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PORT FOLIO ARCHITECTURE. D E S I G N . MATTHEW EDWARDS.

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A COLLECTION OF WORKS.

DESIGN. ART. ARCHITECTURE. MATT EDWARDS


Mattthew Edwards

Education n 08-11

University y of Idaho B.S. Arch

11-Present

University y of Idaho M.A. Arch

Skills:

[Human] Hand Drafting Sketching g Model Building g Communication Teamwork Craftsmanship [Technology] [T

Conta actt Info

email: mat atth hew ewed edwa w rds@ s va and ndal a s.uidaho.e edu phone: e: 360.219.5 563 6 0

AutoCA Auto CAD SSke ketc tchup p [[wVRAY] Rhi R hino noceros Revi Re vitt Ado A dobe b InD nDes e ig gn Ado dobe be IIllllusstr trat ator Ado A dobe be Pho hoto tosh s op p Mic M icro roso soft ft SSui uite te

Biography: Ih hav ave e al always ys had a an n in inte tere rest st in arch c ittec ectu ure re, ar art, t and dd dessig gn. TThe he U Uni nive vers rsit ity y of Idaho’ Idah o’ss Ar A chitec ectu ture re p pro rogr gram am h has as a allow owed ed me to p pur ursu sue e th thes ese e pa pass ssio ions ns a and d the rres esul ultt hass be ha been en a B.S. S in A Arc rchi hite tect ctur ure e an and d a Mi Mino norr in n Art rt.. I am c cur urre rent ntly ly p pur u su suin ing g my M M.A A. of Arc Ar chitec ectu ture re a and nd w wililll be g gra radu duat atin ing g in May y 201 013. 3. M My y ti time me a at th he Un Univ iver ersi sity ty of Id Idah a o ha has been be e inv n al alua uabl ble e to m my y ed educ ucat atio ion n an and d gr grow owth t as a st stud uden e t, d des e igne ner, r, and nd a person. n. I am exc cit i ed to ta ake the he next step in my llif ife and move into o the profes essi sio onal wor orld ld.


20 08 [mus [m useu eum m of the m mov o in ing g im imag age] e

[marine research and education on c cen enter]

20 09 [urban rejuvination]

[kinetic event shelter]

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[municipal cou urtho ous use] e]

[arboretum pavilion]

[courtyard housing]

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[fire [fi re hou ouse s ]

[c cab abin i d in desig gn] n

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[living gc ciity y cha hallllan ange ge]]

[var [v ario ious us p pro roje ro ject je cts] s s]


Studio: ARCH 454 Project: Museum Location: San Francisco,CA

FOLSOM STREET APPROACH The body of the Museum of the Moving Image is formed by multiple layers of space and material that relate to the fragmented nature of the human mind. The interaction of systems becomes a three dimensional manifestation of memory and the unexpected ways these systems interact is reminiscent of the minds abilities to connect memories and construct inter-relationships between highly varied experiences.


SHADE

SKIN

STEEL

CORE

EXPLODED AXON

CIRCULATION

ST TRUCTURE

CORE


LONGITUDINAL SECTION

ENTRY LOBBY


STRUCTURAL BAY DETAIL


RESEARCH

ELEVATE|

MARINE RESEARCH & EDUCATION

Studio: ARCH 553 Project: Lab Location: oca o : St. S . Croix,Virgin C o , g Islands s a ds

WEST FACADE


VIRGIN ISLANDS

ST. CROIX

SITE

The design of the Marine Research and Education Center is composed of two elements; the overall master plan of the proposed campus as well as the design of the marine research laboratory, the focal point of the campus. Located on the island of St. Croix, the campus is sited on a peninsula on the north of the island, defined by the Salt River Bay and the large hillside that rises out of the site.


