete once materials, available in the Registrar’s Office, are signed by 1) Student, 2) Academic Advisor, 3) Business or Student Accounts Office and 4) Registrar’s Office. Registration 1. Separate days are defined and noted in the Academic Calendar specifically for registration. Listed below are the steps for registration: 2. Obtain registration materials. 3. Identify courses desired for the current semester and record correct code numbers for each course desired with an Academic Advisor’s assistance. 4. Register courses in the Registrar Office, and pay tuition and fees in Business or Student Accounts Office. 5. Proceed to “I.D. station” for photograph and official EWC Identification Card. Late Registration Late registration occurs after the first day that classes begin. Students registering late after this period are assessed a late fee and are marked with an “unexcused” absence. They are responsible for making up required course work subject to the approval of the instructor. Instructors begin taking class attendance the first day of class. Students who have three unexcused absences the first week of classes will be dropped from the classes. A drop in classes will affect a student’s credit hours. Students should note that this reduction in credit hours may cause a change in financial aid. Therefore, attending classes is vital to college success. Calendar System and Credits EWC operates on an academic calendar system consisting of two 16-week semesters (Fall and Spring) and a short 6 week Summer session with academic credits measured in semester hours. A “semester hour” is awarded for successful completion of a course meeting one hour/week for sixteen weeks, or the equivalent. (i.e. a typical 3-credit course meets three hours a week over 16 weeks and thus consists of 48 “contact hours” or three “semester hours.” Similarly, courses meeting for nine hours a week over 5 or more weeks could be a 3-credit course and carry the same academic credit.) Course Load A normal course of study towards the baccalaureate degree at EWC is 15 credit hours a semester. However, students enrolling for 12 or more credits hours are considered “full-time” students. Students enrolling for fewer than 12 credits are considered “part-time.” Part time students do not normally have access to campus housing. (Exceptions are possible through appeal to the Vice President for Student Affairs.) Course Load Adjustment -Drop/Add Students may drop and add courses during the first two weeks of the semester with the faculty advisor’s and/or academic advisor’s approval. Adjustments require a $5 add/drop fee. EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 22


Overload Policy Registering for overload (more than 18 credit hours in Fall/Spring Semesters or 6 credits in Summer Sessions) requires permission and signatures from faculty advisors, department chairs, and the Academic Vice President and may be granted to students whose overall GPA is 3.0 or better. Requests for overload are made in writing on college forms for the appropriate approvals. Course Cancellation The EWC administration reserves the right to cancel course sections for which there is insufficient registration or when necessary to meet changing situations. Students are encouraged to participate in advisement and preregistration each semester to enable timely information and planning for class schedules, course offerings, and program and curriculum adjustments. Transcripts The Student Accounts Office must approve Transcript Release Requests for Academic Transcripts. Transcript request forms are located in the Office of the Registrar and the college’s website. Official and unofficial transcripts are $5.00 per copy. The college only accepts cash or money orders. The Registrar’s Office is the ONLY office on campus that can issue an official transcript. Students must have all financial obligations satisfied with EWC before transcripts are released. Students must get approval from Student Accounts. Florida Statute 240.645(5) requires that no individual borrower who has been determined to be in default in making guaranteed loan repayments shall be furnished with his or her academic transcripts or other academic records. Loan status may be obtained from the United States Department of Education at: 1-800-621-3115. Withdrawal from Course Students may withdraw from one or more classes, as of the date specified in the current academic calendar, and a grade of “W” will be assigned at that time. Students withdrawing after this period but prior to the last day of classes will be assigned a grade of “WP” or “WF.” All withdrawals require the instructor’s signature. A grade of “WF” will be included in the calculation of the student’s GPA. Students are responsible for completing and filing forms in the Registrar’s Office in a timely way. Records Locations Admissions Office Recruiting records, contacts, application forms, high school transcripts, housing and health forms, supporting documents enabling the Admissions Committee to determine admission of accepted and non-accepted students. Financial Aid Office Holds personal financial data, students’ receipt of scholarships, grant-in-aid, workstudy, financial aid transcript and veterans’ records. Academic Departments Recommendation for employment and/or graduate school, academic ratings and evaluative materials; academic progress forms and applications for graduation. Academic Affairs Office Lists of academic awards and achievements, candidates for graduation, requests for academic courses for majors and electives, class overloads, grade change appeals, academic rights and privileges, Convocation, and Academic Honors Program. Faculty Offices Copies of unofficial transcripts, grade reports of academic work and degree plans indicating students’ program of study, and copies of graduation applications can be transacted in this office. EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 23


A list of individual faculty advisors and advisees. Daily records of class attendance, reports of class work, records of incomplete grades and conditions by which incomplete can be changed in this office. Office of Planning, Research, and Institutional Effectiveness Copies of individual and cumulative information from throughout the College and external sources to support developing market and effectiveness research studies. This information is used to enhance development and quality control throughout the College. Registrar’s Office Admissions records and supporting documentation for admitted students, academic record of EWC coursework, transcripts from other institutions, periodic correspondence and information, requests for transcripts, notice of academic honors, awards, and disciplinary actions. The Official Records and Transcript for EWC Students. Business Office Student’s accounts and all financial transactions are transacted in this office. Student Affairs Office Personal data sheets, counseling records, withdrawal forms, disciplinary records, athletic award records, academic records of athletes, housing contracts for on-campus residents. Information Release Information concerning an individual student will be released to authorized staff professionals for work-related purposes only upon receipt of a written request including the student’s signature. • Privileged Information • Student records are not open to the public, and are accessible solely to authorized personnel with approved clearance from the student. Included are financial records, student/family relationship information, confidential statements or recommendation according to the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) (20 U.S.C. § 1232g; 34 CFR Part 99) without a student’s rights waiver, financial aid records, medical records, campus employment, faculty files, and alumni information. • Sole-Access Records - Records of faculty, supervisory, and administrative personnel, in the sole possession of the makers, are not accessible to others except temporary substitutes. Information Review and Correction Students have the right to inspect their educational records. EWC staff works to ensure that inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise inappropriate information is not retained in student records. Students are informed when such corrections are made in response to student requests. Should these corrections remain unsatisfactory, written challenge to the particular record should be addressed to the Vice President of Academic Affairs who will provide a hearing conducted in accordance with regulations issued by the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Education. Students may also file a written explanation of any material contained in their records; such statements automatically become a permanent part of the challenged record. EWC reserves the right to deny such requests for review and correction if made for frivolous or malicious purposes. The decision of the Vice President of Academic Affairs about a challenge raised shall be made in writing within 45 days from the conclusion of the hearing. Students may appeal decisions of the Vice President of Academic Affairs to the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act Office in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services in Washington, D.C. EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 24


Disposal of Records Official academic records are kept in the Registrar’s Office for five years; older records are kept in a safe offsite facility. These records include supporting documents used for admission to EWC, academic transcripts, and indications of honors and awards. Grading System Academic progress, and graduation honors are determined by grades submitted by instructors at the conclusion of each semester. The combined quantity and quality of a student’s work will be used to determine the final grade. Grade distributions are as follows: Grade Interpretation A

B

C

D

F

P

NP

Excellent (90-100) (Denotes work of an exceptional character as demonstrated by achievement and initiative on the part of the student) Good (80-89) (Indicates a superior quality of work resulting from diligent and consistent application) Average (70-79) (Represents a satisfactory level of work) Below Average (60-69) (Designates work, which barely meets the minimum requirements of a course. If this is a required course, it must be repeated until a passing grade of “C” or better is obtained) Failure (59 and Below) (No credit; repeat or substitute with equivalent) Passing (Successful; not included in GPA) Non-Passing

Quality Points 4

Grade Interpretation WP

Withdrawal/Passing (Student initiated after the first week after midterms. A WP does not count in a student’s GPA.)

3

AW

0

2

I

Administrative Withdrawal (Issued by administration for disciplinary reasons or extenuating circumstance) Incomplete

1

R

Repeated Course (Course repeated later with higher grade counted in determining GPA) Audit

0

AU

0

0

(No academic credit attempted or earned)

0 CR 0

0 CRX

(Unsuccessful; not included in GPA)

Quality Points 0

Transferred Course (Recorded on transcript for credits transferred from other institutions and/or formal education programs in the military service. Is not used in computing EWC GPAs.) Credit for Portfolio Life learning Experiences in CLIMB

0

0

EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 25


Grade Interpretation W

WF

Withdrawal (Student initiated withdrawal at mid-term, which is the midpoint of the semester.) Withdrawal/Failing (Student initiated after the first week after midterms. A WF counts in a student’s GPA. )

Quality Points 0

Grade Interpretation

Quality Points

“P/NP” is used for course work that does not affect the cumulative GPA or count toward graduation requirements.

0

Grade Reporting Following mid-term examinations, academic deficiency reports are sent to students, the Counseling Center, and the academic advisors in the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning warning of unsatisfactory work. These reports are not part of the student’s permanent record, but do warn all parties of unsatisfactory progress. Staff members in the aforementioned Centers intervene to provide academic support services to enable at-risk students to improve their performance. Final course grades are determined by faculty and must be recorded electronically by faculty in the IQ WEB system no later than forty-eight (48) hours following the final examination. The Registrar is responsible for ensuring that all grades are submitted on time and for entering the grades into students’ permanent records at the end of each semester. At the end of each semester, all full-time and adjunct faculty members are required to submit all official grade books to the Registrar for inclusion in the permanent records. Subsequent to each semester, students receive semester grade reports indicating grades earned for all courses in which they were enrolled. Grade reports indicate the credit hours attempted, grades and credit hours earned, the quality point equivalent, and the cumulative grade point average. Computing the GPA The grade point average is computed by multiplying the quality points earned by the credit hours of each course and dividing the total quality points earned by the total credit hours attempted, as indicated by the following example: Grade Points A B C D F Total

→ → → → →

Quality Points 4 3 2 1 0

x x x x x

Credit Hours 6 3 2 1 3 15

Quality = = = = =

24 9 4 1 0 38

38 Quality Points 15 GPA Credits = 2.53 GPA Grade Changes Course grades reported by faculty members to the Registrar and entered into students’ records by the Registrar become part of the permanent official records of EWC. Grades can be changed only under specific, documented EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 26


circumstances, outlined below: 1. The Instructor of Record made an error in the original calculation, recording and/or reporting of a final grade. The faculty member completes, signs, and returns Grade Change Form with signatures of Department Chairperson, the Dean, and the Academic Vice President to the Registrar’s Office. The faculty member must append to the Form written justification for the change of grade as well as copies of grade book pages to verify computation and assignment of the new grade. 2. The Instructor of Record originally reported/recorded a provisional Incomplete (“I”) grade for the student. Student completes work to remove the “I” grade and the faculty member completes, signs, and returns Grade Change Form with signatures of Department Chairperson, the Dean, and the Academic Vice President to the Registrar’s Office. 3. A student appeals the decision of a faculty member and the results of a formal review reveal that the original grade assigned was arbitrary, capricious or biased. The faculty member completes, signs, and returns Grade Change Form with signatures of Department Chairperson, the Dean, and the Academic Vice President to the Registrar’s Office, or the grade may be changed administratively by the College. Grading Policy • EWC faculty members are solely responsible for evaluating the work and/or performance of students and for assigning appropriate grades. • Students have a right to receive a grade assigned upon a fair and unprejudiced evaluation based on a method that is neither arbitrary nor capricious; • Instructors have the right to assign a grade based on methods that are professionally acceptable, submitted in writing to all students, and applied equally; and • Students have a right to know the criteria by which their academic performance will be evaluated and to know the bases for calculating scores and grades. Modifications to such must be communicated clearly and in a timely manner by the faculty members. Incomplete ( I ) Grades An “I” is the provisional grade given pending fulfillment of an outstanding course requirement. The “I” indicates that the student previously demonstrated satisfactory academic performance in the class, but for exceptional reason(s) beyond his/her control, was unable to complete a specific requirement such as an assignment, a report, an examination, or experiment. The “I” is issued only for specific purposes: 1. illness prevented the student from taking the final examination for the course; 2. illness throughout the semester prevented the student from completing more than one requirement for the course; 3. the student can provide documented evidence to substantiate other valid extenuating circumstances, beyond the student’s control, that prevented his/her completion of required work. A student must prove that failure to complete all course requirements was due to extenuating circumstances beyond his/her control and not due to his/her negligence. A faculty member may only assign an “I” grade if the student were passing the course at the time the “I” is given. The faculty member who assigns an “I” grade to a student must submit to the Registrar with the grade book a completed “I” Grade Contract that indicates the outstanding requirement and the default grade, and is signed by the student and the faculty member. An Incomplete (I) grade must be removed in the succeeding regular semester, by the date designated in the Academic Calendar or the “I” becomes the Default Grade indicated on the “I” Grade Contract. EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 27


Independent Study Edward Waters College recognizes a student’s option for obtaining academic credit through Independent Study. The student must be a Senior, have a minimum Grade Point Average of 2.5, and must work independently under the direction of a full-time EWC faculty member on a mutually agreed upon Independent Study project. Students are limited to two independent study classes during their tenure at EWC. Activity courses and courses that require a lab are not available through Independent Study. The Independent Study must be for a course listed in the college catalog. Undertaking an Independent Study course requires the agreement of the student, the faculty advisor, the faculty member, the relevant department chairperson, the Dean and the Academic Vice President. The approval process begins with the faculty advisor. Once the advisor reviews the student’s degree plan or course of study and assesses appropriateness, the student must then gain approval from the instructor. The instructor will outline with the student the requirements for completion of the Independent Study and indicate approval. Upon approval from the Chair of the Department in which the course is taught, the Dean, and the Academic Vice President, the student may enroll for Independent Study. Under no circumstance will Independent Study be approved after two weeks of the start of a semester or after the first week of a summer session. A student will pay the normal course fee for an Independent Study course. Course Repeat Policy A student must repeat a course in which a grade of “D” or “F” was received. The course may be repeated at EWC or at another accredited college or university. Only the final passing course grade is computed in the student’s institutional grade point average. Repeated courses are governed by college policies on maximum transfer credits accepted and residency requirements. General guidelines for repeating a failed course include the following: 1) Any major course or course in one’s field of specialization requires a grade of “C” or better for graduation. 2)Any course required within the degree program, elective or otherwise, must be completed with a required passing grade of “C” or better. If required for graduation, a student must repeat and earn a grade of “C” or better for all courses taken during the semester for which a student petitioned and was granted Academic Bankruptcy. Academic Bankruptcy Students may petition for the forgiveness of one academic semester of work because of extenuating personal or financial problems. Petitions are not automatically approved. However, if approved, the transcript will note “Academic Bankruptcy” and the courses taken in that semester will be treated as though the student had received an “AW” in every course. The original grades will not count toward graduation. Petitions are available only to current students and will never be approved for the current or immediately preceding terms. All petitions must be approved prior to graduation and no more than one petition will be granted for any student at EWC. Once a bankruptcy has been processed, it will not be restored. Petition forms are available through the Office of the Registrar, however, the petition can only be approved by the Vice President for Academic Affairs. Forgiveness Policy If a student receives a “D” or an “F” grade in a course, he/she may request to repeat a course in order to raise his/her grade point average. Only the higher passing course grade will be computed in the student’s grade point EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 28


average. Only two such requests are available to any student during the student’s undergraduate career. The repeat must be in the same course and taken at Edward Waters College. Academic Standing Classification Class designation is based upon the number of total credit hours earned in college and reflected on transcripts: Name Semester Hours Completed Freshman 0-29 Sophomore 30-59 Junior 60-89 Senior 90 or more (A “graduating senior” has fulfilled all financial obligations and has completed all requirements for the degree.) Standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) Every student enrolled at Edward Waters College is expected to perform academically to the best of his/ her ability. Each student should confer frequently with the instructors in order to determine if his/her work is considered satisfactory. A report of mid-term unsatisfactory grades is provided to the student, faculty advisor, academic advisors, counseling center and the Vice President for Academic Affairs. Reasons for poor performance will be discussed with the student. The U.S. Department of Education regulations require that Edward Waters College establish standards of satisfactory academic progress (SAP) for purposes of continued enrollment and receipt of financial aid. Satisfactory academic progress (SAP) is measured by qualitative and quantitative factors. In general, the qualitative measure is the grade point average (GPA) and the quantitative measure is the maximum time for completion. Specifically, the three determinants are the Time Limitations, the Periods of Evaluations, and the criteria for Mandatory Satisfactory Academic Progress (MSAP). Time Limitations A student will, most often, complete undergraduate degree requirements by the time he/she has enrolled for 160 semester hours. An extension of this time may be obtained from the student’s academic department chairperson. The federal government has enacted the “150% Rule” for eligibility to receive federal financial aid. This rule was established to promote quality and integrity among educational institutions that participate in Title IV funding. Undergraduate students are eligible for financial aid and may receive assistance for a maximum of one and one-half times (150%) the total hours required for a degree; that is, an undergraduate degree requires 120 semester hours to complete; therefore, 120 x 150% equals 180 semester hours. An undergraduate student will no longer be eligible to receive financial aid when he/she has been enrolled for 180 semester hours. The “150% Rule” is final and cannot be waived or appealed. Periods of Evaluation Standards of satisfactory academic progress (SAP) will be evaluated at the close of each second semester of enrollment. If the student enrolls for the summer session(s), the summer session(s) will be included in the evaluation period. Consequently, two semesters plus the summer session(s) will be included in the evaluation period.

EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 29


Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) Effective July 1, 1998, a student will meet the standards of satisfactory academic progress (SAP) by completing 75% of the total semester hours in which he/she is enrolled with a grade other than “F”, “NP”, “NC”, “I”, “AW”, “W”, “WP”, “WF”, and maintaining the grade point average indicated by the following table. The table identifies academic progress according to (1) number of semester hours attempted; (2) classification of students; (3) minimum acceptable cumulative grade point average; (4) probation; and (5) automatic dismissal from the College. The student’s academic standing must fall within the following parameters for the student to be considered “in good standing” at EWC. Semester Hours

Class

0-29 30-59 60-89 90+

FR SO JR SR

Minimum Acceptable CGPA 1.40 1.50 1.80 2.00

Probation Below 1.40 Below 1.50 Below 1.80 Below 2.00

Incomplete (I), withdrawal (W), academic withdrawal (AW), withdrawal passing (WP), withdrawal failing (WF), not passing (NP), and no credit (NC) grades may result in the student’s failure to meet the standards of satisfactory academic progress (SAP) because they are only attempted hours. Note: Post baccalaureate/teacher certification students must earn a 2.50 CGPA or they are automatically dismissed. Satisfactory Progress Requirements for Veterans Effective August1, 2001, a student eligible for and receiving Veteran Educational Benefits must adhere to the standards of satisfactory academic progress according to the following criteria: Complete 75% of the total semester hours in which he/she is enrolled with a grade other than “F”, “NP”, “NC”, “I”, “AW”, “W”, “WP”, or “WF”, and maintain the grade point average Indicated by the following table. The table identifies academic progress according to (1) number of semester hours attempted; (2) classification of students; (3) minimum acceptable grade point average; (4) probation; and (5) automatic dismissal from the College. Minimum Acceptable CGPA Probation Semester Class Hours 0-29 FR 1.85 Below 1.85 30-59 SO 2.00 Below 2.00 60-89 JR 2.00 Below 2.00 90+ SR 2.00 Below 2.00 A student’s VA educational benefits will be terminated if his CGPA remains less than the required standard of academic progress for more than two consecutive semesters. However, benefits may be reinstated upon achieving an acceptable cumulative grade point average. Academic Warning When a student fails to achieve a minimum semester grade point average required, he/ she will receive an “academic warning” letter from the Registrar. Upon notification, a student must schedule EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 30


an appointment with his/her academic advisor and the Counseling Center. The purpose of these meetings is to determine the specific problem(s) related to the student’s poor or marginal academic performance and arrive at appropriate intervention strategies to remedy the problem(s). Academic Probation A student who fails to attain the cumulative grade point average required to meet the standards of satisfactory academic progress (SAP) is placed on probation for one semester. The probation status triggers intervention by academic counselors and advisors and further student support resources are focused on assisting the “at risk” student. A student who is placed on academic and financial aid probation will be notified by the Registrar’s Office and the Financial Aid Office. A student on academic and financial aid probation must receive counseling by his /her academic advisor and the Counseling Center. A student on academic and financial aid probation may not enroll for more than 12 semester hours; must earn at least a grade of “C” in each course taken while on probation; and may not participate in extra-curricular activities. Academic Suspension A student who fails to meet the standards of satisfactory academic progress (SAP), after being on probation for one semester will be placed on academic and financial aid suspension for one semester. A student who has been suspended and wishes to return to the College, after one semester, must apply for readmission. Readmission is not automatic and requires the approval of the Academic Council at least one month prior to registration for the anticipated semester of return. Students permitted to return following suspension are required to meet the standards of satisfactory academic progress (SAP) at the end of the first semester of return. If the student is readmitted, he/she, if otherwise eligible, may receive financial aid; however, financial aid may not be granted retroactively to cover a period of suspension. A student readmitted after academic and financial aid suspension may not participate in extra curricular activities during the first semester of his/her return to school. Students on academic probation or suspension are ineligible to hold elective office, join or participate in Greek-letter organizations, student organizations, or to represent the college in athletics, choir, or any other official capacity. Academic Dismissal Students readmitted after returning to EWC from academic suspension must maintain satisfactory academic progress. Failure to do so will result in academic dismissal with advisement of how to obtain a higher quality of life through other life experiences and options. Academic Status Appeals No personal appeals will be heard in the Registrar’s or Financial Aid Offices. A student may petition the Appeals Committee if he/she had circumstances beyond his/her control , which prevented him/her from attaining or maintaining satisfactory academic progress (SAP). Such circumstances include death in the immediate family, lengthy illness (more than 8 days out of class), accidents, and hospitalizations. To appeal academic and financial aid suspensions, the following procedures must be followed: A request must be made in writing by the student to the Appeals Committee, via the Registrar’s and the Financial Aid Office no later than 10 days after receiving the notice of suspension. The circumstance(s) which prevented satisfactory academic progress from being met must be clearly stated. The request must include documentation to support the exceptional circumstance(s). Examples of acceptable documents include, but are not limited to, death certificates, medical statements, insurance reports and other verified information. If warranted, the student will be invited to appear before the Appeals Committee and the student will be notified of the Appeals Committee’s decision. The decision of the Appeals Committee is final. EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 31


Academic Grievance Policy When a student at Edward Waters College (EWC) believes a faculty member has infringed upon his/her academic rights as set forth in this policy, or has a complaint/grievance related to other academic affairs at the College, the student must follow the procedures detailed below to seek resolution. It is the responsibility of the student to initiate the academic grievance process by submitting a written complaint to the faculty member involved and providing documentation to support the complaint. Should the student not receive satisfactory resolution from the faculty member, the student must appeal the decision, in writing, first with the Department Chairperson. Absent resolution at the Chairperson’s level, the student may then proceed to appeal to the Dean of the Faculty. If the student is not satisfied with the decision rendered by the Dean, the student may then appeal in writing to the Vice President for Academic Affairs. If the student fails to pursue the matter in the manner provided by this policy, the original academic decision will be final. In cases where the student is challenging an assignment of a grade received in connection with a course, classroom management style, or the instructor’s conduct of the course, the student will follow the outlined grade appeal procedure. It is expected that all parties involved at each step of the academic appeals/grievance process will make a good faith effort to resolve the issue. Student Academic Appeals and Academic Grievance Procedures The following procedures outline the steps in the academic appeal/academic grievance process and should be used to appeal or resolve disputes concerning academic grades and other academic decisions considered by a student to be arbitrary or contrary to College policy. These procedures should also be used to grieve perceived violations of any of the student academic rights detailed above. For the purposes of these procedures, a student is an individual who holds an “active” registration status as the time of the alleged violation. 1. Consultation with Faculty - Any student who believes that a faculty member has acted improperly or in a manner inconsistent with academic expectations specified in this policy, may initiate action to obtain a remedy. It is the responsibility of the student to initiate the academic grievance process with the faculty member by submitting a completed Student Conference Request Form to the faculty member involved. Together with this form, the student must submit documentation to support his/her complaint. The action must be initiated within fourteen (14) business days after the student becomes aware of the alleged offense. The student should make every reasonable effort to discuss the matter with the faculty member whose action is addressed in the student’s written grievance. The student shall attempt resolution by seeking a meeting with the instructor in question. The instructor will review the complaint, render a decision and provide the decision, in writing, to the student within seven (7) business days of receipt of the student’s completed Student Conference Request Form. If, to the student, this process does not seem feasible, or if a personal conversation with the instructor has been attempted/initiated, but a resolution satisfactory to the student’s grievance is not obtained, the student may seek resolution through written appeal to the instructor’s Department Chair, who will then attempt to resolve the matter between the student and the instructor. If the grievance is against the Department Chair, the student should proceed to step 3 below. 2. Department Chair In the event that a student perceives that he/she has not received satisfactory resolution to the issue from a discussion with the faculty member involved, or if a student prefers not to discuss his/ her concerns directly with the involved faculty member, the student may schedule a conference to discuss the matter with the department chair (or equivalent). Such discussion must be initiated by the student within EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 32


seven (7) business days after the final discussion with the faculty member. During the conference, the student must provide the chairperson with a copy of his/her written appeal and/or grievance. The department chair will review the complaint, render a decision and provide the decision, in writing, to the student and to the involved faculty member, within seven (7) business days of receipt of the student’s report of an unresolved issue. If the department chair is the involved faculty member, this step should be skipped. 3. Dean of the Faculty – In the event that the involved faculty member is the department chair and the party against whom the grievance is brought, or in the event there is no department chair in the academic unit, or in the event that the student does not obtain satisfactory resolution through appeal to the Department Chair, the student may seek resolution through written appeal to the Dean of the Faculty. This appeal must be filed within seven (7) business days after the student receives notification from the Chair of resolution of the report of alleged academic non-compliance. The Dean (or the Dean’s designee) may attempt informal resolution through discussion with the student and faculty member. The Dean will consider the student’s appeal and issue a written decision and resolution. The dean will have fourteen (14) business days to review the complaint, consult with involved parties, and provide a written notice of resolution. 4. Vice President for Academic Affairs - Only in instances when all established College procedures have been exhausted will it be appropriate for the Vice President for Academic Affairs to consider a final appeal from a student. Generally, the Vice President for Academic Affairs will consider only those appeals that either demonstrate violations of due process or evidence that prior proceedings resulted in a decision contrary to college policies and procedures. Either party to a grievance appeal – whether instructor or student – may appeal the decision of the Dean to the Vice President for Academic Affairs, in writing, within ten (10) business days following notice of the Dean’s decision. A written reply to the other party must be filed within ten (10) business days after receipt of the appeal. The Dean’s decision shall be “stayed” pending appeal. The Vice President for Academic Affairs has discretion to determine the information and procedure that he/she will utilize in deciding each appeal. Should the Vice President for Academic Affairs not find reasonable grounds for the student’s appeal, the Vice President will issue a formal decision regarding the appeal, within fifteen (15) business days of receipt of the appeal. However, if the Vice President for Academic Affairs deems it necessary to hear additional evidence, he/she will convene the Academic Appeals Committee within twenty (20) days of receipt of the appeal. 5. The Academic Appeals Committee will convene hearings as necessary to allow the involved parties the opportunity to present their cases to the committee in a fair and expeditious manner. Appropriate precautions should be taken to ensure the confidentiality of the grievance proceedings – including information regarding the outcome. The Committee shall submit a letter of recommendation including findings and reason(s) for the recommendation to the Vice President for Academic Affairs within ten (10) business days after the final meeting of the committee. 6. The VPAA will consider the findings and recommendations and render a final university determination. This decision will be submitted in writing to the student, faculty member, the department chair and the dean within ten (10) business days after receiving the Academic Appeals Committee’s written recommendation. The written decision rendered by the Vice President for Academic Affairs shall be final step in the academic grievance process and may not be further appealed. In the case of a grade change, the Division Dean or his/ her designee, will be responsible for making the change. 7. Files shall be maintained in the office of the Dean of the Faculty and the Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

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Grade Appeals: Students who believe they have received an unfair final grade have the right to appeal the final grade, within four (4) weeks of the subsequent regular term that the College is in session (fall or spring semester). Students should begin by trying to resolve the problem with his or her instructor. In the event a student is not satisfied with the grade received for a course, the student should follow the process outlined below within 30 days of the end of the semester in which the grade was posted. Students, faculty, and others can obtain this detailed outline of the grade change process from the Registrar’s Office during daily operating hours, the Office of Academic Affairs, Division of Student Affairs, and the College Library. The policy recognizes that: • Every student has a right to receive a grade assigned upon a fair and unprejudiced evaluation based on a method that is neither arbitrary nor capricious; • Instructors have the right to assign a grade based on methods that are professionally acceptable, submitted in writing to all students, and applied equally; and • Students have a right to know how their academic performance will be evaluated to include the bases for calculating scores and grades. Modifications must be communicated clearly and in a timely manner. The following reasons are recognized grounds for a grade appeal: 1. Arbitrary or Capricious: The grade awarded was not based on written information provided to the student on the syllabus and represents such a substantial departure from accepted academic norms as to demonstrate that the instructor did not actually exercise professional judgment. 2. Prejudice: The grade awarded was based on personal bias and is not indicative of the student’s academic performance. 3. Error: The instructor made a mistake in calculation and/or recording. The student and faculty member should make every effort to resolve this issue without seeking a formal grade appeal. The Grade Appeal process should be the last resort. Keeping in mind that the appeal of a course grade should be attended to as soon as possible, the student must contact the professor involved within the first two weeks of the start of the fall semester for the appeal of a spring semester or a summer term grade and within the first two weeks of the spring semester for the appeal of a fall semester grade. Procedure for appealing a course grade: Step One: The student must meet with the Instructor within two (2) weeks of the subsequent regular semester in which the College is in session (fall or spring). As it is the responsibility of the student to demonstrate that the appeal has merit, the student should bring to this meeting any work from the course the student has in his/ her possession for the professor to review. During the meeting the instructor will: □ Review any work that the student brings to discuss. □ Show the student any of the student’s work that remains in the professor’s possession (e.g., papers, final examinations and projects). □ Explain how the student’s grade was determined based on the standards set forth at the beginning of the class and stated in the course syllabus. □ Re-calculate the numerical computation of the grade, if any, to determine if there has been a clerical error. Step Two: If student satisfaction is obtained, the process will stop here. If however, the student is not satisfied, he or she may proceed with the formal grade appeal process as outlined below. EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 34


1. File a Grade Appeal Form with the instructor’s Department Chairperson by the end of the fourth week of the semester. If the Department Chairperson is the instructor involved, the written appeal will go to the Division Dean. 2. The student will submit to the Department Chairperson the Grade Appeal Form and copies of the course syllabus, tests, assignments and papers in the student’s possession. 3. The Department Chairperson will notify the instructor involved, and the instructor will provide a written response to the allegations identified in the Grade Appeal form within one week of notice. Copies of the syllabus, assignments and any of the student’s work that remains in the instructor’s possession should be attached to the response. 4. The Department Chairperson, following consultation with the student and instructor will render a decision in writing regarding the grade appeal by the end of the sixth week of the semester. Step Three: If the student wishes to appeal the Chair’s decision he or she must put the request in writing to the Dean using the Student Conference request form within one week following receipt of the decision from the Department Chair. The Dean may choose to review the case personally or convene a grade appeals committee. Should the Dean choose to review the case, the aforementioned steps as outlined for the Department Chair will apply. Should the Dean choose to convene a grade appeals committee, the following outlines the composition and procedure of the committee. The committee will consist of the following: a) Three (3) members of the Academic Council appointed by the chairperson of the Council, b) one (1) faculty member appointed by the Division Dean of the department involved, and c) one (1) Student Government Association representative appointed by the Student Government President. In the case that the involved student is the Student Government President, the Vice-President shall appoint the student representative. The committee should meet no later than the end of the eighth week of the semester. The chairperson of the grade appeal hearing committee will be chosen from the three council members serving on the committee by the chairperson of Academic Council. All documentation will be forwarded to the Chair of the Academic Council. Grade Appeal Hearing Procedure: The student and the instructor may each bring an advisor from the College (e.g. currently enrolled student, faculty or staff member) to the hearing. The advisor may only counsel the student or the instructor and may not actively participate in or make any statement during the hearing. Recognizing that the grade appeal hearing is an in-house procedure, attorneys, other legal counsel and any other persons outside the university community are not permitted in the hearing. The hearing committee will review all of the documentation received from the student, instructor, Department Chair and Dean, and then ask the student, instructor and their advisors, if present, to come into the room. The student and the instructor will each be allowed to make a statement, and the committee members may ask questions of the student and the instructor. The student, professor and their advisors will then be asked to leave the room, and the final discussion and vote by the committee shall be in closed session. The decision of the committee is final, and the Chair of Academic Council will send written notification of the committee’s decision to the instructor and the student. In the case of a grade change, the Division Dean or his/her designee, will be responsible for making the change. ACADEMIC HONORS Excellence in academic achievement is recognized by inducting students into the National Alpha Chi Honor Society and by presenting accolades to achievers on the President’s List, Dean’s List, Honor Roll. These presentations are made publicly in a ceremony on Academic Honors Day. EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 35


Honor Society - Alpha Chi National Honor Society (Juniors/Seniors with 3.5 or higher GPA) Founded (Feb 22, 1922) at Southwestern University in Georgetown, TX, is a national college honor society. Its ceremonial colors, sapphire blue and emerald green, signify “truth” and “victory” respectively. The name “Alpha Chi” means, in Greek, “truth and character.” The society’s motto is “Ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free.” (John 2:22) The symbolic colors and the motto reflect the “spiritual success” goals outlined in the EWC Statement of Purpose. Juniors and seniors with a 3.5 GPA and “exemplary character” are inducted at Academic Honors Day ceremonies each semester. President’s List Following each semester, the Registrar prepares a list of students with a 4.0 GPA for the College President. Students on this list receive a congratulatory letter from the President and public recognition at the Academic Honors Day ceremony. Dean’s List At the end of each semester, the Registrar prepares a list of students with a 3.5-4.0 GPA for the Vice President of Academic Affairs. Students on this list also receive public recognition at the Academic Honors Day ceremony. Honor Roll Following each semester, the Registrar prepares a list of students with a 3.0-3.4 GPA and without a “D,” “F,” or “I” during the semester, for the Vice President of Academic Affairs. Students on this list are invited to attend the Academic Honors Day ceremony. GRADUATION Application Students who wish to graduate at the end of a given semester must submit the appropriate completed Application for Graduation form to the Registrar and pay the graduation fee prior to the deadline of application for that semester (the fee covers printing of the diploma and purchase of the cap and gown). Deadlines for application are presented in the Academic Calendar and are as follows: The application deadline for spring semester degree conferral is the fourth (4th) Friday in October. The application deadline for fall semester degree conferral is the fourth (4th) Friday in March. EWC holds one formal graduation ceremony at the completion of the spring semester. However, degrees are conferred in December and May. Participation All graduating seniors are expected to participate in scheduled activities and ceremonies including Senior Chapel, Senior Breakfast, Senior Dinner, and the Baccalaureate and Commencement ceremonies. However, the following conditions must be met in order to participate in the aforementioned events. Requirements 1. Satisfactory completion of 120 course credit hours with a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0. 2. Completion of the last 30 semester hours at EWC. 3. Satisfactory completion (a minimum course grade of C in each course) of all degree requirements for the chosen major to include supportive and elective courses required by the major program and additional requirements established by the major program. Students aspiring to graduate with two degrees listed on the diploma must satisfactorily complete all requirements for both degrees including pre-requisites and core course requirements. EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 36


4. Satisfactory completion (a minimum course grade of C in each of the general education courses) of 53 credit hours in the following core course clusters: Cluster 1: Communication Skills (15 hours) Cluster 2: Science, Technology and Mathematics (16 hours) Cluster 3: Humanities, History and Social Sciences (15 hours) Cluster 4: Business Experience (3 hours) Cluster 5: Physical Fitness and Life Skills (4 hours) 5. Obtain 75% of ACES Program points during each semester enrolled at EWC. 6. Earn a minimum of 20 community service hours for each semester enrolled at EWC. OR 7. Pass final course exams, competency tests and take the respective degree program Major Field Exams as required by departments. Additional Graduation Requirements • Satisfy all financial obligations to the College including payment of the graduation fee. • Submit an approved resume to the Office of Career Planning and Placement. • Return borrowed Library books and clear outstanding Library fines or fees. • Complete the financial aid exit interview. • Submit the Graduating Seniors’ Clearance Form by Deadline Graduation Honors Academic distinction is conferred at graduation upon deserving students who have achieved the following cumulative GPA’s: To be considered for honors at graduation, a baccalaureate candidate must have completed at least 90 credit hours of graded coursework at EWC and have a grade point average of 3.00 or higher for all graded coursework earned at EWC. Students transferring from other institutions must be required to submit all their grades. Transfer students and EWC students who have postsecondary work elsewhere must have an overall GPA of 3.00 or higher counting all EWC courses as well as transferable work attempted at other institutions. NOTE: The GPA is not rounded up when determining honors at graduation (e.g., 3.499 is not the same as 3.500). Honor Categories Summa Cum Laude Magna Cum Laude Cum Laude Honors

Meaning With Highest Distinction With Great Distinction With Distinction Worthy of Esteem and Respect

Criteria 3.8 (no grade lower than “B”) 3.5 (no grade lower than “C”) 3.2 (no grade lower than “C”) 3.0 (no grade lower than “C”)

Registration for Non-EWC Credits Regularly enrolled students wishing to transfer courses from other institutions, subsequent to matriculation at EWC, must first obtain their advisor’s written approval specifying the course and institution and obtain a “Transient Form” from the Office of the Registrar. EWC will not otherwise guarantee acceptance of such course work in the major. Official, sealed transcripts must be requested from the institution and received by the EWC Registrar. Coursework must be taken at a regionally accredited institution for credit to transfer. (Grades and GPA are not transferred, only credits for equivalent courses.)

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Catalog Agreement Students have the right to graduate governed by the requirements of the Catalog edition published for the academic year of first enrollment, provided the student had continuous enrollment. More than one semester of non-enrollment obligates a student to meet the requirements of the Catalog in effect upon his/her return to the College. All requirements of a single Catalog must be met and requirements may not be arbitrarily selected from various Catalogs.

