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Education Since 1987 | w: educationmagazine.ie t: 01-8329246 | e: education@clubi.ie

REFERENCE GUIDE

E D U C AT I O N R E F E R E N C E G U I D E 2 0 2 0 - 2 0 2 1

To Be Updated

Careers in the Defence Forces

Apprenticeships ■ Field Trips and Tours ■ Further Education ■ Higher Education ■ Qualifications

Reference ■ Briefings ■ Listings ■ Calendars


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Education REFERENCE GUIDE

Editor: Niall Gormley Production: Michael Farrell Publishers Ard Education Ltd. P: 01 832 9246 E: education@clubi.ie www.educationmagazine.ie Design Real Issues 086-8986827 Printers GPS Colour Graphics Ltd At the time of press information in Education is believed to be accurate and authoritative. However, some information may change due to circumstances beyond our control. Acceptance of advertisements, does not constitute an endorsement of products or services by the publishers. © 2020. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited. ISSN 0791-6161

NEWS: State takes direct action on gender inequality in higher education; Playing sport linked to mental wellbeing ...................................................................................... 4 NEWS: PISA 2018 shows need for more investment - ASTI .......................................................... 5 NEWS: 22 projects to be funded under Human Capital Initiative; Lounge Chair wins new competition............................................................................................ 7 NEWS: Programme for Special Education announced by minister; New National Training Programme for SNAs ................................................................................ 9 EPA 'The Story of Your Stuff 2020' competition ......................................................................... 11 Do you want your students to know more about the European Union? .................................... 12 St. Angela’s College ready for 2020 students ............................................................................. 15 Uptake on the Logistics Associate Apprenticeship (LAA) increases.............................................. 16 CAO 2021 - Think Mary Immaculate College ............................................................................. 19 FEATURE: Cracking Cybersecurity - Smart Futures interview ....................................................... 20 New courses at St Nicholas Montessori College ......................................................................... 22 COVER: Careers in the Irish Defence Forces ............................................................................... 24 FEATURE: The DARE route to third level access .......................................................................... 26 BRIEFING: Graduate outcomes - what becomes of graduates after graduation?......................... 28 NEWS: €10 million funding for Creative Futures Academy; Belfield 50 launched ....................... 31 ETC Consult - Online career assessment..................................................................................... 31 Sallynoggin College of Further Education students step up to a bright future ............................ 32 Training Services at Kilkenny and Carlow ETB............................................................................. 34 Blackrock Further Education Institute - launch your beauty career .............................................. 36 Galway Roscommon ETB Training Centre ................................................................................... 38 NEWS: Taoiseach visits UCC's Tyndall National Institute.............................................................. 39 Getting third level education off to the right start with Dunboyne College ................................ 40 Dún Laoghaire Further Education Institute - Don't have enough points? Come to DFEi ............. 42 Lee Brothers - Achievement Recognition and Commemoratives ................................................. 47 BRIEFING: The HEAR alternative route to third level ................................................................... 48 See your career going places with the ESB Networks Apprenticeship Programme ...................... 50 Accounting Technicians Ireland: Hearing from 'The Apprentice' ................................................. 52 Solas Smart Choices: Finding your feet in FET can increase your chances of success at Third Level and beyond.......................................................................................................... 55 Apprenticeships at Cork Training Centre .................................................................................... 56 Tourism – explore a world of opportunities in an exciting and global industry at LYIT ................ 58 BRIEFING: National Framework of Qualifications ........................................................................ 60 IACP - Make a positive mental health connection today! ........................................................... 63 HPV Immunisation - protect the future ...................................................................................... 65 BRIEFING: Irish and British qualifications comparison .................................................................. 66 Lullymore - exciting new venue for Field Trips and Environmental Tours .................................... 68 Delphi Resort: Great experiences in a stunning environment ...................................................... 69 Galway Atlantaquaria: Explore Ireland’s marine environment and biodiversity ............................ 70 Edmund Rice and the Christian Brothers .................................................................................... 71 BRIEFING: The education system in numbers .............................................................................. 73 LISTINGS: Careers Information ................. 74 Government Departments ............ 75 Government Services ............... 75 Education Institutes in Ireland ...... 76 Education & Training Boards.....77 Education Centres ........................ 77 REFERENCE: Calendars for 2019 and 2020 ............................................................................... 78 Education 3


NEWS ................................................................................................................................