CAMPUS CAM CA C AMP AM MP PU USS P U PL PLAN: LLA AN A N: N

1. LLaboratory 1 aborat ab ra attory y 2.. A 2 Ad Administration dm miin stra trra attiion 3.. M 3 Maintenance aint nten nan anc nce 4. Co 4 C Community omm mu unitty O Out Ou Outreach utrre ea ea ac ch 5. Ar 5 A Artifact rrttiffac ctt SStorage to to orrra age ge 6.. TTeaching 6 ea e achi ach ac hin h ng Ce C Center en nte ter 7. SSt 7 Student tude tud en nt Ho n H Housing ou o usiin ng n g 8. FFac 8 Faculty ac a culty H Ho Housing ou o usin ng g 9. P 9 Pa Parking arki rk kin ng ng

PARKWAY BOARDWALK [BAY]

PARKWAY BOARDWALK [HILLSIDE]

CAMPUS MASTER PLAN The campus design was approached as a singular cut along the landscape, reaching out to connect the beaches on each side of the peninsula and define the interaction of the man-made landscape within the natural hillside. The campus buildings orient along this linear datum, with the laboratory building itself spanning over the park space to frame and offer views to the bay where the majority of campus research would be taking place.

CAMPUS SECTION


100’

8

7

5 3 2 1 6 4

9

20’


ECO-GARDEN

3 7 1

2

6

4 5


10

1

11 12 13 2 14

3

4

5

6 7

SECTION DIAGRAM: 1. Perforated West Shading 2. Operable Curtain Wall 3. Green Roof System 4. Permeable Paving 5. Geo-Exchange Wells 6. Radiant Floor 7. P.V. Panels

8

ENVELOPE DIAGRAM: 1. Steel Roof Decking 2. Steel Truss System 3. Aluminum Curtain Wall 4. Low-E Glazing 5. Steel Truss Structure 6. Concrete Slab Flooring 7. Insulation

ENVELOPE DIAGRAM

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8. Wood Slat Flooring 9. Green Roof 10. Sod Mat 11. Vapor Barrier 12. Insulation 13. Steel Decking 14. Perforated Louvers


SUN VALLEY ROAD FACADE

Studio: ARCH 554 Project: Restaurant & Bar Location: Sun Valley, ID

URBAN

ADAPTATION

Urban Adaptation is focused around the concept of a structure once important to a community adapting to a new age and a new use, once again becoming a vibrant component of the urban fabric of Ketchum, Idaho. The project takes an existing two story brick building on the corner of Sun Valley Road and Main Street and converts the currently vacant building into a restaurant and bar that encourages youth and vitality in a community that is currently lacking in these regards.


1.

+ Maximize Bar and Restaurant square q footage g + Dialogue between street and Restaurant + Service removed from the prominent street corner - No outdoor space - No interaction between Bar and Restaurant

4.

+ Bar engages the street edge + Receding ground floor creates entry - Restaurant is less accessible to the street - Service issues with product transport

DINING AREA

2.

3.

+O Outdoor Space p pprovided above Restaurant + Dialogue between street and Restaurant - Large amount of service space on street - Less square footage for the Restaurant

5.

+C Circulation irculation void provides connection betweenn R Restaurant and Bar while maintaining boundaries + Restaurant creates dialogue with the street + Service is removed from the prominent street corner

+ Maximized Bar and Restaurant size + Both Bar and Restaurant Engage the Street - Potential conflict between Bar and Restaurant - Limited Outdoor space - Required Vertical Circulation for each program

6.

+ Outdoor seating is provided that connects with more active bar space + Bar creates dialogue with adjacent rooftop seating


1 2

5

4 3

6

7


1. Photo voltaic Panels 2. Louvered Alum minum Shading Device 3. Low-E Triple Pane Operable Glazing 4. Existing Brick Facade 5. Wood Supportting Structure 6. Concrete Floor [Thermal Mass] 7. Ventilated Flooor System [Night Flush Cooling]

BAR INTERIOR


Studio: ARCH 454 Project: Event Shelter Location: Union Squarre, San Francisco, CA

INTERVENTION FORMAL STATE The forrm of the event shelter project evolve ed into a gesture that could appea ar solid and monumental at one m moment, and then kinetically transfo orm into an activated space of perform mance and social interaction. In this w way the project relates to both the forrmal use of Union Square as well as morre expressive and active uses at key mo oments in time.


INTERVENTION INFORMAL STATE


As the age of industry passes, the spaces once inhabited by industrial monoliths must be reclaimed and repurposed. These spaces have been scarred by industry and are in need of rehabilitation, yet their history must not be forgotten.