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FINANCIAL SERVICES

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General Information Edward Waters College, an independent, private, nonprofit institution, does not receive direct tax support from any governmental agency; principally the student tuition and fees support EWC. Other sources of support to the College include the contribution from the African Methodist Episcopal Church (AME), the United Negro College Fund (UNCF), grants (Federal, State, Local and Private), and private gifts. Consistent with the college’s mission statement, EWC provides opportunity for students to receive a post secondary degree regardless of their social, educational, or economic background. To accommodate the student body, EWC’s policy is to keep charges as low as possible without affecting the quality of instruction, services and accommodations. While the importance of stabilized educational expense is clearly understood, EWC reserves the right to adjust tuition and fees at the end of any semester, should conditions warrant. Student Accounts The staff of the Student Accounts Office is responsible for monitoring and reconciling all student account activities. The staff ensures that students receive their Statement of Accounts on a monthly basis. Concerns about student account activities should be directed to personnel in this office. Payment of Tuition and Fees Students are ultimately responsible for payment of their tuition and fees even though they may be eligible for Financial Aid. Tuition and fee charges are due at the time of Registration. Special payment arrangements may be made at the discretion of the Vice President for Business and Finance. All student account balances must be paid in full no later than one (1) week prior to the beginning of Final Exams. Students not paying bills promptly are subject to a 5% penalty on the total outstanding balance. At the end of each semester, any outstanding balance will be charged appropriate interest. Cash, cashier’s check, money order, or credit cards (Master Card and Visa) can be used to make all payments. Personal checks may be accepted after appropriate verification. Students will not be allowed to register for classes if they have a prior semester balance. Students may apply for an exception. Application for an exception does not guarantee approval. If financial aid (federal and/or state) is used to supplement the cost of tuition and fees, students and/or parents will be required to have a financial aid award letter listing the type of aid received.. Otherwise, the student’s registration may be delayed. (Registration is completed when total tuition, fees, room and board charges are paid to the Cashier’s Office and/or appropriate arrangements are made with the Student Accounts Office and the student receives a current I.D. card). Students should maintain a record of all financial documents received from the College for future reference. Calculating Tuition and Fees Registration at EWC is considered a binding contract between the student and the college for the academic semester of enrollment. Therefore, upon completing the registration process, a student has accepted full responsibility as stated in this publication.

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2010-2011 Academic Year Tuition & Fees Traditional Full-Time Students (12-18 Hours) Semester Year Tuition $5,235.00 $10,470.00 Room $1,562.00 $ 3,124.00 Board $1,675.00 $ 3,350.00 Total $8,472.00 $16,944.00 More than 18 credit hours (436.25 per additional credit hour) 19 credit hours $5,671.25 20 credit hours $6,107.50 21 credit hours $6,543.75 Traditional Part-Time Students-less than 12 hours (436.25 per credit hour) 3 credit hours $1,308.75 6 credit hours $2,617.50 9 credit hours $3,926.25 C.L.I.M.B. (15 Hours) - Books included ($370.00 per credit hour) Term l 15.0 Semester hours $5,550.00 Term ll 15.0 Semester hours $5,550.00 Term lll 18.0 Semester hours $6,660.00 ADDITIONAL FEES Book Rental Fee (Variable)** Housing Deposit for Room Reservation (For Freshman Students Only) this amount will be credited to the student’s account as a reduction from the total room charge and is non refundable.

$100.00 each academic year

Housing Deposit for Room Reservation (For Returning Students Only) this amount will be credited to the students account as a reduction from the total room charge and is non refundable.

$50.00 each semester

Late Registration Fee $50.00 Graduation Fee (NOT OPTIONAL) $85.00 PER REQUEST Add/Drop $ 5.00 Audit $50.00 Transcripts (cashier’s check or money order) $ 5.00 I.D. Replacement Fee $10.00 Returned Check Fee $30.00

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OTHER FEES Admissions Application (cashier’s check, bank draft, money order) U.S. Students $25.00 International Students $75.00 Internship Fee $70.00 Reinstatement Fee (C.L.I.M.B.) $125.00 Late Book Return Fee $50.00 Insurance estimate per semester non-athletes * $188.00 Insurance estimate per semester athletes* $196.00 Insurance estimate per academic year-non-athletes* $376.00 Insurance estimate per academic year athletes* $392.00 *Insurance for students is mandatory, unless the student can provide proof of insurance coverage under a parent or guardian’s policy at the time of enrollment. **Note: The College will pay up to $350.00 of book costs per student for the Academic Year 2010-11. Starting the Academic Year 2011-2012, students will be responsible for the full costs of their books. Overload Fee Full-time students may take up to 18 credit hours during Fall and Spring semesters and six credits during the summer excluding CLIMB students. Additional credits are considered “overload” and require permission of the Vice President for Academic Affairs to enroll. The overload fees vary per credit hour. For example, students taking 19 credit hours will pay $284.80 per credit hour, students taking 21 credit hours will pay $297.32. Students are expected to have a cumulative GPA 3.00 for permission to be granted. Late Registration Fee Students are encouraged to observe the dates designated for registration. If registration is not completed before the first day of classes, a late registration fee of $50.00 will be assessed and the fee must be paid in cash before completing the registration process. Credit Balance A credit balance may develop in a student’s account as a result of adjustments to charges and fees. A credit balance indicates an overpayment by the student to EWC or a debt owed to the student by EWC. Credit balances that result from any Federal Fund will automatically be refunded to the student within 14 days unless the student requests in writing to leave the balance in his/her account. All Edward Waters College scholarships and GIA are non-refundable. Collections The staff of the Student Accounts Office is responsible for recovering outstanding delinquent account balances owed to the College. A collection fee up to 28% may be levied on all delinquent accounts and any related attorney fees may also be imposed. These accounts will be assigned to a collection agency, credit bureau, and/or the tax commission for refund garnishment. Grades and transcripts will be withheld until indebtedness is fully satisfied.

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REFUND OF TUITION AND FEES Refunds Refunds for students withdrawing from the college or dropping courses to part-time status, for any reason, will be made in accordance with the scale listed below. Week of Class 1st Week 2nd Week 3rd Week 4th Week and Beyond

Percent of Refund 100% 90% 80% 0

Application fees, housing deposit fees and graduation fees are non-refundable. . For further information on the Edward Waters College Institutional Refund Policy, please contact the Office of Business and Finance. The Federal Return of Title IV Refund Policy is listed below. Refund of Room and Board Room and Board charges begin the first day the residential halls open. If a student withdraws from school or moves out of the resident halls, the room and board charges will be prorated from the day the residential halls opened until the day the student officially moved out of the residential hall. After the third week of classes no refund will be given for any reason. FINANCIAL AID INFORMATION Financial Aid is awarded according to individual financial need, in the form of loans, grants, scholarships or work-study to be used solely for school related expenses. The College expects students and parents to assume the primary responsibility for financing college costs. All students and families are encouraged to apply for aid from Federal and State supported programs administered by the Financial Aid Office. How and when to apply for Financial Aid Students seeking financial aid must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid each award year. Financial aid applications can be completed online at www.fafsa.ed.gov. Eligibility for aid is determined by the U.S. Department of Education Federal Methodology need calculation and documents submitted to the Financial Aid Office. Online Applications are available in January for the following award year. Students and/or parents are encouraged to apply early for financial aid. The priority consideration date for Edward Waters College is March 1st. Some financial aid programs are awarded on a first-come first-serve basis until funds are exhausted. General Financial Aid Eligibility Requirements In most instances, student financial aid eligibility is based on a Federal Methodology calculation as determined by completion of the FAFSA. The federal methodology calculation may also be used to determine eligibility for state, institutional and private awards. To be awarded financial aid, an applicant must: (1) have a high school diploma or GED; (2) be accepted or enrolled in an eligible program; (3) be a U.S. citizen or eligible non-citizen; (4) be capable of maintaining a satisfactory academic standing and consistent progress towards a degree; (5) be registered with the Selective Service (if required); EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 43


(6) have not defaulted on a TITLE IV or State student loan; (7) not owe a repayment under any state or federal grant. New and Transfer Students New students must complete admissions requirements and receive their formal letter of acceptance before financial aid commitments are made. Financial aid applications are available beginning January 1 prior to each academic year for which financial aid is sought. Financial aid funding in many programs are limited. Students are encouraged to apply by March 1st to receive priority consideration of funds in those limited programs. Sources and Types of Financial Aid Student aid funds come from three sources: government (federal, state and city), college (gifts and endowments from alumni and other friends of the college), and private gifts (foundations, corporations, associations, or individuals). There are three types of student aid: (1) “Grants and scholarships” are awards that students do not have to repay; (2)”Loans” are funds that are borrowed by students from the Federal government or lenders and must be repaid with interest; they should be used with caution as students’ credit can be severely damaged if not repaid in a timely manner. The longer loans are held, the more expensive they become; (3) “Work-study” awards are wages paid to students to perform a job in a degree related environment to apply what they have learned in the workplace. Financial Aid Counseling Students are encouraged to visit with a Financial Aid Counselor to determine what other forms of financial aid are available.. Students should pursue the many private scholarships and other forms of financial aid available before considering a student loan. How Financial Aid is Determined The Financial Aid Office will determine a student’s allowable educational expenses (student budget). The expected family contribution (EFC) is determined by a Federal methodology established by the U.S. Department of Education. The difference between the two is the student financial need. Edward Waters College will attempt to provide financial aid for all or a portion of a student’s demonstrated financial need in the form of an award package consisting of grants, scholarships, loans, and/or work-study. Selection of students, as well as the types of aid awarded, depends on one or a combination of the following: the demonstrated financial need, the student’s class level, available funds, and the date a student’s forms are received by the awarding agencies and the Financial Aid Office. Full and Part-Time Students Financial aid is available to full-time (12 or more credit hours), three-quarter time, three-quarter time (9-11 credit hours) and half-time (6 credit hours) students at Edward Waters College. Some financial aid programs are predicated on full-time enrollment status. If a student is awarded from a fund based on full-time enrollment and the student’s enrollment drops to part-time, a proration or cancellation of awards may occur. Therefore, students receiving financial aid should review course plans with a Financial Aid Counselor to determine the amount of aid that may be adjusted or cancelled. Federal Pell Grant The U.S. Department of Education provides federal grants to undergraduate students who are eligible U.S. citizens or eligible non-citizens that have financial need as determined by completion of the FAFSA. Unlike loans, Federal Pell Grants do not have to be repaid. How Do You Qualify? Eligibility for a Federal Pell Grant is based on financial need as determined by completion of the FAFSA. Upon completion, a Student Aid Report is sent to the student notifying them of their eligibility. Students are encouraged to contact the Financial Aid Office to complete the application process. EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 44


How Much Will You Receive? Awards for the 2010-11 school year will range from $400 - $5,550 depending on the student’s enrollment status, cost of attendance, and expected family contribution (EFC).. Students attending less than half time may be eligible for a Federal Pell Grant. Federal Academic Competitiveness Grant The Academic Competitiveness Grant (ACG) is available for first year students who graduated from high school after January 1, 2006 and after. To be eligible, students must be a full-time undergraduate in their first or second year of study, be eligible for a Federal Pell Grant, and have completed a rigorous high school program as determined by the Office of Admissions and USED guidelines. Second year recipients must have the above and a cumulative 3.0 GPA. How Much Can A Student Receive? An Academic Competitiveness Grant will provide up to $750 for the first year of undergraduate study and up to $1,300 for the second year of undergraduate study. Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant The U.S. Department of Education provides Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (FSEOG) to undergraduate students who are eligible for the Federal Pell Grant. FSEOG is a grant and does not have to be repaid. How Do You Qualify? Unlike Federal Pell Grant funds, FSEOG funds are limited and are awarded to students who demonstrate exceptional financial need that apply by the priority consideration date. Funds are first-come, first-serve until funds are exhausted. How Much Will You Receive? Awards for the 2010-11 school year will range from $200 to $2,000 per year depending on financial need. State Grants and Scholarships The William L. Boyd, IV, Florida Resident Access Grant (FRAG) Program provides tuition assistance to Florida undergraduate students attending an eligible private, non-profit Florida college or university. Meet Florida’s residency requirements for receipt of state student financial aid by maintaining Florida residency for purposes other than education for a minimum of 12 consecutive months prior to the first day of class of the academic term for which funds are requested. All recipients must earn 12 credit hours each semester and maintain a 2.0 GPA. The Florida Student Assistance Grant (FSAG) Program is a need-based grant program consisting of three separately funded student financial aid programs available to degree-seeking, resident, undergraduate students who demonstrate substantial financial need and are enrolled in participating postsecondary institutions. All recipients must earn12 credit hours each semester and maintain a 2.0 GPA. The Mary McLeod Bethune Scholarship provides financial assistance to undergraduate students who meet scholastic requirements and demonstrate financial need. This scholarship is awarded to the students with the highest need first. The funds are limited at each participating Institution. The Florida Bright Futures Scholarship Program establishes three lottery-funded scholarships to reward Florida high school graduates for high academic achievement. For Initial Eligibility the student will: • Submit a fully completed (error free) Initial Student Florida Financial Aid Application during his/ her last year in high school (after December 1and prior to graduation) by accessing http://www. FloridaStudentFinancialAid.org online (select State Grants, Scholarships & Applications, then Apply Here). EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 45


The application gives the Florida Department of Education (FLDOE) permission to evaluate the student’s high school transcript and standardized test scores for eligibility for a Bright Futures Scholarship and other state scholarships and grants. Apply during his/her last year in high school, before graduation, or will forfeit all future eligibility for a Bright Futures Scholarship. Edward Waters College Scholarships/Grants - In – Aid Grant-in-aid is available to students with exceptional skills in the area of athletics, band, choir and cheerleading. Contact the appropriate office for information. In some cases the said office will contact you. The student must meet the requirements of each of the programs to be qualified. Grant-in-aid (GIA) maybe combined with other scholarships after all federal and state aid has been applied. GIA and other EWC scholarship awards cannot exceed charges for EWC Tuition / Room and Board minus student financial aid awards (not including student loans). Disbursement of GIA funds and other EWC Scholarship awards to a student account in some instances, may not yield a credit balance to be refunded. Tuition Remission Full-time employees of EWC, after three working months, are eligible to enroll in one course a semester without charge. Federal Direct Student Loans Beginning with the 2010-11 academic year, Edward Waters College (EWC) will be a participant in the William D. Ford Federal Direct Student Loan Program. This means all 2010-11 student loan borrowers must complete a new Loan Entrance Interview and Master Promissory Note via the Federal Direct Student Loan Website at: www.studentloans.gov. The Direct Loan Program offers several low interest loans to students. The lender is the U.S. Department of Education rather than a bank or other financial institution (which you may have if you previously borrowed under the Federal Family Educational Loan Program). Loan eligibility and amounts are based on completion of the Free Application for Federal Student Aid and may be completed online at www.fafsa.ed.gov. The Direct Loan Program offers: Direct Subsidized Loans The amount you may borrow per year is based on your level of enrollment, financial need and cost of attendance. Please see www.studentloans.gov website for amounts that may be borrowed per enrollment level and aggregate limits. “Subsidized” means the government pays the interest on your loan while you are in school and during your six month grace period after you leave school. Direct Unsubsidized Loans Independent students may borrow between $6,000-$7,000 based on their level of enrollment and cost of attendance per academic year. Dependent students may borrow up to $2,000 per academic year. “Unsubsidized” means you are responsible for paying the interest while in school and during your six month grace period after you leave school on at least a half-time basis. Direct PLUS Loans Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students (PLUS) is available to parents of dependent students that wish to borrow up to their child’s cost of education or for additional education expenses not covered by other forms of financial aid. A credit check may be required as part of the loan approval. EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 46


For more information on Direct Loan interest rates, fees, and student rights and responsibilities, please visit their website at www.studentloans.gov. Student Loan Defaults Are On The Rise! Edward Waters College encourages students to pursue all other forms of financial assistance before deciding on if a loan should be obtained and how much to borrow. Please visit the Office of Financial Aid regarding other aid options available and for assistance on how much student loan you may need. Remember! The loan must be repaid to the Federal government. Failure to do so will result in your wages being garnished, your credit tarnished and any tax refund intercepted by the government and other sanctions. PLEASE BORROW WISELY! Federal College Work-Study On-campus and off-campus jobs pay at least the Federal minimum wage to students demonstrating need for income while in school and who possess usable skills for on-campus and off-campus positions. Students interested in seeking Federal College Work-study may apply in the Office of Financial Aid. Cooperative Education Paid work experience off-campus may earn course credit, may be during college recess or concurrent with college studies. See Student Affairs Department Representative and academic advisor. Scholarship Descriptions Annual scholarship awards provided to EWC students are as follows: United Negro College Fund Gifts to EWC students administered by the UNCF staff based upon students’ need, performance, and major. Amounts vary from $500 to $5,000 a semester. Please visit the UNCF website at www.uncf.org to apply for the many scholarships available. Other Awards Private individuals and organizations support individual students meeting their own criteria that they select as recipients. Criteria and amounts vary. The African Methodist Episcopal Church (Young People’s Department, and Richard Allen Scholarship) provides several scholarship opportunities. The Urban League, International Longshoreman Association, Delta Sigma Theta, Alpha Kappa Alpha, Greyhound, The Gasper and Irene Lazzara Scholarship, and L-D Industries are among Edward Waters College’s other regular and much appreciated scholarship donors. Students should see a Financial Aid Counselor for information regarding applications for the above scholarships. The Edward Waters College scholarship program is designed to assist students with the direct costs of education and to provide access to higher education at a private college. The following awards will be made after all financial aid has been determined. The scholarship/grant program is not designed or intended for students to make a financial profit. The following scholarships are offered to potential students once all admission documents have been received by the Admissions Office. Trustee Scholarship This scholarship is awarded to incoming High School seniors with a 3.75 cumulative grade point average and SAT scores of 1300 or ACT scores of 27. Students must apply and qualify for financial aid to be eligible for this scholarship. Students must register for and earn at least 15 credit hours per semester. This scholarship is up to EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 47


the full cost of tuition and fees, and cannot generate any refund to the student. This scholarship is renewable up to eight semesters by maintaining a 3.75 GPA. Presidential Scholarship This scholarship is awarded to incoming High School seniors with a 3.50 cumulative grade point average and SAT scores of 1000 or ACT scores of 25. Students must apply and qualify for financial aid to be eligible for this scholarship. Students must register for and earn at least 15 credit hours per semester. This scholarship is up to the full cost of tuition and fees, and cannot generate any refund to the student. This scholarship is renewable up to eight semesters by maintaining a minimum 3.50 GPA. College Scholarship This scholarship is awarded to incoming High School seniors with a 3.25 cumulative grade point average and SAT scores of 900 or ACT scores of 23. Students must apply and qualify for financial aid to be eligible for this scholarship. Students must register for and earn at least 15 credit hours per semester. This scholarship is up to $7,000.00, and cannot generate any refund to the student. This scholarship is renewable up to eight semesters by maintaining a 3.25 GPA. Honors Scholarship This scholarship is awarded to incoming High School seniors with a 3.00 cumulative grade point average and SAT scores of 800 or ACT scores of 21. Students must apply and qualify for financial aid to be eligible for this scholarship. Students must register for and earn at least 15 credit hours per semester. This scholarship is up to $5,000.00, and cannot generate any refund to the student. This Scholarship is renewable up to eight semesters by maintaining a 3.00 GPA. Transfer Incentive Grant This scholarship is non-renewable and is only good for one academic year. This scholarship is for students transferring from another college or institution with a minimum of 24 transferable credit hours. This scholarship is up to $3,000.00, and cannot generate a refund to the student. Incentive Grant This scholarship is non-renewable and is only good for one academic year. This scholarship is for high school seniors with a minimum 2.25 cumulative grade point average. This scholarship is up to $2,000.00, and cannot generate a refund to the student. Talent-Based Scholarship This scholarship is renewable for up to eight semesters. This scholarship is based on the individual talent in choir, or band. Amounts vary. For more information, contact the Music Department at (904) 470-8131 or 4708132. Athletic Scholarship This scholarship is renewable for up to eight semesters. This scholarship is based on the athletic ability of the student. Amounts vary. For more information, contact the Athletic Department at (904) 470-8276 or 470-8277. Scholarships and Financial Aid All institutional scholarship/grant recipients must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). International students are excluded. Some scholarship awards can reduce the amount of financial aid you receive. Should you receive other scholarship awards, the college will adjust the institutional award first. External scholarship awards may be received up to the cost of attendance.

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Satisfactory Academic Progress for Federal Student Aid Title IV of the 1992 Higher Education Amendments requires that institutions establish a minimum standard of “Satisfactory Progress” for students. A minimum standard for “Satisfactory Academic Progress” (SAP) is defined as follows: “SAP” is a measure of whether a student is progressing adequately toward completion of his or her course of study. It is determined in terms of grade point average and course completions. For a student to be eligible for Title IV aid after the student’s second academic year of attendance at an institution, the student must have a cumulative “C” average or its equivalent or have academic standing at that point in the program that is consistent with the institution’s requirements for graduation”. Current law requires a student to maintain satisfactory progress in the course of study he or she is pursuing according to the standards and practices of the institution. Frequency of Monitoring and Evaluation Edward Waters College will review a student’s progress at the end of each academic year. For this purpose, the Edward Waters College academic year is defined as the following: • Two semesters of 15 to 16 weeks of course work occurring between August 1st and May 31st At the end of the spring semester, the Financial Aid Office determines whether or not a student is making “Satisfactory Academic Progress” toward a degree and is thus qualified to receive financial aid during the next academic year. A student’s progress is measured both qualitatively and quantitatively. Courses taken during summer school (and accepted by Edward Waters College if taken at another school) may be included in determining satisfactory progress for the next term; but the student must make sure that the Financial Aid Office receives a copy of the record of courses taken and the grades received. If the removals of an incomplete grade (“I”) makes the student eligible, the student must make sure that the Financial Aid Office is informed of the removal of the incomplete grade. 8.1

Qualitative Progress Qualitative progress is measured in terms of grade points earned during the preceding semester, which are computed on a 4.00 grading system. Following are the standards for maintaining qualitative progress at Edward Waters College: Standards for Qualitative Progress Number of Hours Attempted Required Cumulative Grade Point Average 1-59 1.75 60-above 2.00

8.2

Quantitative Progress All students (full-time or part-time) must successfully complete a minimum number of the semester hours attempted. Students receiving Title IV aid must complete 67% of all coursework as shown in the chart below. Attempted Earned

15 10

21 14

30 20

60 40 EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 49


8.3

Repeats, Remedial, Incompletes, Transfer Credits, and Withdrawals Transfer students must meet the same satisfactory academic progress requirements and maximum enrollment limits as other students. Only transfer hours needed to complete the declared degree will be accepted. Repeated courses, remedial and non-credit courses, incomplete courses, and courses from which you have withdrawn after drop and add periods are also included as semester hours attempted. Failing grades (F) are included in the GPA calculation. Withdrawals (W) are not used in the GPA calculations. Incomplete grades (I) are not factored into the GPA until a letter grade is recorded. Grade changes will be recognized when they occur. Retroactive reinstatement of aid will not be considered unless the grade change is officially posted by the last day of classes and funds are still available. Withdrawal from the College is not considered making satisfactory progress. Students will be financial aid eligible for up to 30 credit hours of Remedial (Developmental) coursework. Remedial courses do not have to be counted as hours attempted.

8.4

Maximum Time Frame The maximum timeframe a student is eligible for financial aid is 150% of the published length of educational programs. Most baccalaureate degrees require a minimum of 125 semester hours and associate degrees a minimum of 65 semester hours. Therefore, a student working toward a bachelor’s degree is eligible for financial aid up to 187.5 semester hours attempted. A student working toward an associate degree is eligible for federal aid up to 97.5 semester hours attempted.

8.5

Financial Aid Probation Students who fall below the required grade point average or completion ratio for attempted hours for maintaining satisfactory academic progress at the end of each academic year will receive written notification of probation which will include conditions for the probationary period. SAP will be monitored at the end of each academic year. Students with academic deficiencies will be monitored closely and should adhere to the conditions surrounding their probationary period (See Quantitative and Qualitative measures above). At the end of the probationary period should the student’s; GPA fall below the required cumulative grade point average or they have not successfully passed a minimum of 67% of their credit hours attempted during the preceding fall and spring semesters, they will be placed on Financial Aid Suspension. Note: Financial Aid Probation will not stop funding, but serve as a warning to encourage successful academic progression and give the student avenues to correct academic difficulties.

Financial Aid Suspension Failure to make Satisfactory Academic Progress upon the end of the probationary period will result in Financial Aid Suspension. The student will be denied all types of federal and state aid (grants, work study and loans) until the deficiency has been removed. Financial aid, once lost, cannot be reinstated retroactively for previous semesters. Expenses incurred while a student’s aid is suspended must be paid by the student. This policy applies to all students at Edward Waters College receiving Financial Aid. Appeal Procedures Students who fail to make satisfactory academic progress due to extenuating circumstances (divorce of a parent or spouse, death of an immediate family member or severe medical or financial problems for example) may appeal. Appeals and any supporting documentation must be submitted in writing and will be forwarded to the Appeals Committee. Students will be notified in writing no later than ten days after the Committee has rendered a decision. The deadlines for receiving submission of appeals are as follows:

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Changing a Program of Study or Major Students who have changed their majors and/or are pursuing a second degree are more likely to reach their maximum timeframes for financial aid eligibility. The College may consider a change of major or pursuing a second degree as extenuating circumstances. This appeal and any supporting documentation must be submitted in writing and will be forwarded to the Appeals Committee. Reinstatement of Financial Aid In order to have financial aid reinstated, a student must complete the following requirements at his/her own expense (no financial aid will be granted at Edward Waters for those on financial aid suspension): • Enroll and successfully complete at least 6 hours with at least a 2.0 GPA for the semester • This is the minimum requirement as a student may need to complete more hours and earn a higher GPA to remedy the SAP deficiency. This is determined on a case by case basis • Having completed the required coursework, the student must file an appeal and the appeal must be approved for financial aid to be reinstated. • Fall Semester: • Spring Semester:

July 25 October 15

Return of Title IV Refunds When you receive a Federal Pell Grant, Federal Stafford Loans, a Federal PLUS Loan, a Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant, or a Federal Academic Competitive Grant to attend Edward Waters College, you are agreeing to complete all of the courses covered by your Federal financial aid. If you accept financial aid but do not complete the term, you may have to repay part of your grant and/or loan. If you officially or unofficially withdraw from all of your classes, you may owe a repayment to the Federal government. This is a Federal law called the “Return of Title IV Refund” (R2T4) for Federal Financial Aid. It is important to successfully complete and attend all of your classes to avoid having to pay back your financial aid. Official and Unofficial Withdraw from Edward Waters College An official withdrawal is an instance in which you drop or withdraw from all courses either on-line or in person. An unofficial withdrawal is when you stop attending your courses and drop out of school without notifying the college. A student who receives all F grades or a combination of AW, F, U and W grades is considered to have unofficially withdrawn from their courses. Commonly Asked R2T4 Questions: How Do I Avoid Paying Back My Pell Grant? Keep attending your classes. • If you receive a Federal Pell Grant or Federal Stafford Loans and then withdraw from ALL your classes or stop attending ALL your classes, you may have to repay all or a portion of that aid received. • Once you have completed more than 60% of the semester, you have earned all of your assistance. If you withdraw from EWC before completing 60% of the semester, you will have to repay any unearned financial aid funds that were already disbursed to you . What About My Student Loan? Keep attending your classes. The same rules apply to Federal Stafford Loans.

EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 51


What If I Do Stop Attending or Withdraw From All My Classes? The College will calculate how much you must repay based on how many days you attended. You will be notified by the Financial Aid Office of how much you must repay. EWC must report any student that does not repay to the federal government at the end of 45 days. You will be ineligible to receive financial aid at ANY school until the funds are repaid in full. How Can I Repay the Funds I Owe? Students are responsible for the repayment. Payment must be made to the Student Accounts Office within 45 days. Once the debt has been reported to the federal government, the amount owed must be repaid to the Federal government and not to EWC. What If I Never Attended? Students who never attended are considered “No Shows.” These students are considered ineligible for financial aid, and 100% of the financial aid received must be repaid. In addition, if a student does not withdraw prior to the published drop date, they may owe 100% of their tuition and fee charges. Official withdrawals must be processed through Admissions, Registration & Records. Students who fail to formally withdraw from classes prior to the published drop date (census date) will be held responsible for any tuition/fee charges and repayment of all financial aid for the term even if they did not attend. Where Does the Repayment Go? For a Return of Title IV Refund, repayment returns back to the Federal Financial Aid program(s) that you received the aid from. Federal regulations require the college return Federal funds in the following order: • Unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loan • Subsidized Federal Stafford Loan • Federal PLUS Loan • Federal Pell Grant • Federal Academic Competitiveness Grant - ACG • Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant - FSEOG How Do You Calculate the RETURN OF TITLE IV FUNDS? Title IV funds include the Federal Stafford Loans, Federal PLUS Loans, Federal Pell Grant, Federal SEOG grant and Federal ACG grant . Students may estimate the amount they have to repay when withdrawing by using the following formula: Total Award X Number of days completed / Total number of days in the semester (Total award multiplied by days completed divided by the total days) For additional information on the Edward Waters College Return of Title IV Refund Policy, please visit the Office of Financial aid.

EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 52


STUDENT AFFAIRS AND ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT

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George N. Collins Building Suite 101 904-470-8211 Edward Waters College provides a comprehensive array of student services. Students are given many opportunities for campus involvement and for community service. Partnerships with companies and agencies allow students to have meaningful internship and shadowing experiences. Students at the College are encouraged to fully participate in all of its extracurricular activities. The Division for Student Affairs and Enrollment Management has a competent and caring staff that provides personal attention to each student. Workshops and seminars sponsored by the Division give students valuable information about current trends in the job market, resume writing and interviewing tips. Students are also provided with free counseling and tutorial services. The Division of Student Affairs and Enrollment Management is making a difference, one student at a time. Individualized attention to students is the rule and not the exception! The Division of Student Affairs and Enrollment Management is comprised of the following offices: Office of Admissions, Black Male College Explorers Program, Office of Campus Ministry, Office of Career Planning and Placement, Office of Counseling, Office of Financial Aid, Office of Health Services, Office of Residential Life and the Office of Student Life. The Office of Student Affairs and Enrollment Management is located in the George N. Collins Student Union Building. Housing The Jacksonville Metro area has over one million residents and offers many alternative arrangements that are subject to availability within the surrounding communities. The EWC housing service is conveniently located on campus-and is managed and operated, by a Professional Residential Life Staff. Off Campus EWC does not at this time offer off campus housing but we do assist in providing information upon request of area rental availability. However, EWC assumes, no responsibility for off campus housing transactions or agreements. Residence Halls Campus housing is available for on campus living in Salter Hall (upper-class females); Morris-Cone A (freshman males); Morris-Cone B (freshman females); Tiger Landing Apartments (upper-class males); Dot Street Apartments (upper-class students); Tyler Street Apartments; and Honor Village (upper-class with a at least a 3.0 grade point average). Co-ed housing is not permitted in any Residence Hall. Although, the Residence Halls are supervised, students are responsible for their conduct and any property damage resulting from inappropriate use or play. Rooms are inspected weekly for the health, safety and welfare of the occupants. Cafeteria Three meals are provided for residential students, Monday through Friday, upstairs in the George N. Collins Student Union Building. Breakfast Lunch Dinner

7:30 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. 11:30 a.m. -1:30 p.m.; Wednesday - 12:00 noon – 2:00 p.m. 5:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 54


On Saturday, Sunday and holiday meals are served: Brunch Dinner

11:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. 5:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.

The Cafeteria’s schedule of operation correlates to the academic calendar. When the College is closed, no services are provided. Residential students must present their ID card with a current meal plan sticker. Staff, faculty and visitors others must pay the cashier upon entering the dining area. The meal plan offers unlimited serving on all food and beverages except premium entrees. Post Office The Post Office is located on the first floor of the George N. Collins Student Center (Student Union Building). Mailboxes are available for student purchases. Mail may be retrieved from mailboxes when the lounging area of the SUB is operational: Campus Mailbox Fee - $30.00 Key Deposit - $10.00 Bookstore The Bookstore is located in the George N. Collins Student Union Building and is operational: Monday-Friday 8:00AM – 6:00PM. The EWC Library The EWC Library serves as the college’s information portal while providing access to the networked world of knowledge resources. As educators, the librarians facilitate the acquisition of the information literacy skills needed to operate effectively in the modern complex technological environment. The Library further strives to provide students, faculty and staff with relevant, contemporary and widely circulated book, periodicals, and multimedia collections. The Library serves as a commons to bring together the various constituencies of the campus and community as it endeavors to stimulate and encourage the development of a lifelong habit of learning. The Library provides year-round service, and is closed on holidays observed by the college. During regular Semesters, the library serves the campus and community 71 hours per week according to the following schedule: Monday - Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday

8:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. 2:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.

*Semester breaks and summer hours vary. Hours will be posted. *Hours are subject to change in case of emergency. Changes will be posted. The Library provides the following services to faculty, staff and students.

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Reference Services • Assistance in the use of the Library’s on-line catalog, web sites and databases • Assistance in the use of reference books and materials • Assistance in the techniques of research • Assistance in locating books and information in other libraries Circulation Services • Books and materials checkout • Maintenance of class reserves as requested by instructors • Retrieval of class reserves and ready reference books • Interlibrary loans • “Hold shelf” for books • Directional information • Assistance in finding books and periodicals on the shelves Educational Services • Freshman Orientation Class • Library manual issued on request Information Literacy and Multimedia Services • Instruction and workshops to enhance research skills • Available use of instructional equipment for the classroom • Information Literacy and Multimedia Lab Other Services • Study carrels • Conference areas • Photocopiers • Comfortable lounge area The Library’s collections include the reference and general book collections, periodical collection, Juvenile book collection, and the non-print (VHS, CD, and DVD) media collection. Computer Centers An on campus computer center is available in the Hatcher-Stewart Building Room. In keeping with national trends and regional accrediting association standards, computers are regularly upgraded to enable keeping pace with changing technology, including hardware, software, databases, networks and communications. In addition, technology-based reading, writing, and math labs are available on the 2nd Floor in the Centennial Building. Access hours are posted. Monday - Thursday 8:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Friday 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Sunday 4:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. * Semester breaks and summer hours vary, and are posted on the front door. Textbooks The textbook is an integral part of the learning process. The College Bookstore located in the Student Union Building distributes textbooks. EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 56


Lost and Found Misplaced articles money and valuables should be turned over to Campus Security. The College assumes no responsibility for lost or stolen items. Counseling The Counseling Department mission is to assist students in achieving their personal, educational, and career goals. The Counseling Department is an integral part of the College’s total learning environment. The Counseling Center provides students with a nurturing environment where personal concerns can be openly explored and discussed with a professional Counselor. The Counseling Services are voluntary, confidential, and free of charge to all currently enrolled students. The Counseling staff provides individual and group counseling, crisis intervention, HIV/AIDS pre and post test counseling, and referrals. The staff presents workshops on time management, depression, assertiveness training, anger management, Chapel etiquette, and interpersonal communication skills. Health Services At EWC, Health and Wellness Services takes special pride in helping students stay healthy which in turn helps with retention and graduation. Whether you have a health emergency, a concern about nutrition, or a bad case of the flu, you can expect excellent care when referred to health care professionals who are friendly and concerned. The EWC Health and Wellness Services is committed to providing students with preventive care programs, and health and wellness fairs which are held each semester. We strongly believe that good health is instrumental in helping students achieve their college education. The college makes an effort to safeguard the health of students and to ensure adequate medical care is available in case of illness or accident. Prior to enrollment at EWC, each student is required to have a physical examination. Medical assistance is available at the College Park Medical Center situated on the campus and students may enroll in health insurance. For further information regarding Health Services please contact the Counseling Center. Disability Concerns Students who need to arrange accommodations for a documented disability, or require special assistance, are to discuss their needs with their instructor, contact their advisor, and notify the Student Counseling Center located in the Student Union Building (904-470-8223). Campus Ministry The Chaplain/Director of Campus Ministry’s primary role is to serve as the spiritual covering for the campus, and to provide various campus programs such as weekly Chapel Services, Bible Study, Sunday Worship Services, Religious Emphasis Week activities, Pastoral Counseling (Psychological-Spiritual), Corporate and Individual Prayers. This goal is in keeping with EWC’S Mission to help students to develop a commitment to a life of excellence and ethics. The Chaplain is available to assist students in their efforts to grow spiritually in order to better cope with day-today living, collegiate challenges, and moral decisions from a biblical perspective. Campus Ministry activities serve as a means to empower students in discovering their own sense of self-worth, in addition to elevating their spiritual values and moral consciousness. The Chaplain’s role also encompasses promoting Edward Waters College as an A.M.E. Church related higher education institution. Career Planning and Placement Center “Making a difference, one student at a time” Our mission is to adequately prepare, groom and empower students for the workplace and a lifetime of careers. The Office of Career Planning and Placement offers a variety of services ranging from career exploration to EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 57


internships and employment. The services and programs are tailored to meet the needs of our students as well as to advance their knowledge base. Students are encouraged to register in person at the Career Center or online (www.ewc.edu) in order to make use of career services. Collaboratively, assistance is given to each student based on an assessment of interests, skills and abilities. Further, students are able to take advantage of all rendered services which can be used as a springboard for development and enhancement purposes. The Career Planning and Placement Center is located in the Student Union Building, Room 110. Employment and internship opportunities may be viewed by going to: www.ewc.edu (click, students; then click, Career Planning and Placement; then click, jobs/internships). For students who are in need of a wardrobe for interviewing and work, the EWC Boutique is also located in the Student Union Building. The boutique is under the auspices of Career Planning and Placement, and the days of operation are Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays. Residence Life The mission of residence life is to create a living and learning environment that challenges and supports the personal, spiritual, social and academic development of our residents and their communities in an environment that is safe, functional, non-threatening, and consistent with the institution’s mission and goals. The Jacksonville Metro area has over one million residents and offers many alternative arrangements that are subject to availability within the surrounding communities. The EWC housing services is conveniently located on campus and is managed and operated by a professional residential life staff. Campus housing is available for on-campus living in Salter Hall (upper-class female facility), Tiger Landing apartments (upper-class male facility), Morris Cone A (freshman male facility), Morris Cone B (freshman female facility), Dot Street Apartment (upper class students), and Honors Village (upper class students with a minimum 3.5 grade point average). Co-ed living is not permitted in any residence hall. The College reserves the right to change housing assignments depending upon availability. Although the residence halls are supervised, students are responsible for their conduct and any property damage resulting from inappropriate use or play. Rooms are inspected weekly for the health, safety and welfare of the occupants. Student Activities Edward Waters College strives to provide a student centered college experience. The best college education must take place both inside and outside of the classroom. A variety of programs are offered to enhance the educational, social cultural experiences, and enrichment of students. Programs are designed to educate, motivate, and stimulate the student body. Student Government The Student Government Association of Edward Waters College is the students’ governing body in any matter pertaining to the interest of the student body. At the time of election, candidates for office shall meet the criteria outlined in the Scholastic Regulations. All candidates shall be full-time students and in good standing with the college. Students elected to offices shall not graduate prior to the expiration of their elected term. Affairs of the Student Government Association are managed by elected representatives of the respective classes. The SGA President is a member of the Board of Trustees and participates in developing general policy for the college. The Vice President for Student Affairs and the Director of Student Activities supervise all SGA activities.