State takes direct action on gender Playing sport linked to mental wellbeing inequality in higher education TWO major gender equality initiatives – aimed at addressing gender under-representation in senior leadership roles, and supporting the achievement of equality and diversity goals in higher education institutions – have been launched today by the Higher Education Authority (HEA) and the Minister for Further and Higher Education, Research, Innovation and Science, Simon Harris, T.D. A call for applications under the Senior Academic Leadership Initiative – which promotes gender-targeted leadership posts in higher education institutions (HEIs) – is now live following approval by the Minister earlier this week. The Call which is being issued by the HEA will be for 15 senior leadership posts in HEIs nationally. This is on top of the 20 posts that were approved in January 2020. New equality funding In addition, the HEA has announced that it will provide €300,000 in funding annually to the Gender Equality Enhancement Fund, which will support organisational and

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cultural change initiatives nationally. This Fund will encourage innovative approaches to addressing gender inequality across HEIs and support cross-sectoral collaboration. This is of particular importance due to the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on female academic staff – many of whom disproportionately carry the increased burden of caring responsibilities, potentially further delaying their career progression. Leadership The Senior Academic Leadership Initiative (SALI) aims to help achieve equality of outcome in the higher education sector, and 45 senior academic leadership posts will be awarded to HEIs over three years to assist in accelerating gender balance at senior levels. The key objective of this initiative is principally to attract outstanding female applicants both from within the sector currently and internationally. In 428 years, there has only been one female president of an Irish university (appointed in 2020).

YOUNG people who engaged in sports were found to have higher levels of wellbeing and lower symptoms of anxiety and depression with team sports conferring an additional benefit according to the Physical Activity and Wellbeing study published by DCU. The study, including a survey of 5,500 adolescents across Ireland found that of the 4 out of 10 who self-reported symptoms of depression and anxiety, 47% were females and 28% were males. Only 8% achieved the daily recommendation of 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous exercise. 70% of male adolescents took part in a team sport compared to 56% of females. Levels of physical activity, among females, decreased as they got older and only 1% of sixth-year female students achieved the recommended physical activity guidelines per day. A fifth of adolescents did not take part in any activity, either individual or team-based.


..........................................................NEWS

PISA 2018 shows need for more investment - ASTI IRELAND has a poor track record for investment in education, according to the ASTI, after the PISA 2018 findings were published. Based on the data for 2018, the report, published today, shows significant disparities between Ireland and OECD comparator countries say the union. Some of the concerns raised by the ASTI were: • 44.8% of Irish students were in schools where the principal reported that the school’s capacity to provide instruction is hindered to some extent or a lot by lack of teaching staff compared to the OECD average of 27.1%. • 44.6% of Irish students were in schools where the principal reported that the school’s capacity to provide instruction is hindered to some extent or a lot by a lack of physical infra-

structure compared to the OECD average of 33.1%. • 56.5% of Irish students were in schools where the principal agreed or strongly agreed that the number of digital devices connected to the internet was sufficient compared to the OECD average of 67.2%. ASTI President, Ann Piggott, said: “Covid-19 has brought to the forefront the importance of school infrastructural capacity and digital learning capacity. "No individual should be disadvantaged by lack of access to online learning."

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Are you interested in German language and culture? Do you enjoy sharing cultural experiences and discovering new things?

Join us: #ThinkGerman invites you to promote German language in Ireland with an individual event and to celebrate your curiosity in German language and culture. When: 2nd – 9th OCTOBER 2020 Who: all institutions (kindergartens, educational institutes, companies, clubs, libraries, etc.) in Ireland relating to German language and culture Where: all Ireland – especially, where you are!

Seems interesting? For more information see: Goethe.de/thinkgerman/info 6 Education


................................................................................................................................ NEWS

22 innovative projects to be funded under Human Capital Initiative THE Government has announced 22 projects are to be funded under the Human Capital Initiative across Ireland's third level institutions. The projects include the use of virtual laboratories in higher education, a new hub to upskill the building sector on green construction, and the establishment of Creative Futures Academy to support digital and screen culture, cinema, literature and broadcasting, art, design, and fashion. Innovative methods of teaching and delivery will be promoted on these projects, so that learners will benefit from improved quality and more engaging ways of learning on enterprise-focused courses, providing lifelong learning and upskilling opportunities for all. Human Capital Initiative Pillar 3, Innovation and Agility is the final Pillar to be announced and commands a total budget of â‚Ź197 million over the 5-year period, 2020 to 2024. The initiative will support innovative and agile proposals from institutions or groups of institutions with potential application and

impact across the higher education system. The proposals will align innovation and agility with national strategic objectives, key system objectives for the higher education system, and future skills needs for society and the economy. Through the projects recommended under this pillar, it is intended that innovative methods of teaching and delivery will be promoted, so that learners will benefit from improved quality and more engaging ways of learning on enterprise-focused courses. The capacity of institutions to anticipate, understand and respond to emerging skills needs of enterprise will be increased, together with the ability of institutions to provide lifelong learning and upskilling opportunities for all.