Stud dio: ARCH 353 Project: Munic cipal Courthouse Loca ation: Moscow, ID

The site of the Moscow municipal courthouse was once rooted in industry, but has now been repurposed to serve the community in a new way. With the influence of the industrial past, and the incorporation of traditional passive design and modern sustainable systems, the Moscow municipal courthouse is an icon of repurposed industry.


COURTHOUSE LOBBY


The program of the courthouse is stacked vertically and pushed to the east side of the triangular site. This allows for the west to open into a public plaza space, creating an outdoor space for visitors and workers alike. The west facade is protected from the harsh west sun through a number of different methods, including vegetation, balconies, and light shelves that reflect daylight into the interior space. The stacked hallways along the west facade serve as a barrier space between the exterior and the courtrooms, creating a double skin condition that can be vented to cool the interior spaces.


Studio: ARCH 353 Projectt: Pavilion Location: U of I Arboretum, Moscow, ID

The arboretum pavilion is a place of gathering and shelterr in the largely introspective space of the arboretum. Jutting out from a grassy hillside, the pavilion becomes a projection over the surrounding valley to the hillsides and mountains beyond. The structure respects the earth, inspired by Glen Murcutt’s mantra of “Touch the earth lightly”.


PRIVATE DECK GARDEN

Studio: ARCH 353 Project: Courtyard Housing Location: Portland, OR

SHIFT

INTO A NEW WAY OF LIVING

Northern Portland is an area in transition, with the construction of a light rail line driving commercial and residential development. With the density of the area increasing, the single family home must be redefined. Courtyard living encourages the densification of the area, bringing residents into closer proximity and encouraging a sense of community. The developing neighborhood must shift into a new way of living.


FLOOR PLANS


STREET VIEW


The form of the courtyard y housing g was derived from the concept p of the literal compression p and distortion of the suburban housing type into a form of increasing density. The courtyard itself spreads from the central community space int n o second level private gardens. This creates a private space of refuge that overlooks the community space. Much of the language of the structure is derived from typical housing, but the ere r are exceptions created relating to forming natu t rally lit spaces that spea ak to the e human condition.


Studio: ARCH 354 Proje ect: ICMA Competitio on Location: Boise e, ID 3rd d Plac ce

The unde d rlying g con nce cept pt o off th he Bois Bo oise ise fifire re ssta tati tion on w wa as disco cove vere red d thro th hroug oug gh th the e an anal a ysis iss of th he unique adjjace ad c ncie es of tthe he sit ite. Loc ocat ated ed nex extt to tthe he con onne nect ctor or ove erp rpasss an a d th the e lo loca call sk kate atte pa p rk, the site si te iiss in inhe here rent ntlly inf nfus used ed w with h en ner e gy g and nd mot otio ion. n. Thi h s di dial alog ogue ue wass ffur urth therr exp xplo lore re ed th hro r ugh a compar aris ison o off th he fifire refifigh ghte terr an and d th the e sk skat ate er. Bo oth p perrso sona nass diisp s la ay an affinit ity y fo forr ac acti tion on, ad adrre rena alil ne ne, and br an brav aver e y, all com ommo m n at attr t ib but utes es of th the quint-es esse sent n ia al he h ro o. Bo Both h ska kate ter and fifire rema man n lilive ve e a lif ife e of o p ec pr car arity. y.


Light The perforated metal panels create a play of light across the angled cmu wall, casting varied shadows and creating a sense of drama.

CMU

8x8x16 running bond cmu wall with vertical reinforcement.

Deck

The steel C channel welded to structure carries the load of the elevated cmu wall.

Transparent

The glazing system visual ally detaches the e c u fr cm f om the gro roun un u nd pllan ane, cre reat atin ing g a se sense off precarityy a and nd d levity.

Strength h The e

steel st stru tru ructural sysstem m frees the cmu from fr om lloa oa oads ads d , al allo lowi w ng iitt to wi o lift ft ffro rom m th the e grou und n a and nd ca ant inwards


BAY EXTERIOR STREET VIEW


Studio: ARCH 554 Project: Rural Cabins Location: Lewiston, ID

RURAL

OUTDOOR LIFESTYLE

The Rural Cabin project was focused on working with a client with a significant amount of undeveloped riverfront property who required overall planning and site development for placing 6-12 rural living units on the site. The cabin design evolved out of concepts of connecting with the natural landscape and integrating within the site to minimize disturbance of the native landscape while providing modern comforts to potential cabin buyers. y