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Fraternities and Sororities Edward Waters College recognizes a variety of Greek-letter organizations. The organizations are designed for the enrichment of students and help prepare students for global living through the various activities provided. The following organizations are registered with the Office of Students Activities and are recognized by the college: • Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity • Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority • Delta Sigma Theta Sorority • Iota Phi Theta Fraternity • Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity • Omega Psi Phi Fraternity • Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity • Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority • Zeta Phi Beta Sorority All Greek-letter organizations may conduct one in-take session during the spring academic semester. The membership in-take period cannot last longer than four weeks. Students must be currently enrolled, of full-time status with a 2.0 semester average, maintaining a cumulative 2.5 GPA and have earned a minimum of twentyfour hours from Edward Waters College. EWC Organizations/Clubs • Band (Marching and Jazz) • Chamber and Concert Choirs • Charles Mingus Society of Composers • Chess Club • College Debate Club • Drama Club • Golf Club • International Students Association • Sankofa Club • Student Activities Advisory Council • Student Government Association • Christians in Action Campus Ministry • Yearbook Club • Sigma Beta Delta Honor Society Academic Enrichment Associations and Clubs • Business Majors’ Association • Communication Majors’ Club • Criminal Justice Majors’ Club • Education Majors’ Club • Math, Science, Engineering Majors’ Club • Math Majors’ Club • Psychology Majors’ Club • Political Science Association • Social and Behavioral Science Club National Organizations • National Associations for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) • National Association Business Journal (NABJ) EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 59


• National Council of Negro Women (NCNW) • National Pan-Hellenic Council National Service Organizations • Anointed Student in Unity Fellowship-Sorority and Fraternity • Tau Beta Sigma Service Sorority • Gamma Beta Chi Service Fraternity Information regarding college policies for all student organizations can be found in the Student Handbook. These policies will cover membership, hazing and other matters of importance. Students may also contact the Director of Student Life at Edward Waters College. Athletics Vital to the overall development of students, an ongoing athletics program is designed to develop motor skills, social and emotional control, sportsmanship, school spirit, and self-reliance of EWC students. The program includes both intercollegiate and intramural components. Intramural Athletics Intramural Recreation sports are an important part of college life. Competitive, recreational sports assist in developing positive social and physical skills. At EWC, the intramural sports include basketball, flag football, ping-pong, and volleyball. These sports are operated according to the National Intramural Recreational Sports Association (NIRSA) guidelines under the supervision of the Director of Student Activities or his/her designee. Enrolled students are encouraged to participate in intramural athletics; thus acquiring practical experience in team management and supervision Intercollegiate Athletics Competitive, scheduled sports with teams from other colleges with membership in the NAIA, Division II and the Sun Conference are vital for developing advanced motor, physical, and social skills; emotional control, sportsmanship, school spirit and self-reliance. EWC abides by the rules and regulations of the NAIA for all sports – football, basketball, baseball, softball, and track & field for both women and men, and golf. . 1. The student must be identified and enrolled in a minimum of 12 institutional credit hours at the time of participation, or if the participation takes place between terms, the student must have been identified with the institution the term immediately before the date of participation. 2. The student must maintain institutional identification during any term of participation. 3. The student must have accumulated a minimum of nine institutional credit hours prior to identification for the second term of attendance. Only those institutional credit hours earned after identification (at any institution) may be applied toward meeting the (9) institutional credit rule for a second term freshman. 4. After completion of the second term of attendance, from then on, a student must have accumulated a minimum of 24 institutional credit hours in the two immediately previous terms of attendance. 5. The student must be making normal progress toward a recognized baccalaureate degree and maintain the minimum grade point average as defined by the institution and the NAIA. 6. All students must maintain a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.0 on a 4.0 scale. 7. To participate a second season in a sport, all students must have accumulated at least 24 semester institutional credit hours. To participate the third season in a sport, all students must have accumulated at least 48 semester institutional credit hours. 8. The student must be eligible according to the institution’s standards for intercollegiate competition. 9. The student must be eligible according to affiliated conference standards when such standards are more stringent than NAIA rules and standards. 10. Repeat courses previously passed with a grade of “D” or better in any term, during summer or EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 60


during a non-term cannot be counted toward satisfying the 24-credit rule. Maximums of one repeat course per term previously passed with a grade of “D” may be counted toward satisfying the 12-hour enrollment rule. 11. A student who has not been identified at an institution during the preceding term does not become eligible at the institution until identification takes place the following term. 12. A student who is eligible the last day of a term may retain eligibility until midnight of the 14th calendar day following the close of a term to allow an institution time to re-certify eligibility. 13. A student enrolling in college after the date set by the institution for enrollment of regular full-time students will not be eligible to compete in intercollegiate athletics until two full calendar weeks of residency have been completed. TRADITIONAL EWC EVENTS African American History Celebration While commemorative ceremonies are programmed throughout the year, special activities are scheduled in February and open to the public. A variety of activities are planned by the EWC “Black History Month Committee” annually. Baccalaureate Service Baccalaureate Service is a special service dedicated to the spiritual side of graduation for seniors, their parents, families, and guests. The purpose of the ceremony is to give all graduating students an opportunity to reflect on their purpose in life and to manifest their need for spiritual fulfillment. Chapel During school terms, a campus-wide assembly is held every Wednesday at 11:00 A.M. Chapel is mandatory for freshmen and all residence hall students. Classes are not scheduled, and certain administrative offices may be closed during this period. The religious oriented assemblies provide opportunities for participation by guest artists and speakers, prominent figures, community members, faculty and staff. Campus Assembly is open to the public. Senior Chapel is required for all graduating seniors, Christian Heritage Week Once annually, during the Spring Semester, the College Chaplain plans and schedules a series of events for the EWC community. The purpose of the activity is to help individuals gain a deeper insight into human spiritual needs. Convocatum Est Convocatum Est is the opening convocation and a ceremony of matriculation, officially welcoming new students to the Edward Waters College community. Faculty dress in academic regalia for the Convocatum Est Ceremony and students are dressed in black and white professional attire. Students witness their signature in the school’s Registry and have the opportunity to shake the hand of the President, while being in the presence of faculty, staff, students and friends of the College. The ceremony takes place each Spring and Fall to represent the official opening of each semester. Participants include all students who are new to the College. Coronation This annual event enables guests to participate in the crowning of Miss Edward Waters College. Commencement The formal graduation activity is held at the end of the Spring Semester for graduating seniors, with a GPA of 2.0 or above, who have accumulated at least 120 semester hours and meeting all requirement of a formal major program of study. EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 61


STUDENT CONDUCT Code of Conduct Students are expected to exhibit appropriate behavior on campus and in the community. Students signify, by enrolling at EWC, that they subscribe to the College’s standards of behavior and agree to conduct themselves with dignity, pride, and respect. They also agree to abide by rules and regulations established by the College. (Please refer to the Student Handbook for more detailed information.) Enforcement of the Code By authority of the Board of Trustees, the President (or designee) is responsible for ensuring that College regulations are followed. The Vice President for Student Affairs and Enrollment Management is responsible for enforcing regulations as they apply to students. EWC community members are responsible to bring cases of misconduct to the attention of the Office for Student Affairs and Enrollment Management. Should disciplinary action arise from student conduct issues, the Vice President will, with advice of appropriate committees, take decisive action. Formal grievance procedure and due process are available to students, and detailed information is available from the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs and Enrollment Management. Primary Behavior Standards The following standards are especially important to EWC group life; violations of these standards may cause a student to be placed on probation, suspension, or expulsion. 1. Use college facilities and property for authorized purposes that support the College mission. 2. Be honest and fair while taking a test or preparing a written assignment and give credit to an author or a classmate for an original idea or work. 3. Abstain from using, selling, or distributing unauthorized narcotics, drugs, or alcohol in the College. 4. Shun carrying, using, or displaying lethal weapons, firearms, or explosives in the College. 5. Maintain and display orderly behavior in the classroom with dignity and respect to instructors and classmates. 6. Comply with directives and requests of College officers while performing their duties. 7. Act orderly, decently, and maturely in the College or at College-sponsored functions. 8. Assist in maintaining fire extinguishers for their intended purpose, and discourage acts of arson. 9. Use gentle and supportive behavior directed towards College members or guests. Threats and/or acts of physical violence are grounds for suspension. 10. Follow national guidelines for initiating new members into student organizations; hazing is illegal. 11. Maintain platonic and sex-free interpersonal relationships on campus. Secondary Behavior Standards The following positive behaviors also enhance the College experience and maintain students’ strong positive role in the community; violations may result in warning, probation, censure or suspension. 1. Be courteous to others. 2. Follow campus traffic regulations (including parking). 3. Follow campus dress codes and recommendations. 4. Promote the rights of others. 5. Support the orderly operation of College affairs. Academic Dishonesty Academic dishonesty and plagiarism are very serious offenses. Each student is expected to do his/her own thinking on all quizzes, tests, class work, written reports, research papers, and homework assignments. If any student is found to be copying from another student, books, or internet sites, or cheating during a quiz or test, he/she will be referred to the Student Counseling Center, have a conference with the instructor, and a grade of F for the course will be awarded. The student may also be administratively withdrawn from the course. EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 62


Class Attendance Punctual class attendance is required at EWC as described in individual course syllabi. Although occasional emergency absence may be unavoidable, students are responsible for completing course work assigned during the period of absence. When absences result from EWC activities, advisors or event sponsors are responsible for notifying instructors (with copies to the offices of Academic and Student Affairs) to ensure “excused absence.” Class Attendance Policy • Students must be present for 80% of the scheduled course time with no more than three (3) unexcused absences in order to receive credit for a course. • Students who have more than three (3) unexcused absences will be administratively withdrawn from the course by the Registrar. 80% attendance is calculated on the following scale based on the days on which the class meets: • Monday/Wednesday/Friday-students who miss more than eight (8) class periods (total excused and unexcused absences) will not receive credit for the course. • Tuesday/Thursday-students who miss more than six (6) class periods (total excused and unexcused absences) will not receive credit for the course. • For classes that meet one day per week, students who miss more than three (3) class periods (total excused and unexcused absences) will not receive credit for the course. • For summer term courses, students may miss no more than four (4) classes to receive credit for the course. Students who fail to meet the 80% attendance rule will be administratively withdrawn from the respective course(s) and receive a W, WP or WF depending on their grade and time period in the semester at which they failed to meet the 80% rule. Student Athletes are required to attend all classes unless the Office of Academic Affairs and the Instructor of Record have been given prior notice by the respective coach that the student will be absent from class for an ‘away’ game, tournament or other extenuating athletic circumstance that would prevent the student from attending classes. Under no circumstances will student athletes be excused from class for practice. Student athletes will be held responsible for all course work (i.e. assignments, readings, examinations, presentations, etc.) covered during their absence, and the Instructor of Record must allow the student athlete to make up all work missed. Excused Absence Excused absences require a doctor’s note, hospital note, court form, juror duty request, obituary program, or some other official note to be considered as an excused absence. Whenever possible, students should inform their instructor in advance of a known absence. Faculty must allow students with excused absence status to make up missed assignments or exams. Students, however, are responsible for making arrangements with the faculty member to make up missed assignments, class projects, exams, etc. Excused absence verifications are issued through the Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs in the following manner: • Student must submit documentation of excused absence to the Vice President for Academic Affairs (VPAA) within two (2) business days after the student’s return to class. EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 63


• If verified as an excused absence, the VPAA will (1) notify the Registrar’s Office, in writing, authorizing a change in Power Campus from ‘unexcused’ to ‘excused’ absence; and (2) provide the student with a signed Excused Absence Notice within two (2) business days upon receipt of documentation. Faculty members are not authorized to change the absence status from unexcused to excused in Power Campus. • Faculty will be notified within two (2) business days by the Registrar of the excused status via IQ Web. • The faculty member who is the Instructor of Record for the course(s) missed will then change the ‘unexcused’ to ‘excused’ status in IQ Web within two (2) business days upon receipt of the Registrar’s notification. Allowable Excuses for Absence from Class: • Admission to a hospital • Serious emotional illness • Serious physical illness • Participation in approved academic events • Participation in scheduled intercollegiate athletic contests away from the campus • Death of a family member • Hospitalization of an immediate family member • Unusual circumstances including, court appearance, military obligation, conferences with college official, physician appointment Excused absences will not be granted for the following: • Tardiness • Transportation problems • Over-sleeping In anticipation of a student’s absence from class, coaches, band and choir directors must submit in writing, to the Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs, a list of the students participating in the Collegesponsored event, at least five (5) business days prior to the day(s) on which the students will miss class(es). Unexcused Absence Allowable unexcused absences are limited to three (3) per course, in a given semester. Occurrence of a fourth unexcused absence will automatically result in the student’s administrative withdrawal from the course. Class Expectations Edward Waters College seeks to provide an environment where discussions and expressions of all views relevant to the subject of the course are recognized and necessary for the educational process. Students do not have the right to interfere with the professor’s right to teach or the other student’s right to learn. A student demonstrating inappropriate behavior during class time will be asked to leave the class and a meeting will be set with the Department Chair to discuss dropping the student from the course and the college. Also, the student’s behavior will be discussed with the Assistant Vice President of Academic Affairs to include expulsion from Edward Waters College. Children are not allowed in the classrooms or on campus. Electronic Equipment All electronic equipment including CELL PHONES, BEEPERS, IPODS AND MP3 PLAYERS must be turned off BEFORE class time and kept out of sight. DO NOT HAVE THESE ITEMS ON YOUR DESK OR ATTACHED TO YOUR BODY. They serve as a clear distraction for both your fellow students who are here to learn, as well as the professors who are here to teach.

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EWC Dress Code Edward Waters College is committed to Sustaining the Principles of Excellence and Ethics with unity of purpose, integrity and effectiveness practices. This includes a commitment to Christian principles and values, moral and ethical behavior. In accordance with its affiliation with the African Methodist Episcopal Church, the College expects faculty, staff and students to model and uphold high standards of conduct and behavior both on and off campus, conducting themselves with pride and respect. Edward Waters College adheres to a business casual dress code. If the dress code is unacceptable, students can feel free to apply to another Institution of their choice. Every student registered at Edward Waters College must be in compliance and adhere to the dress code. Students who continually dress in a manner not consistent with the dress code policy as stated will be subject to disciplinary measures as follows: First Offense - Documented written and verbal warning Second Offense - Final warning issued to student. Student must attend a session on “Dress Code Intervention� Third Offense - Student is suspended from college for the remainder of Semester and/or next semester (NO APPEALS). APPROPRIATE DRESS (Acceptable) Every student registered at Edward Waters College must wear the appropriate dress attire outside the Residence Halls between the hours of 7:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m., except on Wednesday, which is Professional Dress Day. Attire for males: Collared or polo shirts, sweaters, casual shoes or sneakers, khaki pants or jeans (with no graphics or writing on them). Attire for females: Casual blouse, pants, Capri/cropped pants, jeans, sweaters, jackets or blazers, dresses and skirts (must be finger length when standing). INAPPROPRIATE DRESS (Unacceptable) In order to be in compliance with the dress code, students cannot wear: Hats or caps inside buildings Hats or caps worn backwards Wave caps, doo rags, bandanas, or stocking caps outside of the residence halls Decorative orthodontic appliances (grills; permanent or removable) Oversized clothing (baggy pants, baggy shirts) Pants below the waistline Sleeveless undershirts (wife beaters) Shorts except for (physical education classes) Skirts, or dresses that are above the tips of finger when standing Tops that expose any part of the midriff area or excessive cleavage Tube tops INAPPROPRIATE DRESS (Unacceptable) In order to be in compliance with the dress code, students cannot wear: Sexually explicit or derogatory attire Underwear that is visible Undergarments worn as outer wear Pajamas, flip flops, slides or slippers outside the residence halls

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REQUIRED DRESS ATTIRE (MUST HAVE) Every student registered at Edward Waters College must have the following attire: Men Black dress suit Black dress slacks Dress belt, shoes, socks and black tie Collard white dress shirt Ladies Black suit, skirt, dress (fingertip length) White dress blouse Black dress pumps (closed heel and toe) Nylons (stockings) Semi-formal attire for special events on and off campus PROFESSIONAL DRESS DAY Students should be prepared to dress appropriately for Professional Dress Day every Wednesday, 7:00a.m. 5:00p.m. Students should include the following items in their wardrobes: Men Business suit or Dress slacks, dress shirt, tie, belt, dress socks and shoes (jackets and sweaters are optional) Accessories should be limited to watches (no earrings) Ladies Business suit (skirt or pants) or Tailored pants or skirt with professional dress blouse, stockings/nylons, business closed-in-toe shoes no sandals) (jackets or sweaters are optional) If you are in need of assistance, the EWC Clothes Closet is located in the Student Union Building. Questions concerning the Dress Code should be addressed to the Counseling Center located in the Student Union Building. Students may contact the Counseling Center at 9904) 470-8231 or visit Monday-Friday 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. All members of the EWC faculty will uphold and support the EWC Dress Code as stated in this document and referenced in the EWC Student Handbook. If at any time a student (male or female) breaks the above EWC Dress Code, the professor will ask the student to leave the class and the student will receive an unexcused absence for wearing inappropriate attire to the class.

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STUDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES Academic Rights At EWC, students work to achieve personal goals through wholesome academic pursuits and may assume certain clearly established rights. (Described more fully in the Student Handbook) 1. “Academic Freedom,” including the freedom to teach and to learn is a tradition shared between students and faculty within their recognized spheres of expertise in an academic context. 2. “Civil Rights,” including the rights of expression and due process, are legal rights protected by the U.S. Constitution, which will not be used to disrupt the academic rights of others. 3. Opportunity to seek truth and develop critical judgment is critical to a mature learning experience in a community of scholars. 4. Expressing contrasting points of view and reserving skeptical judgment about opinions expressed are encouraged but do not abrogate responsibility for learning content and interpretations presented as part of formal courses. 5. Evaluation of student performance should be expected, as should the fact that it be based upon clearly articulated goals and tasks, carefully predetermined criteria, and professional judgment without prejudice or capricious intent. 6. Review of grade policy, system, and evaluation of faculty and staff is sometimes appropriate and useful to promote enhanced student-faculty understanding. 7. Personal information about a student acquired by the College or a staff member in the course of College work is confidential and the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 govern its release to third parties. Generally, releasing such information requires either specific student permission or court order. 8. Access to join or belong to any EWC organization for which one qualifies is assumed at EWC. 9. Broad involvement in determining individual programs of study within College guidelines and personal responsibility for meeting requirements, in a timely manner, is a normal part of EWC. 10. The right to examine and responsibly discuss questions of interest and to express opinions publicly and privately in like manner is strongly encouraged at EWC. Due Process Students are expected to conduct themselves in accordance with EWC policy and regulations and will be disciplined should infractions occur. (Details relating to violations, penalties, procedures are presented in the Student Handbook.) However, “due process” rights also protect students as follows: 1. Timely notice of charges or allegations 2. Opportunity to plead admission or denial of alleged violations 3. Opportunity to request or waive formal hearing and accept or reject college determination 4. Hearing before tribunal other than those bringing the charge or making the allegation 5. Opportunity for personal appearance in a formal hearing before judgment is rendered 6. Responsible advisor or counselor of choice available 7. Opportunity to call and confront witnesses and accusers and to present evidence in own behalf 8. Advanced notice or information listing witnesses appearing against own interests 9. Copy of the record of a hearing if alleged offense may result in suspension or expulsion 10. Appeal opportunities to the Vice President of Academic Affairs 11. Final appeal opportunity to the EWC President

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Non-Academic Grievance Procedure EWC does not discriminate against otherwise qualified persons on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, gender, age, physical or mental handicap, disability, or veterans status in its recruitment, admissions, employment, facility and program accessibility, or services. It is a violation of EWC policy for any employee or student, male or female, to harass another employee or student. There is a “Zero” tolerance policy on making sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and/or other physical or expressive behavior that may constitute hostile environment. Harassment of any form, is not tolerated on this campus. Students who think that they have been discriminated against, harassed, or otherwise had their civil rights violated, shall make a formal, written complaint to the Vice President for Student Affairs within five calendar days of the alleged incident. The complaint should contain, but is not limited to, date and place of the alleged incident as well as names, addresses, and telephone numbers of any and all witnesses. The specific facts and context of the complaint should be documented. The Vice President for Student Affairs shall convene a formal hearing within 20 calendar days to adjudicate the complaint. Details of the procedure are elaborated in the Student Handbook. Students have the right to appeal the Vice President’s decision to the President of the College. Records Location • Admissions Office Recruiting records, contacts, application forms, high school transcripts, housing and health forms, supporting documents enabling the Admissions Committee to determine admission of accepted and non-accepted students. • Financial Aid Office - Holds personal financial data, students’ receipt of scholarships, grant-in-aid, work-study, financial aid transcript and veterans’ records. • Academic Departments Recommendation for employment and/or graduate school, academic ratings and evaluative materials; academic progress forms and applications for graduation. • Academic Affairs Office Lists of academic awards and achievements, candidates for graduation, requests for academic courses for majors and electives, class overloads, grade change appeals, academic rights and privileges, Convocation, and Academic Honors Program. • Faculty Offices • Copies of unofficial transcripts, grade reports of academic work and degree plans indicating students’ program of study, and copies of graduation applications can be transacted in this office. A list of individual faculty advisors and advisees. Daily records of class attendance, reports of class work, records of incomplete grades and conditions by which incomplete can be changed in this office. • Office of Planning, Research, and Institutional Effectiveness Copies of individual and cumulative information from throughout the College and external sources to support developing market and effectiveness research studies. This information is used to enhance development and quality control throughout the College. • Registrar’s Office Admissions records and supporting documentation for admitted students, academic record of EWC coursework, transcripts from other institutions, periodic correspondence and information, requests for transcripts, notice of academic honors, awards, and disciplinary actions. The Official Records and Transcript for EWC Students. EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 68


Business Office • Student’s accounts and all financial transactions are transacted in this office. Student Affairs Office • Personal data sheets, counseling records, withdrawal forms, disciplinary records, athletic award records, academic records of athletes, housing contracts for on-campus residents. Information Release Information concerning individual students shall be released to other than authorized staff for professional work-related purposes only upon receipt of written requests including the student’s or previous student’s signature. Privileged Information • Records are not open to either students or the public, and are designed solely to enable college operations or to assist individual students. Included are financial records, student/family relationship information, confidential statements or recommendation prior to January 1, 1975 without a student’s rights waiver, financial aid records, medical records, campus employment, faculty files, and alumni information. Sole-Access Records • Records of faculty, supervisory, and administrative personnel, in the sole possession of the makers, are not accessible to others except temporary substitutes. Information Review and Correction • Students have the right to inspect their educational records and to have corrected such records as necessary. EWC staff works to ensure that inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise inappropriate information is not retained in student records. Students are informed when such corrections are made in response to student requests. Should these corrections remain unsatisfactory, written challenge to the particular record should be addressed to the Vice President of Academic Affairs who will provide a hearing conducted in accordance with regulations issued by the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Education. Students may also file a written explanation of any material contained in their records; such statements automatically become a permanent part of the challenged record. EWC reserves the right to deny such requests for review and correction if made for frivolous or malicious purposes. The decision of the Vice President of Academic Affairs about a challenge raised shall be made in writing within 45 days from the conclusion of the hearing. Students may appeal decisions of the Vice President of Academic Affairs to the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act Office in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services in Washington, D.C. Disposal of Records Official academic records are permanent and are kept indefinitely in the Registrar’s Office with duplicate copies maintained in safe off-site facility. These records include supporting documents used for admission to EWC, academic transcripts, and indications of honors, awards, and disciplinary actions, if any. All other records in other offices may be discarded after the student withdraws or graduates.

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ACADEMIC AFFAIRS

“It is not your environment, it is you - the quality of your mind, the integrity of your soul, and the determination of your will – that will decide your future and shape your life.” Dr. Benjamin Elijah Mays EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 70


Lee-Cousins Building Suite 304 904-470-8051 OUR VISION The Division of Academic Affairs will become an urban higher education model that is recognized nationally for excellent academic programs and effective, innovative teaching and learning strategies for diverse, urban student populations. Embracing Christian principles and a spirit of servant leadership, the Division will be a leader in promoting excellence and ethics, student engagement, community service and service learning, relevant and contemporary teaching methodologies, and community-oriented research. OUR MISSION Committed to the principles of excellence and ethics, the Division of Academic Affairs is the nucleus of the academic enterprise at Edward Waters College and offers high-quality baccalaureate degree programs. In an academically challenging, student-centered environment, the Division of Academic Affairs provides rigorous and relevant undergraduate programs that incorporate intellectually stimulating curricula, problem-based and active learning, effective teaching strategies, academic technology, experiential learning opportunities, and diverse instructional delivery systems. Through ongoing faculty development, the Division promotes a culture that nourishes and supports research activities, excellence in teaching, scholarship and service. The Division endeavors to produce graduates who are well-prepared academically and who possess high levels of competence in critical thinking, verbal and written communication, mathematical computation, financial literacy, technology, global awareness, and life skills. Accordingly, the Division seeks to develop within each student a commitment to excellence, service and ethical values and to prepare students with the breadth and depth of knowledge that will empower them to be competitive in a global market. Academic Information and Programs THE CENTER FOR EXCELLENCE IN TEACHING AND LEARNING Academic support services are offered through the College’s Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning (CETL). Faculty and Staff members in CETL are committed to providing services which empower students to develop their full academic potential as self-directed life-long learners. The College offers a comprehensive academic support system which facilitates student learning. Through the Center’s activities, programs, instructional courses, and services students learn how to make the best of their college years. We encourage even the most academically proficient student to take advantage of services available. Academic Advising Advising services in the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning (CETL) are provided to all admitted students of the College, but primarily target students classified as freshmen, sophomores and transfer students. The goal of CETL advisors is to support services to students at Edward Waters College while helping them discover opportunities that will advance their educational goals. Advisors will clarify matriculation processes, promote excellence, and inform students about course requirements that must be completed prior to transitioning to their major department. EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 71


Students are assigned a CETL advisor based on their last name and a degree specific advisor until completion of their bachelor’s degree. The staff of advisors in CETL provides academic guidance to students to ensure they become well informed about academic program requirements, important dates, declaration of a major, prerequisites for courses, critical forms, important dates, and policies and procedures. Students can arrange to meet with a CETL advisor by contacting the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning at: (904) 470-8054. Students at Edward Waters College have exciting academic options from which to choose. Students are encouraged to take advantage of the excellent academic advising offered at EWC which will help you understand your academic options and outline your academic foundation for success. Information regarding the CETL Advising Office is available at www.ewc.edu. Academic Support Services Focused Academics Motivating Excellence (FAME) in the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning (CETL)is a support service program designed to assist academically under-prepared students to increase and enhance their skills in reading, mathematics, and English. The FAME Program has a staff of peer tutors who have been recommended by their instructors and who have a GPA of a 3.0 or better in the field in which they tutor. In addition, the program has a Mathematics Specialist and an English/Reading Specialist to assist students in their course work. This service is available to all enrolled Edward Waters College students who need additional assistance in their college course work. The FAME Program is also responsible for providing academic support services to those students who test into a developmental class. These students, as well as any other enrolled Edward Waters College student, have access to a tutorial software called PLATO. This software is a special tool which will enhance the academic skills of all users. Students enrolled in a developmental class must sign and adhere to the expectations of the Participation Agreement, a binding understanding between the FAME Director and the FAME Academic Counselor to help the students stay focused. The FAME Program is also provides support for students on Academic Warning and Academic Probation by monitoring their progress in their class work, by providing tutoring service, and by offering available academic counseling. Tutoring service is free for all currently enrolled EWC students and is available Monday through Thursday from 8:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. and on Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Developmental Learning Program The Developmental Learning Program (DLP) provides academic skill enhancement coursework and support services for students who need additional preparation in the areas of reading, mathematics and/or English. However, students taking developmental courses are graded using the college’s standard grading system. Students must earn a grade of “C” or better in order to pass each course. Course credit is calculated into the student’s grade point average; however, the credit will not count toward fulfilling course credit hours requirements for graduation and may not be transferable to other institutions. Credit hours count for financial aid and full-time enrollment status. All students who qualify for two or more development courses are required to sign an agreement of participation and adhere to it as a condition for enrolling and continuance with the College.

EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 72


The following are designated as developmental learning courses: REA 097 REA 098 ENG 097

Developmental Reading I Developmental Reading II Basic English Grammar Skills I

Edward Waters College Federal TRiO Programs Upward Bound & Student Support Services The history of TRiO is progressive. It began with Upward Bound, which emerged out of the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964 in response to the administration’s War on Poverty. In 1965, Talent Search, the second outreach program, was created as part of the Higher Education Act. In 1968, Student Support Services, which was originally known as Special Services for Disadvantaged Students, was authorized by the Higher Education Amendments and became the third in a series of educational opportunity programs. By the late 1960’s, the term “TRiO” was coined to describe these federal programs.

Upward Bound Program (Pre-College Services) Campus Location: CETL Building

Upward Bound Program Description The Edward Waters College Upward Bound Program provides fundamental support to participants in their preparation for college entrance. The program provides opportunities for participants to succeed in pre-college performance and ultimately in their higher education pursuits. Edward Waters College Upward Bound serves high school students from low-income families and high school students from families in which neither parent holds a Bachelor degree. The goal of Upward Bound is to increase the rate at which participates complete secondary education, enroll in, and graduate from institutions of post-secondary education. The Upward Bound Program provides academic support in reading, writing, study skills and other subjects necessary for a student to be successful in their educational goals beyond high school. Academic and financial counseling is taught through workshops and students are exposed to academic programs and cultural events through speakers and field trips. A tutorial program provides services to assist students in developing their study skills by instructing them on how to study effectively and test taking skills. EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 73


Upward Bound provides information on post-secondary education opportunities and assistance in completing college entrance applications, financial aid applications and preparing students for college entrance examinations. The goal of Upward Bound at Edward Waters College is to introduce students to college and what college life is all about.

Student Support Services/TRiO (College Support Services) Campus Location: Centennial Library Building 3rd Floor Room 308

Student Support Services Program Description The Edward Waters College Student Support Services (SSS) Program provides opportunities for academic development, assists students with basic college requirements, and serves to motivate students toward the successful completion of their postsecondary education. The goal of SSS is to increase retention and graduation rates and facilitate the process of transition from one level of higher education to the next. Academic Enrichment Participants receive support in the areas of mathematics, reading comprehension, writing, study skills, and time management. Counseling Services The counseling program provides the following services to participants: • Individual and Small Group Counseling Sessions • Financial Aid/Money Management Workshops • Career Exploration • Assistance for Graduate and Professional Programs • Academic Advisement

EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 74


Tutorial Services Student participants have access to regular seminars and tutorial assistance in the areas of mathematics, reading, and writing facilitated by experienced, well-trained academic specialists. In addition, peer tutors with a minimum 3.0 GPA in these subject areas are available to provide tutorial services to students requesting assistance on a one-on-one basis. Other SSS programs include: • • • • • •

Cultural Enrichment Activities Motivational Seminars Graduate School Visit Diversity Workshops Historical Site Tours Etiquette Seminars

General Education Requirements EWC provides an opportunity for students to discover their academic strengths, interests, and capabilities while acquiring knowledge and understanding of educational principles and practices in the traditional liberal arts: humanities, fine arts, social and behavioral sciences, mathematics, and natural sciences. A liberal arts foundation is required of all students matriculating at Edward Waters College which includes developing in each student 1) a breadth of knowledge about Human Cultures and the Physical and Natural World; 2) intellectual and practical skills including inquiry and analysis, critical and creative thinking, written and oral communication, quantitative literacy, information literacy, teamwork and problem solving; 3) a commitment to personal and social responsibility through civic engagement, ethical reasoning and lifelong learning and 4) the ability to integrate learning across general and specialized studies. General Education program requirements include the following components: • The General Education Core Curriculum • First Year Experience • Spiritual and Cultural Development (ACES) • Community Service Students completing or near completion of their General Education requirements are required to take all College designated academic skills tests. Students demonstrating advanced knowledge in a discipline may substitute a more advanced course for the introductory course. In each case the student must successfully pass a placement test administered by the respective department.

EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 75


General Education Core Curriculum Requirements Cluster 1 Communication Skills (15 hours) Foreign Language - 6 hrs. MLS 251 Spanish I MLS 252 Spanish II Oral Communication -3 hours ENG 200 Fundamentals of Speech English Composition - 6 hours ENG 101 Freshman Composition 1 ENG 102 Freshman Composition 2

3 3

History-3 hours (Choose 1) HIS 111 African American History

3

3 3

Cluster 2 Science, Technology and Mathematics (16 hours) Science-minimum 7 hours (Choose 2, one with Lab) BIO 160 Life Science w/ Lab 4 BIO 251 General Biology I w/ Lab 4 ESC 201 Earth Science 3 PHS 201 Physical Science w/ Lab 4 CHE 251 Chemistry I w/Lab 4 Introduction to Technology-3 hours (Choose 1) CIS 101 Introduction to Computers* 3 EDU 350 Instructional Technology 3 *Modified to include coverage of fundamental technology for the 21st century Mathematics-6 hours MAT 104 College Algebra MAT 105 Finite Mathematics

3 3

Cluster 3 Humanities, History and Social Sciences (15 hours) Biblical Studies-3 hours REL 201 Introduction to Biblical Studies Humanities-3 hours (Choose 1) HUM 201 Introduction to Fine Arts THE 210 Introduction to Theater

3

3 3

Social and Behavioral Sciences-3 hours (Choose 1) PSY 210 General Psychology 3 SOC 250 Introduction to Sociology 3 POS 201 American Political 3 Structure

3

Diversity and Global Awareness-3 hours (Choose 1) POS 201 World Political Structures 3 and Politics PHI 401 Ethics 3 Cluster 4 Business Experience (3 hours) Personal Finance and Entrepreneurship-3 hours FIN 200 Personal Finance* 3 *Modified to include fundamentals of entrepreneurship Cluster 5 Physical Fitness and Life Skills (4 hours) College and Life Success-2 hours EWC 100 Introduction to College 2 Health and Fitness-minimum 2 hours (Choose 1) HPE 101 Health and Physical Education HPE 102 Personal and Community Health HPE 351 Health in the Elementary Schools HPE 320 Health in Secondary Schools Total Minimum Hours 53

2 3 3 3

N.B. : In keeping with departmental accrediting regulations, the following courses will be substituted for departmental majors: Education Majors are required to take Diverse Populations (EDU 208)-to satisfy Diversity and Global Awareness; Educational Technology (EDU 250)-to satisfy Introduction to Technology; Physical Education in the Elementary Schools (HPE 352) and Health in the Elementary School (HPE 351)- to satisfy Health and Fitness. EWC Mission Requirements for Graduation EWC requires each student to complete a course in African American History and Biblical Studies in keeping with the unique mission of the College. EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 76


Academic Concentration or Major Programs Upon completion of the core general education curriculum, students select an academic area for concentrated study or major. The major, once completed, ensures that graduates are thoroughly prepared with the basics for a professional career and/or further study in a graduate or professional school. Students will complete approximately 30 credit hours of coursework in the major. These courses have been identified by the faculty as those necessary for the student to be competent in their respective discipline. Ideally, the process of selecting a major field should include consideration of personal interests, demonstrated abilities, academic achievements, and students’ comparative advantages with respect to the field. Supportive Courses Faculty members in each degree program have identified an additional set of 20-30 credit hours of coursework required for the particular degree. The work is selected to enhance and further develop ideas and skills of the major in a broader context. Electives In many programs, provisions have been made for students to broaden their understanding of areas of study outside their major field, develop a recreational or vocational interest, or pursue a minor field of study. Students are, however, encouraged to develop a personal strategy for selecting electives, rather than selecting them randomly. In this endeavor, students should look across the curriculum to identify courses that will further their personal and professional goals. It should also be noted that some degree programs will have prescribed electives for their majors. Graduation Competencies EWC students must demonstrate before graduation, a minimum competency in oral communication, English composition, mathematics, natural science, social or behavioral science, computer technology, information literacy and financial literacy.

ACADEMIC DEGREES

Degree Type EWC offers three categories of degrees: the Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree, and the Bachelor of Business Administration (B.B.A.) degree. Degree Programs EWC offers 9 Bachelor’s Degree programs: Bachelor of Arts (BA) • Communications • Criminal Justice • Elementary Education • Music • Psychology Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) • Business Administration /Computer Information Systems Track • Organizational Management (Non-Traditional C.L.I.M.B. Program) Bachelor of Science (BS) • Biology • Mathematics EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 77


ACADEMIC PROGRAM PREFIXES

Abbreviated prefixes are employed to identify courses as follows: ACC – Accounting ADM – General Business BIO – Biology CHE – Chemistry CIS – Computer Information Systems CJU – Criminal Justice ECO – Economics EDU – Education ENG – English ESC – Earth Science ESL – English as a Second Language FIN -- Finance GEO – Geography HPE – Health & Physical Education HIS – History INR – International Relations JOU – Journalism MAC – Mass Communication MAN – Management MAT – Mathematics MLS – Modern Languages MUE, MUH, MUS, MUT, MVB, MVK, MVP, MVV – Music ORI – Orientation PAD – Public Administration PHI – Philosophy PHS – Physical Science PHY – Physics POS – Political Science REL – Religion PSY – Psychology REA – Reading SOC – Sociology SOS – Social Science SOW – Social Work

ACADEMIC COURSE NUMBERING Courses numbered from 100-249 are general studies courses and should be pursued during the first two years of study at the College. Courses with numbers 250 and above are in the upper level divisions and included in the student’s major program of study.

EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 78


DEGREE PLANS DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY

ESC 201 PHS 201 CHE 251

Brian W.P. Seymour, Ph.D., Chairperson Hatcher-Stewart Building, Room 111 (904) 470-8070

Earth Science Physical Science w/ Lab Chemistry I w/Lab

3 4 4

FULL-TIME FACULTY Associate Professor: Dr. Brian Seymour Dr. Prabir K. Mandal Assistant Professors: Dr. Anita Mandal Dr. Sudhish Mishra

Introduction to Technology-3 hours (Choose 1) CIS 101 Introduction to Computers* 3 EDU 350 Instructional Technology 3 *Modified to include coverage of fundamental technology for the 21st century

The department of biology offers a rigorous program that leads to the Bachelor of Science degree in Biology. The curriculum is designed to prepare students for careers in the life sciences as well as for those planning on matriculating into the health professions. We are equipped with laboratories for hands-on instructions in areas including but not limited to microbiology, molecular biology and genetics. In our laboratories, we have light microscopes, electrophoresis equipments, PCR and ELISA machines. UVVIS, IR and mass spectrometers are available for students with interest in biochemistry and proteomics though we do not offer a formal degree in these areas.

