Issuu on Google+

           

Joint  Doctorate  in   Educational  Leadership      

   

HANDBOOK   Cohort  8                                       Winter  2012  

               

 

             

                       

 


TABLE  OF  CONTENTS       WELCOME  

3

PURPOSE  OF  THE  HANDBOOK  

5

COMMUNITY  PRINCIPLES  

5

PROGRAM  OVERVIEW  

7

LEADERSHIP  CAPACITIES  

8

PROGRAM  OF  STUDY   First  Year  Program   Second  Year  Program   Third  Year  Program  

9 9 10 11

ADVISORS,  PROGRESS  REPORTS,  AND  MILESTONES  

12

QUALIFYING  PAPER  

14

GUIDELINES  FOR  QUALIFYING  PAPER   Purpose   Required  Elements  of  Qualifying  Paper   Criteria  

14 14 14 15

DISSERTATION  PROPOSAL  

16

JDP  DISSERTATION  

17

DISSERTATION  PROCESS   Dissertation  Proposal   Dissertation  

17 18 18

JDP  GUIDELINES  FOR  PROPOSAL  AND  DISSERTATION  PRESENTATIONS   Dissertation  Presentations   Ed.D.  Guidelines  For  Proposal  Development   Ed.D.  Dissertation  Norms  and  Guidelines   Ed.D.    Suggested  Timeline  

19 20 21 22 23

UNIVERSITY  PROCEDURES  AND  IMPORTANT  DATES   Joint  Doctoral  Program  Fees   Program  Enrollment   Enrolling  and  Registering  in  Classes   Student  Billing  Services   Academic  and  Administrative  Holidays  

26 26 26 26 26 27

1  


Photo  ID’S   Parking  Permits   Mail  Boxes   E-­‐Mail  Accounts   UCSD  TritonLink   Tritonlink  Availability  

28 28 29 29 31 31

Ed.D.  CATALOG  DESCRIPTIONS  

32

THE  GRADUATE  STUDENT  HEALTH  INSURANCE  PLAN  (SHIP)  

35

SEXUAL  HARASSMENT  POLICY  

36

STUDENTS  WITH  DISABILITIES  

36

STUDENTS  WITH  SPECIAL  ABILITY/NEEDS  

36

JDP  GRADING  STANDARDS  FOR  GRADUATE  STUDENTS  

37

APPEAL  PROCEDURE  FOR  EDUCATION  LEADERSHIP  GRADUATE  STUDENTS  

39

ACADEMIC  HONESTY  AND  INTEGRITY  OF  SCHOLARSHIP  POLICIES  

40

ATTENDANCE  POLICY  

40

UCSD  EMERGENCY  NUMBERS  

41

UCSD  QUICK  REFERENCE  

41

CSUSM  EMERGENCY  NUMBERS  

42

CSUSM  QUICK  REFERENCE  

42

FACULTY  BIOGRAPHIES   Joint  Directors   CSUSM  Faculty   UCSD  Faculty  

43 43 44 51

ADMINISTRATIVE  STAFF  

55

USEFUL  LINKS      

56  

2  


WELCOME     The   faculty   of   the   Joint   Doctorate   in   Educational   Leadership   welcomed   its   first   cohort   of   regional  leaders  in  2005.  Since  then,  four  cohorts  have  graduated  and  three  cohorts  are  well  on   their  way  toward  meeting  this  goal.    We  are  proud  of  their  accomplishments,  and  we  know  you,   Cohort  VIII,  will  continue  the  trail-­‐blazing  leadership  work  started  by  our  pioneers.     The  program  is  designed  to  work  with  you,  pre-­‐K-­‐20  school  and  postsecondary  leaders  who  are   interested   in   honing   your   leadership   skills   and   research   practice   to   make   a   difference   in   the   lives   of   students   and   those   who   teach   them.   The   inclusion   of   pre-­‐K-­‐12   educators   with   community   college   and   university   administrators   has   enabled   both   levels   to   become   better   acquainted   with   each   other   and   to   explore   more   systematically   pipeline   issues,   social   justice   and   educational   equity   at   all   levels.   Another   unique   feature   of   our   doctoral   program   is   the   benefit  you  receive  from  the  research,  practice,  and  knowledge  of  two  faculties—CSUSM  and   UCSD.     For   the   duration   of   the   program,   the   JDP   directors   at   each   campus   serve   as   the   primary   contacts   and   advisors.     During   the   dissertation   phase,   your   dissertation   chair   and   committee   members  serve  as  your  primary  research  advisors.     The  Joint  Doctorate  Program  (JDP)  in  Educational  Leadership  is  a  member  of  the  Carnegie   Professional  Educational  Doctorate  (CPED)  a  consortium  of  57  universities  nationwide  who   work  together  in  a  critical  examination  of  the  doctorate  in  education.  The  intent  of  the  project   is  to  redesign  the  Ed.D.  and  to  make  it  a  stronger  and  more  relevant  degree  for  the  advanced   preparation  of  school  practitioners  and  clinical  faculty,  academic  leaders  and  professional  staff   for  the  nation’s  schools  and  colleges  and  the  learning  organizations  that  support  them.    CPED   principles  practiced  in  the  JDP  as  well  as  the  other  57  institutions  were  developed  and  are   included  following  community  principles  below.       The  JDP  in  Educational  Leadership  is  committed  to  social  justice  and  educational  equity  with  a   focus   on   strengths   through   appreciative   inquiry   designed   to   explore   and   inform   21st   century   educational   issues.     First,   we   address   educational   inequities   and   consider   diversity   to   be   strength.    Second,  we  teach  and  use  a  strengths-­‐  and  asset-­‐based  inquiry  approach  that  enables   you   to   embrace   your   own   strengths   and   to   identify   and   build   on   the   strengths   of   others   as   stepping   stones   to   powerful   leadership.     Third,   we   engage   you   in   exploring   cutting   edge   research  and  practices  that  will  enable  you  to  design  and  lead  educational  systems  in  and  for   the  future.    Currently  most  educators  are  preoccupied  with  repairing  a  19th  century  model  of   education.     We   believe   we   need   leaders   who   know   and   can   take   the   best   from   the   past   but   envision   the   future.     We   are   prepared   to   design   and   lead   in   ways   that   meet   the   needs   of   learners  today  as  well  as  the  learners  of  tomorrow.    We  envision  a  community  of  learners,  who   strive   to   critically   review   and   engage   in   research   as   a   way   to   contribute   to   knowledge,   improve   practice,  build  theory,  and  shape  the  future  of  education  in  the  region.               3  


Our  goals  are  to:     ♦ Break  new  ground  with  you  to  redefine  leadership  for  the  21st  century.   ♦ Develop  our  capacity  as  a  community  of  scholars  to  collectively  address  pressing  issues   of  social  justice  in  our  schools  and  communities.   ♦ Value  and  build  on  what  you  already  know  as  practitioners  to  define  and  strengthen   your  leadership.   ♦ Develop  your  skills  to  conduct  and  use  research  that  informs  practice.   ♦ Foster  quality  relationships  that  promote  deep  learning.   ♦ Research  and  design  educational  systems  attuned  to  the  future.   ♦ Help  you  learn  to  reflect,  refine,  and  redesign  the  organizations  you  lead.   ♦ Connect  you  to  other  scholars  in  the  region  and  nation  who  are  engaged  in  educational   leadership  and  research.  

4  


PURPOSE  OF  THE  HANDBOOK     This   handbook   will   introduce   you   to   the   JDP   program,   resources,   and   faculty,   as   well   as   important   graduate   student   policies   and   procedures   of   UCSD   and   CSUSM.     Adding   doctoral   studies  to  a  full  time  job  will  stretch  you  to  the  maximum  and  will  require  careful  planning,  time   management,   commitment,   and   perhaps   even   putting   on   hold   previous   activities   or   commitments.  This  handbook  is  designed  to  help  you  know  the  requirements  you  must  fulfill,   and   perhaps   more   importantly,   individuals   available   to   help   you   on   your   doctoral   journey.     Our   cohort  model  creates  a  community  of  scholars.    We  encourage  you  to  be  an  active  member  of   this   community   by   contributing   your   knowledge,   expertise,   new   learning,   support,   and   wisdom   to  colleagues,  and  seeking  help  of  other  colleagues  and  faculty  when  needed.     In  this  joint  program,  UCSD  serves  as  the  primary  administrative  unit.    Fortunately  the  academic   and   administrative   resources   of   both   campuses   are   available   to   you.     It   is   your   responsibility   to   use   this   handbook,   web   pages,   and   your   UCSD   and   CSUSM   email   account   to   stay   informed   about   the   program,   its   requirements,   due   dates,   updates   and   changes,   as   well   as   degree   policies  and  procedures  of  the  Office  of  Graduate  Studies  (OGS).    The  policies  and  procedures   operative  on  the  day  of  your  initial  enrollment  govern  your  program  for  the  duration.        

COMMUNITY  PRINCIPLES  

As  we  strive  to  learn  as  a  group,  we  will  use  the  following  foundational  principles  by  which  we   relate  to  each  other  as  a  community,  individuals,  co-­‐workers,  fellow  students,  and  instructors.     Each  of  us  speaks  from  our  own  experiences.   Each  of  us  is  open  to  listening  and  hearing  others.   Each  of  us  creates  a  space  where  all  voices  are  heard.   Each  of  us  commits  to  having  our  thinking  challenged.   Each  of  us  respects  everyone’s  confidentiality.   Each  of  us  may  share  our  lessons,  but  not  necessarily  who  or  where  it  was  said   Each  of  us  participates  using  a  “value  added”  approach  by  expanding  upon  ideas,   providing  examples,  and/or  expressing  a  different  perspective.    

                     

5  


CPED  PRINCIPLES     CPED  has  identified  the  following  statements  that  will  focus  research  and  development  agendas   to  test,  refine,  and  validate  principles  for  the  professional  doctorate  in  education.     The  Professional  doctorate  in  education:   1. Is  framed  around  questions  of  equity,  ethics,  and  social  justice  to  bring  about   solutions  to  complex  problems  of  practice.   2. Prepares  leaders  who  can  construct  and  apply  knowledge  to  make  a  positive   difference  in  the  lives  of  individuals,  families,  organizations,  and  communities.   3. Provides  opportunities  for  candidates  to  develop  and  demonstrate  collaboration  and   communication  skills  to  work  with  diverse  communities  and  to  build  partnerships.     4. Provides  field-­‐based  opportunities  to  analyze  problems  of  practice  and  use  multiple   frames  to  develop  meaningful  solutions.   5. Is  grounded  in  and  develops  a  professional  knowledge  base  that  integrates  both   practical  and  research  knowledge,  that  links  theory  with  systemic  and  systematic   inquiry.     6. Emphasizes  the  generation,  transformation,  and  use  of  professional  knowledge  and   practice.  

6  


PROGRAM  OVERVIEW     The  Joint  Doctorate  in  Educational  Leadership  is  a  year-­‐round  intense  learning  experience  that   starts  in  the  Winter  Quarter  (semester  at  CSUSM)  and  requires  at  a  minimum  three  full  years  of   study  with  classes  held  winter,  spring,  summer,  and  fall.    As  a  JDP  student  you  are  registered  for   8-­‐10  units  each  quarter,  which  translates  into  two  4-­‐unit  classes  and  in  some  quarters  a  2-­‐unit   practicum  or  in  the  third  year  two  (2-­‐unit)  colloquia.    At  the  graduate  level  this  is  the  equivalent   of  a  full-­‐time  load.     The   JDP   focuses   on   leadership,   research,   and   practice   in   three   key   areas:   leadership   for   21st   century   schools   and   systems;   equity   and   diversity   policy   analysis;   and   foundations   of   organization  development  and  change.    To  this  end,  you  will  take  courses  designed  to  develop   five   specific �� leadership   capacities   that   form   the   foundation   of   the   program.   They   are:   (1)   Leadership  for  Learning;  (2)  Leadership  for  a  Diverse  Society;  (3)  Leadership  for  Organizational   Change;  (4)  Leadership  for  Organizational  Development;  and  (5)  Leadership  for  the  Future.    The   program   prepares   leaders   for   culturally,   linguistically,   and   economically   diverse   educational   settings,  and  provides  the  tools  to  conduct  research  in  such  settings.     In  each  of  these  classes,  you  will  collaboratively  explore  current  research  and  theory  and  will  be   asked   to   critically   analyze   and   relate   the   readings   to   your   practice.     In   addition,   practice   is   reviewed  in  relation  to  how  it  informs  theory  and  research.    In  the  research  strands,  you  will   critically   review   current   research,   learn   how   to   do   a   literature   review   that   helps   frame   new   avenues   for   future   research,   learn   the   basics   of   research   design,   investigate   both   qualitative   and   quantitative   research   methodologies,   and   learn   how   these   methods   can   be   combined   to   conduct  more  valid  and  reliable  research.            

Student  Led  Discussion  

 

7  

 


LEADERSHIP  CAPACITIES     Leadership  for  Learning:  The  foundation  of  this  Joint  Ed.D.  rests  on  the  belief  that  the  work  of   school  leaders  must  always  address  the  common  objective  of  enhancing  and  providing  the  best   conditions   for   student   learning.     Learning   to   apply   the   effective   tools   of   leadership   requires   the   acquisition   of   flexible   communication   skills,   creative   decision-­‐making   capabilities,   a   collaborative  approach  to  problem  solving,  and  the  confidence  to  take  calculated  risks.    At  its   core,   effective   leadership   depends   on   one's   ability   to   advance   the   skills,   dispositions   and   teamwork  of  the  adults  involved  in  the  instruction  of  students.       Leadership  for  a  Diverse  Society:  Leadership  for  a  diverse  society  requires  diversity  of  designs,   practices,   and   solutions.     Candidates   in   the   Joint   Ed.D.   Program   will   learn   to   implement   inclusive  practices,  not  only  as  a  matter  of  policy,  but  also  as  a  matter  of  personal  commitment   and  understanding  of  how  institutions  are  historically  transformed  as  a  result.       Leadership   for   Organizational   Change:   Developing   leaders   who   are   prepared   for   and   understand  the  importance  of  organizational  change  is  a  program  priority.    Meeting  the  needs   of   an   evolving   educational   system   will   require   leaders   who   support   a   myriad   of   strategic   innovations  that  will  lead  to  positive  changes  in  their  organizations.    Candidates  will  focus  on   developing   critical   habits   of   action   to   support   effective   problem   solving,   build   leadership   capacity  within  institutions,  and  alter  institutions  in  ways  that  significantly  improve  the  learning   condition  for  their  students.       Leadership   for   Organizational   Development:   The   program   will   help   individuals   design   organizational  growth  plans  and  encourage  them  to  actively  support  each  other  as  they  work  to   implement   their   plans.     This   experience   will   help   graduates   understand   the   importance   of   building   leadership   capacity   within   their   educational   organizations.   One   of   the   essential   features  of  the  program  is  the  development  of  a  community  of  learners  who  have  experience   creating   safe,   reflective   environments   for   academic   study,   risk   taking,   and   the   practice   of   academic  leadership.       Leadership   for   the   Future:   The   program   will   help   leaders   plan   for   the   future   as   leaders.     This   strand   is   comprised   of   a   specific   course   focused   on   the   future   as   well   as   two   advanced   topic   classes  and  two  colloquia  designed  to  address  cutting  issues  in  leadership  such  as  legal  issues,   technology,  cognitive  development,  learning  theory,  and  social  concerns  including  the  impact  of   diversity   on   society   that   impact   all   leaders.     The   goal   is   not   just   to   focus   on   the   problems   of   today,  but  to  design  and  lead  learning  organizations  able  to  create  positive  futures.     Research:  In  addition  to  expanding  your  theoretical  and  practical  knowledge  in  leadership  that   can   address   issues   of   social   justice   and   educational   equity,   a   key   component   of   this   doctoral   program  is  conducting  research.    A  series  of  research  courses  enable  you  to  learn  about  both   qualitative   and   quantitative   research   paradigms,   and   to   know   how   to   design   and   conduct   a   major  study  often  using  the  your  own  “workplace  as  your  laboratory.”       8  


PROGRAM  OF  STUDY     The  Joint  Doctoral  Program  has  a  unique  January  start  date  to  better  meet  the  time  demands  of   educational   leaders.     The   program   is   designed   so   that   it   can   be   completed   in   three   calendar   years  (4  quarters/year  including  summers,  or  a  total  of  12  quarters,  or  the  semester  equivalent)   and  consists  of  108-­‐quarter  units  of  study.    Although  UCSD  serves  as  the  administrative  unit  for   enrollment,   you   are   considered   a   full   time   graduate   student   by   each   campus   and   your   diploma   will  indicate  your  are  a  graduate  of  both  campuses.    You  will  be  enrolled  in  your  classes  each   quarter   by   the   UCSD   JDP   staff.     You   will   use   your   UCSD   Personal   Identification   number   and   Personal  Access  code,  which  will  be  provided  at  the  orientation,  to  make  fee  payments.    Timely   fee  payment  is  your  responsibility.    In  order  to  meet  residency  requirements,  students  will  need   to   be   enrolled   in   the   JDP   program   for   a   total   of   36-­‐quarter   units   (or   semester   equivalent)   consecutively  for  one  year  (4  quarters).  