CABIN SOUTH FACADE


CABIN SOUTHWEST ELEVATION


1

CABIN WEST FACADE

2

3

SUSTAINABLE SYSTEMS 4

5

1. Solar Panel Array 2. Green Roof System 3. Rainwater Cisterns 4. Local Material Selection 5. Radiant Heat Flooring System


HILLSIDE CABIN

CABIN TRANSVERSE SECTION


Studio: AR RCH 453 (gro oup) Projectt: Living City Challlenge Location n: Seattle, WA

Seattl at le 20 at 2035 35 ad dd dre ess s es e the he iss ssu sue of th he ci city ty y as an allll-c an con onsu su umi min ng g ent ntit ity y.. Appro ppro pp r ac a he hed d up upon th he ba basi sis is o off the e Liv vin ing Ci City y Challlen e ge 2.0 0, th the prroj p o ec ect ev evo ollve ved in nto to a c cri rriiti tique of of mod oder der ern “gre “g ree een-w en--w en w was ash as hiing ng” te tech chni nq qu ues es. s In res e po pons nse to o t e th essse e mo mod mode de errn n ssu ustain usta us tainab ta in nab ble e meth ho ods ds,, Se eat attl ttl te 20 035 35 exxp plo pl lore lore res a re est s ru ruct ctur urin ng of of our cit itie es an and th he eiir re ela ati tion tion o to fo food od pro rod du uctio on. n. B Bas ased as ed in Se eatt attttlle, e, the he prro oje ject ct rev ever erse ses the ro role le e of th the e city ci ty fro rom m co con nssum umer er to pr er pro od duc du ucer er. r.


THEPROBLEM: Oil Reliance:

Traditional farming methods are highly unsustainable and damaging to the land on which our food is produced. Today’s system takes nearly 6.41 barrels of oil to produce food from one hectare of traditional row farming. Current farming methods are heavily reliant on fossil fuels from the scale of heavy machinery down to the pesticides used to manipulate crop yields.

Carbon Footprint:

The way we treat our food is a major contributing factor of the all consuming city. In our current production model, fruits and vegetables regularly travel between 500 to over 2500 miles to reach Seattle, accounting for nearly 20% of the energy consumed in the US. This large agricultural radius creates immense carbon footprints for the food Seattle consumes.

Linear Consumption:

We consume linearly, growing crops in monoculture fields, using gasoline to generate, harvest, and transport food. The linear consumption model is both unsustainable and removed from the consumer. Changing this linear model to a cyclic one brings the consumer in direct relation to the food they consume. By remodeling our impactful relationship with food production, a more culturally self-sufficient system is formed.


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THESOLUTION: Urban Farming:

Evolving from traditional farming methods to urban farming considerably improves efficiency and production by removing outdoor variables. In comparing hydroponic farming to traditional methods, production rates increase by 8 fold. Additionally, with indoor farming their is a possibility to stack planting area to achieve a super efficiency within a given floor area.

Repairing Farmland:

Monocultures created by modern farming methods have severley damaged farmland across the US. Once freed by urban farming, this land can be used for orchards and polycultured uses. Much of the remaining land can be given back to nature.

Local Transportation:

Small agricultural transport units called AGR-PODS will be delivered around the city to create market spaces where pedestrians can gather and buy produce. The immediate area around the proposed agriculture towers will be supplemented with AGRPODS, small delivery vehicles, and streetcar infrastructure.

Cyclic Consumption:

Cyclic consumption is an attempt to create a much greater and more meaningful connection between agriculture and the consumer. By bringing the consumer into closer proximity to food production, cyclic consumption educates the community and decreases the reliance of the city on outside systems.

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Studio: Various,, Design g and Art Project: j Multiple p Design g Works

ART AND DESIGN

Through the pursuit of a minor in a art, the opportunity to explore spac ce and d form in multiple medias has arisen. The fo ocus of my artwork has been around the id deas of expressing form, whether it be e the human h body, the machine, or the landscape e, both natural and built.

Design II: Clock


Arch 504: ERODE Lamp


Arch 504: Advanced Analo og Graphics


STUDIO: ARCH 254 2ND YEAR DESIGN INSTRUCTOR: MATTT EDWARDS

STUDEN ST ENT: N LUK KE PL P ET E CH C ER E

STUDENT

In the spring of 2013 I had the opportunity to instruct a section of the Architecture 254 Design Studio at the University of Idaho. I found this to be an invaluable experience in numerous ways and this selection of work came from my body of students.