Mathematics-6 hours MAT 104 College Algebra MAT 105 Finite Mathematics

Graduates from our program can go on to professional schools, graduate schools, continue in research or pursue careers in education. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN BIOLOGY General Education Core Curriculum Requirements Cluster 1 Communication Skills (15 hours) Foreign Language - 6 hrs. MLS 251 Spanish I MLS 252 Spanish II Oral Communication -3 hours ENG 200 Fundamentals of Speech English Composition - 6 hours ENG 101 Freshman Composition 1 ENG 102 Freshman Composition 2

3 3

3

3 3

Cluster 2 Science, Technology and Mathematics (16 hours) Science-minimum 7 hours (Choose 2, one with Lab) BIO 160 Life Science w/ Lab 4 BIO 251 General Biology I w/ Lab 4

3 3

Cluster 3 Humanities, History and Social Sciences (15 hours) Biblical Studies-3 hours REL 201 Introduction to Biblical Studies Humanities-3 hours (Choose 1) HUM 201 Introduction to Fine Arts THE 210 Introduction to Theater

3

3 3

Social and Behavioral Sciences-3 hours (Choose 1) PSY 210 General Psychology 3 SOC 250 Introduction to Sociology 3 POS 201 American Political 3 Structure History-3 hours (Choose 1) HIS 111 African American History

3

Diversity and Global Awareness-3 hours (Choose 1) POS 201 World Political Structures 3 and Politics PHI 401 Ethics 3 Cluster 4 Business Experience (3 hours) Personal Finance and Entrepreneurship-3 hours FIN 200 Personal Finance* 3 *Modified to include fundamentals of entrepreneurship Cluster 5 Physical Fitness and Life Skills (4 hours) College and Life Success-2 hours EWC 100 Introduction to College 2

EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 79


DEGREE PLANS Health and Fitness-minimum 2 hours (Choose 1) HPE 101 Health and Physical Education HPE 102 Personal and Community Health HPE 351 Health in the Elementary Schools HPE 320 Health in Secondary Schools Total Minimum Hours 53

2 3 3 3

Zoology with Lab Botany with Lab Genetics with Lab Human Anatomy & Physiology I with Lab BIO 322 Human Anatomy & Physiology II with Lab BIO 330 Microbiology with Lab BIO 400 Ecology BIO 412 Cell Biology with Lab BIO 470 Biology Senior Seminar Total Major Requirements

4 4 4 4 4 4 3 4 3 35

Supportive Requirements BIO 480 Biology Research CHE 251 General Chemistry I CHE 252 General Chemistry II CHE 301 Organic Chemistry I CHE 302 Organic Chemistry II MAT 260 Elementary Statistics PHY 251 General Physics I PHY 252 General Physics II Total Supportive Requirements

3 4 4 4 4 3 4 4 30

Suggested Elective Courses BIO 204 BIO 275 BIO 290 BIO 302 BIO 325

Introduction to DNA Forensics Introduction to Biotechnology African American Health Biology of Aging Developmental Biology

Introduction to Bioinformatics BIO 380 Research Methods in Biology BIO 410 Bacteriology BIO 425 Histology BIO 450 Biology of Cancer BIO 485 Environmental Toxicology Minimum Total Required TOTAL TO GRADUATE

Major Courses BIO 305 BIO 306 BIO 310 BIO 321

BIO 340

3 3 3 4 4 3 15 133

DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS ADMINSTRATION Francis Ikeokwu, Ph.D., Chairperson (904) 470-8134 FULL-TIME FACULTY Associate Professors: Dr. Francis Ikeokwu Assistant Professors: Dr. Selvarajah Mohanarajah Dr. Robert Tedeschi Instructor: Ms. Samantha Betton The mission of the Department of Business Administration is to provide interdisciplinary professional awareness in business and related fields, especially in leadership, Business Management, Business Ethics, business industry, entrepreneurship and International Business Relations. The Business Degree Program at Edward Waters College for the Bachelors of Business Administration (BBA) is accredited by the International Assembly for Collegiate Business Education (IACBE). The IACBE (www.iacbe.org) is a national and international business education accrediting agency that is highly student-centered and learning outcome assessment oriented. The Department offers the degree of Bachelor of Business Administration in two areas of concentration: Business Administration and Computer Information Systems.

3

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION TRACK

3

General Education Core Curriculum Requirements

3 3 3

Cluster 1 Communication Skills (15 hours) Foreign Language - 6 hrs. MLS 251 Spanish I MLS 252 Spanish II

3 3

EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 80


DEGREE PLANS Oral Communication -3 hours ENG 200 Fundamentals of Speech English Composition - 6 hours ENG 101 Freshman Composition 1 ENG 102 Freshman Composition 2

POS 201

3

3 3

Cluster 2 Science, Technology and Mathematics (16 hours) Science-minimum 7 hours (Choose 2, one with Lab) BIO 160 Life Science w/ Lab 4 BIO 251 General Biology I w/ Lab 4 ESC 201 Earth Science 3 PHS 201 Physical Science w/ Lab 4 CHE 251 Chemistry I w/Lab 4 Introduction to Technology-3 hours (Choose 1) CIS 101 Introduction to Computers* 3 EDU 350 Instructional Technology 3 *Modified to include coverage of fundamental technology for the 21st century Mathematics-6 hours MAT 104 College Algebra MAT 105 Finite Mathematics

3 3

Cluster 3 Humanities, History and Social Sciences (15 hours) Biblical Studies-3 hours REL 201 Introduction to Biblical Studies Humanities-3 hours (Choose 1) HUM 201 Introduction to Fine Arts THE 210 Introduction to Theater

3

3 3

Social and Behavioral Sciences-3 hours (Choose 1) PSY 210 General Psychology 3 SOC 250 Introduction to Sociology 3 POS 201 American Political 3 Structure History-3 hours (Choose 1) HIS 111 African American History

3

Diversity and Global Awareness-3 hours (Choose 1)

World Political Structures and Politics Ethics

3

PHI 401 3 Cluster 4 Business Experience (3 hours) Personal Finance and Entrepreneurship-3 hours FIN 200 Personal Finance* 3 *Modified to include fundamentals of entrepreneurship Cluster 5 Physical Fitness and Life Skills (4 hours) College and Life Success-2 hours EWC 100 Introduction to College 2 Health and Fitness-minimum 2 hours (Choose 1) HPE 101 Health and Physical Education HPE 102 Personal and Community Health HPE 351 Health in the Elementary Schools HPE 320 Health in Secondary Schools Total Minimum Hours 53 Major Courses ACC 250 ACC 251 ADM 200 FIN 250 MAN 300

Principles of Accounting I Principles of Accounting II Intro to Business Principles of Finance Fundamentals of Management ADM 306 Principles of Marketing MAN 310 Organizational Behavior MAN 312 Human Resource Management ADM 410 Quantitative Analysis ADM 460 Business Practicum (Internship) Total Major Requirements

2 3 3 3

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 6 33

Supportive Courses

ADM 315 ADM 445 CIS 201 EC0 210

Business Law I 3 International Business 3 Introduction to Information 3 Systems Principles of Economics I 3 EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 81


DEGREE PLANS ECO 211 ADM 450 MAN 450

Principles of Economics II Business Strategy & Policy Operations Management

3 3 3

ADM 304 Statistics for Business ADM 302 Calculus for Business Total Supportive Requirements Suggested Elective Courses ACC 310 Intermediate Accounting I ACC 360 Managerial Accounting ADM 470 Business Ethics MAN 340 Business Communication & Rept. Writ. ADM 330 Small Business Enterprise CIS 313 Web Publishing I CIS 305 Computer Concepts ADM 316 Business Law II Minimum Total Required TOTAL TO GRADUATE

3 3 28 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 12 126

COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS TRACK This program prepares students to enter the workforce in a range of professions from Programmers to Project Managers by integrating theory and realistic problems to develop practical skills and as a continuous update of knowledge of how technology is managed in the 21st century. A concentration in computer information systems will respond to current business needs in technology students’ career growth and will encourage students to further their professional business careers. General Education Core Curriculum Requirements Cluster 1 Communication Skills (15 hours) Foreign Language - 6 hrs. MLS 251 Spanish I MLS 252 Spanish II Oral Communication -3 hours ENG 200 Fundamentals of Speech

3 3

3

English Composition - 6 hours ENG 101 Freshman Composition 1 ENG 102 Freshman Composition 2

3 3

Cluster 2 Science, Technology and Mathematics (16 hours) Science-minimum 7 hours (Choose 2, one with Lab) BIO 160 Life Science w/ Lab 4 BIO 251 General Biology I w/ Lab 4 ESC 201 Earth Science 3 PHS 201 Physical Science w/ Lab 4 CHE 251 Chemistry I w/Lab 4 Introduction to Technology-3 hours (Choose 1) CIS 101 Introduction to Computers* 3 EDU 350 Instructional Technology 3 *Modified to include coverage of fundamental technology for the 21st century Mathematics-6 hours MAT 104 College Algebra MAT 105 Finite Mathematics

3 3

Cluster 3 Humanities, History and Social Sciences (15 hours) Biblical Studies-3 hours REL 201 Introduction to Biblical Studies Humanities-3 hours (Choose 1) HUM 201 Introduction to Fine Arts THE 210 Introduction to Theater

3

3 3

Social and Behavioral Sciences-3 hours (Choose 1) PSY 210 General Psychology 3 SOC 250 Introduction to Sociology 3 POS 201 American Political 3 Structure History-3 hours (Choose 1) HIS 111 African American History

3

Diversity and Global Awareness-3 hours (Choose 1) POS 201 World Political Structures 3 and Politics PHI 401 Ethics 3

EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 82


DEGREE PLANS Cluster 4 Business Experience (3 hours) Personal Finance and Entrepreneurship-3 hours FIN 200 Personal Finance* 3 *Modified to include fundamentals of entrepreneurship Cluster 5 Physical Fitness and Life Skills (4 hours) College and Life Success-2 hours EWC 100 Introduction to College 2 Health and Fitness-minimum 2 hours (Choose 1) HPE 101 Health and Physical Education HPE 102 Personal and Community Health HPE 351 Health in the Elementary Schools HPE 320 Health in Secondary Schools Total Minimum Hours 53 Major Courses CIS 201 Introduction to Information Systems CIS 220 System Analysis and Design CIS 250 Basic Programming CIS 305 Computer Concepts CIS 311 E-Commerce CIS 330 Database Management CIS 351 Object-Oriented Program: C++ CIS 415 Network and Telecommunications CIS 440 Project Management and Practice CIS 460 Applied Software Development Project MAN 462 Management Information Systems Total Major Requirements

Supportive Courses ADM 200 ACC 250 ADM 304 ADM 302 ADM 306

Introduction to Business Principles of Accounting I Statistics for Business Calculus for Business Principles of Marketing

2

ECO 210 FIN 250 MAN 300

Principles of Economics I Principles of Finance Fundamentals of Management ADM 460 Business Practicum (Internship) Total Supportive Requirements Suggested Elective Courses CIS 313 Web Publishing I (Required) CIS 314 CIS 417

3 3 3

3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Web Publishing II Network Management Technology CIS 421 Object-Oriented Modeling CIS 431 Advanced Database Management CIS 451 Internet Programming (Required) CIS 352 Object-Oriented Program: JAVA Total Elective Requirements

TOTAL TO GRADUATE

3 3 3 6 30

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 15

131

3 3 3 3 33

3 3 3 3 3

EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 83


DEGREE PLANS THE CREDENTIALS FOR LEADERSHIP IN MANAGEMENT AND BUSINESS (C.L.I.M.B.) PROGRAM Reuben Perechi, Ph.D., Acting Director The Bachelor of Business Administration Degree in Organizational Management is offered through the C.L.I.M.B. Program. The C.L.I.M.B. and C.L.I.M.B. ONLINE Programs are nontraditional programs serving adults ages 23 and older who have already completed one and a half or more years of college cumulative 2.0 grade point average or better, and who now would like to complete their Bachelor’s Degree. C.L.I.M.B. is the acronym for Credentials for Leadership in Management and Business. Program participants are typically employed full-time during the day; thus the program is offered in the evening or blended-online format. One night per week over an eighteen-month period provides the adult learner with the opportunity to earn 48 semester hours of credit in class and receive additional semester hours in credit for prior learning. Classes are taught in a manner that is conducive to learning for adults. C.L.I.M.B. students are expected to spend 15-20 hours in preparation for each weekly class meeting. C.L.I.M.B. Academic Calendar The CLIMB Program operates on a non-traditional term basis with five to six groups of adult learners beginning each year, typically in September, February, and June. Each group takes approximately eighteen months to complete the program and operates on a year-round basis. Cohorts are given a definite schedule that indicates on which dates the group will meet over the eighteen month period of enrollment. C.L.I.M.B. Admission Requirements Admission to the degree-completion C.L.I.M.B. program is restricted to mature, working adults who have accumulated 45 or more semester hours of credit from an accredited college or university. Students must be 23 years or older and have a cumulative grade point average of 2.0.

Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) in Organizational Management (C.L.I.M.B.) General Education Credit Hours ENG 101 Freshman Composition I 3 ENG 102 Freshman Composition II 3 ENG 200 Fundamentals of Speech 3 Computers 3 Humanities 6 Social/Behavioral Science 12 Mathematics 6 Natural (Life or Physical 3 Science) Total General Requirements 39 Major Courses ACC 465 ADM 430 ADM 364

Managerial Accounting Marketing for Managers Research Methods and Statistics ADM 445 Global Business ADM 472 Business Ethics and Individual Values ADM 494 & Business Application 495 Project HIS 411 African American History Survey REL 401 Introduction to Christian Principles MAN 400 Management Principles MAN 431 Business Communication MAN 360 Strategic Management MAN 370 Group and Team Dynamics MAN 362 Human Capital Management MAN 460 Organizational Behavior PSY 367 The Adult Journey Total Major Requirements

Portfolio Credits Maximum Portfolio Credits Electives Maximum Total Required TOTAL TO GRADUATE

3 3 5 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 48 15

3 3 4

33

120

EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 84


DEGREE PLANS DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS Roy Singleton, Ed.D., Acting Chairperson (904) 470-8260 FULL-TIME FACULTY Assistant Professors: Dr. Katura Lasane Dr. Roy Singleton General Education Core Curriculum Requirements Cluster 1 Communication Skills (15 hours) Foreign Language - 6 hrs. MLS 251 Spanish I MLS 252 Spanish II Oral Communication -3 hours ENG 200 Fundamentals of Speech English Composition - 6 hours ENG 101 Freshman Composition 1 ENG 102 Freshman Composition 2

3 3

3

Diversity and Global Awareness-3 hours (Choose 1) POS 201 World Political Structures 3 and Politics PHI 401 Ethics 3 Cluster 4 Business Experience (3 hours) Personal Finance and Entrepreneurship-3 hours FIN 200 Personal Finance* 3 *Modified to include fundamentals of entrepreneurship

3

3 3

Introduction to Technology-3 hours (Choose 1) CIS 101 Introduction to Computers* 3 EDU 350 Instructional Technology 3 *Modified to include coverage of fundamental technology for the 21st century

Cluster 5 Physical Fitness and Life Skills (4 hours) College and Life Success-2 hours EWC 100 Introduction to College 2 Health and Fitness-minimum 2 hours (Choose 1) HPE 101 Health and Physical Education HPE 102 Personal and Community Health HPE 351 Health in the Elementary Schools HPE 320 Health in Secondary Schools

2 3 3 3

Total Minimum Hours 53 3 3

Cluster 3 Humanities, History and Social Sciences (15 hours) Biblical Studies-3 hours REL 201 Introduction to Biblical Studies

3 3

Social and Behavioral Sciences-3 hours (Choose 1) PSY 210 General Psychology 3 SOC 250 Introduction to Sociology 3 POS 201 American Political 3 Structure History-3 hours (Choose 1) HIS 111 African American History

Cluster 2 Science, Technology and Mathematics (16 hours) Science-minimum 7 hours (Choose 2, one with Lab) BIO 160 Life Science w/ Lab 4 BIO 251 General Biology I w/ Lab 4 ESC 201 Earth Science 3 PHS 201 Physical Science w/ Lab 4 CHE 251 Chemistry I w/Lab 4

Mathematics-6 hours MAT 104 College Algebra MAT 105 Finite Mathematics

Humanities-3 hours (Choose 1) HUM 201 Introduction to Fine Arts THE 210 Introduction to Theater

3

Major Courses MAC 301 Reporting and Writing JOU 305 Principles of Public Relations MAC 320 Mass Media & Popular Culture RTV 315 Minorities & Mass Media

3 3 3 3

EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 85


DEGREE PLANS RTV 250 RTV 420

Broadcast Performance Writing & Announcing for R/TV JOU 450 Mass Media Law MAC 490 Senior Seminar/Exit RTV 303 Portable Video Production RTV 302 TV Production RTV 320 College Radio Operation MAC 251 Introduction to Mass Communications MAC 315 Mass Media in Society Total Major Requirements Supportive Courses HUM 203 World View Lit I

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 39

3

HUM 204 ENG 489

World View Lit II Research/ Bibliographic Methods ENG 303 Advanced Composition ENG 412 Advanced Grammar Total Supportive Requirements

Suggested Elective Courses PSY 210 General Psychology ENG 313 African American Literature MUH 323 His of African American Music EDU 208 Teaching Diverse Populations/Cross Cultures EDU 200 Intro to Principles & Practical Issues Minimum Total Required TOTAL TO GRADUATE

3 3

3 3 3 3 15

DEPARTMENT OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE Thomas Jones, Ph.D., Chairperson (904) 470-8114 FULL-TIME FACULTY Assistant Professors: Dr. Thomas Jones Dr. Benjamin Okafor Dr. Judy Scott The Criminal Justice Program seeks to prepare students to function effectively in professional leadership roles within the Criminal Justice system. The program seeks to prepare students with knowledge on how the criminal justice system works at the local, state and federal levels. General Education Core Curriculum Requirements Cluster 1 Communication Skills (15 hours) Foreign Language - 6 hrs. MLS 251 Spanish I MLS 252 Spanish II Oral Communication -3 hours ENG 200 Fundamentals of Speech

3 3

3

3 3 3

English Composition - 6 hours ENG 101 Freshman Composition 1 ENG 102 Freshman Composition 2

3

Cluster 2 Science, Technology and Mathematics (16 hours) Science-minimum 7 hours (Choose 2, one with Lab) BIO 160 Life Science w/ Lab 4 BIO 251 General Biology I w/ Lab 4 ESC 201 Earth Science 3 PHS 201 Physical Science w/ Lab 4 CHE 251 Chemistry I w/Lab 4

3 15 122

3 3

Introduction to Technology-3 hours (Choose 1) CIS 101 Introduction to Computers* 3 EDU 350 Instructional Technology 3 *Modified to include coverage of fundamental technology for the 21st century Mathematics-6 hours MAT 104 College Algebra MAT 105 Finite Mathematics

3 3

EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 86


DEGREE PLANS Cluster 3 Humanities, History and Social Sciences (15 hours) Biblical Studies-3 hours REL 201 Introduction to Biblical Studies Humanities-3 hours (Choose 1) HUM 201 Introduction to Fine Arts THE 210 Introduction to Theater

3

3 3

Social and Behavioral Sciences-3 hours (Choose 1) PSY 210 General Psychology 3 SOC 250 Introduction to Sociology 3 POS 201 American Political 3 Structure History-3 hours (Choose 1) HIS 111 African American History

3

Diversity and Global Awareness-3 hours (Choose 1) POS 201 World Political Structures 3 and Politics PHI 401 Ethics 3 Cluster 4 Business Experience (3 hours) Personal Finance and Entrepreneurship-3 hours FIN 200 Personal Finance* 3 *Modified to include fundamentals of entrepreneurship Cluster 5 Physical Fitness and Life Skills (4 hours) College and Life Success-2 hours EWC 100 Introduction to College 2 Health and Fitness-minimum 2 hours (Choose 1) HPE 101 Health and Physical Education HPE 102 Personal and Community Health HPE 351 Health in the Elementary Schools HPE 320 Health in Secondary Schools Total Minimum Hours 53

2 3 3 3

Major Courses CJU 250 CJU 321 CJU 322 CJU 422

Intro to Criminal Justice Criminology Intro to the Judiciary Criminal Justice/ Constitution CJU 423 Correctional Policy/ Practices CJU 425 Probation and Parole Supervision CJU 429 Juvenile Delinquency CJU 433 Criminal Law and Procedure CJU 460 Criminal Justice Practicum/ Exit Exam Total Major Requirements

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 6 30

Supportive Courses CJU 310 CJU 320

Victimology Terrorism and Homeland Security CJU 327 Police and Law Enforcement CJU 400 Report Writing for Criminal Justice CJU 420 Introduction to Forensic Science CJU 470 Senior Seminar/Current Topics MAT 260 or Elementary Statistics or PSY 260 Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences POS 201 American Political Structure SOC 329 Social Research Methods Total Supportive Requirements

Electives

Minimum Total Required

TOTAL TO GRADUATE

3 3 3 3 3 3 3

3 3 27 18

128

EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 87


DEGREE PLANS DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS Nakamuthu Sundaralingam, Ph.D., Interim Chairperson (904) 470-8222 FULL-TIME FACULTY Associate Professors: Dr. Petero Kwizera Dr. Nakamuthu Sundaralingam Assistant Professors: Dr. Jayanta Ghosh Dr. Zhongzhi Liu Instructor: Ms. Felecia Wider The Mathematics Program at Edward Waters College seeks to prepare students to the degree of having a strong background in skills of logic, reasoning, critical thinking, and technology such that upon graduation they can matriculate successfully and competitively in graduate school or industry. Mathematics Program Goals • To provide all undergraduate students at Edward Waters College with an education in mathematics. This will serve as part of a foundation for life long learning of science, engineering and mathematics. • To graduate mathematics majors who have become liberally educated and are prepared for a mathematically based career. • To continue to build and excellent undergraduate mathematics program along with Dual Degree Math/Engineering Program affiliated with Florida A & M University, Florida State University, and University of Central Florida. • To provide incoming freshman and transfer students with a smooth transition to college. • To continue to have good relationships with other departments and programs. Mathematics Program Objectives The curriculum in Mathematics is designed, in general, to prepare students for employment, for graduate studies, and for productive lives which require quantitative reasoning and computation. Specific objectives are:

1. To provide specific courses designed for students who plan to become teachers of Mathematics at the secondary school level. 2. To provide specific courses and experiences for students who intend to pursue graduate study in Mathematics or other courses of study which require comprehensive Mathematics skills. 3. To provide training careers in the marketable areas of business and industry which require Mathematic skills. 4. To provide strong mathematical background for students who wants to enter in the dual degree engineering program. 5. To increase the number of students who major in mathematics and continuously improve the program’s curriculum. 6. To support each faculty member’s need for professional development fund to enhance teaching skills. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN MATHEMATICS General Education Core Curriculum Requirements Cluster 1 Communication Skills (15 hours) Foreign Language - 6 hrs. MLS 251 Spanish I MLS 252 Spanish II Oral Communication -3 hours ENG 200 Fundamentals of Speech English Composition - 6 hours ENG 101 Freshman Composition 1 ENG 102 Freshman Composition 2

3 3

3

3 3

Cluster 2 Science, Technology and Mathematics (16 hours) Science-minimum 7 hours (Choose 2, one with Lab) BIO 160 Life Science w/ Lab 4 BIO 251 General Biology I w/ Lab 4 ESC 201 Earth Science 3 PHS 201 Physical Science w/ Lab 4 CHE 251 Chemistry I w/Lab 4 I

EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 88


DEGREE PLANS ntroduction to Technology-3 hours (Choose 1) CIS 101 Introduction to Computers* 3 EDU 350 Instructional Technology 3 *Modified to include coverage of fundamental technology for the 21st century Mathematics-6 hours MAT 104 College Algebra MAT 105 Finite Mathematics

Cluster 3 Humanities, History and Social Sciences (15 hours)

Humanities-3 hours (Choose 1) HUM 201 Introduction to Fine Arts THE 210 Introduction to Theater

3

3 3

Social and Behavioral Sciences-3 hours (Choose 1) PSY 210 General Psychology 3 SOC 250 Introduction to Sociology 3 POS 201 American Political 3 Structure History-3 hours (Choose 1) HIS 111 African American History

3

Diversity and Global Awareness-3 hours (Choose 1) POS 201 World Political Structures 3 and Politics PHI 401 Ethics 3 Cluster 4 Business Experience (3 hours) Personal Finance and Entrepreneurship-3 hours FIN 200 Personal Finance* 3 *Modified to include fundamentals of entrepreneurship Cluster 5 Physical Fitness and Life Skills (4 hours) College and Life Success-2 hours EWC 100 Introduction to College 2 Health and Fitness-minimum 2 hours (Choose 1) HPE 101 Health and Physical 2 Education

HPE 351 HPE 320

Personal and Community Health Health in the Elementary Schools Health in Secondary Schools

3 3 3

Total Minimum Hours 53

3 3

Biblical Studies-3 hours REL 201 Introduction to Biblical Studies

HPE 102

Major Courses MAT 271 Calculus with Analytic Geometry I MAT 272 Calculus with Analytic Geometry II MAT 290 Intro to Set Theory/Logic MAT 302 Elementary Linear Algebra MAT 305 Probability & Statistics MAT 310 Calculus III MAT 401 Abstract Algebra MAT 402 Differential Equations MAT 470 Mathematics Seminar Total Major Requirements

4 4 3 3 4 4 3 3 3 31

Supportive Courses BIO 252 CHE 251 MAT 201 MAT 251 MAT 255 MAT 260 MAT 363 PHY 271

General Biology II General Chemistry I History of Mathematics Trigonometry Pre-Calculus Elementary Statistics Numerical Analysis College Physics I with Calculus PHY 272 College Physics II with Calculus Total Core Requirements

Suggested Elective Courses CIS 351

Object Oriented Programming C++ MAT 240 Modern Geometry MAT 273 Number Theory MAT 403 Advanced Calculus Minimum Total Required

4 4 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 31

3 3 3 3 15

TOTAL TO GRADUATE 130 EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 89


DEGREE PLANS DUAL DEGREE IN MATHEMATICS AND ENGINEERING Edward Waters College (EWC) is in partnership with Florida A & M University-Florida State University (FAMU-FSU) College of Engineering and University of Central Florida (UCF) to provide the Dual Degree Math and Engineering Program. With this partnership, a student matriculates three years at EWC and two years at FAMU-FSU College of Engineering or at UCF College of Engineering. A student will receive from 100-109 credit hours in major and supportive courses along with EWC Core Curriculum at EWC. Students may choose to complete two to three years of study at FAMUFSU to earn an additional 72 to 76 credit hours. Upon completion of the Dual Degree Program, the student receives a Bachelor’s of Science Degree in Mathematics from EWC and Bachelor’s of Science Degree in Engineering from FAMU-FSU. UCF requirements are slightly different from FAMUFSU requirements. A student must consult with Department Chairman before he/she enroll in the Dual Degree Engineering Program. Requirements Basic Requirements to enroll in the Dual Degree Engineering Program 1. Students must have official high school diploma. 2. GPA must be 2.75 or higher in the 4.0 scale when they come to the program. 3. SAT minimum score of 1200 (new scoring system) or ACT of 21 is recommended. 4. Students must have excellent writing and verbal communication skill. 5. Students must maintain a minimum GPA of 2.75 in order to stay in the program. The following requirement is applicable for FAMUFSU College of Engineering. As stated previously, please consult the Department Chairman to obtain UCF requirement. 6. A student must have earned 100 to 109 credit hours with no grade lower than “C” from Edward Waters College. The total credit hours include

general education courses and major courses as described in the degree plan below. 7. A student must have earned 72 to 76 credit hours with no grade lower than “C” from FAMUFSU College of Engineering in major courses in electrical engineering as described in the FAMUFSU curriculum plan. General Education Core Curriculum Requirements Cluster 1 Communication Skills (15 hours) Foreign Language - 6 hrs. MLS 251 Spanish I MLS 252 Spanish II Oral Communication -3 hours ENG 200 Fundamentals of Speech English Composition - 6 hours ENG 101 Freshman Composition 1 ENG 102 Freshman Composition 2

3 3

3

3 3

Cluster 2 Science, Technology and Mathematics (16 hours) Science-minimum 7 hours (Choose 2, one with Lab) BIO 160 Life Science w/ Lab 4 BIO 251 General Biology I w/ Lab 4 ESC 201 Earth Science 3 PHS 201 Physical Science w/ Lab 4 CHE 251 Chemistry I w/Lab 4 Introduction to Technology-3 hours (Choose 1) CIS 101 Introduction to Computers* 3 EDU 350 Instructional Technology 3 *Modified to include coverage of fundamental technology for the 21st century Mathematics-6 hours MAT 104 College Algebra MAT 105 Finite Mathematics

3 3

Cluster 3 Humanities, History and Social Sciences (15 hours) Biblical Studies-3 hours REL 201 Introduction to Biblical Studies

3

EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 90


DEGREE PLANS Humanities-3 hours (Choose 1) HUM 201 Introduction to Fine Arts THE 210 Introduction to Theater

3 3

Social and Behavioral Sciences-3 hours (Choose 1) PSY 210 General Psychology 3 SOC 250 Introduction to Sociology 3 POS 201 American Political 3 Structure History-3 hours (Choose 1) HIS 111 African American History

3

Diversity and Global Awareness-3 hours (Choose 1) POS 201 World Political Structures 3 and Politics PHI 401 Ethics 3 Cluster 4 Business Experience (3 hours) Personal Finance and Entrepreneurship-3 hours FIN 200 Personal Finance* 3 *Modified to include fundamentals of entrepreneurship Cluster 5 Physical Fitness and Life Skills (4 hours) College and Life Success-2 hours EWC 100 Introduction to College 2 Health and Fitness-minimum 2 hours (Choose 1) HPE 101 Health and Physical Education HPE 102 Personal and Community Health HPE 351 Health in the Elementary Schools HPE 320 Health in Secondary Schools Total Minimum Hours 53

2 3 3 3

MAT 310 Calculus III MAT 401 Abstract Algebra MAT 402 Differential Equations MAT 470 Mathematics Seminar Total Major Requirements

4 3 3 3 31

Supportive Courses BIO 252 CHE 251 MAT 201 MAT 251 MAT 255 MAT 260 MAT 363 PHY 271

General Biology II General Chemistry I History of Mathematics Trigonometry Pre-Calculus Elementary Statistics Numerical Analysis College Physics I with Calculus PHY 272 College Physics II with Calculus Total Core Requirements

4 4 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 31

Electives and Optional Courses for Dual Degree Math/Engineering PHY 332 Electronics 4 PHY 340 Electrical Circuit Theory 4 PHY 341 Electricity and 4 Magnetism CIS 352 Object Oriented C++ 3 Programming SOS 260 Social Science 3 Minimum Total Required 15 TOTAL TO GRADUATE 130

Major Courses MAT 271 MAT 272 MAT 290 MAT 302 MAT 305

Calculus with Analytic Geometry I Calculus with Analytic Geometry II Intro to Set Theory/Logic Elementary Linear Algebra Probability & Statistics

4 4 3 3 4

EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 91


DEGREE PLANS DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC & FINE ARTS

Cluster 3 Humanities, History and Social Sciences (15 hours)

Timothy Root, DMA, Chairperson (904) 470-8132

Biblical Studies-3 hours REL 201 Introduction to Biblical Studies

FULL-TIME FACULTY Assistant Professors: Dr Yu-Hsuan Liao Dr. Peter Fraser MacDonald Dr. Timothy Root Instructors: Mr. Thomas Pat Brown BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE IN MUSIC General Education Core Curriculum Requirements Cluster 1 Communication Skills (15 hours) Foreign Language - 6 hrs. MLS 251 Spanish I MLS 252 Spanish II Oral Communication -3 hours ENG 200 Fundamentals of Speech English Composition - 6 hours ENG 101 Freshman Composition 1 ENG 102 Freshman Composition 2

3 3

3

3 3

Cluster 2 Science, Technology and Mathematics (16 hours) Science-minimum 7 hours (Choose 2, one with Lab) BIO 160 Life Science w/ Lab 4 BIO 251 General Biology I w/ Lab 4 ESC 201 Earth Science 3 PHS 201 Physical Science w/ Lab 4 CHE 251 Chemistry I w/Lab 4 Introduction to Technology-3 hours (Choose 1) CIS 101 Introduction to Computers* 3 EDU 350 Instructional Technology 3 *Modified to include coverage of fundamental technology for the 21st century Mathematics-6 hours MAT 104 College Algebra MAT 105 Finite Mathematics

3 3

Humanities-3 hours (Choose 1) HUM 201 Introduction to Fine Arts THE 210 Introduction to Theater

3

3 3

Social and Behavioral Sciences-3 hours (Choose 1) PSY 210 General Psychology 3 SOC 250 Introduction to Sociology 3 POS 201 American Political 3 Structure History-3 hours (Choose 1) HIS 111 African American History

3

Diversity and Global Awareness-3 hours (Choose 1) POS 201 World Political Structures 3 and Politics PHI 401 Ethics 3 Cluster 4 Business Experience (3 hours) Personal Finance and Entrepreneurship-3 hours FIN 200 Personal Finance* 3 *Modified to include fundamentals of entrepreneurship Cluster 5 Physical Fitness and Life Skills (4 hours) College and Life Success-2 hours EWC 100 Introduction to College 2 Health and Fitness-minimum 2 hours (Choose 1) HPE 101 Health and Physical Education HPE 102 Personal and Community Health HPE 351 Health in the Elementary Schools HPE 320 Health in Secondary Schools Total Minimum Hours 53

2 3 3 3

EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 92


DEGREE PLANS MAJOR COURSES FOR INSTRUMENTAL OR VOCAL PERFORMANCE CONCENTRATION Seminar MUS 100 Recital Attendance 0 Applied Courses - 8 hours Applied Instruction 8 (Complete an eight-course sequence 101-402 in one of the following.) MVB Applied Brass MVP Applied Percussion MVK Applied Piano MVS Applied Strings MVW Applied Woodwinds Theory Courses - 16 hours MUT 102 Theory I MUT 103 Theory II MUT 202 Theory III MUT 203 Theory IV MUT 332 Form and Analysis MUT 403 Arranging

3 3 3 3 2 2

Music Technology - 3 hours MUT 205 Introduction to Music Technology

3

Music History - 9 hours MUH 251 Music History I MUH 252 Music History II MUH 323 History of Afro-American Music

3 3 3

MUS 150-451 Jazz Band Group Instruction MUS 140-441 Chamber Choir Group Instruction MUS 160-462 Concert Choir

Group Instruction - 4 hours MVK 111 Class Piano I MVK 112 Class Piano II MUE 221 Instrumental Methods MVV 213 Class Voice MVV 231 Singer’s Diction

1 1 2 2 2

Supportive Course Requirements

10

Electives

Minimum Total Required

TOTAL TO GRADUATE

3

Music Education - 3 hours EDU 438 Public School Music

3

Total Major Requirements

42

125

ADDITIONAL MUSIC COURSES FOR SACRED MUSIC CONCENTRATION - 11 hours MUC 360 Practicum in Church Music 3 MUC 420 Survey of Sacred Music 2 History MUC 421 Church Music 3 Administration MUC 435 Hymnology 3

Electives

Minimum Total Required

TOTAL TO GRADUATE

Conducting - 3 hours MUG 317 Basic Conducting

20

9

134

Supportive Courses Instrumental or Vocal Ensemble (Complete a six-course sequence in one of the following.) MUS 171-472 College Band

6

EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 93


DEGREE PLANS DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES

Biblical Studies-3 hours REL 201 Introduction to Biblical Studies

Suzan Armstrong-West, Ph.D., Chairperson (904) 470-8671

Humanities-3 hours (Choose 1) HUM 201 Introduction to Fine Arts THE 210 Introduction to Theater

FULL-TIME FACULTY Assistant Professors: Dr. Suzan Armstrong-West Dr. Noor Kamrul Islam Dr. Kevin Washington General Education Core Curriculum Requirements Cluster 1 Communication Skills (15 hours) Foreign Language - 6 hrs. MLS 251 Spanish I MLS 252 Spanish II Oral Communication -3 hours ENG 200 Fundamentals of Speech English Composition - 6 hours ENG 101 Freshman Composition 1 ENG 102 Freshman Composition 2

3 3

3

3 3

Cluster 2 Science, Technology and Mathematics (16 hours) Science-minimum 7 hours (Choose 2, one with Lab) BIO 160 Life Science w/ Lab 4 BIO 251 General Biology I w/ Lab 4 ESC 201 Earth Science 3 PHS 201 Physical Science w/ Lab 4 CHE 251 Chemistry I w/Lab 4 Introduction to Technology-3 hours (Choose 1) CIS 101 Introduction to Computers* 3 EDU 350 Instructional Technology 3 *Modified to include coverage of fundamental technology for the 21st century Mathematics-6 hours MAT 104 College Algebra MAT 105 Finite Mathematics

3 3

Cluster 3 Humanities, History and Social Sciences (15 hours)

3

3 3

Social and Behavioral Sciences-3 hours (Choose 1) PSY 210 General Psychology 3 SOC 250 Introduction to Sociology 3 POS 201 American Political 3 Structure History-3 hours (Choose 1) HIS 111 African American History

3

Diversity and Global Awareness-3 hours (Choose 1) POS 201 World Political Structures 3 and Politics PHI 401 Ethics 3 Cluster 4 Business Experience (3 hours) Personal Finance and Entrepreneurship-3 hours FIN 200 Personal Finance* 3 *Modified to include fundamentals of entrepreneurship Cluster 5 Physical Fitness and Life Skills (4 hours) College and Life Success-2 hours EWC 100 Introduction to College 2 Health and Fitness-minimum 2 hours (Choose 1) HPE 101 Health and Physical Education HPE 102 Personal and Community Health HPE 351 Health in the Elementary Schools HPE 320 Health in Secondary Schools Total Minimum Hours 53 Major Courses PSY 315 Behavior Modification PSY 330 History and Systems PSY 355 Social Psychology

2 3 3 3

3 3 3

EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 94


DEGREE PLANS PSY 360

Test and Measurements in Psychology and Education PSY 409 Theories of Personality PSY 411 Abnormal Psychology PSY 414 Experimental Psychology PSY 421 Theories of Learning PSY 460 Practicum in Psychology Total Major Requirements

3 3 3 3 3 6 30

Supportive Courses HIS 211 or World History I or World HIS 212 History II HUM 203 or World View in Literature I or HUM 204 World View in Literature II PHI 201 Intro to Philosophy PSY 260 Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences PSY 324 Adolescent Psychology PSY 350 Human Growth and Development SOC 250 Introduction to Sociology SOC 329 Social Research Methods SOW 310 Social Case Work SOW 320 Social Group Work Total Supportive Requirements

3 3 3 3 30

Electives Minimum Total Required

9

TOTAL TO GRADUATE

3 3 3 3 3 3

122/123

DEPARTMENT OF TEACHER EDUCATION Marie Fossett Snow, Ed.D., Chairperson (904) 470-8124 / 8254 FULL-TIME FACULTY Assistant Professors: Ms. Kisha Bryan Dr. Bobby Frazier Dr. Marie F. Snow Instructors: Mrs. Erskerline Favors Mrs. Jeanette Goa Ms. Marilyn Mack “Preparing competent teachers for effective leadership and service roles in a multicultural, global, and technological society.” The Teacher Education Program at Edward Waters College is designed to uphold and carry out its vision and mission, which are also reflected in the College’s mission statement. One major component of the Program’s purpose is to prepare students to teach in an urban, multicultural society (Figure 1: Vision and Mission statements.) Although the Teacher Education Program at Edward Waters College is not yet NCATE approved, the TEP uses these standards as the national guidelines by which the program is evaluated and reevaluated. NCATE’s conceptual framework establishes the shared vision for a unit’s efforts in preparing educators to work effectively in P–12 schools. It provides direction for programs, courses, teaching, candidate performance, scholarship, service, and unit accountability. The department prepares competent teachers for effective leadership and service roles in a multicultural, global, and technological society by providing quality higher education through course work and clinical experiences. Teacher education has been an integral part of the Edward Waters College mission for many years. Faculty members teaching in the department work closely with students to help them acquire the skills, perspectives, and the practical experiences they need to become excellent classroom teachers. Through EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 95


DEGREE PLANS research, collaboration, and applications, department seeks solutions to teaching, learning, and behavioral problems facing America’s urban populations. Vision Statement Upon completion of the Teacher Education Program at Edward Waters College, graduates will RISE to become Reflective decision makers, Instructional leaders, Systematic planners, and Effective communicators Mission Statement The Department of Teacher Education will prepare competent teachers for effective leadership and service roles in a multicultural, global, and technological society Strategic Goals - Florida Educators Accomplished Practices Goal 1 - Assessment The pre-professional teacher will use assignment strategies (traditional and alternative) to assist the continuous development of the learner. Goal 2 - Communication The pre-professional teacher will use effective communication techniques with students and all other stakeholders. Goal 3 – Continuous Improvement The pre-professional teacher will engage in continuous professional quality improvement for self and school. Goal 4 – Critical Thinking The pre-professional teacher will use appropriate techniques and strategies which promote and enhance critical, creative, and evaluative thinking capabilities of students. Goal 5 - Diversity The pre-professional teacher will use teaching and learning strategies that reflect each student’s culture, learning styles, special needs, and socio-economic background.