 

First  Year  Program     The   first   year   of   the   program   consists   of   36   quarter   units   taken   during   one   calendar   year   (including   summers)   and   is   designed   to   build   a   shared   language   and   provide   you   with         knowledge  and  skills  essential  for  understanding  educational  leadership.  You  will  be  enrolled  in   two  4-­‐unit  research  classes  focusing  on  the  basics  of  research  and  designs  appropriate  to  the   field  of  education.    You  will  also  be  enrolled  in  two,  two-­‐unit  practicum  courses  that  focus  on   applying  research  methodologies  to  your  workplace  as  they  relate  to  the  core  courses.  The  first   year   leadership   courses   are   also   designed   to   prepare   you   for   the   qualifying   paper   described   below.   All   courses   are   aimed   at   assuring   that   you   develop   knowledge   and   skills   in   a   range   of   subjects  central  to  educational  leadership  research  and  practice.       By  the  completion  of  the  4th  quarter,  all  candidates  are  required  to  submit  a  Qualifying  Paper,   which   serves   as   a   comprehensive   examination.     This   paper   consists   of   a   comprehensive   literature   review   on   a   significant   topic   relevant   to   educational   leadership,   which   provides   faculty   an   opportunity   to   assess   the   candidate’s   substantive   knowledge,   synthesis   and   analytical  reasoning,  and  writing  proficiencies.    The  research  and  evaluation  courses  assist  you   in   learning   how   to   read   and   interpret   research   studies   and   their   implications   for   effective   educational  practices,  and  develop  skills  needed  to  write  a  review  of  literature.    This  writing  is   expected   to   be   of   publishable   quality   similar   to   that   required   of   other   high   quality   doctoral   programs.  Two  faculty  members  from  each  campus  will  review  every  qualifying  paper.  Students   who   do   not   pass   will   have   an   opportunity   to   revise   and   resubmit   their   papers   one   time.   Continuation  in  the  program  is  contingent  on  passing.  

9  


The  Table  below  summarizes  the  first  year  program:       First  Year  Program  (36  Quarter  Units)    

WINTER                                                                                                  SPRING                                          SUMMER                                                     FALL                                                     QUARTER                                    10                                            QUARTER   10   QUARTER                            8                      QUARTER  

         8      

EDS  280/EDLD  705    

 

EDS  282/EDLD  715    

 

EDS  281/EDLD  710    

 

EDS  283/EDLD  720    

 

Re-­‐Thinking     Leadership    

4    

Leadership  for  a     Diverse  Society    

4    

Leadership  for     Learning    

4    

4    

 

Leadership  for     Organizational     Change    

EDS  287A/EDLD  750A    

 

EDS  287B/EDLD/750B    

 

EDS  284  /EDLD  725  

 

EDS  292/EDLD  785    

 

Educational  Research     &  Evaluation  Design    

4    

Educational  Research     &  Evaluation  Design    

4    

Leadership  for   Organizational     Development    

4    

Qualifying  Paper     Preparation    

4    

EDS  291A/EDLD  770A    

   

EDS  291B/EDLD  770B    

Leadership  Research    

Leadership  Research    

   

Practicum  

 2    

Practicum    

2    

     

     

     

     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    Second  Year  Program  

  The   second   year   of   the   program   is   designed   to   substantially   extend   research   skills   and   knowledge   that   prepare   you   to   submit   a   dissertation   proposal   and   defend   it   before   your   dissertation  committee  by  the  end  of  the  Winter  Quarter  of  the  second  year  of  the  program.   When  this  requirement  is  satisfactorily  completed,  you  will  advance  to  candidacy.    In  addition,   an   important   component   of   the   second   year   is   pursing   advanced   topics   in   leadership   especially   in  the  areas  of  technology,  cutting  edge  policy  issues,  and  data  use  in  decision-­‐making  and  in   future  thinking.    Collaborative  projects  are  a  key  part  of  the  learning.     The  Table  below  summarizes  the  second  year  program:     Second  Year  Program  (36  Quarter  Units)     WINTER       QUARTER    

   

  10    

SPRING       QUARTER            

                 10

   

SUMMER           QUARTER    

        8    

       FALL            QUARTER                  8                        

EDS  287C/EDLD  750C    

 

EDS  288B/EDLD  760A  

 

EDS  286A/EDLD  740A  

 

EDS  286A/EDLD  740C    

 

Educational  Research  and   Evaluational  Design    

4  

Advanced  Research  and   Evaluation  Methods  

4  

Advanced  Topics  on     Leadership  

4  

Advanced  Topics  on   Leadership  

4  

EDS  288A/EDLD  760A    

 

EDS  288C  /EDLD  760C  

 

EDS  290  

 

EDS  285/EDLD  730    

 

Advanced  Research  &   Evaluation  Methods  

4  

Advanced  Research  &   Evaluation  Methods  

4  

Proposal  Preparation    

4  

Leadership  for  the   Future  

4  

EDS  293A  /EDLD  

 

EDS  293B  /EDLD  

 

 

 

 

 

Advanced  Leadership   Research  Practicum  

2  

Advanced  Leadership   Research  Practicum  

2  

 

 

 

 

  10  


Third  Year  Program  

  The  third  year  of  study  is  designed  to  develop  the  student’s  independent  scholarship  through   conducting  dissertation  research  as  outlined  in  the  dissertation  proposal.    The  candidate’s  work   will   reflect   the   standards   governing   dissertations   within   the   graduate   divisions   of   the   partner   institutions.    In  this  final  year  there  are  three  work  strands.    First,  you  must  meet  regularly  with   your   dissertation   chair   for   guidance   and   review   of   work.   It   is   primarily   your   responsibility   to   maintain   contact   and   set   up   appointments.     Second,   a   4-­‐quarter   dissertation   writing   seminar   guides  our  student  cohort  in  the  dissertation  process  by  addressing  advanced  topics  in  research   methodologies,   especially   data   analysis   techniques   and   software   packages,   as   well   as   professional   writing   related   to   completion   of   the   dissertation.     Third,   two   colloquia   are   scheduled  in  the  winter  and  spring  quarters  to  keep  you  current  with  cutting  edge  issues.       Dissertations   may   cover   a   wide   range   of   topics   and   utilize   various   research   methodologies.   You   are   encouraged   to   approach   these   topics   through   the   program’s   vision   as   a   contributor   to   leadership  knowledge  and  systemic  efforts  to  achieve  social  justice.    It  is  anticipated  that  you   will   conduct   and   complete   the   dissertation   by   the   end   of   the   third   year   or   beginning   of   the   fourth  year,  in  time  for  the  May  graduation  from  CSUSM  and  a  June  graduation  from  UCSD.       The  Table  below  summarizes  the  third  year  program:     Third  Year  Program  (36  Quarter  Units)     WINTER       QUARTER    

                       

SPRING          10     QUARTER  

SUMMER              10        

  FALL     QUARTER                  8   QUARTER                8  

 EDS  299/EDLD  794  

 

EDS  299/EDLD  794    

 

EDS  299/EDLD  794    

 

EDS  299/EDLD  794    

 

 Dissertation      Research  

4    

Dissertation     Research    

4    

Dissertation     Research    

4    

Dissertation     Research    

4    

EDS  289A/EDLD  796A    

 

EDS  289B/EDLD  796B    

 

EDS  289C/EDLD  796C    

 

EDS  289D/EDLD  796D    

 

Dissertation  Writing    

4    

Dissertation  Writing    

4    

Dissertation  Writing    

4    

Dissertation    

4    

Seminar    

Educational    

2    

Educational    

2    

Leadership  

 

Leadership    

 

         

Writing  Seminar    

Colloquium  on    

     

Seminar    

Colloquium  on    

     

Seminar    

         

EDS  294A/EDLD  798A    

 

EDS  294B/EDLD  798B    

 

11  

       

 

       

 


ADVISORS,  PROGRESS  REPORTS,  AND  MILESTONES     When  you  enter  the  program,  the  CSUSM  program  director  assumes  the  primary  advising  role   during  the  first  year  and  is  ready  and  willing  to  answer  any  program  questions  you  have.    At  our   regular   JDP   faculty   meetings,  we   review  student  progress  and  bring  to  each  other’s  attention   progress  of  the  cohort  as  a  whole  and  needs  of  any  particular  student.    Our  goal  is  to  ensure   each  student’s  success  in  the  program.       In   the   second   year,   the   UCSD   program   director   serves   as   your   primary   advisor.     Again   you   should   feel   free   to   bring   any   concerns   or   questions   to   the   co-­‐directors   attention   at   either   campus  throughout  the  duration  of  the  program.     During   the   second   year,   after   your   research   interests   are   clarified   and   matched   to   a   faculty   member’s   area   of   expertise,   a   dissertation   committee   will   be   formed.     The   dissertation   chair   at   this  point  becomes  a  critical  advisor  to  you  as  you  continue  to  finalize  the  proposal  for  defense,   conduct  the  research  and  defend  it  at  the  end  of  the  third  year.    However,  at  any  point  in  the   program,   students   should   feel   free   to   contact   the   directors   with   question   or   requests   for   assistance.    Committee  members  should  also  be  seen  as  important  resources  and  advisors  for   informing  the  student’s  dissertation  study.       Student  Progress     Doctoral   students   are   expected   to   make   steady   progress   toward   completion   of   the   requirements  for  the  degree.    You  must  maintain  a  3.0  grade  average  to  remain  in  the  program.     Letter   grades   for   classes   will   include   plus   or   minus   grades.   A   grade   of   C   puts   the   student   on   probation   and   the   student   must   take   steps   immediately   to   improve   performance   in   order   to   remain  in  the  program.         There  will  be  an  annual  assessment  of  student  progress.    At  the  end  of  the  first  year,  the  CSUSM   director   will   provide   the   primary   overall   evaluation   of   your   progress,   which   is   filed   with   the   Office  of  Graduate  Studies.    You  have  a  right  to  review  this  progress  report  and  to  add  your  own   comments.     You   must   sign   the   report   before   it   is   filed.     In   particular   in   this   first   year   we   are   attending   to   your   ability   to   keep   up   with   the   pace   of   the   work   and   whether   or   not   you   are   mastering   the   art   of   academic   writing,   a   key   skill   needed   for   the   qualifying   paper   and   dissertation  work.      You  may  be  asked  to  seek  writing  assistance  to  be  able  to  complete  the  first   milestone  successfully.     During  the  second  year,  the  UCSD  director  will  be  responsible  for  filing  student  progress  reports   as   outlined   above.     Particular   attention   in   this   progress   report   is   paid   to   whether   you   are   on   target  for  a  timely  defense  of  the  dissertation  proposal.    In  the  third  year,  progress  reports  are   filed  by  your  chair  and  JDP  directors.    Time  required  for  completion  of  the  doctorate  depends   less  on  units  or  credits  or  time  of  attendance  than  it  does  on  mastery  of  a  subject  field,  passing   of  the  milestones,  and  completion  of  a  satisfactory  dissertation.    

12  


Milestones   In  addition  to  remaining  a  student  in  good  standing  in  course  work,  you  must  meet  and  pass   three   major   milestones   to   be   awarded   the   doctorate   in   education   degree.     These   milestones   are:   (a)   a   qualifying   paper;   (b)   a   proposal   for   a   dissertation   research   study;   and   (c)   a   dissertation.     The   qualifying   paper   is   a   written   literature   review.     The   proposal   and   dissertation   involve  both  a  written  product  as  well  as  an  oral  defense.    These  milestones  are  described  in   detail  later  in  the  handbook.    

13  


QUALIFYING  PAPER     In  lieu  of  a  comprehensive  examination,  you  will  prepare  a  written  Qualifying  Paper  during  the   Fall  term  at  the  end  of  the  first  year  of  study.    This  paper  consists  of  a  comprehensive  literature   review  on  a  significant  topic  relevant  to  educational  leadership,  which  provides  an  opportunity   for   multiple   faculty   to   assess   your   level   of   substantive   knowledge,   analytical   reasoning,   and   writing   proficiencies.   Faculty   members   from   UCSD   and   CSUSM   campuses   review   the   written   Qualifying   Paper,   through   a   blind   review   process.     Four   faculty   members   read   each   paper.     Three   of   the   four   members   must   agree   that   the   candidate’s   Qualifying   Paper   meets   expectations  in  order  for  you  to  receive  a  pass.    If  your  paper  does  not  fulfill  the  criteria  for  a   pass  grade,  you  will  be  permitted  to  resubmit  the  paper  by  the  end  of  the  Winter  Quarter.    Any   student  failing  on  the  second  attempt  will  not  be  permitted  to  continue  in  the  program,  even  if   class  performance  has  been  satisfactory.    The  qualifying  paper  is  a  vital  step  in  confirming  that   you  will  be  able  to  conduct  a  high  quality  research  study.        

GUIDELINES  FOR  QUALIFYING  PAPER  

  Purpose  –  The  qualifying  paper  provides  the  opportunity  for  a  student  to:       Identify   a   topic   and   seek   and   locate   scholars   and   researchers   who   have   empirically   and   theoretically  studied  and  written  on  this  topic.      Present   and   discuss   the   thinking   of   these   scholars   around   commonalities   and   differences,  which  reflects  an  ability  to  deconstruct,  analyze,  and  synthesize  research.      Explore  the  implications  of  the  topic  for  leadership  and  social  justice.      Critically  reflect  on  the  topic  and  identify  areas  for  future  research.      Apply  principles  of  scholarly  writing,  including  the  use  of  APA  style  rules  for  preparing   manuscripts.     Required  Elements  of  Qualifying  Paper  (Address  each  element  using  the  headings  as  indicated)     Abstract  (500  words  maximum)     Introduction:  Statement  of  the  Problem,  as  presented  in  Creswell     What  is  your  topic?    What  problem  could  research  on  this  topic  help  you  solve?    Why  are  you  curious  about  this  topic?     Current  State  of  knowledge/research  on  this  topic  (17-­‐19  pages)       14  


What  are  the  major  themes/findings  that  surfaced  from  your  review  on  your  topic?    A   strong  paper  identifies  the  major  themes  in  the  literature  review  by  analyzing  and   synthesizing  and  does  not  just  summarize  the  studies.      How  have  these  studies  informed  the  nature  of  the  problem  you  identified?    What   major   research   methods   are   used   to   study   this   topic   (quantitative,   qualitative,   survey,  case  studies,  narrative).       Summary  (2  pages)        What  can  you  conclude  about  the  current  state  of  the  literature  about  your  topic  from   the   literature   you   reviewed?   A   strong   paper   presents   through   the   summary   what   is   known  and  what  are  some  of  the  gaps  in  the  literature.    These  gaps  can  be  in  terms  of   theory  building,  research  approaches  (e.g.  all  quantitative,  and  few  qualitative  studies  to   answer  how  and  why  questions),  or  lack  of  extensive  study  of  the  topic  or  aspects  of  the   topic.     Implications  for  Leadership  (1-­‐2  paragraphs)      What  implications  can  you  draw  from  your  review  that  could  inform  leadership  theory,   research,  or  practice?     Implications  for  Social  Justice  (1-­‐2  paragraphs)        What   implications   can   you   draw   from   your   review   that   could   inform   social   justice   theory,  research,  or  practice?     Areas  for  future  research  (1  page)      What  did  you  learn  that  suggest  areas  for  future  research?  Describe  those  areas.    How  will  a  study  on  this  topic  be  helpful  to  researchers  and  practitioners?     References      Reflect  empirical  research  (primarily).    Carefully  formatted  to  meet  APA  standards.     Criteria      The   review   consists   of   at   least   30   references   (75%   empirical—qualitative   and/or   quantitative)  research.    Other  citations  can  include  theoretical  or  conceptual  articles.    Synthesizing   and   critical   analysis   (comparing   &   contrasting   of   articles)   of   the   research   findings  is  the  goal;  use  direct  quotes  sparingly.    Paper  must  be  20-­‐25  pages  in  length,  excluding  Title  page,  Abstract,  and  References.    On  the  title  page  use  only  your  Student  ID  number  and  title  of  your  paper.    Use  APA  for  style  and  references.     

15  


Small  Group  and  one-­‐on-­‐one  discussion    

 

 

DISSERTATION  PROPOSAL     In  pursuing  a  doctoral  degree,  the  most  difficult  task  is  deciding  on  a  topic  for  study.    Obviously   to  sustain  the  course,  you  need  to  pursue  research  in  an  area  of  interest  as  well  as  one  that  has   critical   implications   for   leadership.     However,   it   is   also   important   that   you   consider   areas   for   research  that  match  with  faculty  expertise  so  that  we  are  able  to  provide  you  with  the  needed   guidance.    In  the  first  quarter,  opportunities  will  be  made  to  review  faculty  bios  and  meet  as   many   faculty   as   possible   in   one   of   the   two   research   classes.     In   addition,   you   will   share   your   interests   with   other   classmates   and   be   clustered   in   affinity   groups   to   do   some   preliminary   reading  of  research.    You  are  encouraged  to  read  broadly  in  the  first  quarter  and  not  narrow   your   focus   too   quickly.     After   reading   bios   of   the   faculty,   you   are   encouraged   to   set   up   appointments  with  any  faculty  you  would  like  to  know  more  about  and  see  if  there  are  shared   research  interests.     In  general  you  will  be  ready  to  defend  your  proposal  by  the  end  of  the  fall  quarter  or  beginning   of   the   winter   quarter   of   the   third   year.     The   dissertation   proposal   defense   will   be   scheduled   once   the   chair   determines   it   is   ready   to   submit   to   other   dissertation   committee   members.     The   proposal  generally  addresses  the  background,  rationale,  research  questions,  literature  review,   research  design  and  methods  of  data  collection  to  be  used,  and  the  significance  of  the  study.     You  will  also  work  with  your  chair  to  complete  the  needed  Human  Protection  Protocols  (IRB).     The   proposal   serves   as   a   critical   guide   for   conducting   the   research   and   often   becomes   the   foundation   for   the   first   three   chapters   of   the   dissertation.     Of   course,   since   it   is   only   a   proposal   these  chapters  are  revised  and  rewritten  to  align  with  the  actual  research  conducted.   16  


JDP  DISSERTATION  

  We   envision   that   you   will   achieve   three   important   goals   through   JDP   dissertation   research.     First,   you   will   learn   all   the   fundamentals   of   how   to   review   current   research   and   use   this   review   to   design   and   conduct   a   research   study.     Second,   you   will   learn   how   to   work   as   part   of   a   research  team  with  your  chair  and  perhaps  other  JDP  students,  even  as  you  pursue  your  own   individual   component   of   research.     For   example,   you   may   explore   the   same   major   issue   in   different   setting,   investigate   different   dimensions   of   a   complex   problem,   or   use   different   methodologies   to   explore   the   same   topic.     Third,   you   will   learn   how   to   coordinate   your   own   study   with   that   of   your   faculty   advisors   and   affinity   group   classmates   so   that   the   impact   on   the   field   can   be   maximized   through   joint   articles,   white   papers   or   interactive   website,   or   other   means  to  collectively  communicate  to  and  inform  the  larger  educational  community.     The  dissertation  will  present  the  results  of  your  investigation  and  you  will  defend  your  findings   in  an  oral  presentation  to  the  committee  that  is  open  to  the  public.    This  presentation  usually   occurs  at  the  end  of  the  third  year  or  in  the  first  or  second  quarters  of  the  4th  year.         DISSERTATION  PROCESS     The  dissertation  process  and  research  courses  are  designed  to  teach  you  how  to  identify  critical   problems   suitable   for   research,   review   what   is   already   known   about   the   problem   from   the   research   of   other   scholars   and   where   gaps   in   knowledge   may   remain,   and   design   a   research   study   that   uses   appropriate   research   methods   to   help   close   the   knowledge   gap.     The   culmination  of  this  phase  of  the  process  results  in  the  development  of  a  dissertation  proposal   and  the  advancement  to  candidacy.    The  second  phase  is  conducting  the  research,  analyzing  the   data,  and  preparing  a  written  dissertation  based  on  the  findings.         During   the   first   two   quarters   in   the   research   classes,   you   will   begin   to   identify   problems   of   practice   or   issues   that   you   may   be   interested   in   researching   that   have   a   direct   bearing   on   leadership   issues.     You   will   learn   about   faculty   interests   and   potential   dissertation   advisors.     Students  with  common  interests  are  urged  to  form  affinity  groups  and  begin  to  explore  ways   their   studies   could   have   a   greater   impact   through   collaboration   and   coordination.     You   are   urged   to   consider   forming   collaborative   research   teams,   similar   to   what   might   be   found   in   a   number  of  science  fields.    Although  you  pursue  and  complete  a  dissertation  that  is  your  own,   you  may  work  with  a  faculty  member  on  a  problem  related  to  the  professor’s  interests  and/or   work  with  other  students  to  (a)  explore  the  same  major  issue  in  different  locales  or  contexts,  or   (b)  investigate  different  dimensions  of  a  complex  problem.    