SSTTUD UDEN ENT: T: CON ONNO NOR JO NO JONE NESS NE


SSTTUD UDEN ENT: T: A ADR DRIANA DR IA A DE GIUI UIILA A

STUDENT: SARAH HULTIN STUD UDEN ENT: MATTT MC EN MCCO COUR CO OUR URTT


Traditional Growth:

Seaside, Florida as a Model for Traditional Neighborhood Development

An Excerpt: The model of growth in our American society has been a matter of constant debate in modern times. There has been a massive shift from the traditional model of neighborhood oriented growth to one of segregation and sprawl, termed suburban growth. This sprawl has created a rift in our societal values, moving away from sense of place and community, and towards mass replication and separation. Suburbia has not only dissected our communities, but has been exposed as growth with complete lack of substance. It is a model dependent on dwindling natural resources and rampant with overconsumption and waste. In response to this movement, and in light of its mass of issues, a countermovement based around traditional American neighborhood development has arisen. This movement, termed New Urbanism, hopes to reform our unhealthy growth into a traditional model that sustains communities and lessens un-sustainable dependencies present in suburbia. Planned on a set of ideals found vital to traditional American neighborhoods, communities such as Seaside, Florida serve as a model for modern growth through traditional neighborhood development. To form a framework of the concept of New Urbanism and traditional neighborhood developments such as Seaside, we must first understand the model of suburban growth that the movement critiques and ultimately rejects. In the post World War 2 era, the United States was infused with money, awed by progressive modern technologies, and inspired by statistical models and efficiencies developed during wartime (Duany p.11). Armed with these tools, developers led an assault on American communities, shaping them into high speed models of automotive efficiency with complete disregard to building communities. With every American household supplied with Detroit steel , the new frontier of suburbia was founded.


Suburban growth has become ever prevalent in the modern American landscape. In 2002, 95 percent of building was occurring in suburban areas (Ellis p. 280). This is not to say that growth in less urban areas is the inherent problem, but that the model for this growth is. One can quickly define suburbia through its key elements and their strict segregation through zoning laws. Forming around housing subdivisions, shopping centers, office parks, civic institutions, and roadways, suburbia has become a noxious infection that has spread virally through the United States. The everyday activities of life; sleeping, working, and shopping, located within the same block in traditional urban planning, are separated by miles of curvilinear roadways that feed into a single massive collector that connects the disengaged elements of the pseudo-community of suburbia. This model creates a massive dependency on roadways and ultimately the motor vehicle, while completely removing the pedestrian from the street. “Since each piece of suburbia serves only one type of activity, and since daily life involves a wide variety of activities, the residents of suburbia spend an unprecedented amount of time and money moving from one place to the next.” (Duany p.7). This waste of time and money, along with suburbia’s disregard of community development and growth in favor of segregation, forms the exclamation point for the counter movement of New Urbanism. To give a very simplistic view of New Urbanism, one might use iconography. The icon of suburban growth would no doubt take the form of its benefactor, the automobile. In response, New Urbanism puts the pedestrian at the forefront. If one were to consider life within a five minute pedestrian radius, there is a fine grain of programs such as living spaces, shops, workplaces, civic centers, and sources of entertainment that all occur within as little as a quarter mile of separation (“New Urban Network”). It is not simply that the traditional neighborhood is a walkable place that makes it successful, but it is the further implications of pedestrian access that begin to speak to the formation of communities and an interrelationship of elements that creates a sense of place completely lost upon suburban growth. To create a conceptual guideline for the movement against suburban growth, a group of professionals devoted to these ideas called the Congress of the New Urbanism convened and created the Charter of the New Urbanism in 1996 (“CNU”). The document underlines a bold and clear statement of intentions for the New Urbanist movement.


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DESIGN. ART. ARCHITECTURE. MATT EDWARDS


PORT FOLIO ARCHITECTURE. D E S I G N . MATTHEW EDWARDS.

20 13

Architecture Portfolio Matt Edwards  

My current portfolio of architecture and design work from the University of Idaho.

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