Goal 6 – Ethics The pre-professional teacher will adhere to the Code of Ethics and Principles of Professional Conduct of the Education Profession in Florida. Goal 7 – Human Development and Learning The pre-professional teacher will use an understanding of learning and human development to provide a positive learning environment that supports the intellectual, personal, and social development of all students. Goal 8 – Knowledge of Subject Matter The pre-professional teacher will demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the subject matter. Goal 9 - Learning Environments The pre-professional teacher will create and maintain positive learning environments in which students are actively engaged in social learning, social interaction, cooperative learning and self-motivation. Goal 10 – Planning The pre-professional teacher will plan, implement, and evaluate effective instruction in a variety of learning environments. Goal 11 – Role of the Teacher The pre-professional teacher will work with various education professionals, parents, and other stakeholders in the continuous improvement of the educational experiences of the students. Goal 12 - Technology The pre-professional teacher will use appropriate technology in teaching and learning processes. Accreditation / Certification Approved Program – Florida Department of Education DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE OFFERINGS 1. Bachelor of Arts Degree Elementary Education (B.A.) 2. Teacher certification in the following areas in conjunction with degrees offered by: EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 96


DEGREE PLANS Biology Education Chemistry Education Mathematics Education Music Education 3. Teacher Certification Only in: Biology Chemistry Elementary Endorsement in Athletic Coaching English Mathematics Middle Grade English Middle Grade Mathematics Middle Grade Science Middle Grade Social Science Music Physical Education K-8 Physical Education K-12 Physics Social Science Varying Exceptionalities Admission Requirements to Teacher Education In order to be admitted into the Teacher Education Program in the Department of Education, students must satisfy the following: 1. Complete a formal application for the Department of Education 2. Complete the General Requirements for all Teacher Education Programs. Present an overall and cumulative GPA of at least 2.50 on a 4.0 scale. 3. A passing score on all sections of the CLAST. General Requirements for Teacher Education Programs Requirements for admission to the Teacher Education Programs include a combination of mandated courses, Edward Waters College mission fulfillment courses and Edward Waters College Core Courses. The General Requirements depend on the degree program and are listed below. EWC Core Curriculum EWC100 REL 201

Introduction to College Introduction to Biblical Studies

English ENG 101 Freshman Composition I ENG 102 Freshman Composition II ENG 200 Fundamentals of Speech Mathematics MAT 104 College Algebra MAT 105 Finite Mathematics [or] MAT 260 Elementary Statistics MAT 240 Modern Geometry Science BIO 251 General Biology I ESC 201 Earth Science PHS 201 Physical Science with Lab Social Science HIS 111 African American History HIS 250 US History I [or] HIS 260 US History II PSY 320 Educational Psychology [or] PSY 323 Child Psychology [or] PSY 324 Adolescent Psychology [or] PSY 350 Human Growth and Development Humanities HUM 201 Intro to Fine Arts PHI 201 Intro to Philosophy Education EDU 208 Teaching Diverse Populations/Cross-Cultural Communications EDU 250 Educational Technology Elementary Education Majors Only EDU 200 Intro to Principles, Practice & Issues In Education EDU 304 Foundations of Reading ESL 122 ESOL–Curriculum Development ESL 221 ESOL–Linguistics PSY 260 Testing and Measurement in Education & Psychology Total Elementary Education

3 3 3 3 3 4 3 4 3 3 3

3 3 3

3 3 3 3 3 3 73

Credit Hours 2 3

EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 97


DEGREE PLANS Professional Education Courses The Professional Education Courses are required for All Teacher Education Programs with the exception of the Non-Teaching Concentration in Recreation. The courses are the following: EDU 330

General Methods, Curriculum I EDU 331 General Methods, Curriculum II EDU 360 Introduction to Exceptional Education EDU 383 Reading in the Content Area For Elementary and Secondary Teachers EDU 390 Practicum I EDU 400 Practicum II EDU 440 Management Skills For Reg. Exceptional Children [or] EDU 489 Behavioral Man./ Emotional Handicapped EDU 450 Student Teaching Total Professional Courses

3 3 3 3

3 3 3

12 33

The professional courses for students electing the Physical Education/Recreation major are the following: EDU 390 Practicum I HPE 450 Recreation Internship Total Professional Courses

3 3 15

Pre-Field Based Experiences And Student Teaching Practicum I and II: Practicum I and II is required for initial teacher certification for undergraduate’s education majors, Pre-K – 12 in the Department. The courses are taken during the junior year after the student’s completion of 45 semester hours. An application is required for admittance to Pre-Field Based Experience, to be submitted the semester prior to enter the Department of Education. A total of ten weeks, five hours per week, 50 hours per semester is required, culminating with final internship during the student’s senior year. All education majors who plan to register for pre-

internship I & II must file on or before April 15th for the Fall semester and November 20th for the Spring semester 2004. No applications will be accepted after these dates. Please comply with all dates so that you will be assigned at the beginning of the semester. Student Teaching: To qualify for recommendation to engage in student teaching, the student must satisfy the following departmental requirements: 1. Submit an application for Student Teaching to the Director of Student Interns. 2. Complete all professional and methods courses. 3. Upon completion of course work, a minimum of 2.50 cumulative grade point is required. 4. Students must complete applications by March 28 for placement in the fall term and by September 27 for placement in the spring term. 5. Students in Teacher Education who have received D’s and F’s in courses in the professional requirements and/or in their major area must repeat the courses until the grade of at least C or above has been earned. This is a requirement prior to the assignment to student teaching. In addition, all “I” grades must be removed before the student is assigned to student teaching. BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION (Revised 2008) FRESHMAN YEAR – (First Semester) EWC 100 ENG 101 BIO 251 HIS 111 EDU 200

MAT 104 Total Hours

Introduction to College Freshman Composition 1 Biological Science African American History Intro to Principles, Practices, and Issues In Education College Algebra

2 3 4 3 3

3 18

FRESHMAN YEAR – (Second Semester) ENG 102 MAT 105 or MAT 260

Freshman Composition II Finite Mathematics Elementary Statistics

3 3

EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 98


DEGREE PLANS ENG 200 EDU 208

EDU 304 REL 201 Total Hours

Fundamental of Speech Teaching Diverse Populations / Cross-Cultural Communications Foundations of Reading Intro to Biblical Studies

3 3

3 3 18

SOPHOMORE YEAR – (First Semester) HUM 201 ESC 201 HIS 250 or HIS 260 PHI 201 PSY 210 EDU 250 Total Hours

Intro to Fine Arts Earth Science United States History 1 United States History 2 Philosophy General Psychology Educational Technology

3 3 3

PHS 201 MAT 240 PSY 360 PSY 320 or PSY 323 or PSY 324 or PSY 350 EDU 360

General Methods, Curriculum I Teaching and Learning Process Physical Science with Lab Modern Geometry Test and Measurement in Education and Psychology Educational Psychology Child Psychology Adolescent Psychology Human Growth and Development Intro to Exceptional Education

EDU 331 EDU 381 EDU 382 HPE 351 Total Hours

ESOL – Linguistics Social Studies in Elem. School General Methods, Curriculum II Literature for Children Reading Methods Health in the Elem. School

ESOL - Curriculum Science in the Elem. School Mathematics in the Elem Sch Language Arts Reading in the Content Area Practicum I

HPE 352

EDU 482 Total Hours

EDU 438 EDU 440

Physical Education in the Elem. School Practicum II Art in the Elementary School Public School Music Man. Skills/Reg. and Excep, Chil D & P Teaching of Reading

4 3 3

SENIOR YEAR – (Second Semester)

3

TOTAL TO GRADUATE (Revised 2008, ESOL Infusion)

3

3 3 3 3 3 3 18

3 3 3 3 3 3 18

SENIOR YEAR – (First Semester)

3

JUNIOR YEAR – (First Semester) ESOL 221 EDU 332

EDU 365 EDU 383 EDU 390 Total Hours

EDU 400 EDU 401

19

Total Hours

ESOL 122 EDU 336 EDU 355

3 3 3 18

SOPHOMORE YEAR – (Second Semester) EDU 330

JUNIOR YEAR – (Second Semester)

EDU 450 Student Teaching Total Hours

3 3 3 3 3 3 18

12 12

139

Requirements for Bachelor of Arts Degree in Elementary Education The Elementary Education degree major provides the knowledge and skill required for elementary education: grades 1-6 and preschool. Graduation 136 credit hours as specified in the following requirements: 1. Completion of the General Requirements for All Teacher Education Programs. 2. Completion of the Professional Education Courses. 3. Completion of the Elementary Education Degree Program Courses. The Elementary Education Degree Program courses are the following: EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 99


DEGREE PLANS EDU 332 EDU 336 EDU 355 EDU 365 EDU 381 EDU 382 EDU 401 EDU 438 EDU 482 HPE 351 HPE 352 Total Hours

Social Studies in Elementary School Science in Elementary School Mathematics in Elementary Language Arts Teachers Literature for Children Reading Methods Art in the Elementary School Music in the Elementary School D & P Teaching of Reading Health in the Elementary School Physical Education in the Elementary School

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 30

EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 100


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 101


ORIENTATION COURSES EWC 100

INTRODUCTION TO 2 Credits COLLEGE A course designed to acquaint entering students with fundamental aspects of college life in a religious setting: college policies, course selections, study methods, academic expectations and class attendance, chapel attendance, library usage, counseling, methods to become self-reliant and a self-actualized individual, and an awareness of available college services, as well as other cultural resources available in an urban setting. In addition, students will receive information about student organizations, counseling services, student activities on and off campus, discussion of academic majors, use of the degree plans, and chapel participation. Twenty-five hours of community service is required in this course. ORI 100

ORIENTATION TO 1 Credit COLLEGE A course designed for transfer students, students who do not attend day classes and/or older nontraditional students. Special attention is given to such areas as the availability of services and resources both on and off campus, student organizations, college policies, requirements for graduation, and college rules and regulations. ORI 300

CLIMB 1 Credit ORIENTATION Prerequisites: Sixty (60) transferable Credits, administrative assessment and interview, and documented evidence of having passed the CLAST examination. The module explains the Credentials for Leadership in Management and Business Program, and, graduation requirements for the BBA degree in organizational management. A history of EWC is also given, with an overview of the College’s organizational structure. Graded on a “P/NP” basis.

ACCOUNTING ACC 250

PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING

3 Credits

This basic course in accounting theory and practice provides an understanding of the fundamentals of accounting including balance sheet, income statement, statement of retained earnings, and other reports. ACC 251

PRINCIPLES OF 3 Credits ACCOUNTING II Prerequisite: ACC 250 A study of classifying accounts, recording in books of original entry, posting ledgers, using control accounts, closing entries, and preparing work sheets, balance sheets, and income statements. ACC 305

COMPUTER3 Credits AUGMENTED ACCOUNTING Prerequisite: ACC 251 An introduction to electronic data processing in accounting with emphasis on accounting controls and reports for corporate accounts, proprietorships, and partnerships. ACC 310

INTERMEDIATE 3 Credits ACCOUNTING I Prerequisite: ACC 251 Advanced theory and practice relating to various balance sheet in accounting sheets.. Working with statements, including review of assets and liability valuation and classification; cash and temporary investments, present and future value concepts, notes and accounts receivable. ACC 320

INTERMEDIATE 3 Credits ACCOUNTING II Prerequisite: ACC 310 A continuation of ACC 310, this course offers advanced theory and practice relating to property, plant and equipment, depreciation and depletion, intangible assets, long-term investments, and long-term liabilities.

ACC 340 COST ACCOUNTING I 3 Credits Prerequisite: ACC 310 A study of cost-volume-price relationships, job order costing, process costing, standard costing, joint and byproduct costing, direct and indirect costing, variable costing, and absorption costing.

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ACC 341 COST ACCOUNTING II 3 Credits Prerequisite: ACC 340 A study of the various aspects of partnerships, ventures, installment sales and consignments, actuarial science, translation of foreign currencies. ACC 350

FEDERAL TAX 3 Credits ACCOUNTING Prerequisite: ACC 251 A comprehensive examination of the federal tax structure, including opportunities for education and experience in the application of tax principles to specific problems. ACC 360

MANAGERIAL 3 Credits ACCOUNTING Prerequisite: ACC 251 An integrative study of the uses of accounting data (cost data) by managers in making policy decisions regarding such matters as financial, resource allocation, organization, staffing, and performance evaluation.

ACC 400 ACCOUNTING THEORY 3 Credits Prerequisite: ACC 320 This course deals with contemporary accounting issues, interpretation and analysis of pronouncements of professional accounting organizations such as FASB: study and examination of underlying theories and controversies surrounding asset valuation, and income determinations. ACC 420

AUDITING 3 Credits PROCEDURES Prerequisite: ACC 320 Comprehensive examination of the auditor’s function and responsibility, including professional standards of ethics, procedures, programs, and reporting. ACC 421

EDP AUDIT AND 3 Credits CONTROLS Prerequisite: ACC 320 An introduction to EDP auditing with emphasis on EDP controls, audit types, and audit techniques and their effects on systems development. Exposure to risk assessments and professional standards in the field of EDP auditing is included.

ACC 430 ADVANCED 3 Credits ACCOUNTING I Prerequisite: ACC 320 A study of various aspects of consolidations and mergers. ACC 431

ADVANCED 3 Credits ACCOUNTING II Prerequisite: ACC 430 A study of forecasting, budgeting, measures of performance, pricing, inventory control. ACC 440

FEDERAL TAX 3 Credits ACCOUNTING II Prerequisite: ACC 350 The student will study income tax laws applicable to corporations, sub-chapter corporations, partnerships, estates, trusts, and an introduction to social security taxes and estate and gift taxes, and an introduction to tax research methodology. ACC 450 CPA REVIEW COURSE 3Credits Prerequisite: At least 24 hours in accounting above ACC 251 Intensive emphasis on the four parts of the CPA exam capped by a CPA review exit test. ACC 460

FUND ACCOUNTING/ 3 Credits EXIT EXAM Prerequisite: ACC 310 A study of the special accounts related to government and nonprofit organizations. Special problems and particular applications of generally accepted principles to similar accounts. ACC 465

MANAGERIAL 3 Credits ACCOUNTING In this module, the adult learner will build on the fundamentals covered in earlier, introductory accounting courses. Topics covered at the introductory level will be taken to a greater depth and new dimensions will be added. Also, new topics will be introduced and explored. Adult Learners will be challenged to develop relevant accounting-related skills and to integrate accounting knowledge with broader management issues. (A “CLIMB” Program component.)

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ADMINISTRATION ADM 200

INTRODUCTION TO 3 Credits BUSINESS A multilevel survey course designed to convey an understanding of the development and structure of American business. ADM 302

CALCULUS FOR 3 Credits BUSINESS Prerequisite: MAT 105 Systems of linear equations and inequalities; elementary topics in differential and integral calculus. Topics in differential and integral calculus. Topics specifically chosen to meet the needs of students of business: the definite integral, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, Lagrange multipliers, and matrices. ADM 304

STATISTICS FOR 3 Credits BUSINESS Prerequisite: MAT 105 This course attempts to respond to the changing needs of business and management by using a practical approach to statistical analysis. While studying descriptive and inferential concepts, the student will apply these to business, management, and industry in general, government and related areas. ADM 306

PRINCIPLES OF 3 Credits MARKETING A general survey of underlying principles of the marketing structure as it exists and functions. Problems involving marketing procedures, policies, and techniques are considered in relation to the fundamental principles of the field. BUSINESS LAW & 3 Credits GERONTOLOGY A comprehensive course introducing students to legal principles of business, contracts, personal property, and the legal environment as it relates to older adults.

ADM 316 BUSINESS LAW II 3 Credits Prerequisite: ADM 315 A study of torts, negligence and liability, real property, agency, securities regulations, bankruptcy, and insurance. ADM 330

THE SMALL BUSINESS 1-3 Credits ENTERPRISE Problems and practices peculiar to the establishment and operation of small business enterprises. The development of a business plan. Practical operations. ADM 340

PRINCIPLES OF 3 Credits INSURANCE The theory of insurance and current insurance practices. Uses of insurance, types of insurance, organization types, policies, mortality tables, etc. analysis of insurance as one of the techniques of risk management. ADM 364

RESEARCH METHODS 4 Credits AND STATISTICS This module will provide an overview of the research process and research methods for management and business learners in the CLIMB program who are required to complete an independent research project in their workplaces to fulfill degree requirements. It will include how to identify and define a problem suitable for such research, how to find information and literature sources related to the defined problem, and how to evaluate and utilize identified sources. Learners will use Microsoft Excel Spreadsheets. Problem analysis and evaluation techniques are presented. Learners are shown methods for defining, researching, analyzing, and evaluating a problem they would solve in their work or a vocational environment. Specific statistical information covered in the module includes identifying and measuring objectives, collecting data, working with significance levels, analyzing variance, and constructing questionnaires. (A “CLIMB� Program component.)

ADM 314

ADM 315 BUSINESS LAW I 3 Credits Fundamental principles of law involved in business transactions including sales, contracts, partnerships, corporations, negotiable instruments, property, bailment, and common carriers are studied.

ADM 400

PRINCIPLES OF REAL 3 Credits ESTATE Survey of the changing pattern of urban development; the structure of real estate markets; characteristics of real estate resources; financing methods and institutions; introductory valuation principles; tax on real property; location analysis, city structures and land use patterns. ADM 410

QUANTITATIVE 3 Credits ANALYSIS Quantitative techniques and models are presented. Decisions under uncertainty, model building and decision-

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making criteria will prepare the student for future managerial decisions. Linear programming, decision trees, probabilities, guessing, and such theories are studied. ADM 420 BUSINESS LAW 3 Credits The history, background, sources and influences of our modern day law as it pertains to the business activities of individuals, corporation and other legal entities are studied. ADM 430

MARKETING FOR 3 Credits MANAGERS Through assigned readings, case studies, Web-site connections, class discussion, writing assignments, and the team project, adult learners will be exposed to basic marketing theory and terminology. They will be given the opportunity to apply these principles and concepts to real world, domestic and international situations. This exploration provides adult learners with an appreciation of the role of marketing in organizational strategic planning: an awareness of how customer behavior and decision data are collected and analyzed in the marketing planning process; and the confidence to participate with other organizational members to “connect with customers” in a variety of effective and meaningful ways. (A “CLIMB” Program component.) ADM 445 GLOBAL BUSINESS 3 Credits Recognizing that today’s college graduates will live in a world that is economically, politically, and environmentally connected, this module seeks to challenge learners to think beyond their immediate surroundings and see themselves as part of a large human community. The module focuses on the complex global, intercultural, and cross-cultural issues that graduates will face as citizens of a global and an interdependent world. ADM 450 BUSINESS POLICY 3 Credits Prerequisite: Senior year only A study of how all functions of a business entity are correlated and integrated. Case study shows how policy and strategy is set. ADM 460 BUSINESS PRACTICUM 6 Credits This course is an internship program, which is designed to provide students with both field experience and practical classroom lectures. Students enrolled in this course will be required to complete a minimum of 240 contact hours working in an industry setting. These contact hours will

be supplemented with group discussions on scheduled dates covering individual internship experience, organizational ethics, leadership skills, employee and organizational relationship, team-work awareness, and project management, and resume writing/job interview skills. ADM 470

BUSINESS SEMINAR: 3 Credits ETHICS/EXIT EXAM Prerequisite: At least 18 Credits in business or accounting A presentation and discussion of selected contemporary topics and ethics in business. A general assessment of learning in the major course of study. ADM 472

BUSINESS ETHICS AND 3 Credits INDIVIDUAL VALUES This is a module in which the learner formulates a philosophy of life, providing the base for such concerns as ethics in business, accountability in government, respect for human rights, and responsible lifestyle in our contemporary world. Ethical theories and personal values are examined through readings, analysis of the workplace, and classroom discussion. (A “CLIMB” Program component.) ADM Business Application 5 Credits 494/495 Project This module will provide an overview of the research process and research methods for management and business learners in the CLIMB program who are required to complete an independent research project in their workplaces to fulfill degree requirements. It will include how to identify and define a problem suitable for such research, how to find information and literature sources related to the defined problem, and how to evaluate and utilize identified sources. Learners will use Microsoft Excel Spreadsheets. Problem analysis and evaluation techniques are presented. Learners are shown methods for defining, researching, analyzing, and evaluating a problem they would solve in their work or a vocational environment. Specific statistical information covered in the module includes identifying and measuring objectives, collecting data, working with significance levels, analyzing variance, and constructing questionnaires. (A “CLIMB” Program component.)

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BIOLOGY BIO 160

LIFE SCIENCE 4 Credits WITH LAB (3+1) Prerequisite: Satisfactory score on freshman placement test. A study of scientific methods; life processes at the cellular, organism and ecological levels; history of theories of evolution; and present ecology of man. BIO 204

INTRODUCTION TO 3 Credits DNA FORENSICS Prerequisite: Approval of Instructor. An overview of DNA-based forensics, including its interpretation, statistical analyses, regulations, laboratory environments. BIO 251

GENERAL BIOLOGY-I 4 Credits WITH LAB (3+1) Prerequisite: None A comparative study of life processes at the cellular, organism, and ecosystem level. Hands on experience with the scientific method. Three hours lecture; two hours lab per week. BIO 252

GENERAL BIOLOGY-II 4 Credits WITH LAB (3+1) Prerequisite: BIO 251 A continuation of General Biology I. A study of structure and function above the cellular level. It includes the plant organism, the animal organism, populations, communities, ecosystems, and theories on the origin of life. BIO 275

INTRODUCTION TO 3 Credits BIOTECHNOLOGY Prerequisite: Approval of Instructor The basic techniques in biotechnology. Biological concepts and current molecular techniques would be developed and explored in this course. BIO 302 BIOLOGY OF AGING 4 Credits Prerequisite: BIO 101 or 251 A study of the process of aging as explained by changes in structure and functions of the major organ systems and as affected by environmental stresses. Three hours lecture and two hours lab per week.

BIO 305

ZOOLOGY 4 Credits WITH LAB (3+1) Prerequisite: BIO 252 A comparative study of morphology, life processes, and ecology of the major animal phyla and classes. Three hours lecture; two hours lab per week. BIO 306

BOTANY 4 Credits WITH LAB (3+1) Prerequisite: BIO 252 A study of the fundamental life processes of algae, fungi and green plants. Taxonomy, biology, and ecology of flowering plants emphasized. Three hours lecture; two hours lab per week. BIO 310

GENETICS 4 Credits WITH LAB (3+1) Prerequisites: BIO 251, MAT 104 A study of heredity. The course includes a survey of the history of genetics, chromosomal basis of heredity, genetic code, and current research in the field of genetics. Three hours lecture; two hours lab per week. BIO 321

HUMAN ANATOMY & 4 Credits PHYSIOLOGY I (3+1) WITH LAB Prerequisites: BIO 250 2 (PE majors consult the instructor regarding prerequisite exemptions.) A study of the following human biological systems: tissues, integumentary, skeletal, muscular, circulatory, respiratory and digestive. Three hours lecture; two hours lab per week. BIO 322

HUMAN ANATOMY & 4 Credits PHYSIOLOGY II (3+1) WITH LAB Prerequisites: BIO 321 A study of the following human biological systems: nervous, endocrine, and reproductive. Three hours lecture; two hours lab per week. BIO 325

DEVELOPMENTAL 4 Credits BIOLOGY Prerequisite : BIO 252 and BIO 321 Survey of processes involved in animal development. Topics discussed include gametogenesis, fertilization, cleavage gastrulating differentiation, and morph genesis. Vertebrate and invertebrate systems are discussed, as are medial applications of the materials presented. Three hours lecture; two hours lab per week.

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BIO 330

MICROBIOLOGY 4 Credits WITH LAB (3+1) Prerequisites: BIO 252 and CHE 252 A study of major microbial groups, with concentration on biology; ecology and medical aspects of bacteria. Three hours lecture; two hours lab per week. BIO 380

RESEARCH METHODS 4 Credits IN BIOLOGY Prerequisites: BIO 251 and MAT 260 Examines the basic methods of biology, including hypothesis formation, survey of methodologies, and the use of statistical models. Students are required to develop a research proposal. BIO 400 ECOLOGY 3 Credits Prerequisite: BIO 252 A study of interrelationships between living things and their environment. Survey of ecological modeling, ecosystems, energy flow, nutrient cycling, population and human ecology. BIO 410 BACTERIOLOGY 3 Credits Prerequisite: BIO 252 and BIO 330 A survey of health related topics pertaining to the study of bacteria. The scope of the course will cover disease prevention, beneficial and harmful bacteria, blood and urine analysis, as well as public health practices, which are related to communicable diseases. BIO 412

CELL BIOLOGY 4 Credits WITH LAB (3+1) Prerequisites: BIO 252, CHE 252 A detailed study of the structure, organization, physiology and biochemistry of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Three hours lecture; two hours lab per week. BIO 425

HISTOLOGY 4 Credits WITH LAB (3+1) Prerequisite: BIO 252 and BIO 321 A study of microscopic anatomy and ultra structure of normal cells, tissues. and organs. The course also includes a study of tissue preparation and staining techniques. Three hours lecture; two hours lab per week. BIO 470

SENIOR SEMINAR & EXIT EXAM Prerequisite: Senior Standing

3 Credits

Guided student research from hypothesis formulation to writing for publication. Discussions on logic of science, experimental design, statistics, modeling and theoretical biology. Assessment of learning in the major course of study. Additionally, all students must complete an exit examination and interview with the Department Chairperson. BIO 480 BIOLOGY RESEARCH 3 Credits Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and approval of division chairperson. Advanced laboratory investigation designed to allow the student to become actively involved in biology research either by participating in faculty designed projects or by pursuing individual interests approved by the instructor. BIO 485

PRINCIPLES OF 3 Credits ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICOLOGY Prerequisites: BIO 251 and BIO 322 An in-depth study of the poisonous effects of hazardous chemicals. It includes different classes and properties of toxic chemicals and their effects on different target organs of the body. Also covers toxicological terms used in MSDS, such as mg/kg, LC50, and dose response.

CHEMISTRY CHE 251 GENERAL CHEMISTRY I 4 Credits Prerequisite: MAT 104 or consent of the instructor A study of the basic principles of chemistry with emphasis on atomic structure, bonding, periodic table, solutions, acids, and bases, oxidation and reduction, chemical equilibrium, and introduction to organic chemistry. Three hours lecture; two hours lab per week. CHE 252 GENERALCHEMISTRY II 4 Credits Prerequisite: CHE 251 A continuation of General Chemistry 1, with emphasis on descriptive chemistry, chemical equilibrium and the foundations of electrochemistry. Three hours lecture; two hours lab per week CHE 301 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I 4 Credits Prerequisite: CHE 252 A study of the chemistry of carbon compounds including preparation, properties, reactions and the relationship between bonding and the geometric

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structure of organic molecules. Three hours lecture; two hours lab per week. CHE 302 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II 4 Credits Prerequisite CHE 301 A continuation of CHE 301, concentrating on organic reactions, stereochemistry, and heterocyclic compounds. Three hours lecture; two hours lab per week. CHE 310

ANALYTICAL 4 Credits CHEMISTRY Prerequisite: CHE 252 The theory and techniques of chemical analysis dealing with volumetric, gravimetric, and spectrophotometer methods. Three hours lecture; two hours lab per week. CHE 311 BIOCHEMISTRY 4 Credits Prerequisite: CHE 302 A study of carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, and vitamins, with consideration also given to physiochemical topics. Three hours lecture; two hours lab per week. CHE 312

PHYSICAL 4 Credits CHEMISTRY I Prerequisites: CHE 252, MAT 271 A presentation of the fundamental principles of theoretical chemistry including thermodynamics, behavior of gases, kinetics, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Three hours lecture; two hours lab per week. CHE 313

.

PHYSICAL 4 Credits CHEMISTRY II Prerequisite: CHE 312 A continuation of Physical Chemistry with emphasis on quantum chemistry, NMR-Spectroscopy, and statistical mechanics. Three hours lecture; two hours lab per week CHE 314

INTERMEDIATE 3 Credits INORGANIC CHEMISTRY A review of atomic structure and chemical bonding. Descriptive chemistry of the main group elements. Modern interpretation of the chemistry of transition and inner transition elements and compounds. Introduction to coordination chemistry, nuclear chemistry, and metals in biological systems.

CHE 410

ADVANCED ORGANIC 3 Credits CHEMISTRY Prerequisites: CHE 302 A study of the structure and stereo chemistry of organic, compounds, molecular orbital treatment of bonding, conformational analysis, mechanisms of reactions and synthetic methods. CHE 420

INSTRUMENTAL 3 Credits ANALYSIS Prerequisite: CHE 252 An introduction to the theory and application of modern instruments to chemical analysis. CHE 470

CHEMISTRY 1 Credit SEMINAR/EXIT EXAM Prerequisite: Senior standing A presentation and discussion of selected topics from the major areas of chemistry. A general assessment of learning in the major course of study. CHE 480 CHEMICAL RESEARCH 1-3 Credits Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and approval of Department Chairperson Advanced laboratory investigation designed to allow the student to become actively involved in chemistry research either by participating in faculty designed projects or by pursuing individual interests approved by the instructor.

COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS CIS 101

INTRODUCTION TO 3 Credits COMPUTERS Prerequisite: None Computer technology, including social, ethical, philosophical and economic implications, is introduced. Basic hardware components are identified and the concept of software examined. Facility with productivity tools, including word processing, spreadsheets, database, presentation graphics, Internet access and e-mail, is developed. (Formerly BAT 201: Introduction to Data Processing.) CIS 201

INTRODUCTION TO INFORMATION SYSTEMS Prerequisite: CIS 101

3 Credits

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Concepts regarding the use and benefits of information in the organization are introduced. Information technologies including telecommunication, computation, data storage and user interface are presented. The evolving nature of information systems and the change process, including design, development and implementation are also presented. (Formerly BAT 300 Introduction to Information Systems.) CIS 220

SYSTEM ANALYSIS 3 Credits AND DESIGN Prerequisite: CIS 201 Management and planning of the information system are presented. Included are the concepts and technologies of life cycle, requirements, analysis, logical specification, logical design and detailed design are introduced. Case studies and team projects are utilized. CIS 250 BASIC PROGRAMMING 3 Credits Prerequisite: CIS 101 Programming techniques and concepts regarding information processing including algorithms, data and file structures, program creation, correction and validation are presented. Both object-oriented and procedural methodologies are covered. Traditional and visual development environments are introduced and utilized. (Formerly BAT 250 Basic Programming.) CIS 302

MANAGEMENT 3 Credits OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS Prerequisite: CIS 201 This course provides an introduction to the issues and practices of organizational components responsible for the design, development and delivery of information services and systems including organizational theory, personnel, budgeting and strategic planning. Management science techniques will also be introduced: cost-benefit analysis, optimization and game theory. CIS 305

COMPUTER 3 Credits CONCEPTS Prerequisite: CIS 201 Fundamental concepts and terminology associated with computer hardware and software are presented. Topics covered include processor components and architecture, peripheral devices, operating systems, and standards. (Formerly BAT 260 Computer Concepts.)

CIS 311 E-COMMERCE 3 Credits Prerequisite: CIS 201 Business strategies and technologies facilitating the delivery of products and services in a globally networked environment are introduced. Topics covered include an overview of electronic commerce and technical infrastructure; business strategies including revenue models, selling and marketing on the Web, legal and ethical issues; and technological implications such as hardware and software, security and integration issues. (Formerly BAT 318 E-Commerce.) CIS 313 WEB PUBLISHING I 3 Credits Prerequisite: CIS 201 Introduction to models and tools used to develop documents for the World Wide Web. Topics covered include planning, and designing, basic graphics and markup language. (Formerly CSC 435) CIS 314 WEB PUBLISHING II 3 Credits Prerequisite: CIS 313, CIS 330 concurrently Extend the concepts and techniques presented in CIS 313, Web Publishing I. Topics covered include advanced multimedia utilization, animation, audio, and database enabled applications. CIS 330

DATABASE 3 Credits MANAGEMENT Prerequisite: CIS 220, CIS 250 Analysis, design and implementation of information systems with databases are presented. Topics covered include normalization concepts; DBMS tools, EntityRelationship modeling and query processing are studied and utilized in a project environment. (Formerly BAT 410 Database Management.) CIS 351

OBJECT-ORIENTED 3 Credits PROGRAMMING: C++ Prerequisite: CIS 101 Introduction to object-oriented programming using C++. Topics covered include control structures, functions, data types and abstractions, inheritance, polymorphism and templates. CIS 352

OBJECT-ORIENTED PROGRAMMING: JAVA Prerequisite: CIS 101

3 Credits

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Introduction to object-oriented programming using Java. Topics covered include virtual machine, control structures, functions, data types and abstractions, inheritance and polymorphism. CIS 353 OBJECT-ORIENTED 3 Credits Prerequisite: CIS 101 Introduction to object-oriented programming using C#. Topics covered include virtual machine, control structures, functions, data types and abstractions, inheritance and polymorphism. CIS 415

NETWORKS AND 3 Credits TELECOMMUNICATIONS Prerequisite: CIS 305 Principles and application of networking and telecommunication fundamentals are presented. Data communication and telecommunication protocols and models, standards and Standard Organizations, hardware and software implementations are studied. Installation, configuration, management and administration skills are gained in the laboratory. CIS 417

NETWORK 3 Credits MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGY Prerequisite: CIS 415 Introduction to models and tools used to manage networks and Web sites. Topics covered include planning, and designing, including physical site, hardware and software; implementation; and management including user and data administration, security, monitoring, operational support and user support (help desk).

CIS 440

PROJECT 3 Credits MANAGEMENTAND PRACTICE Prerequisite: CIS 220 Project management concepts and practice, including teamwork and decision-making, are studied. Advanced CIS majors design and implement an information system employing project management techniques. CIS 451

INTERNET 3 Credits PROGRAMMING Prerequisite: CIS 250 Introduction to event-driven programming using a “visual” computer language and integrated development environment. Topics covered include event-driven design, interactive programming, and use of controls. CIS 460

APPLIED SOFTWARE 3 Credits DEVELOPMENT PROJECT Prerequisite: CIS 330, CIS 311 A senior project in which the students, working in teams, undertake the analysis, design and implementation of an information system application providing the solution to a “real world” requirement. Additionally, all students must complete an exit examination and interview with the Department Chairperson.

CRIMINAL JUSTICE

CIS 421

INTRODUCTION TO 3 Credits CRIMINAL JUSTICE Principles of philosophy and history of criminal justice including the constitutional restraints imposed on criminal justice officials. Emphasis will be on the criminal justice official’s role in the prevention and control of crime and delinquency.

CIS 431

CJU 310 VICTIMOLOGY 3 Credits An overview of the history and theory of victimology in which patterns of victimization are analyzed, with emphasis on types of victims and of crimes. The interaction between victims of crimes and the system of criminal justice is considered in terms of the role of the victim and the services that the victim is offered.

OBJECT-ORIENTED 3 Credits MODELING Prerequisite: CIS 220 Introduction to the methods and tools of object-oriented analysis and design including Unified Modeling Language (UML) and computer-assisted software engineering (CASE) tools. ADVANCED DATABASE 3 Credits MANAGEMENT Prerequisite: CIS 330 Introduction to issues and techniques of database administration and security. Topics covered include planning, implementation, user-management and security.