17  


Dissertation  Proposal       Students  select,  develop  and  defend  a  research  proposal  for  the  dissertation  by  the  end  of  Fall   Quarter  of  the  Second  Year  or  Winter  Quarter  of  the  Third  Year.    The  dissertation  proposal  is   submitted   to   the   student’s   Dissertation   Committee,   who   will   examine   the   candidate   on   the   proposal.     The   proposal   will   include   the   background,   rationale,   research   questions,   literature   review,   research   protocol   and   methodology,   and   significance   of   the   dissertation   project.     The   proposal   forms   a   foundation   for   the   first   part   of   the   written   dissertation,   but   of   course   is   revised  and  rewritten  in  alignment  with  the  findings  of  the  actual  research  conducted.    Support   in  developing  the  proposal  is  provided  in  EDS  290  and  through  work  with  your  committee  chair.     Once   your   proposal   has   been   successfully   defended   and   the   committee   and   other   university   officials  have  signed  the  required  paperwork,  you  will  file  the  advancement  to  candidacy  form   and   pay   the   required   fee.     You   will   then   be   considered   to   have   met   the   second   critical   milestone.     Dissertation     Developing   the   research   proposal   is   a   major   accomplishment,   but   the   end   goal   is   to   now   conduct  the  research,  analyze  findings  and  write  up  the  results  in  a  dissertation.    The  goal  of   this  process  is  to  contribute  to  professional  knowledge  in  education—yours  and  others  in  the   broader   community.     Your   chair   will   be   your   primary   guide   in   this   process.     It   is   your   responsibility  to  schedule  regular  meetings  with  your  chair  and  to  keep  them  informed  about   your  progress  or  challenges  you  may  be  encountering.    You  will  also  be  supported  in  this  last  leg   of   the   journey   by   CSUSM   and   UCSD   faculty   teaching   the   dissertation   writing   seminars.     Your   fellow   students,   especially   if   you   are   pursuing   a   collaborative   dissertation   theme,   or   have   developed  other  affinity  groups  also  need  to  be  seen  as  a  key  support  group.    As  a  community   of  scholars,  our  goal  is  to  work  together  to  ensure  that  all  students  are  successful.  

18  


JDP  GUIDELINES  FOR  PROPOSAL  AND  DISSERTATION  PRESENTATIONS     These   guidelines   are   intended   to   assist   you   as   students,   chairs,   and   committee   members   to   successfully  complete  the  processes  associated  with  forming  the  dissertation  committee  as  well   as  your  proposal  and  dissertation  presentations.         Advising:    During  the  dissertation  phase,  the  chair  serves  as  the  primary  advisor  who  guides  you   in  conducting  your  research  and  preparing  the  dissertation.    The  Director  of  the  Joint  Doctoral   Program  at  each  campus  serves  as  the  programmatic  advisor  for  all  students  whose  dissertation   chair  is  on  that  campus’  faculty.    The  director/advisor,  student,  and  chair  will  work  together  to   ensure  a  smooth  proposal  and  dissertation  process.       Chair  Selection:    As  your  interests  begin  to  solidify  through  the  research  classes,  your  qualifying   paper,  your  opportunities  to  learn  about  other  students’  interests,  as  well  as,  faculty  research   agendas,  you  will  be  asked  to  identify  three  (3)  possible  chairs.    The  Joint  Doctorate  Executive   Committee   then   reviews   these   preferences   and   works   to   honor   requests   by   considering   a   good   match   of   student   to   faculty   member   relative   to   topic   and/or   methodology,   and   to   balance   workload   among   faculty   and   across   campuses.     If   you   and   other   students   want   to   pursue   common   or   closely   related   issues   with   a   faculty   member,   it   is   most   likely   that   this   faculty   member  will  become  the  chair  for  each  member  of  the  group.     Forming  the  dissertation  committee:    The  chair  of  the  committee  and  the  campus  JDP  Director,   with   input   from   you,   collaboratively   decide   who   will   be   the   other   members   of   the   three-­‐ member  dissertation  committee.    Potential  committee  members  should  not  be  contacted  until   the  campus  JDP  Director  has  finalized  the  decision.    Each  committee  must  have  a  minimum  of   one  CSUSM  and  one  UCSD  member.    The  committee  must  also  have  at  least  two  faculty  who   are  tenured  at  one  or  other  of  the  two  campuses.  The  Joint  Doctorate  Executive  Committee  and   chair   will   take   an   active   role   in   suggesting   potential   members.     Each   campus   Director   will   assume   the   responsibility   for   assuring   the   proper   forms   are   filed   with   the   respective   campus   graduate  student  affairs  offices.         When   to   have   the   dissertation   proposal   presentation   meeting:     The   JDP   Cohort   Model   and   timeline   suggest   that   the   dissertation   proposal   presentation   occur   by   the   end   of   the   second   year  (Fall  Quarter)  or  in  the  beginning  of  the  third  year  (Winter  Quarter).    You  are  encouraged   to  complete  your  proposal  as  soon  as  practical  in  the  Fall  quarter  of  the  second  year  in  order  to   set  a  presentation  time  no  later  than  the  first  month  in  the  Winter  quarter  of  the  third  year.    An   important  point  to  remember  is  that  a  thorough  and  thoughtful  proposal  will  facilitate  better   research  in  subsequent  quarters.      The  proposal  is  presented  for  defense  when  the  chair  deems   it  is  ready.         Two   weeks   before   the   dissertation   proposal   presentation:     It   is   your   responsibility   to   give   copies  of  your  proposal  to  your  committee  members.    Some  members  may  want  the  proposal   electronically   and   others   in   writing.     Please   consult   with   your   committee   members   and   see   what   is   best   for   them.     If   the   two-­‐week   deadline   is   not   met,   it   is   strongly   suggested   that   the   chair   reschedule   the   meeting   so   committee   members   have   adequate   time   to   review   the   proposal  prior  to  the  presentation.     19  


Scheduling   the   proposal   presentation   meeting:     The   chair   and   you   schedule   the   proposal   defense  at  a  time  convenient  to  all  three  committee  members.  Then,  decide  on  which  campus   the  defense  is  to  be  held  and  make  room  and  parking  arrangements  by  contacting  the  program   assistant  at  the  appropriate  campus.     The   chair   should   not   allow   a   meeting   to   be   scheduled   unless   he/she   is   convinced   that   the   proposal   is   ready.     Once   the   meeting   time   is   set   and   confirmed   by   the   chair   and   all   the   committee  members,  you  are  responsible  for  sending  the  date,  time  and  location  to  each  JDP   director  and  campus  JDP  staff  who  prepares  an  announcement  of  the  defense.    Please  ask  the   appropriate   JDP   staff   to   download   the   signature   form   and   pick   it   up   before   the   defense.     An   announcement   of   the   proposal   presentation   is   sent   to   all   current   doctoral   students   and   faculty   inviting  them  to  attend.     A  two-­‐hour  meeting  for  the  proposal  presentation  is  suggested.    The  primary  purpose  of  the   proposal   defense   is   to   ensure   you   are   ready   to   carry   out   a   well-­‐designed   study.     At   the   beginning   of   the   meeting,   you   will   be   asked   to   step   outside   while   the   committee   members   briefly   discuss   meeting   format   and   any   initial   issues   regarding   the   proposal.     You   should   plan   approximately  20  minutes  to  outline  your  problem,  summarize  key  literature,  and  present  the   proposed  methodology.    The  committee  and  you  will  decide  if  questions,  which  should  be  the   bulk  of  the  presentation,  may  be  asked  throughout  the  presentation  or  at  the  end.    Generally  a   better  dialogue  occurs  if  questions  are  asked  throughout.    After  all  questions  are  asked  by  the   committee  members,  then  you  will  again  be  asked  to  step  outside  while  the  committee  comes   to  a  decision  about  whether  to  allow  you  to  proceed  with  the  proposed  research  and  what,  if   any,   changes   are   needed   before   proceeding.     Finally,   you   will   be   invited   to   return,   be   informed   of   the   decision,   and   provided   with   guidance   on   how   to   proceed.     Again,   the   primary   purpose   is   to   demonstrate   that   you   are   ready   to   move   forward   and   to   draw   on   the   entire   committee’s   wisdom  to  ensure  the  highest  quality  study  possible.     Dissertation  Presentations     It  is  anticipated  that  JDP  dissertations  will  be  presented  at  the  beginning  in  the  fall  quarter  at   the   end   of   your   third   year   of   study.     However,   research   often   follows   an   unpredictable   path,   therefore,   it   is   anticipated   that   some   students   may   conclude   their   doctoral   studies   and   present   their  dissertations  anytime  between  fall  and  spring  quarters  of  their  3rd  and  4th  years  of  study.     Within  this  time  frame,  all  students  should  be  able  to  graduate  with  their  cohort.    Guidelines  for   scheduling  and  presenting  the  dissertation  presentations  are  similar  to  those  described  above   for   the   proposal   presentation.     Given   the   length   of   the   dissertation,   however,   you   must   submit   your   dissertation   to   your   committee   one   month   prior   to   the   date   and   make   contact   with   all   committee   members   during   that   month   to   ascertain   if   there   are   questions   or   concerns.     See   Dissertation  Norms  described  on  the  following  pages.  

20  


Ed.D.  Guidelines  For  Proposal  Development     Research   studies   vary   in   their   topic,   questions   and   methodology;   nevertheless,   there   are   common   elements   to   most   dissertation   proposals.   To   assist   you   in   preparing   your   research   proposal,   we   suggest   the   following   guidelines   be   used   in   consultation   with   your   committee   chair.     I.   Title  Page,  with  committee  members  listed;  Resume  or  Vitae;  Acknowledgements       II.   Abstract       III.   Introduction     A.   Background/Context/Nature  of  the  Study     B.   Statement  of  the  Problem/Issue  to  be  investigated  including  research  questions               C.     Significance  of  the  study     IV.   Literature  Review                 A.   This  section  typically  includes  two  to  four  sections  that  present  the  research  that   outline   what   is   known   or   not   known   in   relationship   to   the   general   topic   of   the   dissertation  and  the  specific  themes  of  the  research  questions  posed.                   B.   In   a   theoretically   grounded   study,   a   review   of   the   literature   in   regard   to   the   theory  and  how  it  will  guide  the  study  is  presented.     V.   Methodology  (the  format  of  this  section  varies  depending  on  the  nature  of  the  study)               A.   Research  Design  (Qualitative/Quantitative)             B.   Context  or  Site  of  the  Study  (more  typical  in  qualitative  studies)               C.   Participants               D.   Data  to  be  collected                 1.   For   quantitative   studies,   this   usually   involves   a   hypothesis,   a   description   of   variables   to   be   measured,   instruments   to   be   used   and   how   they   will   be   administered.                         2.   For   qualitative   studies,   this   usually   involves   a   discussion   of   interviews   (number,   who,   when,   protocols),   observations   (number,   when,   where,   protocols),   focus   groups   (number,   who,   when,   protocols),   and/or   document   analysis   (which   ones,   why,   approach   to   be   used).     Propositions   can   also   be   presented  similar  to  hypotheses  in  qualitative  studies.                 E.   Data  Analysis                           1.    For  quantitative  studies,  statistical  tests  and  analyses  that  will  be  conducted.                           2.   For   qualitative   studies,   discussion   of   how   data   will   be   coded,   themes   identified,  patterns  illuminated  and  if  any  computer  data  analysis  systems  will  be   used.                 F.       Issues  of  Validity,  Reliability,  Trustworthiness                 G.       Ethical  Issues  and  Role  of  Researcher       H.       Limitations  of  the  Study     21  


Each  student  will  submit  his  or  her  IRB  proposal  at  the  institution  where  his  or  her  committee   chair  resides.    Based  on  a  reciprocal  acceptance  arrangement  between  UCSD  and  CSUSM,  the   acceptance  of  the  IRB  from  the  chairperson’s  institution  will  be  accepted  by  the  other  JDP   institution.             For  UCSD  chair:    The  application  can  be  downloaded  from  the  website  at:   http://irb.ucsd.edu/forms.shtml     The  UCSD  Human  Research  Protection  Program  (HRPP-­‐IRB)  website  can  be  viewed  at:   http://irb.ucsd.edu     For  CSUSM  chair:  The  Application  is  at  CSUSM  Human  Subject  Protection  (IRB)  website  can  be   viewed  at:  http://www.csusm.edu/gsr/irb/  .     Ed.D.  Dissertation  Norms  and  Guidelines     1.     Complete   drafts   of   the   dissertations   are   to   be   distributed   to   the   dissertation   committee   members   one   month   prior   to   the   scheduled   presentation.   All   committee   members   must   approve  exceptions  to  this  norm.     2.     Prior   to   the   presentation,   the   committee   chair   should   communicate   with   all   committee   members  to  ensure  that  they  agree  that  the  dissertation  is  ready  to  be  defended  and  to  discuss   any  questions  and  issues  that  committee  members  have.     3.     Prior   to   the   presentation,   the   candidate   should   meet   with   each   committee   member   to   discuss  the  dissertation  draft  and  to  receive  feedback  and  guidance  for  revisions.     4.     Dissertation   presentation   meetings   are   announced   and   open   to   the   public.   UCSD   will   prepare   the   announcement   information.     The   Program   Directors   for   each   campus   will   assure   distribution  of  the  information  to  appropriate  individuals  in  their  institutions.     5.    Dissertation  presentations  are  scheduled  for  a  two-­‐hour  time  block,  the  specific  time  agreed   upon   by   the   committee   to   be   communicated   to   the   UCSD   EDS   staff   in   charge   of   the   JDP   Program,  who  will  reserve  a  space  for  UCSD  defenses  and  announce  the  defense  time  and  place   to   the   faculty.     Room   arrangements   for   defenses   scheduled   for   CSUSM   will   be   made   by   the   CSUSM  campus  JDP  director.    The  presentation  will  be  held  on  the  campus  to  which  the  chair  is   affiliated.       6.    Faculty  may  choose  to  meet  in  closed  session  at  the  beginning  of  the  presentation  to  discuss   the  format  and  process,  at  the  discretion  of  the  chair  of  the  dissertation  committee.     7.     Candidates   are   expected   to   present   their   work   in   a   30-­‐40   minute   power   point   and   summary   talk.  Dissertation  chairs  have  the  ultimate  decision  about  the  length  of  the  presentation  and  the   format  of  the  talk  and  should  discuss  this  decision  with  the  candidate.     22  


8.     The   dissertation   presentation   meeting   will   remain   open   to   the   public   until   the   committee   discussion  period,  when  the  candidate  and  all  visitors  are  asked  to  leave  the  room.     9.    The  meeting  will  reconvene  at  which  time  the  Chair  will  report  the  decision  and  comments   of  the  committee.       Ed.D.    Suggested  Timeline  

 

First  Year    By   the   end   of   the   first   year   (December):   Complete   and   submit   first   year   Qualifying   Paper.    By  the  end  of  first  quarter  of  second  year  (March):  Complete  and  submit  any  revisions   requested  to  the  Qualifying  Paper.     Second  Year    By  the  beginning  of  Fall  Quarter:  Meet  with  dissertation  chair  and  confirm  dissertation   committee  members.    By  the  end  of  second  year  (November/December):  Complete  and  submit  IRB  forms.    By  the  end  of  the  second  year  (December):  Complete  and  submit  dissertation  proposal.    By   the   end   of   the   second   year/beginning   of   third   year   (December/January):   Schedule   and  hold  proposal  presentation.     Third  Year    By   the   end   of   the   first   month   of   Winter   Quarter:   Submit   any   changes   required   for   dissertation  proposal.    By   the   end   of   the   Spring   Quarter:   Collect   data   and   rewrite   methods   section   to   reflect   any  changes  in  methodology  based  on  data  collected.    By  end  of  Summer  Quarter:  Complete  data  analysis  and  draft  of  results  section.    By  end  of  first  month  of  Fall  Quarter:  Complete  draft  of  discussion  section.    By   middle   of   Fall   Quarter:   Revise   dissertation   based   on   chair’s   feedback   and   give   complete   draft   to   dissertation   committee   (one   month   prior   to   the   scheduled   presentation).    Note:  students  have  until  middle  of  Spring  Quarter  (into  their  4th  year)  to   complete  their  study  and  still  graduate  with  their  cohort.    Make   any   revisions   as   required   by   the   committee   and   prepare   the   dissertation   to   be   filed.         NOTE:  You  can  complete  your  dissertations  any  time  between  Fall  Quarter  of  your  Third  Year   and  Spring  Quarter  of  the  same  year  and  graduate  with  your  Cohort.    If  you  will  defend  in  the   Winter  Quarter  of  the  fourth  year,  you  do  not  have  to  enroll  for  that  quarter  but  pay  a  filing  fee   when   filing   the   dissertation.     If   you   plan   to   defend   in   the   Spring   Quarter   of   the   4th   year,   you   must   remain   enrolled   during   the   Winter   Quarter,   but   not   in   the   spring.     If   a   summer   or   fall   defense   in   planned   for   the   4th   year,   you   must   remain   enrolled   in   Winter   and   Spring   Quarters   of   the  4th  year.         23  


Graduation:     It  is  your  responsibility  to  make  sure  that  you  have  submitted  your  intent  to  graduate  by  the   individual  campus  deadlines.    UCSD’s  deadline  is  in  the  very  first  part  of  June  and  CSUSM’s  is   early   March.     You   must   do   this   for   both   campuses,   since   each   campus   has   a   different   graduation  process.       The   filing   deadline   to   have   your   name   included   in   the   CSUSM   Commencement   Program   is   early   March  and  for  UCSD  it  is  the  ninth  Friday  of  the  quarter.      

You  will  be  provided  more  specific  graduation  information  in  the  Dissertation  Writing  Seminar   as   each   cohort   nears   graduation.     This   information   is   also   available   on   the   Graduate   Studies   website  at  both  universities.       UCSD:    http://ogs.ucsd.edu  and     CSUSM:    http://www.csusm.edu/gsr/graduatestudies/forms.html    

Some  of  Cohort  3  at  Graduation,  CSUSM,  June  2010

24  

 


Final  Dissertation/Graduation  Process       UCSD/CSUSM  

                                                                                   

Complete final Draft of Dissertation, send to Chair for review.

  REMINDER: You need to file with each campus your intent to graduate and have your name in the Commencement Booklet by campus deadlines (Early Spring/Summer).

Chair reviews, edits and provides feedback. (Anticipate 3-4 weeks for review). When approval is granted, send to other committee members.

After all reviews, plan defense date. Identify location of defense, reserve room (committee members can help with this). Send your defense title, date, time, and location to campus directors.

Schedule to meet with Sara Hogue two weeks before your defense to review your formatting (858) 534-6977 (UCSD Ofc. of Graduate Studies). Bring a copy (plain paper) of your dissertation to your appointment. Sara will give you two surveys & info about what to bring back to your final appt. CSUSM will accept the UCSD review of your manuscript.

Prepare PPT for defense and make changes to dissertation format. Review presentation plan with chair. Get JDP5 form from UCSD graduate coordinator and bring to defense with signature pages on cotton paper (as many as needed).

Successfully defend dissertation!

MAKE & MAIL CORRECTIONS AS REQUESTED BY THE COMMITTEE & GIVE TO CHAIR FOR FINAL REVIEW AND APPROVAL

After defense, schedule to meet with Sara Hogue for final appointment (858) 534-6977 (UCSD Office of Graduate Studies). Follow instructions in Graduate Handbook page re: filing (electronic or paper). http://ogs.ucsd.edu/academicpolicy/Dissertations_Theses_Formatting_Manual.pdf st Remember to bring completed surveys, signature pages, JDP5 form, etc. (see checklist from 1 appt.)

Contact a publisher about the printing of your dissertation. Request enough copies for your committee, and CSUSM (2) – and yourself! Remember that you must submit to UCSD online or paper copy (refer to online instructions).

25  


UNIVERSITY  PROCEDURES  AND  IMPORTANT  DATES     Joint  Doctoral  Program  Fees     The  fee  structure  for  graduate  students  is  usually  announced  annually  in  the  summer  of  each   year,  but  due  to  the  State  financial  crisis  this  is  subject  to  change.    Since  UCSD  is  handling  the   fees   and   the   transcripts,   please   link   to   UCSD   Office   of   Graduate   Studies   at   http://students.ucsd.edu/finances/fees/registration/index.html   to   view   current   fee   structures   and  information.    

 

Program  Enrollment UCSD   is   serving   as   the   campus   handling   the   administrative   duties   for   this   program.   UCSD   Student  Services  staff  in  the  Education  Studies  Program  will  enroll  each  student  for  their  course   of   study   quarter   by   quarter.     As   with   any   Graduate   Program,   all   fees   must   be   paid-­‐to-­‐date   in   order  for  the  Graduate  Coordinator  to  enroll  you  in  your  course  of  study.       Enrolling  and  Registering  in  Classes     UCSD   will   enroll   you   in   your   classes,   and   you   may   view   your   status   at   any   time   using   TritonLink   on   the   UCSD   Web   Site   at   http://students.ucsd.edu/   You   will   be   asked   to   enter   your   Personal   Identification  Number  (PID)  and  Your  Personal  Access  Code  (PAC),  which  will  be  mailed  to  you   before  you  complete  your  registration.    Be  sure  that  you  receive  these  numbers  and  keep  them   in   a   safe   place.     It   is   your   responsibility   to   check   your   status   and   be   sure   the   system   has   the   correct   information.     If   you   see   errors   (as   does   happen),   immediately   contact   the   UCSD   Program  Director  or  the  JDP  Staff     Student  Billing  Services     UCSD  sends  billing  statements  only  once  each  quarter.    It  is  your  responsibility  to  pay  fees  by   the  established  deadlines  even  if  you  do  not  receive  a  bill.    Failure  to  pay  fees  may  result  in  late   fees,  enrollment  holds,  etc.    The  most  complete  and  up-­‐to-­‐date  information  available  regarding   fee  payment  methods  and  other  student  related  business  maters  can  be  found  by  visiting  the   Student  Business  Services  website:    http://www-­‐bfs.ucsd.edu/sbs/     If  you  have  questions  about  your  payment  call  the  Cashier’s  Office  at  858-­‐534-­‐3725.    If  you  have   questions   about   your   billing   statement,   please   call   858-­‐534-­‐7537.     Any   questions   about   Financial   Aid   can   be   directed   either   to   the   Financial   Aid   office   at   858-­‐534-­‐4480   or   to   Melissa   Wolf  in  the  Education  Studies  office  at  858-­‐822-­‐2177.      

26  


ACADEMIC  AND  ADMINISTRATIVE  HOLIDAYS     FALL  QUARTER  2011     Fall  Quarter  Begins  .................................................................Monday,  September  19     Instruction  Begins  ..................................................................Thursday,  September  22     Veteran’s  Day  Holiday  ...........................................................  Friday,  November  11     Thanksgiving  Holiday  .............................................................Thursday  -­‐  Friday,  November  24-­‐25     Instruction  Ends  .....................................................................Friday,  December  2     Final  Exams  ............................................................................Monday  -­‐  Saturday,  December  5-­‐10     Fall  Quarter  Ends  ...................................................................Saturday,  December  10     Christmas  Holiday  ..................................................................Monday  -­‐  Tuesday,  December  26-­‐27     New  Year  Holiday  .........................................................    Friday  -­‐  Monday,  December  30-­‐January  2     WINTER  QUARTER  2012     Winter  Quarter  Begins  ............................................................Wednesday,  January  4     Instruction  Begins  ..................................................................    Monday,  January  9     Martin  Luther  King,  Jr.  Holiday  ................................................Monday,  January  16     President's  Day  Holiday  ...........................................................Monday,  February  20     Instruction  Ends  ......................................................................  Friday,  March  16     Final  Exams  .............................................................................  Monday  -­‐  Saturday,  March  19-­‐24     Winter  Quarter  Ends  ................................................................Saturday,  March  24     SPRING  QUARTER  2012     Spring  Quarter  Begins  ..............................................................  Thursday,  March  29     Cesar  Chavez  Holiday  ...............................................................  Friday,  March  30     Instruction  Begins  ....................................................................  Monday,  April  2     Memorial  Day  Observance  ........................................................  Monday,  May  28     Instruction  Ends  ......................................................................  Friday,  June  8     Final  Exams  .............................................................................  Monday  -­‐  Friday,  June  11-­‐15     Spring  Quarter  Ends  ................................................................  Friday,  June  15     Commencement.………………………………………………………….....Saturday-­‐Sunday,  June  16-­‐17  

27  


Photo  ID’S Where?     UCSD   ID   cards   are   issued   by   the   Student   Business   Services   Office   (SBS);   tel:   (858)   534-­‐ 4322.    They  are  located  in  the  Student  Services  Center,  402  University  Center  (Building  931  on   campus  map),  3rd  floor,  south  wing.     When?    To  have  your  picture  taken,  you  may  go  any  time  during  business  hours.  The  office  is   open   Monday   through   Friday,   from   8am   –   4pm.     You   will   receive   your   ID   immediately.     Be   sure   to  bring  an  additional  form  of  picture  ID  (e.g.,  driver’s  license)  with  you.       How   Much   will   the   ID   Cost?     There   is   no   fee   for   the   ID   card.     Be   sure   to   mention   that   you   are   a   new  EDS  Graduate  Student  when  you  arrive.       Why   Get   One?     A   validated   student   campus   identification   card   is   required   for   use   of   the   library   and  other  university  facilities.       CSUSM  ID  cards  are  issued  in  the  Kellogg  Library,  Room  2100;  tel:  (760)  750-­‐4370.    The  cost  is   $5.00   for   students.     The   office   is   open   Monday   through   Thursday,   from   8   am   –   9   pm,   Friday,   from  8  am  –  5  pm,  and  Saturday  through  Sunday,  from  1  pm  –  5  pm.    Please,  be  sure  to  bring  an   additional  form  of  picture  ID  (e.g.,  driver’s  license)  with  you.     Parking  Permits     Parking  fees  are  necessary  because  UC  and  CSU  campuses  receive  no  tuition  or  state  funding  to   support  parking  facilities.    Funding  comes  directly  from  parking  permit  sales.    If  you  plan  to  park   at  UCSD  or  CSUSM,  you  must  purchase  and  properly  display  a  valid  parking  permit  during  the   hours  listed  below.                                       UCSD   Transportation  and  Parking  Services  Office  tel:  (858)  534-­‐4223         http://students.ucsd.edu/campus-­‐services/parking-­‐and-­‐transportation/index.html   Main  campus  permit  required  7am  to  11  pm  weekdays.   -­‐    Students  may  consider  the  One-­‐Night  parking  permit  for  Wednesday  and  Friday  night  classes.     These   permits   cost   $43.00/quarter   and   begin   at   4:30   per   evening.     You   may   also   purchase   visitor  permits  which  run  $2.00/hour  and  can  be  purchased  at  any  parking  meter  machine.     -­‐    Parking  on  Saturday  and  Sunday  at  UCSD  is  free.       BE  SURE  YOU  PARK  LEGALLY  TO  AVOID  COSTLY  CITATIONS.  With  a  night  permit  you  may  park   only  in  white  “V”  visitor  spots  in  the  Gilman  Parking  Structure.    You  may  park  in  A,  B,  or  C  spots   in  all  other  lots.    Do  not  park  in  faculty  spots  marked  “A  permit  required  24  hours  a  day,  7  days   a  week”           28  


CSUSM     Transportation  and  Parking  Services  (760)  750-­‐7500  for  CSUSM        http://csusm.edu/parking     A  parking  permit  is  required  at  all  times  while  parked  on  CSUSM  campus.    You  may  purchase  a   daily  or  timed  permit  in  any  general  parking  lot  utilizing  the  daily  permit  machines.  All  day   permits  ($7.00)  are  available  in  the  Parking  and  Commuter  Services  office  (located  in  FCB  107).     For  questions,  please  call  Parking  and  Commuter  Services  at:  (760)  750-­‐7500.     Daily  Rates  (Yellow  &  Blue  Pay  Stations  accepts  cash  and  credit  cards.)   Pay  stations  accept  1's,  5's,  and  quarters.   Pay  Stations  are  located  in  parking  lots  B,  C,  F,  J,  K,  and  X.                    All  Day  permit  .............$9.00                    5  hour  permit..............$7.00                    3  hour  permit..............$6.00                    1  hour  permit..............$3.00     Students  may  utilize  parking  meters  located  in  lots,  B,  C,  E,  K,  O,  &  L.    Costs  of  the  parking  meters  are   $1.50  per  half  hour.    Daily  permits  should  be  displayed  face  up  on  the  dashboard  of  the  vehicle  so  they   are  clearly  visible  from  the  outside  of  the  vehicle;  the  date  and  time  information  should  be  displayed   and  clearly  visible  from  outside  of  the  vehicle.    A  citation  may  be  issued  if  the  permit  is  not  properly   displayed.    

Mail  Boxes     Your  graduate  student  mailbox  is  located  in  the  EDS  graduate  Leadership  Computer  Center  at   UCSD,  Pepper  Canyon  Hall,  Third  Floor,  room  374.    Please  be  sure  to  check  it  regularly.     E-­‐Mail  Accounts     UCSD   -­‐   New   incoming   Educational   Leadership   Graduate   Students   must   obtain   a   UCSD   E-­‐mail   account  from  Academic  Computing  and  Media  Services  (ACMS).  The  ACS  office  is  ROOM  2113.   Applied  Physics  and  Math  Building,  Muir  Campus  858-­‐534-­‐4060  or  for  more  detailed  questions,   858-­‐534-­‐4061.  Hours:  10  am–3:30  pm,  Monday–Friday,  E-­‐mail:  acms-­‐help@ucsd.edu.  You  may   apply  for  an  email  at:  https://sdacs.ucsd.edu/~icc/index.php     Even   if   you   currently   have   an   E-­‐mail   account,   you   must   also   obtain   a   UCSD   E-­‐mail   account,   which  can  be  automatically  linked  to  your  current  account.    Your  email  is  the  first  and  main  way     the  program  has  to  contact  you.  Without  a  UCSD  account  link  you  risk  missing  important  waiver   and  deadline  information.        

29  


CSUSM   -­‐   Email   is   provided   free   of   charge   to   every   registered   student.     Instructors   frequently   give  out  assignments,  advice,  and  other  information  via  e-­‐mail.    Campus  information  is  also  sent   via  e-­‐mail.    To  obtain  a  CSUSM  e-­‐mail  account,  go  to  the  Student  Technology  Help  Desk  located   at  the  2nd  floor  entry  of  Kellogg  Library.    Hours  of  operation  are  Monday  through  Friday,  from  8   am  –  9  pm  and  Saturday  through  Sunday  from  10  am  –  5  pm.    The  number  of  the  office  is  (760)   750-­‐6505.     PLEASE   INFORM   MELISSA   WOLF,   EDS   (mawolf@ucsd.edu)   OF   ANY   CHANGE   IN   YOUR   E-­‐MAIL   PERSONAL  EMAIL  ADDRESS.     We  must  have  a  current  E-­‐mail  address  for  you  at  all  times.                           The  Joint  Doctorate  Program  faculty  use  Moodle  online  learning  platforms  as  a  tool  in  many  of   the  classes.  Support  for  this  on-­‐line  learning  tool  is  provided  by  CSUSM  Instructional  Technology   Services.   It   provides   a   dedicated   email   function   specific   to   a   given   class,   as   well   as   other   features  that  will  be  explained  during  your  orientation.    Faculty  using  this  tool  will  provide  you   with  instructions.  In  order  to  navigate  Moodle  platforms  with  reliability  and  ease,  you  will  need   a  laptop  (specification  to  be  discussed  at  orientation).         MOST  IMPORTANT:     All   electronic   messages   should   be   crafted   with   professionalism   and   care.   Electronic   correspondence  (e-­‐mail  and  on-­‐line  discussion)  is  a  part  of  our  professional  world  now  and  is   often   the   easiest   way   to   communicate.     Remember   that   e-­‐mail   and   on-­‐line   discussions   are   a   very  specific  form  of  communication,  with  their  own  form  of  nuances  and  meanings  that  often   communicate  more  than  the  sender  originally  intended.    Please  be  mindful  of  all  e-­‐mail  and  on-­‐ line  discussion  messages  that  you  send  to  your  community  as  a  whole.     In   addition,   should   you   have   a   concern   with   an   electronic   message   sent   to   you,   please   speak   face-­‐to-­‐face  with  the  sender  to  correct  the  confusion.    You  and  the  other  party  will  be  so  very   pleased  that  you  did.                           See  the  ACMS  “Students”  website:   http://acms.ucsd.edu/students/   for   information   on   several   useful   topics   including   how   to   connect   your   computer   to   the   internet,   printing   services,   names   and   locations   of   computer   labs,  where  to  get  help,  and  tips  for  off-­‐campus  ISP  users.       UCSD  ACMS  Help  Desk,  (858)  534-­‐3227.   Academic  Computing  Services  (ACMS)  http://acms.ucsd.edu/students/     CSUSM  Student  Technology  Help  Desk  (STH),  (760)  750-­‐6505.   2013  Kellogg  Library     email:  sth@csusm.edu      website:  http://www.csusm.edu/iits/support/studenthd         30  


UCSD  TritonLink   http://tritonlink.ucsd.edu     By  using  your  Student  ID  and  PAC  you  can  access  TritonLink.    Here  are  some  of  the  features   available  to  students  on  TritonLink.      View  your  billing  statement  and  make  payments.   By   choosing   the   yellow   button   labeled   Billing   and   Payment,   you   can   determine   how   much  you  owe  the  University  and  see  your  account  transactions  for  the  last  thirty  days   and   prior   periods.     You   can   also   see   your   Billing   Statement   and   make   an   electronic   payment.    You  will  not  be  able  to  graduate  if  you  have  a  hold  on  your  account  for  any   unpaid  bills  or  a  delinquent  account.    Be  sure  to  keep  up  to  date.    If  you  have  extreme   financial   difficulties   be   sure   to   contact   one   of   the   JDP   Directors   for   assistance.      View  your  financial  aid  information.   You   can   view   detailed   information   about   your   application   for   financial   aid,   including:   academic   progress   for   financial   aid,   preliminary   aid,   eligibility,   application   status,   documents   needed,   award   letter   status,   award   amounts,   scheduled   disbursements,   and   loan  statuses  and  amounts.      Verify  your  residency  status  for  tuition  purposes.   Use  the  Where  do  you  want  to  go?  pull-­‐down  menu,  and  select  Residency  Information.     This   page   also   provides   links   for   Residency   information   for   new   students   and   instructions  for  change  of  classification  for  continuing  students.      Update  your  Addresses  (mailing  and  E-­‐MAIL),  Emergency  Contacts,  and  Directory   Publishing  Restrictions.   All  of  this  information  can  be  reached  by  using  the  yellow  button  labeled  Addresses.     View  your  academic  history,  classes  and  wait  lists,  weekly  planner  majors,  and  holds.     Tritonlink  Availability     You  can  access  TritonLink  from  anywhere  you  have  a  connection  to  the  internet:  via  on-­‐campus   labs,  network  connections  located  in  on-­‐campus  housing,  dialing  in  through  UCSD  modem  pool,   or   through   an   off-­‐campus   Internet   Service   Provider   (ISP).     Schedule   of   Classes,   Student   Directory,  and  general  information  are  available  24  hours/day.    Personal  data  is  pulled  from  the   real-­‐time   database   (Academic   History,   Addresses,   Billing   Statements,   WebReg,   etc.)   and   is   available   7am   –   midnight   daily.     (Access   on   weekends   and   holidays   is   subject   to   computer   maintenance  schedules  and  cannot  be  guaranteed.)      