CJU 250

CJU 320

TERRORISM AND 3 Credits HOMELAND SECURITY

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The objective of this course is to provide basic knowledge and foundation for understanding terrorism. In this course, we will review major theories in the field that include; definitions and motivations for terrorism; religious, ideological, nationalistic, and ethnic terrorism; domestic and international terrorist movements; technological, cyber, nuclear, biological, and chemical terrorism; terrorism financing; jihadist networks; the organization and function of homeland security; the protection of constitutional rights and civil liberties. Finally, we will examine the effect of the media on terrorism. CJU 321 CRIMINOLOGY 3 Credits Criminal procedure can be described as the methods and the rules by which society balances the conflicting governmental functions of maintaining law and order and protecting civil rights under the United States Constitution and to show how certain of these rights come into conflict with the maintenance of public order and the enforcement of the criminal laws of the United States and each individual state. The course gives an overview of the criminal court system, the arena in which this conflict is resolved and in which much of the law of criminal procedure is formulated. The course also focuses on the law of arrest, search and seizure, confessions, and pretrial identifications. CJU 322

INTRODUCTION TO 3 Credits JUDICIARY The course focuses on the criminal justice system and the systems’ overlapping agencies: police, courts, and corrections. The course explores the various components of criminal justice and how the separate agencies may be viewed as interdependent and interrelated. CJU 327

POLICE/LAW 3 Credits ENFORCEMENT A study of the roles of police departments and individual officers in a democratic society, public relations in the law enforcement field, police discretion, socialization of police officers and related issues. CJU 400

REPORT WRITING FOR 3 Credits CRIMINAL JUSTICE PROFESSIONALS The purpose of this course is to enable the student realize the importance of written communication in law enforcement; at time and effort required of a quality

report not only by the police, but also by corrections, probation and security personnel: that better written report will help expedite court action, save time and money, and make each community a safer place. CJU 420

INTRODUCTION TO 3 Credits FORENSIC SCIENCE This course is intended to introduce the student to the complex nature of criminal investigation. It includes interrogative and interviewing techniques, sources of information [electronic/traditional], crime scene procedure, collection, preservation, retrieval, laboratory techniques and presentation of evidence. Student will understand the functions and duties of the forensic scientist. CJU 422

CRIMINAL JUSTICE/ 3 Credits CONSTITUTION An examination of constitutional law principles and the Constitution’s limitations on the criminal justice system, including a study of leading constitutional cases. This course focuses on the first three articles of the U.S. Constitution, which established the legislative, executive and judicial branches of government and our system of checks and balances. CJU 423

CORRECTIONAL 3 Credits POLICY/PRACTICES An examination of correctional philosophies, administrative practices, abuses and improvements, research and planning, and contemporary trends. CJU 425

PROBATION/PAROLE 3 Credits SUPERVISION The study of the techniques and theory of probation and parole supervision with emphasis on treatment and counseling techniques and behavior modification procedures. CJU 429

JUVENILE 3 Credits DELINQUENCY Theories of delinquency, characteristics of juvenile criminality, socio-cultural analysis, prevention and control of delinquency, and detention and treatment of the juvenile offender. CJU 433

CRIMINAL LAW/ 3 Credits PROCEDURE A study of corpus delicti of selected law felonies and misdemeanors; principle of criminal law; general criminal procedures ranging from arrest through trial and appeal.

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CJU 460

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 6 Credits PRACTICUM/EXIT EXAMINATION Supervised experience in a criminal justice agency designed to provide learning and work experience for criminal justice majors considering a career in the criminal justice system.

EARTH SCIENCE ESC 201 EARTH SCIENCE 3 Credits Prerequisite: REA 202 This course acquaints students with the development of science, the integrating principles and theories in the earth sciences, the practice of the scientific method and with a useful knowledge of selected areas of geology, astronomy and meteorology. Presentation involves lectures, demonstrations and films. The course is for general education and is not designed specifically as an introductory or preparatory course for any of the specific sciences.

ECONOMICS ECO 210

PRINCIPLES OF 3 Credits ECONOMICS I Prerequisite: REA 202 An overview of basic economic concepts and institutions. An introduction to macroeconomics which deals with the theories of employment, inflation, money, backing, economic growth and development, the public sector, and how these are influenced by government fiscal and monetary policies. The theories are organized around the National Accounts. (Formerly ECO 310) ECO 211

PRINCIPLES OF 3 Credits ECONOMICS II Prerequisite: ECO 210 An introduction to microeconomics which deals with the theory of markets, price mechanism, production, distribution, and resource allocation; application of marginal analysis and equilibrium theory to the price and output decisions of the individual firm in pure competition, monopolistic competition, monopoly and oligopoly; agriculture, labor, rent, interest, and profit theory; international trade, and the economics of change. ((Formerly ECO 311) ECO 323

MONEY, CREDIT, AND BANKING

3 Credits

Principles of money and banking with special emphasis on functions, attendant economic problems, credit, the banking process and the Federal Reserve System, foreign and domestic exchange, business cycles, with historical and international aspects. ECO 400 LABOR PROBLEMS 3Credits Prerequisite: ECO 211 Analysis of labor in the marketplace; wage determination; labor organizations; manpower problems, collective bargaining, and the impact of labor on public welfare.

EDUCATION EDU 200

INTRODUCTION 3 Credits TO PRINCIPLES, PRACTICES, & ISSUES IN EDUCATION A comprehensive survey of the historical, philosophical, and sociological foundations of American education. It explores principles, practices, and issues and contemporary development in educational programs and practices. 3 Credits TEACHING DIVERSE POPULATIONS/ CROSS-CULTURAL COMMUNICATION A historical and sociological investigation of ESOL/ bicultural education. Emphasis is on a multiplicity of cultural groups; identification of cultural-specific verbal and non-verbal communications; and school behaviors and attitudes. EDU 208

EDU 250

EDUCATIONAL 3 Credits TECHNOLOGY This course is designed to prepare educators to effectively utilize contemporary and emerging educational technologies to support teaching, facilitate learning, and master educational technology tasks/ skills mandated by state/federal educational entities. Emphasis is placed on the use of classroom multi-media hardware and software, utilization of the Internet, and exploration of educational resources found throughout the www. Additionally, the course will introduce educators to web enhancing courses and distance education. EDU 255

DYNAMICS OF LEARNING Prerequisite: PSY 210

3 Credits

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Dynamics of factors influencing the educational process including principles of the learner’s social, physical, emotional, and intellectual development. Implications of learning theories as they relate to the student’s curriculum and classroom administration will be discussed.

Prerequisite: EDU 330 This course is designed to provide theoretical and experiential knowledge regarding basic principles of educational assessment and evaluation. Primary emphasis is on the acquisition of traditional, alternative measurement skills, and the examination of contemporary issues confronted by educators Pre-K to grade 12.

EDU 301

TESTS AND 3 Credits MEASUREMENTS IN PSYCHOLOGY AND EDUCATION Prerequisite: EDU 200 A course of study that identifies and defines instructional objective in behavioral terms, construct or selects the evaluation instruments which measure specific learning outcomes, and gives the student techniques for using the results to improve learning.

EDU 332

SOCIAL STUDIES IN 3 Credits THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL Prerequisites: EDU 200, 250 A course designed to provide methods and materials for teaching social studies in the elementary school. Emphasis is placed on instructional strategies. EDU 333

SOCIAL STUDIES IN 3 Credits THE SECONDARY SCHOOL Prerequisites: EDU 200, 250 This course emphasizes the relationship between the American society and the social studies curriculum in the secondary school; the learning process and teaching methods; and the translation of theory into classroom practices.

EDU 304

FOUNDATIONS OF 3 Credits READING Prerequisite: EDU 382 This course is designed to examine the philosophy of reading, theories of reading and the reading process. Students will explore how literacy is emergent, some reading assessment techniques, controversies in teaching methods, and the role that social factors contribute to the reading process. EDU 320

METHODS AND 3 Credits MATERIALS OF TEACHING MUSIC An examination of modern methods and materials of teaching music in the secondary school, with emphasis on techniques, classroom adjustments, and administrative tools for use as a classroom teacher. Practical in-the-field experience is included.

EDU 336

SCIENCE IN THE 3 Credits ELEMENTARY SCHOOL Prerequisites: EDU 200, EDU 250 A study highlighting the concepts and principles for teaching science in the elementary school focusing on a variety of ways of helping children to make the greatest use of their environment.

EDU 330

GENERAL METHODS, 3 Credits CURRICULUM I, TEACHING AND LEARNING PROCESS Prerequisite: EDU 200 An introductory course which illustrates how to design and implement a curriculum. Emphasis on developing and writing objectives, planning lessons, using appropriate teaching skills, selecting effective audiovisual aids, and utilizing computers. EDU 331

GENERAL METHODS, CURRICULUM II, EDUCATIONAL ASSESSMENTS

3 Credits

EDU 337

SCIENCE IN THE 3 Credits SECONDARY SCHOOL Prerequisites: EDU 200, EDU 250 A study of behavioral instructional objectives and the development of specific outcome learning evaluation instruments, the course provides students with techniques for using evaluation results to improve learning in secondary school science programs and focuses on guiding students to learn science by the discovery method.

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EDU 355

MATHEMATICS IN 3 Credits THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL Prerequisites: EDU 200, EDU 250 A course designed for teaching sequential development skills and concepts of mathematics and presenting tools for mathematics instruction, including the real number system and problem solving techniques. Provisions are made to explore various materials and strategies for diagnostic teaching. EDU 356

MATHEMATICS IN THE 3 Credits SECONDARY SCHOOL Prerequisites: EDU 200, EDU 250 A study of teaching materials, content, and techniques used in secondary mathematics instruction. The course encompasses the application of theories and methods in real and simulated situations. EDU 359

SOCIAL & PERSONAL 3 Credits SKILLS A course designed to study the theory and methods for teaching positive pro-social skills to children with varying exceptionalities. Students will be expected to synthesize content from class sessions and readings, and apply it in small groups activities and projects. Students completing the course will have a working knowledge of approaches that improve social behavior of students. EDU 360

INTRODUCTION TO 3 Credits EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN Exceptional Student Education 360 introduces future and practicing teachers to the characteristics of exceptional learners and how these characteristics impact their education. The course emphasizes classroom practices as well as the psychological, sociological and medical aspects of exceptionalities. EDU 364

EDUCATIONAL 3 Credits ASSESSMENT EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN Prerequisites: EDU 360 Knowledge of basic testing procedures and terminology as related to the exceptional student. Interpretation and utilization of test data in developing individual educational plans. Introduction to norm-referenced assessment, curriculum-based assessment, and informal or alternative assessment practices.

EDU 365 LANGUAGE ARTS 3 Credits Prerequisites: PSY 350, EDU 200 A detailed description of the elementary school language curriculum with careful attention to teach the English language and its literature in the secondary schools, and for experienced teachers who wish to keep abreast of current teaching practices in their profession. EDU 366

ENGLISH IN THE 3 Credits SECONDARY SCHOOL Prerequisites: EDU 200, EDU 250 A course in principles, techniques, and procedures for students preparing to teach the English language and its literature in the secondary schools, and for experienced teachers who wish to keep abreast of current teaching practices in their profession. EDU 367

BUSINESS IN THE 3 Credits SECONDARY SCHOOL A course in principles, techniques, and procedures for students preparing to teach business education in the secondary schools. EDU 381

LITERATURE FOR 3 Credits CHILDREN Prerequisites: PSY 350, EDU 200 A course designed for the study and interpretation of characters in reading and storytelling. Attention is given to the availability and selection of various kinds of literature, audiovisual aids, and library materials suitable for teaching children’s literature. Methods for developing reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills are also included. EDU 382 READING METHODS 3 Credits Prerequisites: EDU 200, EDU 250 A course in principles, techniques, and procedures in developing reading readiness and reading skills throughout primary, intermediate, and upper grades; principles underlying selection and use of materials and techniques; and construction of devices, charts and set work. EDU 383

READING IN THE CONTENT AREA FOR ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY TEACHERS

3 Credits

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A study of how to use various reading methods, materials, and activities to increase reading performance. The difference between reading instruction in a reading class and a content area is demonstrated, with emphasis on demonstrating that reading instruction is part of the curriculum in each content area.

EDU 431 ELEMENTARY MUSIC 3 Credits A survey of the philosophy, method, and literature used in the elementary school. Emphasis on activity approach to singing, rhythm, movements, creativity, listening, and the use of rhythm musical instruments. (Formerly MUS 331)

EDU 390 PRACTICUM I 3 Credits A required course for initial teacher certification for undergraduate education majors Pre-K-12. The course is taken during the junior year after the completion of 45 hours. It is designed to introduce the prospective teacher to the classroom. Students will observe, assist the classroom teacher, and participate in the classroom planning activities. Field placements entail hours per week for ten consecutive weeks (50 hours minimum). Seminars are held twice weekly.

EDU 438

EDU 400 PRACTICUM II 3 Credits Prerequisite: Practicum I A required course for initial teacher certification for undergraduate education majors Pre-K-12. This course is the second stage on a continuum and progresses to the culminating experience of a internship to the culminating experience. It is designed to provide experience in learning theory, classroom management techniques, instructional technology, development of learning centers, teaching individualized and group lessons. Field placement entails 5 hours per week for ten consecutive weeks. Seminars are held twice weekly. EDU 401 ART IN THE 3 Credits ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS Prerequisites: PSY 250, EDU 330 Art experiences, techniques, methods, and materials to facilitate the teaching of art in elementary schools. EDU 402

PRIMARY 3 Credits EDUCATION I Prerequisites: PSY 350, EDU 200, EDU 250 A study of the curriculum needed in understanding young children with emphasis on special methods and observation. EDU 403

PRIMARY 3 Credits EDUCATION II Prerequisites: PSY 350, EDU 200, 250, 402 A study of teaching materials, content and techniques in the development of creative type expressions with continued emphasis on methods and observations.

MUSIC IN THE ELEM. 3 Credits SCHOOL A study of the music curriculum and the methods of teaching in all grade levels. A thorough study in music fundamentals, terms, scales, keys, rhythms, and sightsinging drills.

EDU 440

MANAGEMENT 3 Credits SKILLS FOR REG. AND EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN This course is a survey of the skills of classroom discipline. Designed to equip the pre-service teacher with strategies for managing regular and exceptional learners, the environment, and academic tasks so that all pupils’ opportunities for psycho social and cognitive growth are enhanced. Emphasis on individual and large group management skills. EDU 450 STUDENT TEACHING 12 Credits A teaching experience (elementary or secondary) under joint supervision of College and public school personnel. Weekly seminars are held to discuss, analyze, and evaluate intern experiences. Emphasis on competencies and domains of the Florida Performance Measurement System for the beginning teacher program. A general assessment of learning for primary, elementary, and physical Education majors. EDU 460

STRATEGIES FOR 3 Credits INDIVIDUALIZING LEARNING A seminar designed for the experienced teacher who desires to implement individualized instruction into the classroom curriculum. Students will be expected to design, develop and implement an integrated curriculum package for the individual learner. EDU 461

CURRICULUM FOR THE INDIVIDUAL LEARNER

3 Credits

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A comprehensive course providing strategies for constructing curriculum materials and retrieving the applicable content information to support classroom instruction. In addition, general methods of presentation of the totally designed curriculum package for the individual learner will be discussed.

A survey of curriculum modifications, appropriately designed for emotionally handicapped learners. Focus on curriculum development: the evaluation, identification, modification, and usage of commercial materials and programs for constructing effective academic and emotional development curricula.

3 Credits INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES: EMOTIONALLY HANDICAPPED Strategies for teaching students who are emotionally handicapped including instructional techniques; motivational strategies; development, implementation, and evaluation of individualized educational plans; and data based management.

EDU 487

EDU 481

EDU 482

D & P TEACHING OF 3 Credits READING Prerequisite: EDU 382 or consent of the instructor A course designed to provide additional training in reading instruction beyond that offered in the basic reading course, EDU 382. Emphasis is placed on development of skills and knowledge in diagnostic and prescriptive methods of teaching reading. EDU 484

NATURE/NEEDS 3 Credits OF EMOTIONALLY HANDICAPPED LEARNERS A survey of the characteristics, nature & needs of emotionally handicapped learners, focusing upon etiology, intervention models, and utilization of community resources, and prevention. EDU 485 REMEDIATION 3 Credits OF READING DISABILITIES Prerequisites: EDU 382, 482 or consent of the instructor Use of miscue analysis to investigate qualitative and quantitative diagnostic information in reading skills. Techniques of instruction and materials used in remedial reading instruction. EDU 486

CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT: EMOTIONALLY HANDICAPPED

3 Credits

METHODS: 3 Credits SUPERVISING ELEMENTARY READING PROGRAM This course emphasizes the principles, techniques, and materials basic to the curriculum in reading in the elementary school. 3 Credits BEHAVIOR MANAGEMENT: EMOTIONALLY HANDICAPPED A survey of behavior management techniques for emotionally handicapped students. Emphasis on the application of theories, crisis intervention and prevention, legal considerations, and counseling skills. EDU 489

EDU 493

INDIVIDUAL PROJECT 3 Credits IN EDUCATION To renew exceptional students’ certification, verification from the instructor of the exceptionally covered must be submitted to the state along with official transcripts for evaluation. (While projects in philosophy of education, discipline and motivation, human growth and development, and general curriculum not appropriate for renewal of professional certification, they may meet professional preparation requirements upon approval of course descriptions.) See instructor for details. EDU 495

MASTER TEACHER 1 Credit COURSE IN EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY A course designed to prepare teachers and future educators to effectively utilize advanced educational technology. Topics and modules include introduction to educational technology, advanced PowerPoint, webcam technologies, integration of multi-media, desktop video conferencing, and web enhancing courses. This course is designed to be self-paced, can be delivered via distance education, and includes a national certification opportunity.

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EDU 495

EDUCATIONAL 1 Credit LEADERSHIP A course designed to prepare teachers and future educators to become effective and dynamic leaders within the school system and the community. This course is designed to be self-paced, can be delivered via distance education, and includes a national certification opportunity.

BASIC ENGLISH 4 Credits GRAMMAR SKILLS I This is a college preparatory course which emphasizes the rudiments of grammar and usage, writing, critical thinking and logical reasoning. The course includes a mandatory lab. Credits do not meet requirements for graduation.

FRESHMAN HONORS 3 Credits ENGLISH II Prerequisite: ENG 111 or equivalent. A course providing practice in using critiquing and abstracting skills. The genres for further study include poetry, the short story, and drama. A documented theme, essay, or research paper is required. ENG 190 CLAST ENGLISH 3 Credits The course will allow students to practice writing wellplanned, coherent essays within fifty minutes. The value of systematic, outlined thoughts in the development of a coherent prose essay is stressed. The course is designed to develop skills that will enable students to pass standardized written tests, especially the CLAST. Some of the competencies also include general test taking skills, making appropriate word choices, subject-verb agreement, and punctuation. The Credits from this course do not fulfill the requirement for graduation.

ENG 098

ENG 200

ENGLISH ENG 097

BASIC ENGLISH 4 Credits GRAMMAR SKILLS II This is a college preparatory course which emphasizes fundamental grammar, mechanical, organizational and usage skills; critical thinking and logical reasoning. The course includes a mandatory lab. Credits do not meet requirements for graduation. ENG 101 FRESHMAN 3 Credits COMPOSITION I A study of rhetorical modes and paragraphs: exposition, narration, description, analysis, definition, and argumentation to understand and use various techniques for effective writing. A research paper is required. ENG 102

FRESHMAN 3 Credits COMPOSITION II Prerequisite: ENG 101 A study of rhetorical modes and writing techniques through the analysis of literary works, by developing three-level themes, using the various kinds of paragraphs. A library project or research paper is required. ENG 111

FRESHMAN HONORS 3 Credits ENGLISH I Prerequisites: Upper percentile on Freshman placement test An advanced comprehensive course, which provides skills involved in successful expository writing based on critical and analytical reading. A research paper is required.

ENG 112

FUNDAMENTALS OF 3 Credits SPEECH Prerequisite: Satisfactory score on Freshman placement test Training in pronunciation, articulation and delivery, development of content, audience analysis, and the art of persuasion. ENG 255

SURVEY OF 3 Credits AMERICAN LITERATURE I Prerequisites: ENG 102 A survey of the development of the literature of the United States from the Colonial period to the present, with emphasis on the works of major writers. ENG 256

SURVEY OF 3 Credits AMERICAN LITERATURE II Prerequisites: ENG 102 A survey of the development of the literature of the United States from the Colonial period to the present, with emphasis on the works of major writers. ENG 260

HONORS ENGLISH 3 Credits COLLOQUIUM Prerequisite: ENG 112 This course consists of the reading of one volume each week, to generate creative and critical thinking. Students will prepare weekly written themes.

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ENG 301

SURVEY OF ENGLISH 3 Credits LITERATURE I Prerequisite: ENG 102 A survey of the development of the literature of England from its origin to the mid-17th century, with emphasis on the major writer. ENG 302

SURVEY OF ENGLISH 3 Credits LITERATURE II Prerequisite: ENG 301 A survey of the literature of England from the mid17th century to the present, with emphasis on the major writers. ENG 303 EXPOSITORY WRITING 3 Credits Prerequisite: ENG 102 Practice in advanced composition, while emphasizing development of an individual style. ENG 304

HISTORY OF THE 3 Credits ENGLISH LANGUAGE Prerequisite: ENG 102 A study of the historical changes in grammar, spelling, pronunciation, and vocabulary of the English language from its origin to the present. ENG 306

ADOLESCENT 3 Credits LITERATURE Prerequisite: ENG 102 The study of literature written for adolescents or young adults including realism, fantasy, science fiction, and biography. Special emphasis is paid to books commonly used in middle and high schools. ENG 308

ORAL 3 Credits COMMUNICATION FOR ENGLISH MAJORS Prerequisite: ENG 200 A continuation of ENG 200 Oral Language, with emphasis on content development and audience analysis. Attention will be given to development, audience analysis and appropriate techniques of communication for varied settings. Opportunities are available for teaching and tutoring General Studies English students. ENG 310 CHAUCER Prerequisite: ENG 301

3 Credits

A general survey of English literature of the middle ages, as a background to the work of Chaucer. Study of Chaucer’s poetry, emphasizing the Canterbury Tales. ENG 311 SHAKESPEARE I 3 Credits Prerequisite: ENG 301 A general survey course of Shakespeare’s major tragedies and comedies. ENG 312 SHAKESPEARE II 3 Credits Prerequisite: ENG 301 A general survey course of Shakespeare’s major tragedies and comedies. ENG 313

AFRICAN AMERICAN 3 Credits LITERATURE Prerequisite: ENG 102 A general survey course of the development of the literature of African Americans from the colonial period to the twentieth century. ENG 314

ADVANCED STUDIES IN 3 Credits AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE An in depth analysis of a selection of works and topics in the African American literary tradition with focus on the construction of an indigenous genre. ENG 401 THE AGE OF MILTON 3 Credits Prerequisite: ENG 302 A study of post Shakespearean, seventeenth century literature with special emphasis on the works of John Milton. ENG 402 THE NOVEL 3 Credits Prerequisites: ENG 255, ENG 302 A study of the development of the novel in England and the United States with emphasis on representative British and American authors. ENG 406

NINETEENTH3 Credits CENTURY ENGLISH POETRY Prerequisite: ENG 302 A study of major figures of the Romantic and Victorian periods, including Blake, Keats, Wordsworth, Shelley, Tennyson, Browning, and Arnold.

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ENG 410

MODERN AMERICAN 3 Credits DRAMA Prerequisite: ENG 255 A study of modern plays by American playwrights. 3 Credits CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE Prerequisites: ENG 255, 302 A study of contemporary British and American literature. ENG 412 ADVANCED GRAMMAR 3 Credits Prerequisite: ENG 102 An intensified study of traditional English grammar, with an introduction to some of the modern approaches to the study of grammar. ENG 411

ENG 413 CREATIVE WRITING 3 Credits Prerequisite: ENG 102 Development of students’ skills of written expression in a variety of forms. ENG 414

STUDIES IN POPULAR 3 Credits CULTURE Popular works in written and other media, such as crime and detective films and novels and science fiction, will be studied both as literary and social documents. ENG 489

RESEARCH AND 3 Credits BIBLIOGRAPHICAL METHODS Prerequisite: ENG 102 Acquisition of research skills in literature, communications media, and other arts and sciences will lead to preparation for the senior research/critical paper. ENG 490

SEMINAR FOR 3 Credits ENGLISH MAJORS/ EXIT EXAM Prerequisite: Eng 489 Review for senior comprehensive exams will be combined with the completion of the research/critical paper begun in ENG 489. (Formerly ENG 490; Senior English Seminar.) ENG 495 PRACTICUM 3-6 Credits Prerequisites: ENG 303, 489 Work experience with an outside agency, such as a television station or newspaper that will provide the student with practical experience using research and writing skills.

ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE ESL 121

INTRODUCTION TO 3 Credits ESOL An historical and sociological investigation of ESOL/ bicultural education. The investigation will include the identification of cultural variations in the classroom and how these variations influence student behavior and attitudes. ESL 122

ESOL CURRICULUM 3 Credits DEVELOPMENT Course focuses on applications of the theories, principles, and current research related to second language acquisition as well as instructional techniques and materials relevant to development of ESOL curriculum. ESL 221

LINGUISTICS FOR 3 Credits ESOL EDUCATION A practical course for teaching English to speakers of other languages. The syllabus includes an introduction to general linguistics with stress on those aspects of various linguistic schools applicable to language teaching; a discussion of language theory and teaching methodology (including practical exercises in the use of the direct method and audio-lingual techniques); and instruction in the use of comparative techniques in the teaching of sounds, word structure, and sentence structure. ESL 222

STRATEGEIS OF ESOL 3 Credits EDUCATON A survey of principles and methods of educational measurement as it relates to English for speakers of other languages with emphasis on evaluation and diagnosis of students in school settings. ESL 321

STRATEGIES OF ESOL 3 Cedits INSTRUCTION A general introduction to the field of teaching English as a second language. Students examine current strategies and methods of instruction and theory. Grammar, reading, and writing skills development are examined in detail with the intention of equipping the teacher with the techniques for presenting concepts, conducting exercises from instructional materials and testing. Reference will be made to several schools of grammar and language teaching methods.

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FINANCE FIN 200 PERSONAL FINANCE 3 Credits This course is an introduction to personal financial management, including basic financial planning, savings, and basic investment practices. Students will learn how to create a budget, plan for the future, which include consumer buying, personal credit, savings and family savings, investment, home ownership, insurance and retirement, as well as making good purchasing decisions.

Examines the role and function of stress in everyday life from a physiological, psychological, and sociological perspective. Personal, situational, and environmental sources of stress are explored along the continuum from distress to eustress. A broad spectrum of stress management techniques are examined. Analysis of the physical and psychological effects of stressors and individual appraisals will be explored. Emphasis will be on teaching students to learn how to personally identify and manage stress in a healthy manner. HSC 210

FIN 250

PRINCIPLES OF 3 Credits FINANCE This is an analysis of the factors governing financial management. The course examines the processes, decisions structures, and institutional arrangements concerned with the use and acquisition of funds by a firm. The course examines the management of shortterm assets, the sources and cost of long-term capital investment, and investment decision-making factors. Students acquire knowledge of how to utilize accounting data from financial statements in financial analysis by deriving cash and capital budgets, forecasting sales and expense, and discounting capital investments.

HEALTH EDUCATION HSC 101

WELLNESS PRINCIPLES 1 Credit & PRACTICES An introduction to wellness practices and principles, including a focus on the components of wellness, lifestyle diseases, behavior modification, individualized wellness programs, and online wellness resources. Additionally, emphasis is placed on a holistic and multi-disciplinary approach towards promoting healthy lifestyles. HSC 110

SELF DEFENSE AND 1 Credit PERSONAL SAFETY This course provides an overview of contemporary and emerging personal self-defense techniques used to protect individuals from assault involving a perpetrator intending bodily harm. Emphasis is also placed on recognizing threatening situations, avoiding unsafe environments, and employing proactive preventative measures to ensure personal safety and avoid potential problems. HSC 120

STRESS MANAGEMENT & RELAXATION TECHNIQUES

1 Credit

PERSONAL HEALTH & 3 Credits WELLNESS An introduction to individual health principles, issues, and research. Wellness education and promotion is emphasized and lifestyle diseases are studied. Topics of study include stress management and emotional health, chemical dependency, sexual responsibility, nutrition, fitness, heart disease, cancer and the communicable diseases including the STDs and AIDS. Self-assessment inventories are used to involve students in many health issues and provide a means for applying health information in personal decision-making. With the focus on prevention and intervention, students are encouraged to make lifestyle choices conducive to lifelong wellness. HSC 240 FIRST AID AND CPR 3 Credits An in-depth study and application of emergency care procedures necessary to maintain basic life support measures, until the victims of an accident or sudden illness are cared for by EMS personnel. First aid and basic life support skills are mastered in accordance with national standards. Knowledge and skill gained will lead to certification in first aid and basic life support. HSC 250 COMMUNITY HEALTH 3 Credits Study and analysis of major community health problems, their causes, the roles of individuals, community institutions, and government in effecting solutions. Emphasis is placed upon participation and organization for community health. HSC 300

HEALTH AND MEDICAL 3 Credits TERMINOLOGY Study and in-depth understanding of medical language and individual medical terms. This course is intended to assist those studying in the fields of medicine, health care, and public health fields by learning a word-building system for defining, using, spelling and pronouncing medical words, including the cconstruction of medical terms, medical suffixes, medical term roots and medical prefixes.

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Additionally, a study of medical terms involving body systems will be emphasized. An exploration of specific online health-related glossaries will be investigated. HSC 310

HUMAN SEXUALITY 3 Credits EDUCATION An in-depth study of the social, cultural, biological, psychological, ethical, and religious aspects of human sexual behavior and interaction.

Principles for planning, developing, implementing, administering, and re-evaluating health education and promotion programs. A consideration of the role of the health educator, promoter, and administrator in effectively working with public and private health industries and agencies, which provide health programs is also explored and analyzed.

DRUG ABUSE 3 Credits EDUCATION AND PREVENTION Study of legal and illegal use, misuse, and abuse of chemical substances classified as drugs. Governmental and community drug education, treatment, and preventative programs are investigated.

HEALTH ASSESSMENT 3 Credits AND BIOSTATISTICS This course will review health assessment methods and present basic descriptive, vital statistics, and the concepts of data validity and reliability for measures used in health sciences. The course will also cover definitions of healthrelated statistical terms, data collection methods, analysis and interpretation of data, calculation of healthcare statistical formulas, and methods of presenting statistical data.

HSC 320

HSC 372

HSC 314

ENVIRONMENTAL 3 Credits HEALTH A survey of the environmental factors that are the most important determinants of the health status of the community, including problems associated with contamination of air, water, food, and soil; and such physical hazards as radiation, solid wastes, and pesticides. Additionally, the course covers an introduction to the issues of environmental health policy and management, emphasizing the competing interests of health risk, environmental preservation, and the economic considerations of policies and management practices. HSC 350 EPIDEMIOLOGY 3 Credits Overview of the epidemiological methods used to identify and control the outbreak of human diseases. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of the distribution and determinants of disease, disability, disorders, morbidity and mortality in human populations. HSC 355

LIFESTYLE AND 3 Credits COMMUNICABLE DISEASES Study of the etiology, control, and prevention of communicable and lifestyle-related chronic diseases. Emphasis is placed on the cause, prevention, and treatment of heart disease, diabetes, hypertension, cancer, STDs, and emerging contagious diseases. HSC 358

HEALTH PLANNING AND PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT

3 Credits

HSC 371

INSTRUCTIONAL 3 Credits METHODS IN HEALTH EDUCATION Theory, research and practice of a variety of individual, small group and large group instructional strategies utilized in health education and health behavior change programs in school, community and/or clinical settings. HSC 373

OCUPATIONAL HEALTH 3 Credits AND SAFETY The study of major environmental and occupational factors that contribute to development of health problems in industrialized and developed countries. Worksite health programs and safety issues are analyzed. HSC 413

MENTAL AND 3 Credits EMOTIONAL HEALTH Study and analysis of the fundamental concepts of mental health, mental illness, and emotional wellness. Emphasis is placed on etiology, symptomology, treatment, and prevention of mental illness. Includes an overview of stress and contemporary methods associated with stress management. HSC 452 HEALTH AND AGING 3 Credits This course focuses upon changes in aspects of health during the middle and later years of life. Emphasis is placed on the demographics of population aging and identification of social, psychological and physical issues and trends associated with human aging. Common causes of morbidity and mortality explored as they relate to the

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aged. Additional attention is provided to the psychosocial and economic needs of the elderly as well as to those aspects of gerontology, which deal with legislation and community organization.

development, environmental health, oral re-hydration in primary healthcare, education, HIV/AIDS, and indigenous infectious diseases.

HSC 453 WOMEN’S HEALTH 3 Credits Examines current and historical influences on women’s health throughout the life span. Anthropological, epidemiological, sociological, and political factors relating to specific health issues are presented. In addition to gender, the variables of race and class are examined as they affect women’s health.

HSC 457 URBAN HEALTH 3 Credits An introduction to public health problems encountered within urban environments. Examines the impact of social and political forces on the health of urban populations and describes roles for public health professionals in promoting health of urban communities.

HSC 454 MINORITY HEALTH 3 Credits Examines the causes and effects of the growing disparity in the health status of African Americans, Hispanics, and Native Americans compared with the general population of the United States. Examines the major contributors to this disparity: cancer, cardiovascular disease, chemical dependency, infectious disease (including AIDS), diabetes, homicide, and infant mortality. Discusses disease prevention and health promotion strategies to help reduce morbidity and mortality within minority populations.

HSC 458

ALTERNATIVE HEALTH 3 Credits PRACTICES AND COMPlEMENTARY MEDICINE This course explores the proliferation, acceptance, and infusion of alternative health practices in society and the emergence of accepted complementary medicine. Cultural health practices and scientific study of these non-traditional healthcare practices will be evaluated.

MATERNAL, 3 Credits INFANT, CHILD, AND ADOLESCENT HEALTH An overview of current maternal, infant, child, and adolescent health issues that are commonly encountered in a variety of public health practice and policy arenas. Emphasis is placed on the major health concerns throughout the life stages of women, infants, children, and adolescents. Risk factors and prevention strategies are emphasized. National maternal and child health indicators are examined and discussed.

NUTRITION, OBESITY, 3 Credits AND WEIGHT MANAGEMENT Introduction to principles and concepts of nutrition and how dietary practices affect health and disease. Examines factors in obesity and weight control, emphasizing techniques in behavior modification and lifestyle change for effective weight management. Additionally, this course examines the principles of normal and clinical human nutrition applied to various stages in life, especially as they relate to disease prevention, obesity, fitness, and weight control. Factors that influence human nutrition needs and eating patterns are also explored.

HSC 456

HSC 460

HSC 455

WORLD HEALTH 3 Credits PROBLEMS, PROGRAMS, AND RESOURCES Examines major international health problems of underdeveloped, developed, and emerging nations. This course also explores the roles and types of international health organizations, including financing institutions, implementing institutions, research entities, technical support entities, and coordinating bodies. Organizations such as USAID, World Bank, UNICEF, WHO, and other private and non-governmental voluntary organizations are described and compared. World-related health topics include infant mortality, maternal health, primary healthcare, health economics, essential drugs, gender and

HSC 459

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY 3 Credits AND HEALTH An introduction to principles and practices of exercise physiology and the role of a regular physical fitness program. Emphasis is placed on the benefits and promotion of regular physical activity in the prevention of chronic disease. Additionally, students explore developing and managing fitness and wellness programs in the corporate, community, school or commercial setting. HSC 465

HEALTH LAW AND 3 Credits ETHICS A study and analysis of health law and ethics. An examination of the ethical rules, principles, and theories as they relate to public health practice and the delivery of

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HSC 494

GRANT WRITING IN 3 Credits PUBLIC HEALTH Designed to make students familiar with the steps of the grant proposal process, explore the various sources of grants available to health professionals and develop skills and competencies to successfully write grant proposals.

health services through individual and institutional providers. Issues in health care ethics will be explored, with emphasis on their impact on delivery and administration of health care, and the personal ethical dilemmas they impose upon the health care professional. Issues included are general health care ethics, the right to health care, allocation of scarce resources, control of death, and human experimentation.

1 Credit PUBLIC HEALTH PREPAREDNESS AND RESPONSE TO TERRORIST ATTACK INVOLVING WMD An introduction to terrorism and public health preparedness, defense, planning, training, and future responses to weapons of mass destruction attacks. Emphasis is placed on chemical, biological, & radiological terrorism threat agents/weapons, responding to nuclear attacks, personal protective measures against CBR attacks, decontamination operations and resources, and first aid treatment for CBR contamination. Students will be provided the opportunity to become nationally certified. HSC 496 HEALTH AND FITNESS 1 Credit TRAINER The study and practice of the fields of health and fitness instructor and advanced personal training. This course will prepare students to become certified personal trainers and health & fitness instructors. Students will be provided the opportunity to become nationally certified. HSC 495

HSC 466 CONSUMER HEALTH 3 Credits Examines health products and services, advertising, marketing, quackery and government control, and guidelines for consumer action when deception, misrepresentation, or fraud is encountered. Methods of critical analysis are used to evaluate the credibility of claims made in the marketplace as well as by government. Consumer protection and rights, marketing, science, public agenda setting, and special interest groups are also studied with the objective of developing critical health consumers. Students will become more informed consumers of health products and services. HSC 491

RESEARCH IN HEALTH 3 Credits EDUCATION AND PROMOTION A study of the organization of health education and health promotion programs. A consideration of the role of the health educator, promoter, and administrator in effectively working with public and private health industries and agencies, which provide health programs. This course will also examine health beliefs of individuals across the life span. Health practices imbedded in diverse cultures will be explored. Barriers to healthy behaviors are addressed through examination of health promotion and health education models. SPECIAL TOPICS IN 3 Credits PUBLIC HEALTH An in-depth study of a particular health topic, contemporary health issue/concern or new health practice. This course provides students with the opportunity to conduct research and write extensively on a special topic of interest.

HSC 497

MASTER FITNESS 1 Credit TRAINER AND HEALTH EDUCATOR A review and in-depth exploration of the skills and knowledge necessary to become a military Master Fitness Trainer/Health Educator and provide fitness and health education instruction. This course prepares students to become a Certified Master Fitness Trainer to serve the military. Students will be provided the opportunity to become nationally certified.

HSC 492

HSC 493

PRACTIUM IN HEALTH 3 Credits EDUCATION AND PROMOTION Enables students to apply skills and knowledge in an applied setting through a supervised field training experience in a public health setting that complements the student’s interests and career goals.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION & RECREATION

HPE 101

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 2 Credits AND RECREATION The primary purpose of this course is to provide an opportunity for all students to acquire knowledge and motor skills in major and minor sports, along with regular physical exercise and health information.

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HPE 102

PERSONAL AND 3 Credits COMMUNITY HEALTH Analysis of current personal and community health problems and how solutions can be achieved in and through starting health agencies and school health programs.

HPE 307

HPE 204 FIRST AID AND SAFETY 3 Credits Fundamentals of First Aid and emergency response. Instruction in fundamentals of first aid and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and general emergency responses.