 

31  


Ed.D.  CATALOG  DESCRIPTIONS     EDS  280/EDLD  705  RE-­‐Thinking  Leadership  (4  quarter  units)     Catalog  Description:    This  course  will  present  the  evolution  of  leadership  thought  and  theory,   with  an  emphasis  on  the  distinction  between,  and  inter-­‐relatedness  of,  effective  management   and  leadership.    The  ethics  of  leadership  practice  and  epistemological  perspectives  of  emerging   leadership   styles   will   be   explored,   and   students   will   have   opportunities   to   reflect   on   the   nature   of   leadership   as   it   is   practiced   in   educational   settings.     Applying   critical,   self-­‐reflective   leadership  practice  through  structured  activities  is  also  an  element  of  this  course.     EDS  281/EDLD  710  Leadership  for  Learning  (4  quarter  units)     Catalog   Description:     This   course   will   explore   various   models   of   curriculum   and   instruction   in   response  to   student   learning   needs.     It   also   will   examine  models   of   school   organization   and   the   leader’s   role   and   responsibility   in   developing   a   school   culture   that   promotes   student   achievement,  using  evidence-­‐based  decision  making.    A  major  emphasis  will  be  on  evaluating   research  upon  which  theories  and  practice  are  based.     EDS  282/EDLD  715  Leadership  for  a  Diverse  Society  (4  quarter  units)     Catalog  Description:    This  course  will  address  theories  and  practices  for  achieving  schools  and   classrooms  that  are  informed  by  and  built  around  the  participation  of  diverse  communities  and   cultures.    The  emphasis  in  this  course  is  on  how  leadership  intersects  with  socio-­‐historical  and   socio-­‐cultural   theories   that   suggest   the   organization   of   schools   and   instruction   is   critical   to   student  inclusion  and  outcomes.       A  basic  premise  of  this  course  is  that  a  socially  just  learning  theory  begins  with  using  all  of  the   resources   and   knowledge   of   families,   communities,   and   cultures   in   formulating   policy   and   practice.     EDS  283/EDLD  720  Leadership  for  Organizational  Change  (4  quarter  units)     Catalog   Description:     This   course   will   present   multiple   theories   of   organizational   change,   explore   group   processes   and   identify   models   of   decision-­‐making,   and   analyze   human   motivation   theories.     Establishing   and   nurturing   a   purpose-­‐driven   organization,   while   dealing   with  competing  demands,  will  be  discussed.    A  major  emphasis  in  this  course  is  on  people  as   agents  of  change  and  creating  high  quality  ethical  and  productive  workplaces  where  employees   can   achieve   success   and   satisfaction,   while   advancing   the   mission   of   the   educational   organization.             32  


EDS  284/EDLD  725  Leadership  for  Organizational  Development  (4  quarter  units)     Catalog   Description:     This   course   will   investigate   the   skills   and   dispositions   needed   for   students   to   lead   the   development   of   learning   organizations.     Faculty   will   teach   and   model   concepts   of   working  with  people  within  educational  organizations  and  programs.    Emphasis  will  be  placed   on   individual’s   team   development   and   facilitation,   organizational   communications,   adult   learning,  and  professional  development.     EDS  285/EDLD  730  Leadership  for  the  Future  (4  quarter  units)     Catalog   Description:     This   course   addresses   interdisciplinary   influences   on   leadership   practice   within   learning   organizations.     Contributions   from   scholars   in   futures   studies   will   be   used   to   explore  topics  such  as  long-­‐rang  planning,  demographic  trends,  technology,  and  brain  theory.     EDS  291  AB/  EDLD  770  AB  Leadership  Research  Practicum  AB  (2,2  quarter  units)     Catalog   Description:     Students   use   their   placements   in   local   schools   and   educational   settings   to   examine   leadership   research   and   practice   topics   raised   in   the   Leadership   core   courses   and   Research  and  Evaluation  Design  Courses.    (S/U  grade  permitted)    This  is  a  two  course  sequence.     EDS  286AB/  EDLD  740  AB  Advanced  Topics  in  Leadership  AB  (4,4  quarter  units)     Catalog   Description:     This   course   explores   topical   issues   in   the   field   of   leadership.     It   focuses   on   recent   developments   that   have   broad   implications   for   research   and   practice   in   educational   leadership.    Course  topics  will  vary  each  time  the  course  is  offered.     EDS   287ABC/   EDLD   750   ABC   Educational   Research   and   Evaluation   Design   ABC   (4,4,4   quarter   units)     Catalog   Description:     This   course   integrates   a   variety   of   social   and   behavioral   science   perspectives  and  research  methodologies  in  examining  topics  of  central  relevance  to  education.     Students  have  opportunities  to  design  and  apply  to  educational  research  questions  on  a  variety   of   methodologies   including:   experimental   and   quasi-­‐experimental   survey,   interview,   ethnographic,  case  study,  video  data  analysis,  and  discourse  analysis  methods.    This  is  a  three   course  sequence.     EDS   288   ABC/   EDLD   760   ABC   Advanced   Research   and   Evaluation   Methods   ABC   (4,4,4   quarter   units)     Catalog   Description:     This   course   addresses   more   advanced   topics   in   research   design   and   methodology.     Students   hone   the   requisite   research   skills   to   conduct   dissertation   research.     Students   gain   varied   hands-­‐on   experiences   in   collecting   and   analyzing   data   relevant   to   schooling,   as   well   as   learn   how   to   develop,   manage,   and   analyze   large   data   files.     Students   create   a   research   agenda   and   develop   skills   needed   in   proposal   writing:   development,   33  


organization   and   coherence,   conceptualization   of   research   design,   and   attention   to   audience   and  writing  style.  This  is  a  three  course  sequence.     EDS  299/  EDLD  794  Dissertation  Research  (4,4,4,4,4,quarter  units)     Catalog   Description:     Directed   research   on   dissertation   topic   for   students   who   have   been   admitted  to  candidacy  for  the  Ed.D.  degree.    (S/U  grade)     EDS  289ABCD/EDLD  796  ABCD  Dissertation  Writing  Seminar  ABCD  (4,4,4,4  quarter  units)     Catalog  Description:    This  seminar  provides  an  opportunity  for  doctoral  candidates  to  present   and   critique   in-­‐progress   dissertation   research   and   writing.     Topics   addressed   also   will   include   writing  for  professional  publications  and  presenting  research  findings  to  varied  audiences.  This   is  a  four  course  sequence.     EDS  290/EDLD  792  Dissertation  Research    (S/U  grade  only)  (1-­‐12)     Catalog   Description:   Supervised   research   studies   with   individual   topics   selected   according   to   students’   special   interests.   Students   will   develop   a   research   proposal   appropriate   for   M.A.   thesis,  begin  to  gather  and  analyze  data.     EDS  292/  EDLD  785  Qualifying  Paper  Preparation  (4  quarter  units)     Catalog  Description:    This  course  will  provide  students  with  time,  resources,  and  guidance  for   the   purpose   of   developing   a   review   of   literature   on   a   student-­‐related   topic,   which   typically   becomes   the   focus   of   the   dissertation   research   project.     Students   will   be   expected   to   use   a   variety   of   research   tools   in   order   to   discover   and   identify   relevant   information.     (S/U   grade   permitted)     EDS  294AB/EDLD  798  AB  Colloquium  on  Educational  Leadership  (2,2  quarter  units)     Catalog   Description:     Program   faculty   and   visiting   lecturers   present   leadership   research   in   progress.     The   colloquium   series   serves   as   a   forum   to   discuss   current   research   in   educational   leadership.    (S/U  grade  permitted)  This  is  a  two  course  sequence.     EDS  286AB/EDLD  740  AB  Advanced  Topics  in  Leadership  (4,4  quarter  units)     Catalog   Description:     This   course   explores   topical   issues   in   the   field   of   leadership.     It   focuses   on   recent   developments   that   have   broad   implications   for   research   and   practice   in   educational   leadership.     Course   topics   will   vary   each   time   the   course   is   offered.     This   is   a   two-­‐course   sequence.      

34  


THE  GRADUATE  STUDENT  HEALTH  INSURANCE  PLAN  (SHIP)     The   Student   Health   Insurance   Plan   (SHIP)   is   a   comprehensive   plan   affiliated   with   a   preferred   provider   network   requiring   written   referral   from   the   Student   Health   Service   (SHS)   staff.   It   provides   a   full   range   of   medical   services,   including   in/out   patient   services,   specialty   care,   emergency   care,   hospitalization   and   mental   health   care,   as   well   as   pharmacy,   dental   and   vision   coverage.  Enrollment  is  mandatory  for  graduate  students  unless  a  waiver  is  obtained  from  the   SHS   insurance   coordinator.     Since   most   EDS   students   are   full   time   employees   with   health   insurance,  to  not  be  double  billed,  you  must  secure  a  wavier.     Students   already   covered   by   health   insurance,   which   was   in   effect   prior   to   acceptance   as   a   graduate  student  at  UCSD,  may  qualify  for  a  waiver  of  the  mandatory  SHIP  if  the  benefits  are   equal   to   or   better   than   SHIP   benefits.     A   listing   of   required   documents   is   available   from   the   Student  Insurance  Office  at  SHS.    Approved  waivers  are  effective  for  the  current  academic  year.   If  you  wish  to  waive  out  of  SHIP  for  subsequent  academic  years,  a  new  waiver  application  will   need  to  be  submitted  by  the  appropriate  deadline  date  each  academic  year.    A  list  of  current   deadlines   can   be   found   on   the   SHS   website.     If   You   Do   Not   File   The   Waiver   By   the   Listed   Deadline,  You  Will  Automatically  Be  Charged,  THERE  IS  NO  APPEAL.         Student   Health   Services   (SHS)   is   located   in   University   Center;   tel:   (858)534-­‐2123;     Regular   Hours:  M,  W,  F  8am  –  4:30pm,  T,  Thu  (9am-­‐4:30pm).  Quarter  Breaks/Summer:  Regular  hours,   but   closed   between   12:00   -­‐   1:00pm.     SHS   is   closed   weekends   and   holidays.     Website:   http://studenthealth.ucsd.edu     The  Student  Health  Insurance  Plan  (SHIP)  covers  after-­‐hours  care  only  in  cases  of  emergency.     Visit   the   Student   Health   Services   website   for   complete   details   of   benefits,   co-­‐payments,   deductibles,  exclusions,  waiver  requirements,  and  limitations:     http://studenthealth.ucsd.edu/Gshipmedical.shtml           Premiums   are   assessed   and   paid   with   registration   fees.   Spring   SHIP   coverage   continues   automatically   through   the   summer   quarter.   Information   on   separate   health   insurance   plans   for   dependents  is  available  at  SHS.  The  State  of  California  also  offers  dependent  care  insurance.        

35  


SEXUAL  HARASSMENT  POLICY   The   Education   Leadership   Program   strongly   reaffirms   UCSD   and   CSUSM’s   commitment   to   creating  and  maintaining  a  harassment-­‐free  community.    Specifically,  we  will  not  tolerate  sexual   harassment,  and  such  behavior  is  prohibited  both  by  law  and  by  UCSD  and  CSUSM  policy.     Please  notify  your  instructor  or  dean  if  you  feel  any  situation  or  problem  has  occurred.     The   University   of   California   system   wide   Policy   on   Sexual   Harassment   is   available   online   at:   http://www.ucop.edu/ucophome/coordrev/policy/PP021006Policy.pdf.     UCSD's  Sexual  Harassment  Complaint  Resolution  Procedures  are  available  online  at:     http://adminrecords.ucsd.edu/ppm/docs/200-­‐10.pdf.     The   California   State   University   of   San   Marcos   system   wide   Policy   on   Sexual   Harassment   is   available  online  at  http://www.calstate.edu/HR/er_sh.shtml                                    

STUDENTS  WITH  DISABILITIES  

  CSUSM   –   Students   are   approved   for   services   through   the   Disabled   Student   Services   Office   (DSS).     This   office   is   located   in   Craven   Hall   5205,   (760)   750-­‐4905,   or   TTY   (760)   750-­‐4909.     Students   authorized   by   DSS   to   receive   reasonable   accommodations   should   meet   with   their   instructor  to  discuss  needs.  http://www.csusm.edu/dss/     UCSD   –   Students   are   approved   for   services   through   the   Office   for   Students   with   Disabilities   (OSD),  voice  and  TTY  (858)  534-­‐4382.    http://disabilities.ucsd.edu/      

STUDENTS  WITH  SPECIAL  ABILITY/NEEDS  

  Equitable   educational   consideration   and   appropriate   accommodation   is   the   right   of   every   student   in   the   Educational   Leadership   Program.     Many   students   have   different   abilities   (mobility,   sight,   hearing,   documented   learning   challenges,   first   language/English   as   a   second   language)   and   are   requested   to   contact   their   primary   professor   at   the   earliest   point   in   time.     The   program   and   the   instructor   will   make   every   effort   to   accommodate   the   students’   needs.     Both  campuses  have  a  Disabled  Student  Services  offices,  technology  in  the  computer  labs  and   other   services   available,   as   part   of   reasonable   accommodation   for   special   needs   students.     CSUSM  also  has  the  Writing  Center  that  may  be  of  assistance  to  all  students,  especially  those   with  special  needs.  

36  


JDP  GRADING  STANDARDS  FOR  GRADUATE  STUDENTS     This  document  is  intended  to  give  you  guidance  in  understanding  what  is  expected  of  you  and   to  help  you  interpret  the  grades  you  receive  in  the  upper-­‐division  and  graduate  level  courses   you  take  as  a  graduate  student  while  in  the  doctoral  program.     Additionally,   you   should   understand   that   the   Office   of   the   Dean   of   Graduate   Studies   (OGS)   monitors   the   GPA’s   of   all   graduate   students.     A   graduate   student   whose   overall   GPA   drops   below   3.0   is   placed   on   academic   probation.     Students   on   academic   probation   risk   dismissal   if   their   GPA   remains   below   3.0   in   future   quarters.     The   CSUSM   Office   of   Graduate   Studies   and   Research  will  be  informed  of  any  student  placed  on  academic  probation.     Although  you  may  have  few  or  no  S/U  courses  allowed  in  your  program,  you  should  be  aware  of   the   University’s   S/U   grading   policy.     According   to   UCSD   policy,   the   minimum   standard   of   performance  for  a  grade  of  S  (satisfactory)  is  a  course  that  is  offered  S/U  shall  be  the  same  as   the  minimum  performance  for  a  grade  of  B.  Any  grade  below  B  performance  results  in  a  grade   of  U  (unsatisfactory)  in  an  S/U  course.     Implications  for  a  JDP  student’s  grade  in  a  course     A     Excellent  work,  expected  performance.   A  -­‐           Good  work,  improved  performance  encouraged.   B  +       Acceptable  work,  improved  performance  expected.   B     Minimally  acceptable  work,  greatly  improved  performance  expected.   B  -­‐     Marginal  work,  very  poor  performance  (letter  from  Director  with  copy  placed  in   student’s  file).   C  +  (or  lower)  Unacceptable  performance  at  the  graduate  level  (may  be  subject  to  dismissal).     Students   who   receive   grades   indicating   that   improvement   in   future   courses   is   expected   and   who  need  guidance  in  how  to  improve  are  encouraged  to  confer  with  the  course  instructor  and   other  program  faculty.  

37  


General  Evaluation/Feedback  Rubric     Does  not  meet  standards  (B  or   Approaching  Standards     below)     (A-­‐/B+)   •  Includes  some  of  the  required   •  Includes  required  elements  as       elements  as  delineated  in  the      delineated  in  the  syllabus   syllabus   •  All  components  of  the     •  Some  components  of  the      assignment  are  included   assignment  are  included   •  Provides  concrete  details  of  the   •  Provides  a  few  concrete  details   information  required  for  the   of  the  information  required  for   assignment   the  assignment   •  Includes  personal  viewpoints   •  Includes  primarily  personal   that  are  somewhat  documented   viewpoints  and  limited   and  supported  with  logical   supporting  evidence  from  prior   arguments   research   •  Good  organization   •  Organization  hard  to  follow   •  Has  few,  if  any,  mechanical   •  Many  mechanical  errors,   errors  including  APA  format   including  APA  format   •  Holds  interest  –  is  interesting  to   •  Hard  to  read   read   •  Little  sentence/vocabulary   •  Some  sentence/vocabulary   variety   variety      

Meets  Standards  (A)   •  Includes  required  elements  as   delineated  in  the  syllabus   •  All  components  of  the   assignment  are  included   •  Provides  concrete  details    of   the  information  required  for  the   assignment  and  makes  clear   connections  to  class  discussions,   readings  and  activities   •  Insightful  commentary  using   personal  viewpoints  supported   by  current  learning  and  research   •  Presents  clear  and  logical   organization  of  thoughts   •  Has  few,  if  any,  mechanical   errors  including  APA  format   •  Holds  interest  –  is  engaging  and   thought-­‐provoking  to  the   audience   •  Uses  a  sophisticated  scholar   researcher  vocabulary  and   sentence  structure    

  If  you  are  unable  to  submit  an  assignment  by  the  due  date,  it  is  your  responsibility  to  contact   the  instructor  before  the  due  date.    We  recognize  that  you  are  serving  in  many  critical   leadership  capacities  that  on  occasion  interfere  and  compete  with  your  graduate  studies.    It  is   your  responsibility  to  let  your  faculty  know  and  to  do  your  best  not  to  let  your  cohort  down   since  many  classes  involve  collaborative  work  and  learning.  

 

38  


APPEAL  PROCEDURE   FOR  EDUCATION  LEADERSHIP  GRADUATE  STUDENTS     The   Education   Leadership   program   faculty   is   responsible   for   evaluating   the   academic   performance   for   all   of   the   students   within   the   program.   The   faculty   engages   in   a   series   of   complex  assessments  to  reach  a  comprehensive  performance  evaluation  for  each  student.    The   appeal   procedure   is   considered   confidential   unless   both   the   student   and   the   faculty   member   agree  otherwise.  The  appeal  procedure:       1.    Present  your  case  directly  to  the  faculty  member(s)  involved.  Most  issues  are  resolved  at  this   stage  after  all  of  the  facts  have  been  reviewed.       2.     If   you   still   feel   your   grievance   has   not   been   resolved   to   your   satisfaction,   make   an   appointment  with  the  Program  Directors  at  one  or  both  campuses,  to  review  the  situation.  If   warranted,   an   ad   hoc   review   committee   comprised   of   faculty   from   both   campuses   will   be   constituted  to  perform  a  review  of  the  case.       3.    If  your  grievance  has  not  been  resolved  to  your  satisfaction,  you  may:       For  denial  of  admission:  Within  two  weeks  of  the  admission  denial  letter  date,  submit  a  written   request   to   the   Education   Studies   Director,   for   a   second   interview   with   a   subcommittee   comprised  of  the  co-­‐directors  of  the  Education  Leadership  Program.    The  letter  should  contain  a   statement   outlining   why   re-­‐consideration   is   warranted.     If   still   unsatisfied,   within   two   weeks   of   the  review  findings  letter  date,  you  may  submit  a  written  appeal  to  the  Dean,  Graduate  Studies,   UCSD.       For   appeal   of   a   course   grade:   Submit   a   written   appeal   to   the   Director   of   Education   Studies,   UCSD.  If  the  grievance  is  still  not  resolved  to  your  satisfaction,  submit  a  written  appeal  to  the   CEP   Subcommittee   on   Grade   Appeals   at   UCSD.     There   are   submission   deadlines   that   must   be   adhered  to.    Details  on  these  deadlines  are  in  the  UCSD  General  Catalog.    At  CSUSM,  for  a  grade   appeal,  consult  Dr.  P.  Stall,  Associate  Dean.     For   denial   of   recommendation   of   Doctor   of   Education:   Within   two   weeks   of   the   recommendation  denial  letter  date,  submit  a  written  appeal  to  the  Dean,  Graduate  Studies,  at   UCSD.       The   Education   Leadership   Program   is   confident   that   you   will   be   successful   in   your   pursuit   of   your   doctoral   degree.     We   hope   you   will   not   find   it   necessary   to   employ   the   appeal   procedure,   but   if   you   do   find   it   necessary   and   you   have   questions   about   the   appeal   process,   please   feel   free   to   discuss   them   with   the   Joint   Doctoral   Program   Directors   or   the   Director   of   Education   Studies  at  UCSD  or  the  Dean  at  CSUSM.    

39  


ACADEMIC  HONESTY  AND  INTEGRITY  OF  SCHOLARSHIP  POLICIES     All  Joint  Doctoral  Program  students  are  expected  to  adhere  to  standards  of  academic  honesty   and  integrity,  as  outlined  in  the  “CSUSM  Student  Academic  Honesty  Policy”  and  the  “UCSD   Policy  on  Integrity  of  Scholarship.”     It  is  expected  that  all  oral  and  written  assignments  will  be  original  work.    Any  idea  or  materials   that   are   utilized   from   another   source   must   have   all   of   the   appropriate   references   for   that   original  source.    Students  using  quoted  material  must  mark  with  quotes  such  material  and  cite   the  sources.    Examinations  are  to  be  completed  honestly  by  the  student.     There   will   be   no   tolerance   for   infractions.   Please   bring   any   perceived   infractions   to   the   attention   of   the   instructor   who   reserves   the   right   to   discipline   any   student   for   academic   dishonesty  in  accordance  with  the  general  rules  and  regulations  of  the  universities.    Actions  are   delineated  in  the  policies  referenced  above.        

There  is  always  time  for  a  cup  of  coffee  and  a  chat  with  an  instructor.      

 

ATTENDANCE  POLICY

The  Educational  Leadership  Program  is  exploring  theories  of  leadership,  reflecting  on  practice   and  solving  problems  together  through  the  cohort  model.  Attendance  is  critical.  As  we  promote   system-­‐thinking  and  inquiry-­‐based  problem  solving  in  our  learning  opportunities,  we  require  all   of   our   professional   students   to   be   on   time   and   present   at   each   class   meeting.     Attendance       expectations  apply  to  all  instructional  activities,  in  class,  on-­‐line  and  at  other  events  included  in   course  syllabi.    In  a  cohort  model  each  student  counts  for  the  success  of  the  whole!         Students  are  expected  to  have  read  assigned  materials  by  the  date  indicated  in  the  syllabus  and   should  be  prepared  to  discuss  readings  individually  or  in  variously  structured  groups.

40  


UCSD  EMERGENCY  NUMBERS     Medical  Emergencies,  Police  Fire,  Rescue           911        or  to  reach  UCSD  emergency  response  from  a  cell-­‐phone     (858)  534-­‐HELP  (4357)   Campus  Emergency  Status  Information  Line         (888)  308-­‐8273   UCSD  Thornton  Hospital  Emergency  Room  (on  campus)       (858)  657-­‐7600     UCSD  Medical  Center  (Hillcrest)             (619)  543-­‐6400     Mental  Health  Crisis  Line*               (800)  479-­‐3339     UCSD  Psychological  Services                         (858)  534-­‐3755              http://caps.ucsd.edu/  -­‐  students     UCSD  Student  Safety  Awareness  Program           (858)  534-­‐5793              http://studentsafety.ucsd.edu.     UCSD  Office  of  Students  with  Disabilities           (858)  534-­‐4382      http://www.ucsd.edu/current-­‐students/academics/disability-­‐services/       Rape  Crisis  Hotline*                 (888)  385-­‐4657     Poison  Information*                 (800)  222-­‐1222       *24  hour  lines      

UCSD  QUICK  REFERENCE    

Admissions    -­‐  Office  of  Graduate  Services   Bookstore               Campus  Operator         Disabled  Student  Services       Financial  Aid  &  Scholarship       Help  Desk  (Student  Health)       Library             Parking  and  Transportation  Services     Registration  and  Records       University  Police             Mailing  Address   UCSD  –  EDS   9500  Gilman  Drive  #0070   La  Jolla,  Ca    92093-­‐0070     Website:    http://eds.ucsd.edu    

                   

                   

41  

                   

(858)  534-­‐3555   (858)  534-­‐3149   (858)  534-­‐2230   (858    534-­‐4382   (858)  534-­‐4480   (858)  534-­‐3300   (858)  534-­‐3336   (858)  534-­‐4223   (858)  534-­‐3150   (858)  534-­‐4357  


CSUSM  EMERGENCY  NUMBERS    

Police  Emergency  Number         Adult  Protective  Services         Alcoholics  Anonymous         American  Trauma  Society         Battered  Women's  Shelter  &  Hotline       Crime  Victims  Hotline           Domestic  Violence  Information  Line       Drug  Abuse  Information/Reference       EYE  Counseling  &  Crisis  Center       Libre  24-­‐Hour  Domestic  Violence  Hotline     Narcotics  Anonymous           National  Domestic  Violence  Hotline       North  County  Counseling  Center       San  Diego  County  Crisis  Line/  Suicide  Prevention   STD  Hotline             Women's  Resource  Center  24-­‐Hour  Crisis  Line  

 

                                                                                                   

911   (800)  523-­‐6444   (760)  758-­‐2514     (800)  556-­‐7890   (619)  234-­‐3164   (619)  688-­‐9200   (619)  234-­‐3164   (800)  668-­‐4357   (760)  747-­‐6281   (760)  633-­‐1111   (800)  479-­‐0062   (800)  799-­‐SAFE   (760)  758-­‐1092   (800)  479-­‐3339   (800)  277-­‐8922   (760)  757-­‐3500  

     

CSUSM  QUICK  REFERENCE     Admissions  (Cougar  Central)       Bookstore  (University  Store)       Campus  Operator         Disabled  Student  Services       Financial  Aid  &  Scholarship       Help  Desk  (Student)         Library             Parking  and  Transportation  Services     Registration  and  Records       University  Police             Mailing  Address   333  S.  Twin  Oaks  Valley  Road   San  Marcos,  CA    92096-­‐0001     Website:    www.csusm.edu  

                   

                   

42  

                   

(760)  750-­‐4848   (760)  750-­‐4730   (760)  750-­‐4000   (760)  750-­‐4905   (760)  750-­‐4850   (760)  750-­‐6505   (760)  750-­‐4340   (760)  750-­‐7500   (760)  750-­‐4814   (760)  750-­‐4567  


FACULTY  BIOGRAPHIES   Joint  Directors    

LORRI  SANTAMARíA   Professor,  College  of  Education,  Health,  and  Human  Services,  CSUSM   Director  for  the  Joint  Doctorate  in  Educational  Leadership     Dr.  Lorri  J.  Santamaría  is  Professor  of  Multicultural/  Multilingual  Education,  CSUSM  Director  of  the   Joint   Doctoral   Educational   Leadership   Program   with   UCSD   at   California   State   University,   San   Marcos.     Building   on   nine   years   of   bilingual   teaching   and   district   leadership   in   elementary   school   contexts,  she  teaches  courses  in  the  joint  Doctorate  Program  and  the  CSUSM  College  of  Education   Teacher  Preparation  Program;  conducting  research,  and  writing  with  a  focus  on  leadership  for  social   justice  and  educational  equity,  diversity  and  schooling,  theory  and  methods  of  bilingual  education,   and   inclusive   elementary   multilingual   education.   Representative   publications   include:   Santamaría,   L.  J.  &  Santamaría,  A.  P.  (2012).  Applied  critical  leadership  in  education:  Choosing  change.  New  York,   NY:   Routledge.   Santamaría,   L.   J.   (In   Press).   Grace   at   the   top:   Barrier   transcendence   and   Black   feminist   applied   critical   leadership   in   education.   The   Negro   Educational   Review.   Santamaría,   L.   J.   (2009).   Culturally   responsive   differentiated   instruction:   Narrowing   gaps   between   best   pedagogical   practices   benefiting   all   learners.   Teachers   College   Record;   Santamaría,   L.   J.,   Santamaría,   C.   C.,   Fletcher,   T.   V.   (2009).   Journeys   in   cultural   competency   of   pre-­‐service   teachers   from   Arizona   and   California   universities   participating   in   Mexico   study   abroad   programs.   The   International   Diaspora   of   Indigenous  and  Minority  Education  (DIME);  Mercado,  C.  &  Santamaría,  L.  J.  (2005).   A  comparative   perspective   on   educational   research   for   Latinos:   problems   and   possibilities.   In   P.   Pedrazo   &   M.   Rivera   (Eds.),   Latino   Education:   An   agenda   for   community   action   research.   New   Jersey:   Lawrence   Erlbaum  and  Associates,  Publishers.       AMANDA  DATNOW   Professor   Chair,  Education  Studies     Amanda  Datnow  is  Professor  and  Chair  of  the  Department  of  Education  Studies  at  the  University  of   California,  San  Diego.    Prior  to  joining  the  faculty  at  UCSD  in  2008,  she  was  most  a  professor  at  the   USC  Rossier  School  of  Education,  where  she  chaired  the  Ph.D.  program  and  was  Associate  Director   of  the  Center  on  Educational  Governance.  Earlier  in  her  career  she  was  on  the  faculties  at  University   of  Toronto  and  Johns  Hopkins  University.  She  received  her  Ph.D.  in  Education  from  UCLA  and  her   B.A.  from  UCSD.  Her  research  focuses  on  the  politics  and  policies  of  school  reform,  particularly  with   regard  to  the  professional  lives  of  educators  and  issues  of  equity.  Sociological  perspectives  inform   her  research  on  these  topics,  and  her  methods  are  mostly  qualitative.  She  has  conducted  studies  on   data  informed  decision  making,  comprehensive  school  reform,  and  on  the  intersection  of  gender   and  educational  reform.  She  is  currently  conducting  a  major  national  study  on  the  educational   opportunities  and  obstacles  for  students  in  poverty  funded  by  the  Bill  and  Melinda  Gates   Foundation.  She  is  the  author  or  editor  of  6  books  and  over  50  journal  articles  and  book  chapters.   She  is  editor  of  the  Journal  of  Educational  Change  and  also  serves  on  the  editorial  boards  of  several   other  journals.    

43  


ADDITIONAL  FACULTY  ON  EACH  OF  OUR  CAMPUSES     CSUSM  Faculty     MARK  BALDWIN   Professor,  College  of  Education,  Health,  and  Human  Services,  CSUSM       Dr.  Mark  Baldwin  received  his  doctorate  in  Educational  Leadership  and  Organizational  Change   from   Northern   Arizona   University.   He   received   his   B.A.   in   Latin   American   History   from   the   University  of  California,  Irvine  and  a  M.S.  in  Counseling  from  San  Diego  State.    Prior  to  joining   the  College  of  Education  at  CSUSM  in  1995,  Dr.  Baldwin  was  a  respected  and  effective  teacher   and   administrator   in   the   Poway   Unified   School   District   for   twenty   years.     Dr.   Baldwin   is   recognized   nationally   and   internationally   for   his   work   in   organizational   change   in   educational   settings,   curriculum   design   and   assessment   systems.     Over   the   past   two   decades,   he   has   worked  with  colleges  and  universities  as  well  as  with  K-­‐12  public  school  systems  to  help  them   develop  evidence  driven  change  models.    His  most  recent  international  experience  was  in  the   United  Arab  Emirates  (UAE)  where  he  lived  and  worked  during  the  2004-­‐2006  academic  years   at   the   UAE’s   national   university.     Dr.   Baldwin   led   a   university   team   to   redesign   the   academic   programs   of   the   first   year   experience,   overseeing   all   academic   programs   in   the   first-­‐year   curricula.     BRIDGET  BLANSHAN   Dean  of  Students,  CSUSM     Dr.  Blanshan  has  held  numerous  positions  in  Student  Affairs.    Currently  as  the  Dean  of  Students   at  Cal  State  University  San  Marcos  where  she  provides  leadership  to  create  dynamic,  interactive   learning  opportunities  for  students  in  higher  education.    Dr.  Blanshan  attained  an  Ed.D.  in   Organizational  Leadership  at  the  University  of  La  Verne  in  2007.  Additionally,  she  has  a  Master’s   Degree  in  Educational  Leadership  from  the  University  of  San  Diego  and  a  Bachelor’s  Degree  in   Business  Administration  from  Iowa  State  University.    Her  research  interests  include  higher   education,  cultural  identity  development,  leadership  theory,  assertive  communication  skills,   sexual  assault  awareness  and  prevention,  domestic  violence,  peer  counseling,  crisis   intervention,  ethical  decision-­‐making,  motivating  volunteers,  conflict  resolution,  individual  and   group  development,  and  goal  setting.   RONG  JI  CHEN   Assistant  Professor,  College  of  Education,  Health,  and  Human  Services,  CSUSM     Dr.  Rong-­‐Ji  Chen  is  an  assistant  professor  of  mathematics  education  at  CSUSM.  He  earned  his   doctorate  in  Curriculum  &  Instruction  from  the  University  of  Illinois  at  Urbana-­‐Champaign.  He   has  a  M.A.  degree  in  Instructional  Technology  from  the  University  of  Texas  at  Austin  and  a  B.S.   degree  in  mathematics  from  National  Tsing  Hua  University,  Hsinchu,  Taiwan.  Before  coming  to   the  U.S.,  he  taught  middle  school  mathematics  in  southern  Taiwan.  At  CSUSM,  Dr.  Chen  teaches   K-­‐8  mathematics  methods  courses  and  an  introductory  educational  technology  course.  He  has   been  involved  in  mathematics  teachers’  professional  development  in  Escondido  Union  School   District.  His  research  interests  pertain  to  teachers’  perceptions  about  the  nature  of   44  