HPE 308

HPE 250

INTRODUCTION TO 3 Credits PHYSICAL EDUCATION Orientation to the physical education profession in regard to history, objectives, relationships, and the importance of the field in American life. Students are afforded the opportunity of evaluating their personal fitness for the profession. Some principles of first aid are included. (Formerly HPE 300) 3 Credits THEORY AND PRACTICE OF TEACHING INDIVIDUAL SPORTS Prerequisites: EDU 390, 400 This course is designed to develop the skills and knowledge necessary to teach the sports of archery, badminton, golf, aquatics and tennis. With these skills the student will be able to orchestrate the learning environment for physical education students. HPE 302

HPE 303 RHYTHMICS 3 Credits This orientation course is designed to provide students with the fundamental skills and basic understanding of folk, square, and social dances. HPE 304

THEORY AND 3 Credits METHODS OF TEACHING TEAM SPORTS Prerequisite: EDU 390,400 This course is to prepare prospective physical education teachers to teach a variety of team sports for grades K-12. It involves the application of curricular, instructional, and management methods in the teaching team sports. The course also involves skill development, error analysis and correction, teaching methods, and assessment.

THEORY OF 3 Credits COACHING Prerequisite: HPE 101 This course presents an overview of coaching a variety of sports in the junior high school, senior high school and recreational programs with emphasis on the following: conditioning, training methods, drug use in athletics, public recreation, legal aspect of athletics, dealing with college recruiters, awards, officials, values, budget, equipment and staff members. COACHING 3 Credits BASKETBALL The organization, fundamental skills, techniques and strategy of coaching basketball theory and practice. HPE 309 COACHING BASEBALL 3 Credits The organization, fundamental skills, techniques and strategy of coaching baseball theory and practice. HPE 310

COMMUNITY 3 Credits RECREATION A course of study devoted to planning, organizing, and implementing recreation programs and activities. Organizations, agencies and groups having a responsibility for recreational activities in the community are introduced. HPE 311 GYMNASTICS 3 Credits Organization, supervision, skill development and administration techniques needed for teaching and coaching gymnastics. Laboratory experience required. HPE 312

EXERCISE 3 Credits PHYSIOLOGY Prerequisites: BIO 321 or consent of the instructor and approval of the division chairperson. A study of the physiological aspects of sports and physical activity. Laboratory experience required. HPE 313

ADAPTIVE PHYSICAL EDUCATION 3 Credits Prerequisite: EDU 360 A study of normal and faulty body mechanics and common deviations found among school children; practice and interpretation of findings; organization of programs in physical education for the individual who is psychologically or orthopedic ally handicapped.

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HPE 314

OFFICIATING SPORTS, 3 Credits PRINCIPLES & TECHNIQUES A course designed to present a basic approach to officiating sports, to develop a set of guiding principles for an official to use in handling a contest, and to judge wisely and efficiently the circumstances of a game. HPE 315

RECREATION 3 Credits LEADERSHIP Prerequisite: HPE 310 This course is designed to help students improve and better understand leadership and programming skills, theories, and techniques in relation to community, therapeutic, commercial, and outdoor recreation services.

This course is designed to explore various methods and techniques of teaching physical education activities in grades 6-12, with emphasis on the study of current program content design and teaching techniques. HPE 322 MOTOR LEARNING 3 Credits A study of the various factors affecting the acquisition of motor skills. HPE 330 KINESIOLOGY 3 Credits Prerequisite: BIO 321 A study of human movement from the perspective of anatomy and biomechanics, with emphasis on the analysis of sport-skill movement.

utilized in clinical and non-clinical settings are taught. The therapeutic recreation process, theories, scope of practice and components of professionalism are initially applied to the practice setting.

HEALTH IN 3 Credits ELEMENTARY SCHOOL Prerequisite: EDU 330,331,390,400 This course is designed to help prospective teachers strengthen basic skills and methods for producing materials for effective presentation and instruction in the elementary school (K-8); structured to investigate current trends, methods of instruction, and curriculum designs in teaching health education at the elementary level.

HPE 317

OUTDOOR 3 Credits RECREATION Prerequisite: HPE 310 Resources and needs for outdoor recreation; managing people and natural resources to provide quality outdoor recreation experiences. Study of historic, social, political, economic, and environmental factors influencing natural resources recreation at federal, state, and local levels.

HPE 352

HPE 320

HPE 360

HPE 316

THERAPEUTIC 3 Credits RECREATION Prerequisite: HPE 310 This course prepares students for the utilization of activities for rehabilitative and habilitative purposes. The therapeutic recreation specialist’s role and activity; skills

HEALTH IN THE 3 Credits SECONDARY SCHOOL Prerequisite: EDU 330,331,390,400, This course is designed to explore various methods and techniques of teaching health in the secondary school level (6-12). Principles in organizing and integrating materials and methods, with emphasis on developing new and creative ways of teaching health are included. HPE 321

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 3 Credits IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL Prerequisite: EDU 330,331,390,400

HPE 351

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 3 Credits IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL Prerequisite: EDU 330,331,390,400 Instructional activities, methods and materials designed to develop basic loco motor, non-loco motor, and manipulative skill patterns in young children, including rhythms, games of low organization, and self-testing methods. SCHOOL HEALTH 3 Credits PROGRAMS A study of the total school health program involving health services, healthful school living, and health instruction including an analysis of public health laws relating to schools. Pre-internship or field experience required. HPE 400

ORGANIZATION & 3 Credits ADMINISTRATION OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION Prerequisite: EDU 330,331,390,400

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This course is designed to meet the needs of students who will plan, direct, supervise, and construct physical education programs in relation to the total school program. Special attention is placed on organization, supervision and administration. HPE 401

CARE AND 3 Credits PREVENTION OF ATHLETIC INJURIES Prerequisite: HPE 204 The principles of emergency action in case of accidents and special care of the injured are presented. Special attention is given to prevention and care of athletic injuries with laboratory experience in bandaging, splinting, and artificial respiration. HPE 411

HEALTH: ISSUES, 3 Credits TRENDS, AND PROBLEMS A study of health problems and health education, implications of current trends, problems and issues including drug abuse, alcohol, smoking, venereal disease, and other critical problems. HPE 412

AREA AND FACILITIES 3 Credits MANAGEMENT Prerequisite: HPE 310 This course provides an opportunity for students to analyze the planning, design commercial recreation areas (indoor and outdoor) and facilities. Survey of design, function, aesthetics as well as meeting program needs will be addressed. HPE 450

RECREATION 12 Credits INTERNSHIP Prerequisite: EDU 330,331,390,400 Experience in recreation planning, leadership, supervision, and program evaluation through work in recreation, park, and other leisure-oriented settings. This in-service is supervised and controlled by Faculty members and personnel from recreation agencies.

HISTORY HIS 111

AFRICAN AMERICAN 3 Credits HISTORY Prerequisite: REA 202 A topical survey of the African American experience, including the African beginnings, Peculiar Institution, Harlem Renaissance, Depression, and the Civil Rights Movement. Trends in African American thought are examined in light of the socio-economics of African Americans. HIS 211

WORLD HISTORY 3 Credits SURVEY I A survey course designed to acquaint the student with the main events and developments ranging from the early ancient period to the late Middle Ages. The history of Asia, Africa, and Europe is considered as well as ancient American Indian civilizations. HIS 212

WORLD HISTORY 3 Credits SURVEY II A survey course designed to study the main events and developments from the age of discovery to the twentieth century: Renaissance, Reformation, Scientific Revolution, the rise of modern industry, the great political revolutions, major war, and cultural changes. HIS 250

UNITED STATES 3 Credits HISTORY I An in-depth study of the United States, from the Age of Exploration to the Civil War, including political, cultural, social, and economic developments. HIS 260

UNITED STATES 3 Credits HISTORY II An in-depth study of the United States history from the Civil War to the present, including political, cultural, social, and economic developments as well as contemporary developments. HIS 301

HPE 458

NUTRITION AND 3 Credits HEALTH An introduction to the functions of nutrients and nutrient allowances; model for health diets; the role of nutrition in prevention and treatment of diseases of major public health importance; and basic strategies of nutrition education.

HISTORY OF THE 3 Credits THIRD WORLD A historical survey of Africa, China, and South America, since 1900, focusing on imperialism, nationalism, socialism, independence movement, and current events. Major ideologies, economic problems, social systems, and other important trends are also considered.

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HIS 311

AFRICAN AMERICAN 3 Credits HISTORY I A survey of experiences of African Americans up to 1865: Africa, the international triangular slave trade, slavery in the Caribbean and South America. Emphasis is placed on the North American experience, with indepth analyses of race relations in the United States, north and south, according to the institution of slavery. HIS 312

AFRICAN AMERICAN 3 Credits HISTORY II Prerequisite: HIS 311 or consent of instructor A survey of the African American experience from the end of the Civil War to the present. Legal, social, intellectual and cultural perceptions of the meaning of citizenship for African Americans are explored. HIS 320

HISTORY OF THE 3 Credits AMERICAN SOUTH Highlights the history of the American South, emphasizing the ante-bellum period, including slavery and social relations, which grew out of it, racism and race relations during Reconstruction and after, the Populist Movement, the Depression, and the Civil Rights Movement. HIS 331 AFRICA BEFORE 1800 3 Credits A survey of the history of Africa from ancient times, including the climate and geography, early politics and trade, Islamic, European, and Asian influence, slavery and the slave trade. HIS 332 AFRICA SINCE 1800 3 Credits A survey of pre-colonial and post-colonial Africa, including examination of pre-colonial African kingdoms, the impact of colonial policies on pre-colonial Africa, and the struggle for African independence, liberation and hegemony. HIS 341

EUROPE TO THE REFORMATION 3 Credits A survey course beginning with the early civilizations of Egypt, Greece, and Rome; continuing through the Medieval Period, with emphasis on Christendom in Europe, the social, economic, and political relations of that period, and the decline of feudalism; the Renaissance, Reformation, and emergence of capitalism are also explored.

HIS 342

EUROPE SINCE REFORMATION 3 Credits A survey of the development of nation-states in Europe and the bourgeois revolutions of the eighteenth century, leading to the development during the past two centuries of modern capitalist society in Western Europe. HIS 411

AFRICAN AMERICAN 3 Credits HISTORY SURVEY This course is a survey of the African American experience. It includes the African beginnings, the Harlem Renaissance, the Depression, and the Civil Rights Movement. (A “CLIMB� Program component.) HIS 430

SURVEY OF THE 3 Credits HISTORY OF ENGLAND A survey of English history from prehistoric times to the present, including the following periods: Roman and Saxon, Reformation, Stuarts, Eighteenth Century, Inter war, World War II, and Labor.

HUMANITIES HUM 201

INTRODUCTION TO 3 Credits FINE ARTS Prerequisite: REA 202 This course is designed to introduce students to the humanities: philosophy, religion, art, literature, music, film, theatre, dance, literature, painting, sculpture, and architecture. The major emphasis here in on Western World Humanities. This emphasis, however, does not preclude the study of contributions from Eastern cultures. (Formerly HUM 202) HUM 203

WORLD VIEW IN LITERATURE I 3 Credits Prerequisite: HUM 201 This course facilitates the study of major literary masterpieces or classics from antiquity to the end of the Middle Ages. HUM 204

WORLD VIEW IN LITERATURE II 3 Credits Prerequisite: HUM 201 This course facilitates the study of major literary masterpieces or classics from the end of the Middle Ages to the present.

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HUM 215

HONORS SEMINAR IN 3 Credits WORLD LITERATURE This course facilitates an in-depth analysis of six or more major literary works. These masterpieces in thought, truth and ideas must give "Keys to the Meaning of Life"; moreover, they must be especially significant for the development of convergent and divergent thinking and reasoning. The in-depth analyses will be presented and shared through dynamic classroom discussions and the presentation of formal papers.

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

also include the role and influence of multinational corporations and other non-governmental organizations, which complicate negotiations and relations with “new nations” in the international political system. INR 403 INTERNATIONAL LAW 3 Credits A survey course of the role of law in conferring legitimacy on national and civic. The International Court of Justice and International Law Commission will be examined to reflect an understanding of the nature, sources and effect of international law.

CONTEMPORARY 3 Credits WORLD: PROBLEMS AND IDEOLOGIES Prerequisite: POS 200 A survey course of the state of the world, its global issues and problems such as wars, refugees, hunger, disease, and homelessness. The course will also analyze the political and economic differences between the North and South, East and West, in a world of competing political ideologies.

INTERNATIONAL 3 Credits AND REGIONAL ORGANIZATIONS A study of ideas of visionaries in the quest for peace. The League of Nations and United Nations as representatives of advanced organizations are compared to earlier experiments. Emphases also include governmental or non-government organizations such as OAS, OAU, EEC; the IMF, World Bank, or defense arrangements (NATO & WTO) as examples and experimental plans for peacekeeping, economic cooperation, de-colonization, and human rights.

INR 251

INR 433

INR 250

INTERNATIONAL 3 Credits POLITICS Prerequisite: POS 200 A survey course of the world of unequal states, powers, and interests, which create tensions that, attract the use of power to solve economic, social and policy matters. Although attention is paid to conflicts like World War I & II and civil wars, the politics of Eastern and Western Europe and other Super Powers are explored. INR 301

INTERNATIONAL 3 Credits RELATIONS A study of theoretical and practical methods employed by nation-states in their relations, past and present with other nation-states. The course also explores the power systems with regard to international organizations, politics, law, economics, war, diplomacy, and peace in the contemporary world. INR 312

INTERNATIONAL 3 Credits POLITICAL ECONOMY Prerequisite: ECO 210 A survey course, which explores various international political economies through the examination of their theoretical foundations and national policies. Topics

INR 405

FOREIGN POLICY ANALYSIS 3 Credits The course demonstrates the relationship of domestic policy to foreign policy. The roles of the Chief Executive-- President, Head of State or Prime Minister as the case may be --are discussed as well as the part played by the Department of State, public opinion and other foreign policy variables.

JOURNALISM JOU 195

NEWSPAPER 1 Credit PRODUCTION I Emphasis will be placed on news reporting techniques. Newspaper production courses require students to serve on the staff of the campus newspaper “Edwardian Today”. JOU 196

NEWSPAPER 1 Credit PRODUCTION II Emphasis will be placed on newspaper design. Newspaper production courses require students to serve on the staff of the campus newspaper “Edwardian Today”.

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JOU 197

NEWSPAPER 1 Credit PRODUCTION III Emphasis will be placed on writing styles. Newspaper production courses require students to serve on the staff of the campus newspaper “Edwardian Today”. JOU 198

NEWSPAPER 1 Credit PRODUCTION IV Emphasis will be placed on newspaper management techniques. Newspaper production courses require students to serve on the staff of the campus newspaper “Edwardian Today”. JOU 250

FUNDAMENTALS OF 3 Credits JOURNALISM Involves a laboratory in journalistic writing and a thorough review of grammar, spelling and punctuation. JOU 260

HISTORY OF 3 Credits JOURNALISM Prerequisite MAC 251 A comprehensive study of the development of journalism in America. JOU 305

PRINCIPLES OF 3 Credits PUBLIC RELATIONS Prerequisite: MAC 251 A survey of theories, principles, and practices of communicating to internal and external publics of an organization. JOU 310

PUBLIC AFFAIRS 3 Credits REPORTING Prerequisites: MAC 301 This course provides practice in the reporting of governmental affairs. Emphasis will be on coverage of the judicial, legislative, and executive branches of government. JOU 315

INVESTIGATIVE 3 Credits REPORTING Prerequisite: MAC 301 This course will focus on investigative reporting of governmental affairs. Emphasis will be on coverage of the judicial, legislative, and executive branches of government. JOU 320

EDITORIAL WRITING

Practice in research and writing opinions on local, state, national and international issues. JOU 350 PHOTO JOURNALISM 3 Credits A study of the concepts, practices, and functions of the use of photographs in newspapers, magazines, brochures, and television. Laboratory experience in photography and darkroom procedures may be required. JOU 401

COPY EDITING AND MAKE-UP 3 Credits Prerequisite: MAC 301 Theory and practice in the preparation of copy and illustrations for printing.

MANAGEMENT MAN 300

FUNDAMENTALS OF 3 Credits MANAGEMENT An introduction to the theories, techniques and concepts of management and its functions. Planning, organizing, motivating, influencing and controlling will be examined as means to solving management and group functioning problems. Topics include the classical, behavioral and systems approaches to managing, negotiation, efficiency and effectiveness. (Formerly ADM 301) MAN 306

PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION 3 Credits An examination of the principles and methods of efficient labor management and the maintenance of harmonious relations between management and employees. (Formerly HRM 306) (NOT FOR CLIMB) MAN 310

GROUP AND 3 Credits ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR Introduction to theoretical behavioral science concepts applied to formal organizational structures. Exposes the student to a variety of responses for dealing with issues of human relations and management. Topics include individual and group behavior in organizations, group dynamics, solving communication problems and conflict, implementing change, perceptions, attitudes and motivation. (NOT FOR CLIMB) MAN 312

HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

3 Credits

3 Credits

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This course investigates communication and relationships in creating a productive work environment. Effectiveness in personal and social relationships is also covered through readings and exercises concerning non-verbal communication, constructive feedback, dealing with anger and resolving conflict. Students develop a model for effective communication. (NOT FOR CLIMB) MAN 340

BUSINESS 3 Credits COMMUNICATION/ REPORT WRITING A study of techniques for the collection and presentation of technical or business information. Course includes research methods; technical descriptions and definitions; organizing, abstracting, formatting, and preparing reports. MAN 360 STRATEGIC 3 Credits MANAGEMENT This module introduces adult learners to various management planning models and techniques and applies these to actual business cases. It stresses the concepts of strategic planning and strategic management. (A “CLIMB” Program component.) MAN 362

HUMAN CAPITAL 3 Credits MANAGEMENT Learners explore the values and perceptions of selected groups affecting social and economic life through an analysis of policies and practices of recruitment, selection, training, development and compensation of employees. Special attention is given to Equal Employment Opportunity and Office of Safety and Health Administration legislation through a series of case studies and simulations. (A “CLIMB” Program component.) MAN 366

PERSONNEL 3 Credits ADMINISTRATION Students examine management control functions, strategic planning, and organizational structure and design. Also examines are motivational theory and its application to individual and group functioning in work and home situations. Total quality management, organizational design, work force diversity and successful negotiating strategies receive attention. MAN 370

GROUP AND TEAM DYNAMICS

3 Credits

This module is a study of group and team behavior and how group functioning affects organizational effectiveness. Emphasis is placed on decision making and resolving conflict in groups. Learners develop strategies for efficient and productive group management, and determine which tasks groups or individuals handle. (.A “CLIMB” Program Component) MAN 400

MANAGEMENT 3 Credits PRINCIPLES Adult learners will examine the foundations and traditional approaches of management principles: planning, organizing, leading, and controlling. This incorporates the elements of delivering strategic value, building a dynamic organization, mobilizing people, and learning and changing. Leadership and collaboration is integrated with direct applications to the individual and group functioning in today’s business environment. (.A “CLIMB” Program Component) MAN 401 FINANCIAL 3 Credits MANAGEMENT Prerequisite: At least 18 Credits in business A study of corporate organization and control, financial analysis, corporate securities, management of fixed capital and income, reserve surplus and undivided profits, investment banking, and the securities market. MAN 405

WORD PROCESSING 3 Credits MANAGEMENT A business-writing course providing practice in word processing applications using commercial word processing software. MAN 420

OFFICE PROCEDURES 3 Credits MANAGEMENT Practice in a wide range of duties and responsibilities involved in repro-graphics, financial records, and work planning. MAN 430 ORGANIZATIONAL 3 Credits AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT Prerequisite: MAN 300 This course provides students with the management skills to plan, schedule, organize and control project activities (including fund raising, programs, meetings, workshops, conferences, etc.) as well as to observe techniques of objective assessment of activities and outcomes and quality control.

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MAN 431

BUSINESS 3 Credits COMMUNICATIONS This module investigates communication and relationships in creating a productive work environment. Effectiveness in personal and social relationships is also covered through readings and exercises concerning nonverbal communication, constructive feedback, dealing with anger, and resolving conflict. Learners develop a model for effective relationships. (A “CLIMB” Program component) MAN 450

PRODUCT, 3 Credits OPERATIONS, LOGISTIC MGMT. & CONTROL Prerequisite: Senior year only Students examine the formal and informal functions of organizations and analyze an agency and solve organizational problems using step-by-step methods. The course covers the development of understanding and appreciation of theories, design and control of production, logistic functions, and control of operations. (NOT FOR CLIMB) MAN 460

ORGANIZATIONAL 3 Credits BEHAVIOR Learners examine the formal and informal functions of organizations and analyze an agency or organization based on a systems model. Learners will also analyze and solve organizational problems using a step-by-step method. This analysis will be applied to learners’ workrelated projects. (A “CLIMB” Program component.) MAN 462

MANAGEMENT 3 Credits INFORMATION SYSTEMS Prerequisite: CIS 201 is required for CIS majors. The delivery and use of information in organizational decision-making are examined. Topics covered include system theory; system type, for example, strategic, tactical and operational; user considerations including roles and system user-interface; ethical and societal issues; and system evolution. MAN 490

ENTREPRENEURSHIP/ EXIT EXAM 3 Credits Practical experience in utilizing business principles, theories, and practices in designing a business. An assessment of the major course of study.

MASS COMMUNICATIONS MAC 251

INTRODUCTION 3 Credits TO MASS COMMUNICATIONS An introduction to mass media in America via a comprehensive survey of the role and influence of newspapers, magazines, records, radio, and television. MAC 301

REPORTING AND 3 Credits WRITING Prerequisite: ENG 102 Theory and practice in news writing, emphasis will be placed on style, proofreading, and the arrangement of facts in a story. MAC 315 MASS MEDIA IN 3 Credits SOCIETY Prerequisite: MAC 251 This course explores how various media cover issues and general news that affect society and how people react to mass media. MAC 320

MASS MEDIA AND 3 Credits POPULAR CULTURE Genres including documentaries and docudramas and their influence on public perception of issues and events. MAC 410

MINORITIES AND 3 Credits MASS MEDIA An examination of the relationship between minority groups and the mass media in America with emphasis on content, stereotyping, ownership, and programming. MAC 450 MASS MEDIA LAW 3 Credits Prerequisite: MAC 251 An examination of the legal concepts and precedents in the areas of libel, privacy, copyright, freedom of the press, obscenity, and broadcast regulation. MAC 460

MASS MEDIA 3 Credits MANAGEMENT Prerequisites: MAC 251 An introduction to the basics of managing the media as a business. Topics covered include personnel, financing, advertising, programming, and audience research.

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MAC 490

SENIOR SEMINAR 3 Credits PRACTICUM/ EXIT EXAM Prerequisites: Senior status and or instructor’s consent The purpose of this course is to give students practical experience to sharpen and integrate their skills in communications.

MATHEMATICS MAT 098 BASIC MATHEMATICS 4 Credits Prerequisites: None This is a college preparatory course designed for students who have had little or no algebra. Topics include sets, real numbers and their properties, exponents and polynomials, linear equations and linear inequalities, roots and radicals, and graphing in two variables. The course includes a mandatory lab. Credits do not meet requirements for graduation. MAT 099

GENERAL 3 Credits MATHEMATICS I Prerequisites: MAT 098 or satisfactory score on placement test This course includes signed numbers, linear equations and inequalities, polynomials. factoring polynomial, algebraic function, radicals, quadratic equations and linear equations with two variables. Credits do not meet requirements for graduation. MAT 104 COLLEGE ALGEBRA 3 Credits Prerequisite: MAT 100 or satisfactory score on placement test The real number system, linear equations and inequalities, quadratic equations, polynomials, rational expressions, functions, coordinates in the plane, exponents and radicals are studied. MAT 105 FINITE MATHEMATICS 3 Credits Prerequisite: MAT 104 or satisfactory score on placement test Set theory, Venn diagrams, logic, properties and measurement or geometric figures, probability of specified outcome, measures of central tendency, and dispersion properties of normal curve graphical representation of data and introduction to computers are studied. MAT 190 “CLAST” MATHEMATICS 3 Credits Prerequisite: Low CLAST math test score.

A comprehensive course, which includes the most tangible topics in general mathematics, algebra, geometry, statistics and measurement. It is designed to include the classic types of problems found on contemporary and relevant examinations-especially the CLAST test. Designed for students who need to retake the Math portion of CLAST. The 3 credits do not fulfill the requirement for graduation. MAT 201

HISTORY OF 3 Credits MATHEMATICS Topics will be chosen from the History of Mathematics, which starts when number systems were invented and continues to this day. For example, number theory and geometry have been studied thousands of years. The contributions from great mathematicians such as Archimedes, Newton, Leibnitz, Euler, and Gauss will be discussed. MAT 240 MODERN GEOMETRY 3 Credits Prerequisite: MAT 105 In this course both Euclidean plane geometry and nonEuclidean geometries are investigated. Also included is a discussion of geometric transformations. This course is intended for mathematics education majors in their second year of study MAT 251 TRIGONOMETRY 3 Credits Prerequisites: MAT 104 Theorems about triangles, trigonometric functions, identities and equations, inverse trigonometric functions, and graphs of trigonometric functions are examined. MAT 255 PRE-CALCULUS 3 Credits Various functions for studying calculus courses; functions, inverse functions, polynomial and rational functions, exponential functions, logarithmic functions, trigonometry functions, graphs of linear, quadratic functions, circles, ellipses, solving equations involving radicals and absolute signs are explored. MAT 260

ELEMENTARY 3 Credits STATISTICS Prerequisite: MAT 104 An introduction to frequency distributions, counting techniques, probability, distribution functions, estimation, testing, hypothesis, regression, correlation. (Same course as PSY 260, Statistics for Behavioral Sciences) MAT 271

CALCULUS W/ ANALYTIC 4 Credits GEOMETRY I

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Prerequisite: MAT 251, MAT 255 An introduction to analytical geometry, functions, limits, and differentiation of trigonometric functions. (Note: Same course as “Calculus I” in many institutions; not same as “brief” or “business” Calculus.) MAT 272

CALCULUS W/ 4 Credits ANALYTIC GEOMETRY II Prerequisite: MAT 271 The theory of the integral, applications of integral, exponential, and logarithmic functions and indeterminate forms of improper integrals are explored. (Note: Same course as “Calculus I” in many institutions; not same as “brief” or “business” Calculus.) MAT 273 NUMBER THEORY 3 Credits Prerequisite: MAT 105 An investigation of properties of the integers including the Euclidean and Division Algorithms, Prime Factorization, Diophantine Equations, and Congruencies. INTRODUCTION TO SET 3 Credits THEORY/LOGIC Fundamental Theory for Modern Mathematics. Logical Operations, Algebra of Logic, Set Operations, Algebra of Set, Equivalence Relations, Propositions of functions, Quantification, Infinite Sets, Cardinality, Mathematical Induction.

MAT 363 NUMERICAL ANALYSIS 3 Credits Prerequisites: MAT 272 Polynomial interpolations, roots of equations, solutions of nonlinear equations, matrices, determinants; numerical integration and differentiation, direct and indirect methods of solution of a system of linear equations, error analysis, numerical calculations of Eigen values, and eigenvectors, norms and error estimates. MAT 401 ABSTRACT ALGEBRA 3 Credits Prerequisite: MAT 302 An introduction to the basic concept of modern algebra. Groups, rings, integral domains, fields, and elementary number theory. MAT 402

DIFFERENTIAL 3 Credits EQUATIONS Prerequisite: MAT 310 Linear equations with constant coefficients, first-order and second-order linear equations, numerical techniques, and boundary value problems are examined.

MAT 290

MAT 302

ELEMENTARY LINEAR 3 Credits ALGEBRA Prerequisite: MAT 104, MAT 290 Linear equations, matrices and determinants, vector spaces, linear transformations, and canonical forms. MAT 305

PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS 4 Credits Prerequisite: MAT 260 or PSY 260 or ADM 304 Introduction to probability theory, discrete and continuous random variables, mathematical expectations, distribution theory, sampling distributions and hypothesis testing. MAT 310 CALCULUS III 4 Credits Prerequisite: MAT 272 Infinite series, polar coordinates, three-dimensional analytic geometry, multiple integration, and elementary differential equations are examined.

MAT 403 ADVANCED CALCULUS 3 Credits Prerequisite: MAT 310 Real numbers, functions, sequences, limits, continuity, uniform continuity, differentiation, integration, convergence, and uniform convergence are examined. MAT 460

SPECIAL TOPICS IN 3 Credits MATHEMATICS Prerequisites: Consent of instructor and approval of division chairperson. Topics can be selected from optimization, operations research, number theory, and complex variables according to the student’s needs. Designed for students who want to pursue further study in mathematics in graduate school. MAT 470

MATHEMATICS 3 Credits SEMINAR/EXIT EXAM Prerequisite: Senior standing A presentation and discussion of selected topics from the major areas of mathematics. Oral and written reports required. A general assessment of learning in the major course of study. Additionally, all students must complete an exit examination and interview with the Department Chairperson.

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SPANISH MLS 251

ELEMENTARY 3 Credits SPANISH I This course offers training in the skills involved in listening, speaking, reading, and writing the Spanish language. Elements of grammar are included. MLS 252

Transposition, modulation and techniques for conducting from the keyboard will be covered MUC 360

PRACTICUM IN 3 Credits CHURCH MUSIC A seminar in church music. In-depth discussions involve the practices, expressions, and elements used in the worship service. Particular emphasis is given to the director’s choice of repertoire, rehearsal preparation, and management skills.

ELEMENTARY 3 Credits SPANISH II Prerequisite: SPA 251 or consent of the instructor. A review and study of more advanced grammar within an extended conversational pattern and the writing of short compositions. Reading of modern Spanish texts with specific emphasis on the historical background and cultural traits of Spain and Hispanic America is included.

SURVEY OF SACRED 2 Credits MUSIC HISTORY Survey of sacred music styles and genres from the medieval period to the present, including chant, hymns, anthems, spirituals, and traditional and contemporary gospel music.

MLS 301

MUC 421

INTERMEDIATE 3 Credits SPANISH III Prerequisite: SPA 252 or consent of the instructor A review and study of more advanced grammar within an extended conversational pattern and the writing of short compositions. Reading of modern Spanish texts with specific emphasis on the historical background and cultural traits of Spain and Hispanic America is included. MLS 302

INTERMEDIATE 3 Credits SPANISH IV Prerequisite: SPA 301 or consent of the instructor A continuation of SPA 301, an advanced study of Spanish grammar, culture, and literature. MLS 390SPECIAL TOPICS 3 Credits 391, 490-491 Prerequisite: SPA 301, 302 or consent of the instructor These courses are designed to provide the forum for further student exploration of Spanish history, language, and culture. Refinement of speaking and writing skills in the language is emphasized.

MUSIC MUC 351

KEYBOARD SKILLS 2 Credits FOR THE CHURCH MUSICIAN A practical keyboard class in playing hymns, anthems, and service music for a variety of denominations.

MUC 420

CHURCH MUSIC 3 Credits ADMINISTRATION This course is designed to equip the church music director with the skills to effectively administer a church music program. Areas of study include organization, planning, and budgeting. MUC 435 HYMNOLOGY 3 A historical study of chants, psalms and hymns, their use in church, and their influence on the cultural history of our society. Special attention will be given to hymnody utilized in the African American Worship experience. MUE 221 STRING METHODS 2 Credits Elementary class instruction in string instruments. Designed for students majoring in music education. Course Fee: $75.00. MUE 321 WOODWIND METHODS 3 Credits Elementary class instruction in flute and double reed instruments. Designed for students majoring in music education. Course fee: $30.00. MUE 331 BRASS METHODS 2 Credits Elementary class instruction in brass instruments. Designed for students majoring in music education. Course fee: $30.00. MUE 341 PERCUSSION METHODS 2 Credits Elementary class instruction in percussion instruments. Designed for students majoring in music education. Course fee: $30.00.

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MUE 342

TECHNIQUES OF 3 Credits MARCHING BAND Current styles and trends of marching band: Concepts, drills, and charting. MUE 431

CHORAL METHODS, 3 Credits TECHNIQUES, AND MATERIALS Organization, administration, and financing of public school choral groups: teaching methods; study materials and rehearsal techniques; choral literature; recruiting. MUE 432

INSTRUMENTAL 3 Credits METHODS, TECHNIQUES, AND MATERIALS Organization, administration, and financing of public and private school bands and orchestras: preparing and programming festival concerts, teaching methods, study materials, and rehearsal techniques, choral literature, recruitment. MUE 437

SEMINAR IN MUSIC 3 Credits EDUCATION The study of the philosophy and rationale of the music education program in the public and private schools. DIRECTED READINGS 3 Credits IN MUSIC EDUCATION Readings and discussions of texts and articles in the foundation literature of music education, with focus on concepts of curriculum development.

MUH 251 MUSIC HISTORY I 3 Credits MUH 252 MUSIC HISTORY II 3 Credits These courses are in-depth surveys of Western Music from the Middle Ages through the twentieth century. Emphasis is placed on examining the stylistic aspects of each period with the assistance of compositions of major composers from each period. MUH 323

HISTORY OF AFRO3 Credits AMERICAN MUSIC A survey of styles arising from black American culture: the African background, spirituals, blues, gospel music and their influence on American and World music. MUS 100 RECITAL ATTENDANCE 0 Credits All students enrolled in applied courses are required to participate in weekly recitals on their principal instrument. MUT 102 BASIC THEORY I 3 Credits This course is designed to familiarize the beginning music major with the fundamental concepts of music theory. The development of basic analytical skills, aural perception, part writing, and awareness of theoretical tools employed in various musical styles of the “ Common Practice Period” are the primary thrust of the course.

MUE 438

MUG 317 BASIC CONDUCTING Prerequisite: MUS 102 and 103 This course explores the basic principles of conducting, including the study of baton techniques, transposition, and score reading. MUG 318

ADVANCED 3 Credits CONDUCTING Prerequisite: MUS 317 This course explores advanced principles of conducting, include an examination of scores with reference to rehearsal and interpretation problems.

MUT 103 BASIC THEORY II 3 Credits Prerequisite: MUT 102 This course is a continuation of MUT 102 and is designed to familiarize the beginning music major with the fundamental concepts of music theory. The development of basic analytical skills, aural perception, part writing, and awareness of theoretical tools employed in various musical styles of the “ Common Practice Period” are the primary thrust of the course. MUT 202 ADVANCED THEORY III 3 Credits Prerequisite:MUT 103 Study of harmonic practices of the eighteenth century; practice in the writing and analysis of compositions in these idioms. MUT 203 ADVANCED THEORY IV 3 Credits Prerequisite: MUT 202 Study of harmonic practices of the late eighteenth century through the 21st century; practice in the writing and analysis of compositions in these idioms.

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MUT 205

INTRODUCTION TO 3 Credits MUSIC TECHNOLOGY This course is an introduction to music technology for the musician and/or music instructor. Topics include synthesizers/samplers, composition, arranging, music printing, and computer assisted instruction. MUT 332 FORM AND ANALYSIS 2 Credits Prerequisite: MUS 203 Includes analysis of melody, harmony, form, tonal structure, color and texture, and of higher-order tonal relationships indicative of Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and Contemporary musical eras. MUT 403 ARRANGING 2 Credits Prerequisite: MUS 203 Study of the ranges, colors, and techniques of instruments and voices. Scoring for homogeneous and mixed ensembles. MVK 111 CLASS PIANO I 1 Credit MVK 112 CLASS PIANO II 1 Credit Prerequisite: MVK 111 Beginning piano classes for music majors and non-music majors. MVV 213 CLASS VOICE 2 Credits Beginning Vocal technique for students without previous instruction in singing. Emphasis is on breath management, resonance, tone production, musicianship, and diction. MVV 231 SURVEY OF DICTION 2 Credits A study of the International Phonetic Alphabet coupled with a survey of Italian, French and German diction for the solo singer and the choral music educator. PRIVATE INSTRUCTION APPLIED MUSIC Private instruction in most instruments and voice. MVB 101-402

APPLIED BRASS

1 Credit

MVK 101-402

APPLIED PIANO

1 Credit

MVP 101-402

APPLIED PERCUSSION 1 Credit

MVS 101-402

APPLIED STRINGS

1 Credit

MVW 101-402 APPLIED WOODWINDS 1 Credit MVV 101-402

APPLIED VOICE

1 Credit

ENSEMBLES – Ensembles are open to all students by audition or permission of the instructor. Membership in performing ensembles is open to all students. Participation in all phases of these programs, including performances and trips are a requirement for membership. MUS 140-441

CHAMBER CHOIR

1 Credit

MUS 150-451

JAZZ BAND

1 Credit

MUS 160-462

CONCERT CHOIR

1 Credit

MUS 171-472

COLLEGE BAND

1 Credit

PHILOSOPHY PHI 201

INTRODUCTION TO 3 Credits PHILOSOPHY This course emphasizes problems and methods of philosophical inquiry such as metaphysics (theories of reality), epistemology (theories of knowledge), axiology (theories of values), and logic (theories of correct thinking). Some attention will be given to major schools of philosophy, including Naturalism, Idealism, and Pragmatism. PHI 305

HISTORY OF WESTERN 3 Credits PHILOSOPHY I Prerequisites: REL 201, PHI 201 This course covers ancient philosophy from Thales to Plotinus in chronological order. PHI 306

HISTORY OF WESTERN 3 Credits PHILOSOPHY II Prerequisite: PHI 305 This course covers modern philosophy from Descartes through pre-Kantians. The course is primarily chronological in approach. PHI 312 LOGIC 3 Credits Prerequisites: REL 201, PHI 201 This course investigates the structure of argumentation, the use of language, formal logic, and fallacious arguments.

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PHI 401 ETHICS 3 Credits Prerequisites: REL 201, PHI 201 An inquiry into the philosophical reflection of human behavior, this course will explore classical, Christian, and modern ethical positions. Problem solving will be a significant feature of this course. PHI 402

SOCIAL AND 3 Credits POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY Prerequisites: REL 201, PHI 201 A study of the major thinkers in social and political rights, and the philosophical basis of democracy, aristocracy, and totalitarianism.

PHYSICAL SCIENCE PHS 201

PHYSICAL SCIENCE 4 Credits WITH LABORATORY Prerequisite: MAT 104 This course deals with basic fundamentals of physical science including chemistry, physics, astronomy, and geology.