mathematics  and  how  teachers  construct  their  subjectivity  in  relation  to  mathematics.  He  is   also  interested  in  technology  integration  in  mathematics  education  and  teacher  education,   especially  with  respect  to  a  critical  theory  of  technology.     ERIKA  DANIELS   Assistant  Professor,  College  of  Education,  Health,  and  Human  Services,  CSUSM     Dr.  Erika  Daniels,  Assistant  Professor  at  Cal  States  San  Marcos,  earned  her  Ed.D.  in  Literacy  from   a  joint  program  between  San  Diego  State  University  and  the  University  of  San  Diego.  She   earned  her  M.S.  from  the  University  of  Southern  California  in  Los  Angeles,  California.  She  is  the   Co-­‐Coordinator  for  the  Middle  Level  Education  credential  program  at  CSUSM  and  a  member  of   the  Literacy  faculty  of  the  COE.  Dr.  Daniels  has  served  K-­‐12  education  as  a  kindergarten,  middle,   and  high  school  teacher  and  middle  and  high  school  Literacy  Coach.  Her  focus  for  research  and   teaching  is  creating  motivating  learning  environments  and  helping  struggling  adolescents   develop  missing  literacy  skills.  Dr.  Daniels  believes  that  academic  research  can  and  should   inform  classroom  practice  and  that  classroom  practice  makes  academic  research  relevant  and   useful.  She  has  published  numerous  articles  on  motivation  and  authentic  literacy  experiences  in   journals  such  as  Educational  Leadership,  English  Journal,  and  Voices  from  the  Middle.   ANNETTE  DAOUD   Associate  Professor,  College  of  Education,  Health,  and  Human  Services,  CSUSM     Dr.  Annette  M.  Daoud,  Ph.D.  earned  her  doctorate  in  Education  with  an  emphasis  in  Cultural   Perspectives  of  Education  from  the  University  of  California,  Santa  Barbara.    She  earned  her  B.A.   in  Psychology  from  the  University  of  California,  Irvine  and  an  M.A.  in  Education  with  an   emphasis  in  Multicultural  Education  from  the  University  of  California,  Santa  Cruz.    Dr.  Daoud  is   an  Associate  Professor  of  Education  in  the  area  of  Multicultural  /  Multilingual  Education  at  CSU   San  Marcos.    She  also  serves  as  the  founding  director  of  the  Social  Justice  and  Equity  Project   (SJEP),  the  only  center  at  CSU  San  Marcos  dedicated  to  promoting  academic  excellence  by   creating  a  socially  just  and  equitable  campus  environment  for  students,  faculty,  staff  and  our   community  constituencies.    Dr.  Daoud’s  research  and  teaching  are  centered  on  the  principles  of   social  justice,  critical  pedagogy,  multicultural  education,  and  providing  equitable  education  for   students  from  culturally  and  linguistically  diverse  backgrounds.    She  works  extensively  in  high   schools,  with  a  primary  focus  on  the  academic  and  social  aspects  of  school  for  secondary   English  learners,  and  currently  is  writing  a  book,  Teaching  High  School  English  Learners:     Equitable  Instruction  in  Content  Area  Classrooms.    Dr.  Daoud  also  has  done  research  in  the   areas  of  second  language  acquisition,  culturally  responsive  teaching,  school  cultures,  Latino   parent  involvement,  and  social,  cultural  and  linguistic  capital.       ANNE  RENÉ  ELSBREE   Associate  Professor,  College  of  Education,  Health,  and  Human  Services,  CSUSM     Dr.  Anne  René  Elsbree  earned  her  doctorate  in  Curriculum  and  Instruction  from  the  University   of   Wisconsin-­‐Madison.   She   earned   her   B.S.   in   Sociology   from   the   University   of   California,   Riverside   and   her   Masters   in   Special   Education   from   Point   Loma   Nazarene   College.   Most   of   her   teaching   has   been   with   marginalized   high   school   students   in   special   education,   shelters   and   court  schools.    She  is  currently  an  associate  professor  in  the  College  of  Education  at  California   45  


State   University   San   Marcos   (CSUSM)   and   serves   as   co-­‐coordinator   for   the   Single   Subject   Credential  Program.  She  serves  as  the  advisor  for  CSUSM  Lesbian,  Gay,  Bisexual,  Transgender,   Queer   and   Ally   Student   Organization   and   is   on   the   steering   board   for   the   San   Diego   Gay,   Lesbian   and   Straight   Educator   Network   (GLSEN).   She   uses   queer   theory   and   feminist   post-­‐ structuralism  to  embrace  the  paradoxes  in  life;  she  acknowledges  oppression  as  a  normal  part   of   schooling   while   maintaining   a   hopeful   outlook   for   education.   She   believes   teaching   is   a   political  act  and  she  encourages  educators  to  understand  themselves  and  their  contexts  in  an   effort   to   maximize   their   ability   to   impact   change   and   create   anti-­‐oppressive   pedagogies.   Her   research  focuses  on  how  teachers  and  teacher  educators  challenge  homophobia  in  schools.  She   enjoys  traveling  and  pursuing  holistic  health  practices  with  her  partner  Kim.     KATHY  HAYDEN   Associate  Professor,  College  of  Education,  Health,  and  Human  Services,  CSUSM     Dr.   Katherine   Hayden   earned   her   doctorate   in   Educational   Technology   at   Pepperdine   University.  She  is  currently  an  associate  professor  in  the  College  of  Education  at  California  State   University  San  Marcos.  Her  area  of  expertise  involves  technology  as  an  integrated  part  of  the   educational   environment   and   her   research   has   focused   on   development   of   online   communities   and   the   use   of   videoconferencing   in   educational   environments.   She   has   worked   as   a   classroom   teacher,  technology  mentor  teacher,  consultant  and  technology  specialist  at  the  district  level  to   support  the  use  of  technology  to  address  student  needs  targeting  both  California  and  national   standards.  Through  her  previous  position  as  Coordinator  of  Curriculum  and  Instruction  for  the   ILAST   (Improving   Learning   for   All   Students   through   Technology)   Partnership   from   2001-­‐2003,   she   collaborated   with   teachers   and   administrators   in   thirty   school   districts   to   support   the   integration  of  technology  in  classroom  teaching  and  learning.  Dr.  Hayden  works  with  districts  in   developing   technology   plans,   grant   writing   and   curriculum   development   including   the   integration  of  technology.     JOHN  HALCON   Professor,  College  of  Education,  Health,  and  Human  Services,  CSUSM     Dr.   John   J.   Halcón   (PhD,   University   of   California,   Santa   Barbara,   Educational   Administration,   Program   of   Organizations   and   Policy   Studies   specializing   in   Bilingual/Bicultural   Education;   M.Ed.-­‐Inner   City   Education;   and   B.A.-­‐Chicano   Studies/Sociology   from   Loyola   Marymount   University).     Dr.   Halcón   has   taught   at   CSU   San   Marcos   since   2002   where   he   is   Professor   in   Multilingual/  Multicultural  Education.  Prior  to  CSUSM,  Dr.  Halcón  was  Professor  of  Education  at   the   University   of   Northern   Colorado   where   he   taught   14   years   in   the   School   for   the   Study   of   Teaching  and  Teacher  Education  (SSTTE).  In  Colorado,  he  also  worked  as  a  Post-­‐Doctoral  Fellow   at  WICHE  (the  Western  Interstate  Commission  for  Higher  Education)  where  he  was  involved  in  a   program   for   improving   the   education   of   Chicano/Latino   children.   He   has   taught   children   ‘at   risk’,  including  high  school  drop  outs,  and  limited  and  non-­‐English  speaking  children.  Presently,   he   is   involved   with   teaching   teachers   to   recognize,   understand,   and   adapt   their   teaching   to   meet   the   educational   needs   of   foster   children.   Dr.   Halcón   also   taught   at   UC   Santa   Barbara,   California  Lutheran  University,  CSU  Bakersfield,  and  CSU  Monterey  Bay.       Dr.  Halcón  has  published  extensively  on  bilingual/multicultural  education,  racism  in  education,   and  the  education  of  ‘at  risk’  children,  including  in  the  Harvard  Educational  Review,  the  Urban   46  


Review,   the   Bilingual   Review   Press,   the   Journal   of   The   National   Association   for   Bilingual   Education,  Bordos,  Hispanic  Outlook,  and  the  Journal  of  Latinos  and  Education.  A  co-­‐authored   book   (with   Maria   de   la   Luz   Reyes,   2000)   entitled   The   Best   for   Our   Children:   Critical   Perspectives   on  Literacy  for  Latino  Students,  was  recently  awarded  the  AESA  (American  Educational  Studies   Association)  Critics  Choice  Book  Award  in  2004.       JENNIFER  JEFFRIES   AVP  of  Planning  and  Accreditation/  Associate  Professor,  College  of  Education,  Health,  and   Human  Services,  CSUSM     Dr.   Jennifer   Jeffries   earned   her   Doctor   of   Education   from   the   University   of   San   Diego   in   Leadership  Studies.  She  earned  her  B.A.  in  English  and  her  M.A.  in  Educational  Administration   from   San   Diego   State   University.   She   has   served   as   a   middle   school   teacher,   high   school   assistant   principal,   elementary   school   principal   and   assistant   superintendent   of   educational   services.  She  served  as  superintendent  of  Fallbrook  Union  Elementary  School  District  from  1991   to  2000.  In  partnership  with  three  friends,  she  owned  and  operated  a  28-­‐bed  retreat  center  for   five   years,   hosting   a   variety   of   events   for   non-­‐profit   organizations.   Embracing   the   wisdom   of   “change  is  good,”  she  left  the  superintendency  in  2000  to  teach  at  California  State  University   San   Marcos,   where   she   teaches   in   the   Educational   Administration   Credential   and   Masters   program  and  in  the  Educational  Leadership  Doctoral  Program.  She  is  an  organizational  change   nerd,   taking   great   joy   in   assisting   individuals   and   groups   to   develop   the   courage   to   ask   hard   questions  and  to  take  action  in  pursuit  of  greater  effectiveness  and  fulfillment  of  organizational   vision.  She  is  a  firm  believer  that  leaders  are  not  born,  but  develop  through  intellectual  growth,   emotional   maturity,   experience   in   politically   charged   environments   and   engagement   in   personally   meaningful   endeavors.   When   she   takes   a   break,   she   can   be   found   strumming   her   guitar,  tooting  on  her  flute  or  cooking  up  a  storm  for  family  and  friends.         BRIAN  LAWLER   Assistant  Professor,  College  of  Education,  Health,  and  Human  Services,  CSUSM     Dr.  Brian  Lawler  earned  his  doctorate  in  Mathematics  Education  at  The  University  of  Georgia.   He  received  his  B.S.  in  Mathematics  from  Colorado  State  University,  M.A.  in  Curriculum  and   Instruction  from  California  State  University  Dominguez  Hills,  and  M.A.  in  Mathematics  from  The   University  of  Georgia.  He  taught  high  school  mathematics  for  9  years  in  a  variety  of  settings,   including  suburban,  urban,  and  urban/rural  settings.  He  is  a  contributing  author  to  the  second   edition  of  the  Interactive  Mathematics  Program,  a  four-­‐year,  college  preparatory,  problem-­‐ based  high  school  mathematics  curriculum  designed  particularly  for  untracked  classrooms.  He   has  also  collaboratively  designed  professional  development  for  high  school  math  teachers   seeking  to  meet  the  needs  of  all  learners  in  heterogeneous  classrooms,  resulting  in  a  4-­‐year   teacher  curriculum.  He  is  currently  an  assistant  professor  in  the  College  of  Education  at   California  State  University  San  Marcos  and  serves  as  Coordinator  for  the  M.A.  –  General  Option   Program.  Brian  draws  upon  a  Piagetian  epistemological  framework,  a  Deweyan  progressivism,  a   critical  pedagogy,  and  a  post-­‐structural  worldview  to  theorize  an  equitable  and  socially  just   framework  for  mathematics  education.  This  emerges  as  a  Critical  Mathematics  Education,  in   which  the  child’s  mathematics  and  the  mathematics  of  society  are  both  held,  not  in  tension,  but   as  interacting,  in  order  to  understand  learning  and  teaching  of  mathematics  in  its  sociopolitical   context.  His  research  focuses  on  the  personal  epistemology  of  adolescent  mathematical   47  


learners,  and  power  and  privilege  in  the  sciences  and  politics  of  Mathematics  and  Mathematics   Education.     DELORES  B.  LINDSEY   Associate  Professor,  College  of  Education,  Health,  and  Human  Services,  CSUSM     Dr.   Delores   B.   Lindsey,   Assistant   Professor   at   Cal   States   San   Marcos,   earned   her   Ph.D.   in   Educational   Leadership   from   Claremont   Graduate   University   in   Claremont,   California.   She   earned   her   M.Ed.   from   Southern   University   in   Scotlandville,   Louisiana.   She   is   the   Coordinator   for   the   MA   and   Credential   Program   in   Educational   Administration   at   CSUSM.   Dr.   Lindsey   has   served  k-­‐12  education  as  a  middle  grades  and  high  school  teacher,  assistant  principal,  principal,   and  county  office  of  education  administrator.  Her  focus  for  research  and  teaching  is  developing   culturally  proficient  leadership  practices.  She  is  coauthor  of  Culturally  Proficient  Instruction:  A   guide   for   people   who   teach,   2nd   ed.   (2005)   and   Culturally   Proficient   Coaching:   Supporting   educators   to   create   equitable   schools,   (2007),   published   by   Corwin   Press.   As   a   university   professor   Dr.   Lindsey   leads   and   coaches   students   and   organizations   using   motivational   and   inspirational   communication   skills,   “strategic   visioning”   techniques,   team   development   strategies,   and   leadership   standards   for   excellence.   Drawing   from   her   southern   heritage,   she   invites   students   of   educational   leadership   to   examine   and   share   personal   stories   in   ways   to   surface  assumptions,  beliefs,  and  actions.  Graduate  students  appreciate  her  refreshing  look  at   life   within   an   organization   as   reflected   in   the   stories   and   language   of   its   members.   Using   the   lens   of   Cultural   Proficiency,   Dr.   Lindsey   helps   organizations   and   groups   examine   their   policies   and  practices,  and  as  well  as  individual  beliefs  and  values  about  cross-­‐cultural  communication.   Her  favorite  question  is:  Are  we  who  we  say  we  are?  This  and  other  reflective  questions  guide   leaders  in  examining  their  espoused  vales  and  their  values-­‐in-­‐action.  Dr.  Lindsey  serves  as  coach   and  co-­‐researcher  for  several  local  school  districts  and  administrators.     ROBIN  MARION   Associate  Professor,  College  of  Education,  Health,  and  Human  Services,  CSUSM     Dr.   Robin   D.   Marion   (Ph.D.,   University   of   Wisconsin-­‐Madison)   is   an   assistant   professor   of   Teaching   and   Learning   at   CSUSM.     Dr.   Marion   previously   taught   in   an   M.Ed.   program   at   National-­‐Louis   University,   in   the   teacher   education   program   at   University   of   Wisconsin-­‐ Madison,   and   high   school   science   and   agriculture   in   Vacaville,   CA.     Dr.   Marion’s   research   interests   revolve   around   teacher   voice   in   educational   theory,   practice   and   policy.     Facilitating   practitioner   conducted   research   (e.g.   teacher   research,   action   research),   increasing   access   to   teacher-­‐authored   studies,   and   cross   study   analysis   are   central   to   her   work.       Dr.   Marion,   in   collaboration   with   colleagues   at   UC   Davis   and   CSU   Sacramento,   developed   the   League   of   Teacher  Researchers,  an  electronic  archive  of  teacher  authored  studies.    These  studies  form  a   rich,  largely  untapped  literature  about  teaching  and  learning.    Dr.  Marion  is  currently  on  loan  to   the  Chancellor’s  Office  as  Director  of  the  Chancellor’s  Doctoral  Incentive  Program.     SUE  MOINEAU     Assistant  Professor,  College  of  Education,  Health,  and  Human  Services,  CSUSM  

 

Dr.   Suzanne   Moineau   is   an   Assistant   Professor   in   the   College   of   Education   at   California   State   University  San  Marcos.    She  was  hired  in  2006  to  design,  develop  and  direct  the  new  Masters   48  


degree  option  in  Communicative  Sciences  and  Disorders,  which  is  currently  undergoing  review   for  national  accreditation.    Dr.  Moineau  received  her  M.A.  in  Speech-­‐Language  Pathology  from   the  University  of  Iowa  and  her  Ph.D.  in  Language  and  Communicative  Disorders  from  the  Joint   Doctoral  Program  at  University  of  California,  San  Diego  and  San  Diego  State  University.    She  has   been  a  practicing  Speech-­‐Language  Pathologist  for  15  years,  and  has  specialized  in  the  provision   of  services  in  acute  care  settings  with  adults  with  acquired  injuries.    Dr.  Moineau’s  research  and   scholarly   interests   center   around   language   processing   and   breakdown   in   both   typically   developing  individuals  and  those  with  neurological  impairment.    She  is  particularly  interested  in   the   neurological   and   non-­‐linguistic   underpinnings   of   communication   behaviors,   and   how   they   support   or   interfere   with   typical   language   development   in   monolingual   and   bilingual   children   and   how   they   impact   the   accurate   and   efficient   processing   of   language   in   adults.     Finally,   in   recent  years,  Dr.  Moineau  has  participated  in  a  number  of  workshops  and  writing  activities  that   focus  on  relationship-­‐based  and  wellness  approaches  to  intervention.     MOSES  OCHANJI   Associate  Professor,  Science  Education,  College  of  Education,  Health,  and  Human  Services,   CSUSM     PATRICIA  PRADO-­‐OLMOS   Professor   Associate  Dean,  College  of  Education,  Health,  and  Human  Services     Dr.   Patricia   L.   Prado-­‐Olmos   earned   her   BA   in   Psychology   from   Pomona   College   in   1987.     She   earned   her   PhD   in   Educational   Psychology   from   University   of   California,   Santa   Barbara   in   1993.     She  has  held  faculty  positions  at  the  University  of  Houston-­‐Clear  Lake,  Pomona  College  and  is   currently   Professor   of   Multicultural/Multilingual   Education   at   California   State   University   San   Marcos.    Dr.  Prado-­‐Olmos  closely  ties  her  scholarly  teaching,  research  and  service  to  the  theme   of  social  justice  and  equity  for  the  express  purpose  of  Latino  educational  success  narrowly  and   all  marginalized  communities  broadly.    Her  research  interests  range  from  the  study  of  literacy   acquisition  in  bilingual  public  school  classrooms  to  ways  in  which  higher  education  faculty,  in-­‐ service   and   pre-­‐service   teachers   come   to   understand   diversity,   equity   and   social   justice   and   how   these   issues   impact   public   school   classrooms   and   students.     Dr.   Prado-­‐Olmos   has   also   served  as  the  Academic  Director  for  CSUSM  in  the  Southwest  Riverside  County  region.    She  was   instrumental  in  program  development  for  the  College  of  Education  and  has  worked  diligently  to   build   strong   and   effective   partnerships   between   CSUSM   and   area   school   districts.     Dr.   Prado-­‐ Olmos   enjoys   spending   time   in   creative   crafts,   and   can   often   be   found   on   some   type   of   athletic   field  cheering  on  her  children.         PATRICIA  STALL   Associate  Professor,  College  of  Education,  Health,  and  Human  Services,  CSUSM     Pat   Stall   is   currently   an   associate   professor   of   literacy   and   coordinates   the   single   subject   credential  program  at  California  State  University  San  Marcos.  Pat  taught  high  school  and  middle   school  remedial  reading  and  English  on  the  Navajo  Reservation  and  eventually  developed  and   administered   a   bachelor’s   degree   program   in   education   for   the   University   of   New   Mexico   in   Gallup.  As  an  extension  of  that  program,  she  also  developed  a  Master  of  Arts  program,  which   was   based   on   the   National   Board   for   Professional   Teaching   Standards   Core   Propositions.   Pat   49  


has   two   master’s   degrees,   one   in   educational   leadership   and   the   other   in   curriculum   and   instruction.   She   received   her   PhD   in   Childhood   and   Multicultural   Education   from   the   University   of   New   Mexico.   Pat’s   research   interests   and   work   in   schools   include   literacy,   of   course,   and   professional  development  with  attention  to  teacher  autonomy  in  a  collaborative  environment   to  create  of  culture  of  ownership  and  self-­‐direction.     LAURIE  STOWELL       Professor,  College  of  Education,  Health,  and  Human  Services,  CSUSM     Laurie   Stowell   is   a   Professor   of   literacy,   director   of   the   San   Marcos   Writing   Project   and   Co-­‐ Coordinator  of  the  Literacy  program  at  California  State  University,  San  Marcos.    There  she  has   taught  a  course  in  the  joint  Doctorate  Program,  the  CSUSM  College  of  Education  Master  of  Arts   program  with  a  specialization  in  literacy  and  Teacher  Preparation  Program  for  elementary  and   middle   level   teachers.     She   conducts   research,   and   writes   with   a   focus   on   writing,   literacy,   middle  level  education  and  children’s  literature.  In  1997  she  was  named  CSUSM  Distinguished   Professor,   in   2005   received   the   CSU   Wang   Family   Excellence   Award   and   in   2008   received   the   California  Teachers  of  English  Classroom  Excellence  Award.      She  has  chaired  over  forty  master’s   thesis  at  CSUSM.    In  addition,  she  has  successfully  written  state  and  federal  grants  to  fund  the   San   Marcos   Writing   Project   for   eight   years   as   well   as   state   funds   for   reading   institutes   for   secondary  teaches.     CAROL  VAN  VOOREN   Assistant  Professor   Coordinator  Educational  Administration  Program,  College  of  Education,  Health,  and  Human   Services,  CSUSM  

50  


UCSD  Faculty     ALAN  J.  DALY   Assistant  Professor,  Education  Studies         Alan  graduated  from  Clark  University  with  a  BA  in  Psychology,  received  a  MS  in  Counseling  from   San  Diego  State  University,  and  a  MA  and  Ph.D.  in  Education  with  an  emphasis  in  Educational   leadership  in  Organizations  from  the  University  off  California,  Santa  Barbara.  Over  the  last  15   years,  Alan  has  held  a  wide  variety  of  positions  in  public  education  ranging  from  classroom   teacher  to  district  psychologist  to  site  administrator.    In  addition  to  his  K-­‐12  public  education   experience,  Alan  has  most  recently  been  the  Program  Director  for  the  Center  for  Educational   Leadership  and  Effective  Schools  at  the  University  of  California,  Santa  Barbara  where  he   collaboratively  supported  the  delivery  of  high  quality  services  and  research  to  5  school  districts   focusing  on  the  rigorous  examination  of  strengths,  building  leadership  capacity,  and  facilitating   the  potential  of  systems  for  transformation.    Alan  has  presented  at  the  local,  state,  and  national   level  around  conflict  mediation  the  creation  and  maintenance  of  positive  school  cultures,  and   the  impact  of  current  accountability  structures.    As  a  licensed  educational  psychologist,  he  has   also  provided  consultation  to  school  districts  working  to  build  and  sustain  systemic  leadership   capacity,  district  reform,  and  implementation  of  adult  and  student  conflict  resolution.    Alan’s   research  interests  include  the  intersection  of  leadership  and  trust,  district  coherence,  strengths   based  processes,  and  social  network  theory  and  analysis.       CHRISTOPHER  HALTER   Lecturer  SOE     Chris  Halter  received  his  B.S.  degree  from  the  College  of  Charleston  and  Ed.D  in  Teaching  and   Learning:  Curriculum  Design,  from  the  University  of  California,  San  Diego  in  2006.  During  his   career  he  has  taught  in  middle  and  secondary  schools  in  both  science  and  mathematics  and  has   taught  university  computer  education  courses.  He  is  a  Technology  Mentor  Teacher  for  San   Diego  County  Office  of  Education  and  is  a  member  of  the  Greater  San  Diego  Mathematics   Council.  Dr.  Halter  has  presented  workshops  on  the  integration  of  technology  and  curriculum  at   numerous  conferences,  including  the  Greater  San  Diego  Mathematics  Conference,  the  San   Diego  Science  Conference,  the  San  Diego  Computer  Expo,  the  California  Mathematics  Council   Conference  (Southern  Section),  and  the  National  Council  of  Teachers  of  Mathematics  (NCTM)   National  Conference.  He  has  been  a  member  of  the  2007  California  Mathematics  Curriculum   Adoption  process  as  a  material  review  panel  member.  Dr.  Halter  is  a  member  of  the  California   Commission  on  Teacher  Credentialing  Board  of  Institutional  Review  (BIR)  panel.  He  has  also   worked  on  several  educational  programs  including  UCSD's  EarthRise  project,  the  UC  Science   and  Mathematics  Initiative,  and  the  Fund  for  the  Improvement  of  Postsecondary  education   (FIPSE)  on  Mathematics  Education.  He  coordinates  the  EDS  Noyce  Teacher  Scholarship  program   and  the  Noyce  Master  Teacher  Fellowship  program.  His  research  interests  include  the  use  of   advanced  technology  to  support  secondary  mathematics  curriculum  and  the  use  of  video   analysis  in  teacher  education.       51  


CAROLYN  HUIE  HOFSTETTER   Lecturer  (SOE)     Carolyn   Huie   Hofstetter   earned   her   Ph.D.   in   Education,   Social   Research   Methods,   from   the   University   of   California,   Los   Angeles.     Prior   to   joining   the   Education   Leadership   program   at   UCSD,   she   was   an   Assistant   Professor   at   the   University   of   California,   Berkeley,   Graduate   School   of  Education,  where  she  taught  doctoral  courses  in  evaluation  practice  and  theory.    Her  career   in   education   research   began   in   adult   literacy.     Later,   in   graduate   school   at   UCLA,   she   worked   as   a  Research  Associate  for  the  Center  for  Research  on  Evaluation,  Standards,  and  Student  Testing   (CRESST)   and   began   a   research   program   looking   at   the   intersection   of   evaluation   and   assessment,   with   emphases   on   assessment   accommodation   for   English   language   learners,   evaluations  in  K-­‐12  educational  settings,  and  bridging  evaluation  theory  and  practice  by  seeing   how   theoretical   issues   (stakeholder   involvement,   evaluation   use)   play   out   in   real   evaluation   settings.     While   at   UC   Berkeley,   Carolyn   was   a   PI   or   co-­‐PI   on   several   studies,   including   an   evaluation   of   a   K-­‐5   transitional   bilingual   education   program   (San   Jose   USD),   evaluation   of   an   analytic   procedure   to   align   content   standards   and   test   items   (AAAS/Project   2061),   and   an   evaluation  of  a  professional  development  program  for  mathematics  teachers  of  English  learners   (LHS/EQUALS).     Currently   she   is   the   PI   for   the   federally   funded   evaluation   of   the   Striving   Readers  Initiative  at  the  San  Diego  USD,  which  provides  intensive  literacy  instruction  for  middle   and  high  school  students.         JIM  (JAMES)  LEVIN   Professor       This   is   Jim   Levin's   third   time   back   to   UCSD,   and   he   hopes   that   the   third   time   will   be   the   charm.         His   research   focuses   on   distributed   learning   and   on   ways   to   help   people   learn   better   using   powerful   distributed   learning   environments.   He   has   developed   several   innovative   models   of   learning,   including   the   concept   of   teleapprenticeships.   He   has   been   studying   "teaching   teleapprenticeships",   instructional   frameworks   that   allow   education   students   to   learn   within   the   context   of   remote   K-­‐12   classrooms.   He   is   especially   excited   by   the   ways   in   which   new   technologies  fundamentally  change  the  relationship  between  education  and  the  rest  of  society.   He  likes  to  take  walks  on  the  beach  with  his  wife.     PAULA  LEVIN   Senior  Lecturer  (SOE)  &  Graduate  Adviser   MA/Ed.D.  in  Teaching  and  Learning     Paula  Levin  received  her  Ph.D.  in  Anthropology  from  UC  San  Diego,  and  has  conducted  research   on  schooling  and  culture  in  the  United  States,  as  well  as  in  French  Polynesia  and  Papua  New   Guinea.  Her  writings  have  addressed  early  literacy,  teacher  preparation,  home-­‐school   relationships,  curriculum  design,  and  social,  linguistic,  and  cultural  aspects  of  learning.  She  has   served  as  a  research  anthropologist  in  the  Pre-­‐Kindergarten  Program  at  the  Center  for  the   Development  of  Early  Education  (CDEE)  at  the  Kamehameha  Schools  in  Honolulu,  Hawaii.  In   that  role,  she  led  a  curriculum  development  project  team  to  develop  and  assess  educational   programs  for  native  Hawaiian  children  ages  0-­‐5.  As  a  member  of  the  Culture  and  Learning   Department  in  CDEE,  she  was  honored  with  the  Kimball  Award  for  Applied  and  Public   52  


Anthropology,  presented  by  the  American  Anthropological  Association.  Paula  has  worked  on  a   number  of  collaborative  projects,  including  "Visualizing  Earth",  an  NSF-­‐funded  multi-­‐site,   multidisciplinary  research  project  to  study  scientific  visualization,  and  to  integrate  the  use  of   space  shuttle  images  into  middle  school  earth  science  instruction.  She  has  also  served  as   Project  Director  of  a  Ford  Foundation-­‐funded  study  of  university  core  instruction,  called   "Teaching  Diversity  and  Learning  Tolerance."  Paula  serves  as  affiliated  faculty  in  UCSD's   Program  in  Human  Development  and  Department  of  Anthropology.  In  Spring  2000,  she  was   named  by  the  UCSD  Academic  Senate  as  a  recipient  of  UCSD’s  Distinguished  Teaching  Award.  In   2008,  Paula  became  Associate  Faculty  Director  for  Programs  Abroad,  and  in  that  capacity  works   with  the  International  Center  staff  to  support  the  international  studies  of  UCSD   undergraduates.  As  well,  since  2008  she  has  served  as  a  member  of  the  Western  Association  of   Schools  and  Colleges  (WASC)  Substantive  Change  Committee.  In  that  capacity,  she  reviews  new   degree  programs  proposed  by  colleges  and  universities  in  the  Western  Region.     MICA  POLLOCK   Director  of  Center  for  Research  on  Equity,  Assessment,  and  Teaching  Excellence     Mica  Pollock,  an  anthropologist  of  education,  joins  UCSD's  Center  for  Research  on  Equity,   Assessment,  and  Teaching  Excellence  (CREATE)  as  its  new  Director.  Pollock's  work  explores   communications  that  support  student  success  in  diverse  schools  and  communities.  Her  first   book,  Colormute:  Race  Talk  Dilemmas  in  an  American  School  (winner  of  the  2005  AERA   Outstanding  Book  Award),  helped  readers  navigate  six  core  U.S.  struggles  over  talking  (and  not   talking)  in  racial  terms  in  schools.  Because  of  Race:  How  Americans  Debate  Harm  and   Opportunity  in  Our  Schools  (2008),  examined  the  U.S.  Department  of  Education's  Office  for  Civil   Rights  as  the  background  for  analyzing  common  debates  over  improving  the  everyday  school   experiences  of  students  and  families  of  color.  In  Everyday  Antiracism:  Getting  Real  about  Race   in  School  (2008),  Pollock  next  organized  70  scholars  to  write  short  essays  for  teachers.  Winner   of  a  2008  Outstanding  Book  Award  from  the  Gustavus  Myers  Center,  “EAR”  is  being  used  to   spark  inquiry  in  schools  and  districts  across  the  country.  In  2009-­‐11,  Pollock  began  collaborating   with  educators,  families,  young  people,  and  technologists  in  The  Oneville  Project  in  Somerville,   MA,  a  participatory  design  research  project  piloting  new  ways  that  commonplace  technology  —   cell  phones,  computers,  free  software  —  might  help  people  who  share  students,  schools,  and  a   diverse  community  to  communicate  and  collaborate  regularly  to  support  young  people's   success.  Pollock  and  colleagues  in  San  Diego  are  now  forging  a  bicoastal  partnership  with   OneVille  participants  and  others  to  help  improve  the  “communication  infrastructure”  of  public   education  —  that  is,  to  assemble  a  set  of  free  and  low  cost  communication  tools  and  strategies   that  support  everyday  collaboration  and  student  support  in  diverse  schools  and  communities.   As  the  new  Director  of  CREATE,  Pollock  is  excited  about  helping  to  network  UCSD's  students,   researchers,  and  professional  development  experts  with  the  diverse  K-­‐12  educators,  youth,  and   families  of  San  Diego  County.  She  and  CREATE/EDS  colleagues  are  now  mapping  educational   partnerships  linking  UCSD  to  the  San  Diego  community.  Pollock  previously  taught  high  school  in   California  and  received  her  Ph.D.  from  Stanford.  

53  


ALISON  WISHARD  GUERRA   Assistant  Professor,  Education  Studies     Alison   Wishard   Guerra   is   an   Assistant   Professor   in   the   Education   Studies   Program   at   the   University   of   California,   San   Diego.   She   received   her   Ph.D.   in   Education   from   UCLA   with   an   emphasis  in  Psychological  Studies  in  Education.    Dr.  Wishard  Guerra’s  research  focuses  on  social   and   language   development   in   early   childhood,   with   particular   focus   on   developmental   competencies   among   Latino   children   from   low-­‐income   families.   She   studies   within   group   variations   related   to   immigration   and   acculturation   experiences   and   their   associations   to   children's   longitudinal   developmental   outcomes.   Specifically   in   her   narrative   work   she   has   sought   to   describe   the   normative   development   of   narrative   competencies   among   Mexican-­‐ heritage  children.  Dr.  Wishard  Guerra  was  a  member  of  the  expanded  research  consortia  that   helped   to   develop   the   California   Preschool   Learning   Foundations   on   English-­‐Language   Development.  

54  


ADMINISTRATIVE  STAFF   CSUSM,  School  of  Education    

Lorri  Santamaría   JDP  Co-­‐Director   (760)  750-­‐8520          lsantama@csusm.edu    

CSUSM,  Student  Services    

Andi  Shibata     Student  Affairs  Officer   (760)  750-­‐4292          ashibata@csusm.edu    

CSUSM,  Office  of  Graduate  Studies    

Linda  Collins   Administrative  Support  Coordinator   (760)  750-­‐4066          lcollins@cssusm.edu    

UCSD,  Education  Studies    

Amanda  Datnow   JDP  Interim  Co-­‐Director   (858)  534-­‐9598          adatnow@ucsd.edu    

Pamela  Frugé   MSO   (858)  534-­‐4875        pfruge@ucsd.edu    

Melissa  Wolf   Graduate  Coordinator   (858)  822-­‐2177    mawolf@ucsd.edu    

UCSD,  Office  of  Graduate  Services    

Sara  Hogue   Graduate  Academic  Persnl/Affrs   (858)  534-­‐6977        shogue@ucsd.edu  

 

55  


USEFUL  LINKS     PLEASE  MAKE  THIS  A  LISTING  THAT  IS  USEFUL  TO  YOU.    ADD  TO  IT  AS  YOU  WILL,  I  HAVE  GIVEN   YOU  A  START!     UCSD  RESOURCES     • UCSD's  Human  Research  Protections  Program  (IRB)     http://irb.ucsd.edu/     • UCSD's  Graduate  Student  Handbook     http://ogs.ucsd.edu/student-­‐affairs/graduate-­‐student-­‐resources/graduate-­‐student-­‐ handbook/index.html     • UCSD's  Instructions  for  Preparation  and  Submission  of  Doctoral  Dissertations  and   Master's  Theses     http://ogs.ucsd.edu/current-­‐students/index.html       • Redirecting  your  UCSD  Email  to  a  Personal  Email     http://acms.ucsd.edu/students/email/redirect.shtml     • Keeping  your  UCSD  e-­‐mail  account  after  you  leave     http://blink.ucsd.edu/Blink/External/Topics/Policy/0,1162,17332,00.html            

56  


JDP Cohort 8 Handbook