PHYSICS PHY 251 GENERAL PHYSICS I 4 Credits Prerequisite: MAT 105, 251 A study of the fundamental concepts of mechanics, heat, and sound; an introduction to the special theory of relativity. Three hours lecture; two hours lab per week. PHY 252 GENERAL PHYSICS II 4 Credits Prerequisite: PHY 251 A study of electricity, magnetism, light, and modern physics. Three hours lecture; two hours lab per week. PHY 271 COLLEGE PHYSICS I 4 Credits W/CALCULUS Prerequisite: MAT 272, PHY 252 or consent of instructor A study of the fundamental laws and theories of physics with an emphasis on mechanics, heat, and sound. Three hours lecture; two hours lab per week. PHY 272

COLLEGE PHYSICS II 4 Credits W/CALCULUS Prerequisite: PHY 271, MAT 272 or consent of instructor

Advanced study of the fundamental laws and theories of physics with emphasis on electricity, magnetism, light, and modern physics. Calculus used in problem solving. Three hours lecture; two hours lab per week. PHY 330

MECHANICS OF 3 Credits SOLIDS Prerequisites: PHY 252 and MAT 272 Vectors, force systems, equilibrium, friction, centroid, movement of inertia, introduction to stress and strain. Hooks Law, Geometric compatibility, shear and bending movement diagrams. PHY 331

MECHANICS AND 4 Credits HEAT Prerequisite: PHY 252, MAT 272 A study of vectors, statics, dynamics, fluid mechanics, and heat. Three hours lecture; two hours lab per week. PHY 332 ELECTRONICS 4 Credits Perquisite: PHY 252 or PHY 272 A study of DC and AC circuit analysis, semiconductor devices such as diodes and transistors, transistor analysis, amplifier circuits, operational amplifiers and oscillators. Digital electronics, analog and digital measurements, and microprocessors are also addressed. Three hours lecture and two hours lab per week. PHY 340

ELECTRICAL CIRCUIT 3 Credits THEORY I Prerequisites: PHY 252, MAT 272 Fundamentals of DC-AC circuit laws, including steady state and transient analysis. PHY 341

ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM 4 Credits Prerequisites: PHY 252, MAT 272 A study of electrostatics, magnetostatics, electric circuits, electromagnetic waves, and Maxwell equation. Three hours lecture; two hours lab per week. PHY 435 MODERN PHYSICS 4 Credits Prerequisites: PHY 252, MAT 272 A study of atomic, molecular, solid-state, and nuclear physics; elements of relativity; and quantum theory. (Formerly PHY 431) Three hours lecture; two hours lab per week.

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POLITICAL SCIENCE POS 200

INTRODUCTION TO 3 Credits POLITICAL SCIENCE This course defines politics as the science and art of government with regard to issues, in different spheres of human activity. It treats such concepts as power and authority. Nations, states, individuals and constitutions form the base of this course. Such concepts as democracy, types of government, ideologies, political parties, legislators, bureaucracies, as well as legal systems are fully discussed. Public policies, foreign policy and international relations are also introduced. POS 201

AMERICAN POLITICAL 3 Credits STRUCTURE A study of the structure and systems of the local, state, and national governments in the United States. The course also includes an introduction to the principles of the federal constitution focusing on the problems of the legislative, executive, and judicial powers of government. POS 250

STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT 3 Credits A study of the structure, functions, powers, and problems of state and local governments and their role in the federal system. POS 251

WOMEN AND 3 Credits POLITICS A course designed to trace the early contributions of women in general, as well as the change in the status of women, which quickened the tempo of their participation in politics. The new relationships between men and women, extend to society - - family, government, business, industry, and the professions. POS 301

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 3 Credits A study of the organization and operations of the international state system, including consideration of nationalism, imperialism, militarism, and foreign policy conducts by nation-states, and international law. POS 307 CARIBBEAN POLITICS 3 Credits Historically, the many nations lying outside the eastern coastal territories of the United States are conveniently grouped as the Caribbean. They range from moderately populated countries to mini-states. Stretching from the

north eastern end across to the territories bordering South America are Cuba, Jamaica, Bermuda, Trinidad, and Tobago, Guyana, the Virgin Islands, etc. Notwithstanding the obvious differences in these countries they are bound by deep-rooted history of peoples from other lands. The history, culture, language, geography, and economy bind them. This course will fully treat both the similarities and dissimilarities of the Caribbean nations. POS 308

GOVERNMENT & 3 Credits POLITICS: NEWLY INDEPENDENT NATIONS A study of old nations with new political perspective. Africa, Asia, and Latin America, as former colonies, are saddled with the problems of under development and inequality, in their economic and international relations. Case studies of new nations with remarkable records of progress will be analyzed. POS 320 CLASSICAL POLITICAL THEORIES 3 Credits A study of classical political theories with focus on Plato, Socrates, Aristotle, Cicero, early Christianity, and St. Augustine, up to the Middle Ages and Machiavellian. (Formerly POS Political Theories) POS 321

MODERN POLITICAL THEORIES 3 Credits A study of early modern and contemporary political thinkers. From Machiavellian, modern political theories span the Reformation, More, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Montesquieu, Marx, Pascal, Hegel, Sorrel, Lincoln, Wilson, Roosevelt, King, revolutions, pacifism, nonresistance, and idealism. POS 403

AFRICAN AMERICAN POLITICS 3 Credits A study of the political experience, movements, and strategies of African Americans. Consideration of accommodation, nationalist, integrationist, civil rights, and black power strategies including the contributions of leaders such as Frederick Douglass, Richard Allen, W. E. B. Dubois, Booker T. Washington, Marcus Garvey, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Malcolm X. POS 404

LATIN AMERICAN POLITICS 3 Credits The organization of American states serves the interest of both the United States and the Latin American countries. This course will dwell on the Latin American

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or South America. Spanish and Portuguese influence are felt in Latin America and affects politics and culture. The economics of Brazil, Argentina, Mexico, and Chile among others are noted by their northern brothers, United States and Canada. Special attention will be paid to the impact of immigration from Latin American countries to the North America. POS 405

INTERNATIONAL 3 Credits AND REGIONAL ORGANIZATIONS A study of the role of global organizations in international politics, including the United Nations, the International Monetary Fund, and the World Court, as well as treaty organizations such as NATO, the EEC, ASEAN, and the Warsaw Pact. POS 406 POLITICS OF ASIA 3 Credits Asia is the largest and most populous continent. More than any other continent, Asia has religions with populations that dwarf it’s adherents in other parts of the world. Confucianism in China, Hinduism in India, Islam in Indonesia and Shintoism in Japan all impact the government and politics of the giant continent. POS 407

MIDDLE EAST 3 Credits POLITICS In the past and at the present time, the Middle East is generally regarded as the crossroads of civilization. Inhabited by Arabs, Jews, Persians, and others and known as the birth place of Christianity, Islam, and Judaism. One or more nation states from this violent convulsive part of the world would be studied. POS 408

COMPARATIVE 3 Credits POLITICS A study of both the selected major and minor nationstates in Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Americas. The study of comparative politics treats the political system in terms of historical development, constitutional and political structures, interests, economics, regimes, socialization, policy making, performance and evaluation. POS 409

AFRICAN POLITICS: 3 Credits NORTH AFRICA AND SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA The African continent comprises at least 48 nation states located in North Africa and Sub-Saharan Africa. They range from both major and minor countries. Each

one of these is worthy of study. It is the purpose of this course to select one or more countries every time the course is offered, bearing in mind that Sub-Saharan Africa dominates in population geography and other features. 3 Credits POLITICAL SCIENCE SEMINAR/ EXIT EXAM An intensive research and seminar investigation of one or more current issues in public administration. A general assessment of learning in the major course of study. POS 410

PSYCHOLOGY PSY 210

GENERAL 3 Credits PSYCHOLOGY Prerequisite: Satisfactory score on Freshman placement test. An introduction to the study of human and animal behavior. A brief study of learning and behavior modification, sensation and perception, personality, social psychology, psychotherapy, motivation and emotion. Also covers individual differences and psychological testing. This course is a prerequisite for all other psychology courses. PSY 260

STATISTICS FOR THE 3 Credits BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE Prerequisite: MAT 104 An introduction to frequency distributions, counting techniques, probability, distribution functions, estimation, testing, hypothesis, regression, correlation, index numbers, and time series. (Same course as MAT 260, Elementary Statistics) PSY 300 BLACK PSYCHOLOGY 3 Credits Prerequisite: PSY 210 This course will utilize a combination of lectures, readings from assigned texts, and articles pertaining to the Black experience in the realm of psychology. The course will provide students with a framework of issues and theories relevant to the Black experience. Students will view psychology and psychological research from a slightly different point of view than is normally provided in a mainstream class. Students will be introduced to research, and report writing in APA style, giving them the opportunity to further develop their writing and research skills.

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PSY 315

BEHAVIOR 3 Credits MODIFICATION Prerequisites: PSY 210 and PSY 421 A study of various approaches to the modification of problem behavior through the application of learning principles and theories. The application of operant conditioning and contingency management principles related to interpersonal, and learning problems. PSY 316

PSYCHO3 Credits PHYSIOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF AGING The course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the psycho-physiological aspects of aging from a life span perspective. A focus will be given to cultural influences and the impact of social changes on attitudes towards human potential in later life. PSY 320

EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 Credits Prerequisite: PSY 210 An analysis of the principles of classroom learning, including the major concepts and theories in the acquisition of knowledge and interpersonal social skills; an exploration of how learning theory is applied in the school environment by teachers, counselors, and administrators to enhance the learning experience. PSY 323 CHILD PSYCHOLOGY 3 Credits Prerequisite: PSY 210 A study of the development and behavior of the child, emphasizing the growth and maturation of body structure, the acquisition of habits and emotions, the development of capacity, formation of interests, mental hygiene, and physiological facets of behavior, which have particular implications for parents, teachers and counselors. PSY 324

ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY 3 Credits Prerequisite: PSY 210 A study of the psychological and biological factors contributing to the changes from childhood through adolescence and into adulthood. PSY 325

CHILD AND ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT Prerequisite: PSY 210

3 Credit

Development and behavior of children from infancy to adolescence. A critical analysis of various theories in physical, cognitive, social and personality development of the child in society. Cultural issues will also be explored. (May be taken in lieu of PSY 323 and PSY 324) PSY 330

HISTORY AND 3 Credits SYSTEMS Prerequisite: PSY 210 An introduction to major historical schools of psychological thought and their relationship to present day discipline of psychology. PSY 350

HUMAN GROWTH AND 3 Credits DEVELOPMENT Prerequisite: PSY 210 A study of the patterns of human growth and development and the relationships between physical growth and psychological functioning. (Formerly PSY 212) PSY 355 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 Credits Prerequisite: PSY 210 A study of the interrelationship between society, culture, and personality including topics of motivation, perception, socialization, development of self-awareness, personality, crowd behavior, small group dynamics, and the effect of propaganda. PSY 360

TESTS AND 3 Credits MEASUREMENTS IN PSYCHOLOGY AND EDUCATION Prerequisites: PSY 210, PSY 260/MAT 260 A study of the concepts and practice in the design, construction, administration, scoring, and interpretation of tests, including diagnostic, achievement, and aptitude tests, both standardized and otherwise. PSY 367 THE ADULT JOURNEY 3 Credits This module introduces adult learners to both classical and contemporary adult learning theory. As learners analyze adult learning theories, they will reflect on their own life experiences and review their strengths and motivations as adult learners. Adult learners will review the physical, psychological, and mental stages of learning development. Learners will have an opportunity to reflect, think critically, and prepare written responses to readings in the field of adult development.. (A “CLIMB� Program component.)

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PSY 409

THEORIES OF 3 Credits PERSONALITY Prerequisite: PSY 210 A study of human interpersonal relations, including an in-depth study of the theories of personality and of the development and application of these theories. PSY 411

ABNORMAL 3 Credits PSYCHOLOGY The study of individuals and groups who demonstrate atypical behavior, including historical definitions of abnormality, psychological dynamics of psychological disorders, neurosis and psychosis, standard psychiatric nosology and etiology. Prevention and treatment of maladaptive behavior will be reviewed.

Field experience working in a direct service position in a public or private agency, utilizing knowledge of psychology on the job. PSY 470

PSYCHOLOGY 3 Credits SEMINAR/ EXIT EXAM Prerequisite: Senior psychology major An intensive research and seminar investigation of one or more current issues in psychology. A general assessment of learning in the major course of study.

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION

EXPERIMENTAL 3 Credits PSYCHOLOGY Prerequisite: PSY 210 An introduction to the basic principles and methods of conducting psychological experiments.

INTRODUCTION 3 Credits TO PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION Prerequisite: REA 202 An introductory survey of public administration as developed in the United States through the study of significant theories, values, and practices of governance and management in the public sector.

PSY 421

PAD 300

PSY 414

THEORIES OF 3 Credits LEARNING Prerequisite: PSY 210 Examination of the essential features of the major theories of learning. An exploration, critical analysis and practical application of these theories will be the focus. PSY 426

PRINCIPLES AND 3 Credits THEORIES OF HUMAN RELATIONS Prerequisite: PSY 210 A study of human interpersonal relations, including an in-depth study of the theories of Carl Rogers and Abraham Maslow concerning group counseling and personal relations. PSY 450 PSYCHOMETRICS 3 Credits Prerequisites: PSY/ MAT 260, MAT 105, PSY 414 A study of psychometric instruments and their validity, reliability, strengths, and weaknesses, emphasizing their use in the decision-making process, the teacher-learning process, and the evaluation and psychotherapeutic process. PSY 460

PRACTICUM IN PSYCHOLOGY Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor

6 Credits

PAD 250

ADMINISTRATIVE 3 Credits THEORIES AND MANAGEMENT Prerequisite: PAD 250 An introduction to administrative and organization theories, tracing their development from the Scientific Management theorists through the Human Relations theorists to the present day Behaviorists. Topics include concepts of managing large complex organizations, the concept of bureaucracy, policy making and administration, roles and role conflict, decision making, delegation of authority, motivation, communication and leadership. PAD 306

PUBLIC FINANCE AND 3 Credits BUDGETING Prerequisite: PAD 250 or consent of instructor Introduction to the theory and practice of financial management and budgeting in the public sector with emphasis on their influence on policy and program decision-making. PAD 307

PUBLIC PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION Prerequisite: PAD 250

3 Credits

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A survey of public personnel administration, including the growth and development of the civil service and an examination of the principles and methods of efficient labor management and maintenance of harmonious relations between management and employees. PAD 308

INTRODUCTION TO 3 Credits PUBLIC POLICY Prerequisite: PAD 250 or consent of instructor Introduction to public policy with emphasis on decision-making theories and practices in the United States and a review of current public policies. PAD 460

PRACTICUM 6 Credits IN PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION Prerequisites: PAD 250 and consent of instructor. Placement for practical field experience in a public agency, utilizing knowledge of public administration on the job.

READING REA 097

DEVELOPMENTAL 4 Credits READING I This is a college preparatory course designed to help students improve basic reading and writing skills. Topics include word analysis, vocabulary development and comprehension techniques; test taking strategies, study skills and writing strategies. The is a 4 credit hour course that includes 3 credit hours of classroom instruction and 1 credit hour of reading lab enrichment activities. Credits do not meet requirements for graduation. REA 098

DEVELOPMENTAL 4 Credits READING II This is a college preparatory course designed to help students develop college level reading, writing, and critical thinking skills. Students learn to recognize main ideas, remember key points, take inclusive/ meaningful notes, and utilize active and critical reading skills. This is a 4 credit hour course that includes 3 credit hours of classroom instruction and 1 credit hour of reading lab enrichment activities. Credits do not meet requirements for graduation..

provides short-term reviews and instructions for the students, and also provides individual instructions for students with varied learning rates. The purpose of the course is to ensure proficiency in reading skills necessary to master all competencies mandated and defined by the State of Florida. The hours do not count toward graduation. REA 202 COLLEGE READING 3 Credits Prerequisites: Satisfactory score on Freshman placement test. This course is designed to enhance interdisciplinary reading skills. Included will be the development of regular and specialized vocabulary, reading comprehension, content area reading, research techniques, speed-reading and peer tutoring. (Formerly REA 200)

RELIGION REL 201

INTRODUCTION TO 3 Credits BIBLICAL STUDIES Prerequisite: REA 202 An introduction to Judeo-Christian tradition is designed to foster knowledge understanding of the literature of the Judeo-Christian heritage and relate it to life, relationships, and the contemporary world through selected readings from the Bible and contemporary biblical scholarship. REL 260

INTRODUCTION TO 3 Credits THE OLD TESTAMENT This course is designed to give the student an appreciation of the history and literature of ancient Israel. It further seeks, through contemporary biblical scholarship, to orient the student to the situations out of which the biblical material emerged, and the relevance of the messages for today. REL 261

INTRODUCTION TO 3 Credits THE NEW TESTAMENT This course is designed to give the student an appreciation of the history and literature of the New Testament. It further seeks, through contemporary biblical scholarship, to orient the student to the situation out of which the Gospels and Epistles emerged, and the relevant implications of their messages for today.

REA 190 “CLAST� READING 3 Credits This course is designed to meet the needs of those sophomores who are preparing for the CLAST. It

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REL 301 WORLD RELIGIONS 3 Credits Prerequisites: REL 201 An introduction to the major religions of the world including, Buddhism, Confucianism, Shintoism, Sikhism, Islam, etc. are prerequisites for this course. Judaism and Christianity will not be considered here because they are included in the biblical courses. The major religions listed will be studied in terms of beliefs and practices, geographical distribution, and influence on the contemporary world. REL 302

THE AFRICAN 3 Credits AMERICAN RELIGIOUS EXPERIENCE Prerequisites: REL 201 This course will enable the student to explore the black religious experience beginning with the link between Africa and the New World Slavery Years, the Civil Rights Era, and concluding with contemporary black theology. REL 303

INTRODUCTION 3 Credits TO RELIGIOUS EDUCATION Prerequisites: REL 201 This course introduces the student to the history, scope, objectives, and methodology of religious education. REL 304

SOCIOLOGY OF 3 Credits RELIGION Prerequisites: REL 201 This course is designed to explore the relationships between religion and culture, and the various social institutions: family, economics, government, education, and stratification. REL 305

PHILOSOPHY OF 3 Credits RELIGION Prerequisites: REL 201, PHI 201 An examination of various concepts of God, the function of religious language, arguments concerning God’s existence (pro and con), faith and reason, the problem of evil, and immortality. REL 306

AFRICAN RELIGIONS AND PHILOSOPHY Prerequisites: REL 201, PHI 201

3 Credits

A systematic exploration of the world views of the African people. African religions, beliefs, and practices are examined with an aim of gleaning the basic moral and cosmological structure underlying the diversity and influence of African “self”. The impact of Christianity and Islam on African views and vice versa is examined, and the African roots of the religious experiences in America are explored. REL 312

HISTORY OF THE 3 Credits CHRISTIAN CHURCH Prerequisites: REL 201 This course is designed to introduce the student to the great movements which have served as the impetus and challenge for the Christian Church throughout its history. Special attention will be given to problems, controversies, and their results. REL 401

INTRODUCTION 3 Credits TO CHRISTIAN PRINCIPLES This is an overview study of the literary, historical and religious dimensions of the Old and New Testaments. Adult learners are guided in an examination of Biblical faith and teaching in relation to daily life and individual purposes. (A “CLIMB” Program component.)

RADIO AND TELEVISION RTV 250

BROADCAST 3 Credits PERFORMANCE Prerequisite: REA 202 An introduction to the techniques of radio and television performance, announcing, writing and production. Emphasis will be placed on voice and diction, phonetics and delivery style. RTV 255 AUDIO PRODUCTION 3 Credits Theory, technique, and practice in the use of sound in electronic media and telecommunication. Topics to be covered include equipment, recording, editing, mixing, and signal processing. RTV 300

ELEMENTS OF 3 Credits BROADCASTING An overview of the background, development and current practices of broadcasting. The course covers the functions and uses of telecommunication by the individual and society. Emphasis will be on regulation, economics, financing and technology.

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RTV 302

TELEVISION 3 Credits PRODUCTION A study of the theory, technique, and practice of studio television production. Emphasis will include on-camera and off-camera skills and techniques. RTV 303

PORTABLE VIDEO 3 Credits PRODUCTION Theory, technique, and practice in the use of portable television equipment and videotape editing. RTV 320

COLLEGE RADIO 3 Credits OPERATIONS Course provides practical experience in operating the campus radio station. RTV 350

PRODUCING/ 3 Credits DIRECTING FOR RADIO AND TELEVISION Prerequisites: RTV 260, 300 An intensive skills development course designed to develop the student’s technique and technical knowledge of producing and directing for radio and television. RTV 420

WRITING/ 3 Credits ANNOUNCING FOR TELEVISION AND RADIO Prerequisites: MAC 251, 301 A comprehensive study of copy writing and creative writing in both radio and television. This course will emphasize format, plot, audience involvement and style. Students emolled in this course will be required to complete one major project. RTV 430 TELEVISION EDITING 3 Credits The purpose to this course is to give students practical experience to sharpen their skills in radio or television production, writing, and announcing with emphasis on editing. RTV 490

RADIO/TELEVISION 3 Credits PRACTICUM Prerequisites: MAC 301, RTV 255 and 265 or instructor’s consent. The purpose of this course is to give students practical experiences to sharpen their skills in radio and television production, writing, editing and announcing.

SOCIAL SCIENCE SOS 260

INTRODUCTION TO 3 credits THE SOCIAL SCIENCES A course to study how social sciences are concerned with human behavior and human condition. This course is designed to systematize the interrelationship of its component areas: anthropology, economics, history, political science, psychology and sociology. SOS 470

SELECTED CURRENT 3 Credits TOPICS SEMINAR Prerequisites: Senior major status in a social science major and consent of instructor. An intensive research and seminar investigation of one or more current issues in one or more of the social sciences. SOS 472

SOCIAL SCIENCE 3 Credits SENIOR SEMINAR Prerequisites: Senior major status in a social science major and consent of instructor. An interdisciplinary seminar designed to allow advanced major students to delve more deeply into each of the disciplines making up the social sciences. SOS 480 HONORS THESIS 1-6 Credits Prerequisites: Senior social science major, cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher and consent of instructor. Students will prepare a senior honors thesis under the supervision of a faculty member chosen in consultation with the division chairperson. The student will defend this thesis before a committee of three faculty selected in consultation with the professor. Student may take the course for any combination of hours not exceeding six during the semester of senior status. SOS 490 INDEPENDENT STUDY 1-3 Credits Prerequisites: Study status and consent of academic advisor and instructor. An opportunity for a student to undertake advanced study of a particular aspect of a social science discipline, in a manner beneficial to the student’s major under the personal supervision of a faculty member.

SOCIAL WORK SOW 310 SOCIAL CASE WORK 3 Credits A course designed to focus on the foundations for best practice in case management. The course is designed

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to learn ethics and ethical issues, the reasons for case management, the importance of the ecological model in assessment, planning, and monitoring cases from case management perspectives, how to document contacts related to the client, and how to terminate the case. SOW 320 SOCIAL GROUP WORK 3 Credits A course designed to focus on the practice group work by professional social workers. Group work entails the deliberate use of intervention strategies and group processes to accomplish individual, group, and community goals using the value base and ethical practice principles of the social work profession. This course will focus on generalist practices and comprehensive typologies for both treatment groups and task groups.

SOCIOLOGY SOC 250

INTRODUCTION TO 3 Credits SOCIOLOGY Prerequisite: REA 202 A study of the nature of society, culture, and human groups, including a survey of the major social institutions, the social aspects of personality, and the basic processes of social interaction.

SOC 310

AMERICAN MINORITY 3 Credits GROUPS Prerequisite: SOC 250 A study of the racial and cultural minority groups, as they exist in the United States in comparison with other societies. Consideration will be given to the origin, development, and influence of racial myths, doctrines, and movements, prejudice and discrimination, and their effects on minority and majority populations. Proposed solutions to ethnic problems will be studied. SOC 315 THE SOCIOLOGY OF 3 Credits AFRICAN AMERICANS Prerequisite: SOC 250 A basic rigorous introduction to the study of African American life. This course explores the epistemological issues surrounding the assumptions and paradigms used to examine African American life experiences; assesses the strengths and weaknesses of commonly used research strategies and techniques in theory building, research design, data collection and analysis within African American and African Studies; and provides a general body of knowledge enabling appropriate use of various modes of inquiry into African American life. Special consideration is given to the research and writings of contemporary African American and African scholars, e.g., W.E.B. DuBois, Frantz Fanon, Carter G. Woodson.

SOC 301 THE FAMILY 3 Credits Prerequisite: SOC 250 A comparative study of the institution, of marriage and the family with a special emphasis on the contemporary American family. Consideration of the modern family as a unit and interacting personalities; of family organization, and contemporary problems facing the family.

SOC 320

SOC 270

SOC 329

SOCIOLOGY OF 3 Credits CULTURE Prerequisite: SOC 250 The study of the nature and scope of culture and cultural determinants, in shaping patterns of social interactions, relationships and social institutions. Special consideration is given to the dynamics of multiculturalism and cultural transfer, cultural transfers and cultural competence within human service agencies, and the process of retention assimilation and acculturation in a global context.

CURRENT SOCIAL 3 Credits PROBLEMS Prerequisite: SOC 250 A study of the tensions of contemporary American society as reflected in social problems and their relationship to individuals, the society, and the culture. Consideration of proposed solutions to social problems in relation to cultural values and the social structure. SOCIAL RESEARCH 3 Credits METHODS Prerequisite: MAT 260 / PSY 260 A study of major techniques and methods of social research, including a critical analysis of various types of design, sampling, techniques, questionnaire construction, and interpretation of research findings. SOC 330

SOCIOLOGICAL 3 Credits THEORY Prerequisite: SOC 250 A survey of sociological thoughts and theories since Comte, including consideration of their relevance to modern sociology.

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SOC 350 URBAN SOCIOLOGY 3 Credits Prerequisite: SOC 250 Sociological and ecological analysis of urban centers in terms of changing structure and processes, including a study of the social pressures, patterns, and institutions of urban life and their impact on social relations and personality. SOC 412

SOCIAL MOVEMENTS 3 Credits AND SOCIAL CHANGE Prerequisite: SOC 250 or consent of instructor Analysis of contemporary social movements and current theories of social-cultural change.

SOC 460

PRACTICUM IN 6 Credits SOCIOLOGY Prerequisites: SOC 250 and consent of instructor Field experience to practice skills in human services delivery and social research in a public or private agency etting. SOC 470

SOCIOLOGY SEMINAR/ 3 Credits EXIT EXAM Prerequisite: Senior Sociology major An intensive research and seminar investigation of one or more current issues in sociology. A general assessment of learning in the major course of study.

3 Credits SOCIAL CLASS, POWER AND INEQUALITY IN AMERICA Prerequisite: SOC 250 or Consent of Instructor This course identifies various socioeconomic classes in America and addresses who gets what and why; how inequality is generated and maintained; and how inequality is distributed by race and gender in the backdrop of power politics. SOC 419

SOC 419

AMERICAN SOCIAL 3 Credits STRUCTURE Prerequisite: SOC 250 or consent of instructor Analysis of the stratified structure of societies, especially American society, as reflected in castes, classes, perceived racial differences, bureaucratic and other elite organizations, and occupational and authority patterns SOC 422 SOCIOLOGY OF AGING 3 Credits A study of American social attitudes towards aging, and the biological and psychological problems of aging. Emphasis on the problems of adjustment to the aging process for both the aged person and the family, as well as means of accomplishing these adjustments successfully. SOC 430

CULTURAL 3 Credits ANTHROPOLOGY Diversity of human cultures; nature of cultures, social organizations, subsistence patterns, economics, law, religion, language and other facets of culture in crosscultural perspective.

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ORGANIZATION AND STAFF

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EXECUTIVE MANAGEMENT TEAM

PRESIDENT’S COUNCIL

Mr. Nathaniel Glover Interim President

Mr. Nathaniel Glover Interim President

Dr. Eurmon Hervey, Jr. Executive Vice President/Chief Operating Officer

Dr. Eurmon Hervey Executive Vice President

Dr. Bertha D. Minus Vice President for Academic Affairs

Dr. Bertha D. Minus Vice President for Academic Affairs

Dr. James B. Ewers Vice President for Student Affairs and Enrollment Management

Dr. David Marshall Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs Dr. James B. Ewers Vice President for Student Affairs and Enrollment Management Mr. Randolph Mitchell Acting Vice President for Business & Finance Mr. Michael Q. Rogers Director of Human Resources and Administrative Services

Mr. Randolph Mitchell Acting Vice President for Business and Finance Mr. Michael Q. Rogers Director of Human Resources and Administrative Services Mr. George Dandelake Executive Business Auditor

OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT Mr. Nathaniel Glover Interim President

Mr. Johnny Rembert Director of Athletics

Dr. Eurmon Hervey, Jr. Executive Vice President

Mrs. Wanda Willis Acting Assistant Vice President for Institutional Advancement

Brenda Priestly Jackson, Esq. Special Advisor to the President

Mrs. Lois Washburn Director of Title III and Sponsored Programs

Mrs. Lois Washburn Title III Coordinator & Sponsored Programs Mrs. Linda Foster Secretary of the College/Clerk for the Board Ms. Debra Pace Executive Administrative Assistant

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DIVISION OF ACADEMIC AFFAIRS Dr. Bertha D. Minus Vice President for Academic Affairs Dr. David Marshall Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs Dr. Reuben Perechi Dean of the Faculty Ms. Shannon Thompson Administrative Assistant Ms. Sherri Barr Administrative Assistant Office of the Registrar Mr. Lindsey Barnette Registrar Ms. Shirley Bell Veterans Administration/ Transcript Coordinator/ Assistant to the Registrar Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning (CETL) Academic Advising Dr. Thelecia Wilson Director Mr. Everett Harris Administrative Assistant Rev. Michael McConnell Adviser Mrs. Trina Wiley Adviser Focused Academics Motivating Excellence (F.A.M.E.) Program Mrs. Gladys Clay Director Ms. April Woodley Academic Counselor TRIO Student Support Services Program Dr. Sabrina Edwards Director Mr. Selah Bishop Counselor Ms. Gwannettia Hall Administrative Assistant Mr. LaRoda Barnes English Specialist Mr. Darryl Oliver Math Specialist Up-Ward Bound Program Dr. Delacy Sanford

Director

Institutional Planning, Research & Effectiveness Mrs. Bernice Parker-Bell Interim Director and Researcher Schell-Sweet Community Resource Center Mrs. Marie Heath Director Ms. Maria Edwards Sr. Wellness Coordinator EWC Catalog 2010-2012 Page 149


Library Mrs. Vivian Brown-Carman Ms. Gwendolyn Gatson Ms. Carmella Martin Mr. Michael Wolfe

Director Library Technical Assistant Reference Librarian Circulation Librarian

DIVISION OF STUDENT AFFAIRS AND ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT Dr. James B. Ewers Vice President for Student Affiars and Enrollment Management Office of Admissions Mr. Edward Alexander Director of Admissions Mr. Francky Jeanty Admissions Counselor Mr. Zerick Jones Admissions Counselor Ms. Aishia Thornton Admissions Counselor Ms. Carmelia Smith Administrative Assistant Ms. Melanie Armstrong-Person Data Entry Specialist Office of Financial Aid Office of Career Planning & Placement Mrs. Helen Britt Director Ms. Sharon Harris Administrative Assistant Office of Campus Ministry Rev. Dr. D. Lovett Sconiers

Chaplain

Counseling Office Ms. Elvera Carter Ms. Donna McFadden

Counselor Secretary

Black Male College Explorers Program/ Office of Student Life Mr. Tommie Fox Director Office of Residential Life Ms. Gwendolyn Prince Ms. Angela Dupree

Director Administrative Assistant

Office of Health Services Ms. Beverly Bolton

Coordinator

ATHLETICS Mr. Johnny Rembert Mr. Henry Smith Mr. James Day

Athletic Director Sports Information Director Assistant Athletic Director

Coaching Staff Mr. Anthony Mosley

Men’s Basketball

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Mr. Danny Pearson Men’s Basketball Mr. Elroy Green Women’s Basketball Mr. Kevin Clark Head Football Coach Mr. William Bell Running Back Coordinator Mr. Lamont Turner Offensive Line Coach Mr. Antwan Nicholas Defensive Backs Coach Mr. Wayne Anderson Wider Receiver Coach Mr. Melvin Marshall Men’s Baseball Mr. Mike Evans Athletics Trainer Ms. Marilyn Mack Volleyball Mr. Matthew Moscinski Men’s Golf Mr. Harry Upshaw Women’s Golf Ms. Valerie Crimes Softball Mr. Archie Gallon Men/Women’s Cross Country & Track

ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES BUSINESS AND FINANCE Mr. Randolph Mitchell Acting Vice President for Business & Finance Ms Hazel Clayton Administrative Assistant Ms. Rosalind Lopez Ms. Ernestine Hickson Ms. Susie Mattison Ms. Josephine Bellamy Ms. E. Betty Davis

Accounts Payable Manager Accounts Payable Purchasing Student Accounts Student Accounts

Information Technology & Telecommunications Mr. David Simfukwe Acting Director Ms. Merlyn Vasquez Database Administrator Mr. Donald Shefield Database Administrator Mr. Shedrick Hollaway Academic Support Specialist Mr. Jay Baker Audio/Visual Coordinator Human Resources And Administrative Services Mr. Michael Q. Rogers Mr. Ezra Lott Mrs. Ashley Hardin

Director HR Specialist

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DIVISION OF INSTITUTIONAL ADVANCEMENT

Dr. Eurmon Hervey Executive Vice President Vice President for Institutional Advancement

Mrs. Wanda Willis Acting Assistant Vice President for Institutional Advancement Ms Karen Estella Smith Ms. Dadra Driscoll Mr. Stephen Masciocchi

Director of External Relations Web Manager Webmaster

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CREDENTIALS OF EWC FACULTY Armstrong-West, Suzan Social and Behavioral Sciences B.S. Psychology & Biology, Howard University M.A. Counseling/Guidance, University of North Florida Ph.D. Student Personnel on Higher Education, University of Florida Betton, Samantha Computer Information Systems B.B.A., Business & Computer Information Systems, Savannah State University M.A., Computer Research, Webster University Brown, Thomas P. Music B.S., Music, Florida A&M University M. A., Music, Southern Illinois University Bryan, Kisha Education B.A., English, Voorhees College M.A. ,TESOL, State University of New York Favors, Erskerline Education B.S., Curriculum and Instruction, Hampton Institute M. Ed., Elementary Education , Florida Atlantic University Frazier, Bobby Physical Education B.A., Physical Education, Bethune Cookman University M.Ed., Physical Education, Florida A&M University Ph.D., Organization, Administration & Supervision in Physical Education, Florida State University Ghosh, Jaynata Chemistry B.S., Chemistry, Utakl University M.S., Chemistry, Utakl University M.S., Computer Science, University of South Carolina M.P.H., Public Health; Environmental Health Science, University of South Carolina Ph.D., Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Goa, Jeanette Education B.S., Elementary Education. University of Miami M. Ed., Elementary Education, Florida A&M University Ikeokwu, Francis Business Administration B.S., Finance, University of South Florida M.B.A., Florida Metropolitan University M.A.C. Forensic Accounting, Florida Atlantic University Ph.D., Financial Management & Trade Relations, Union Institute & University

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Islam, Noor Social and Behavioral Sciences B.S., Geography, Dhaka University M.S., Geography, Dhaka University M.A., Sociology, East Carolina University Ph.D., Sociology North Carolina State University Jones, Jr., Thomas C. Criminal Justice B.C.J. Criminal Justice, Alabama State University M.C.J., Criminal Justice, Columbus University M.H.A., Health Care Administration, Central Michigan University Ph. D., Columbus University Kwizera, Petero Mathematics B.S., Makerere University M.S., Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Ph.D., Physics, MIT Lesane, Katura M. Communication B.A. English, Emory University M. A. Education, Coppin State College Ph. D., Educ. Leader. , Capella University Liao, Yu-Hsuan Music B.F.A, Music , Tung-Hai University M.M., Piano Performance, The University of Texas Ph.D., Piano Performance, The University of Texas Liu, Zhongzhi Mathematics B.S., Mathematics, Shandong Normal University M.S., Mathematics, Xinan Jiaotong University Ph.D., Mathematics, Temple University MacDonald, Peter Music B.Mus., Performance, Western Washington, University M.Mus.,Performance, Western Washington, University D.M.A. Composition, University of Miami Mack, Marilyn Physical Education B.S., Physical Education, Recreation and Dance, Fayetteville State University M.Ed., Physical Education , Alabama State University

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Mandal, Anita Biology B.Sc., Botany, University of North Bengal M.Sc., Botany, University of North Bengal B.E., University of North Bengal Ph.D., Botany, Banaras Hindu University Mandal, Prabir Biology B.Sc., Zoology, University of North Bengal M.Sc., Zoology, University of North Bengal Ph.D., Genetics, Bhopal University Mishra, Sudhish Biology B.S., Biological Sciences, University of Kapur M.S. Biotechnology, Indian Veterinary Research Institute Ph.D., Medical Genetics, Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences Mitchell, Jason Communication B.S., Elizabeth City State University M. A., Regent University M’Mworia, Damaris Religion & Philosophy B.A., Education, Kenyatta University M.A., Christian Education, Methodist Theological School Ph.D., Religion & Society, Drew University Mohanarajah, Selvarajah Computer Information Systems B.Sc. (Hon.), Mathematics, University of Jaffna M.Sc., Computer Science, University of Colombo Ph.D., Computer Science, Massey University Okafor, Benjamin Criminal Justice B.S., Criminal Justice, University of Louisiana M.S., Criminal Justice, Grambling State University M.Ed., Educational Leadership, St. Leo University Ed.D., Educational Leadership Root , Timothy J. Music B.A. Music Education, Eastern Washington University B.A. English Lit., Univ. of Michigan Th. M. Theology, Dallas Theo. Semin. DMA, Univ.. of Washington Scott, Judy Criminal Justice B.B.A., Organizational Management, Edward Waters College J.D., Barry University

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Seymour, Brian W. P. Biology B.S., Southern Illinois Uni. M.S., San Francisco State University Ph. D., University of California, Davis. Singleton, Roy Communication B.S. Education, Edward Waters College M.Ed., Clark-Atlanta University Ed.D., Univeristy of Florida Snow, Marie Education B.S., Elementary Education, Edward Waters College M.Ed., Early Childhood and Curriculum and Instruction, University of South Florida Ed.D., Educational Leadership, University of Miami Sundaralingam, Nakamutha Mathematics B.S., Physics, Chemistry & Applied Mathematics, University of Jaffna M.S., Physics, Tufts University Ph.D., High Energy Physics, Tufts University Tedeschi, Robert J. Business Administration B.A., Mercy College M.B.A., Wagner College Ph.D., Capella University Wider, Felicia Mathematics - Developmental Education B.A., Interdisciplinary Studies; History, University of Florida M.A.T., Mathematics, Jacksonville University

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APPENDIX

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2010-2012 EWC Catalog