Lounge Chair wins new competition GMIT Letterfrack and Farrell Furniture (Co Louth) announced that Gerry Murray, a final year student on the Bachelor of Science in Furniture Design & Manufacture course is the first winner of the annual Conor Farrell Design Award for Excellence in Design. The simple silhouettes of the #352 Lounge Chair hides well the complex geometry and jointing techniques needed to construct it, said the judges. "The classic low-slung lines bring together beech and leather. The materials are from trusted sources which will not only ensure longevity but also aesthetically pleasing ageing.

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................................................................................................................................ NEWS

Programme New National Training Programme for Special Needs Assistants for Special Education announced by new minister “AS the first-ever Minister with responsibility for special education, I am determined that the department’s vision will have clear and actionable goals," said minister Josepha Madigan announcing priorities in special education provision. The priorities are: Staff Professional Training: Improving initial teacher education and training, and continuous professional development, in order to ensure that teachers and SNAs are supported to receive training and ongoing guidance in the area of inclusion and special educational needs provision. School Inclusion: Providing a wraparound support service in schools for young people, including occupational therapists, speech and language therapists, behavioural practitioners, and crisis support by expanding the pre-school and in-school therapy demonstration project and the school inclusion model. School Places: Improved long-term planning for the provision and development of special school and special class places; supporting both special schools and pupils with special educational needs in mainstream education. Listening and Learning, Empowering Students: Ensuring that the student voice is at the core of planning with regular contact with young people and families. Updating the Laws: Reviewing and updating the Education for Persons with Special Educational Needs (EPSEN) Act. Wellbeing: Expanding the National Educational Psychological Services. Improving Supports: Improving the Assistive Technology Support scheme and the Home Tuition scheme. Gifted and Talented: Supporting exceptionally able students. SNAs: Providing for the new SNAs, a new SNA training programme, and a new model for allocating SNAs to schools. Irish Sign Language: Ensuring support for ISL to reflect the right of ISL users to use ISL as their native language. Summer Provision: Reforming the Summer Provision programme for students with complex needs.

THE Government has announced the launch of a new National Training Programme for Special Needs Assistants (SNAs). This is the first dedicated n a t i o n a l t r a i n i n g p ro gramme for SNAs. It will be delivered by UCD and funded by the Department of Education at no cost to the SNA. The new online programme for SNAs will

begin in January 2021 and will consist of five modules delivered over a ten-month period covering inclusion, communications and language, a range of special needs and information on caring for students with additional care needs. In total, there are 3,500 places available on the programme over the next four years. Applications opened on October 1st.

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the

Story OF YOUR

WIN €500 FOR YOURSELF, €500 FOR YOUR SCHOOL AND A CHANCE TO WIN THE CLIMATE TOPIC PRIZE THINK. CREATE. MAKE A DIFFERENCE.

LETS START THINKING ABOUT STUFF!* COMPETITION OPENS IN JANUARY 2021 *Your entry must be submitted by your teacher on your behalf via www.thestoryofyourstuff.ie

VISIT WWW.THESTORYOFYOURSTUFF.IE WWW.EPA.IE/IRELANDSENVIRONMENT AND WWW.EPA.IE FOR MORE RESOURCES 10 Education

The EPA The Story of Your Stuff Programme is a Government of Ireland Initiative funded by the Department of Communications, Climate Action & Environment.


The story of soap Video examining the life cycle of soap claims the top prize in the EPA’s 'The Story of Your Stuff 2020' competition A VIDEO that creatively examines the environmental life cycle of soap has won this year’s Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ‘The Story of Your Stuff’ competition. The project, entered by Caoimhe Higgins and Katherine Mooney from St Andrew’s College in Booterstown, Dublin, looks at the history of soap manufacture and the effect of soap and its plastic packaging on the environment. It also identifies natural and locally made bars of soap as an alternative for consumers to consider. Ms. Higgins and Ms. Mooney won the top prize of €500, along with €500 for the school. Now in its fourth year, the competition brings together curiosity, creativity and science. It aims to get young people thinking about sustainability, climate action and environmental protection, using resources - such as the EPA Ireland’s Environment website (www.epa.ie/ irelandsenvironment/) - to spread the word among their friends, families and communities. 2020 Competition This year’s competition received more than 120 entries from schools across the country. Entrants were tasked with highlighting the environmental impact of an everyday item or activity, by creatively telling its story through a visual medium. The other four shortlisted entries, receiving gift token prizes, were: • ‘The Story of Plastic’, by first year students from Rice College,

Ennis, Co Clare; • ‘The Story of Plastic Bottles’, by Jakub Varhola and Liam Dixon of Bremore Educate Together Secondary School, Balbriggan, Co Dublin; • ‘The Story of Lipstick’, Paula Umama Agada, Nimra Nawaz and Rhea Ann Thomas of Hansfield Educate Together Secondary School, Dublin 15, and • ‘The Story of Plastic Bottles’ by Sara O’Beirne from Mohill Community College, Mohill, Co Leitrim. Climate focus This year, a new ‘Climate Topic Prize’ was also awarded for the entry that best addressed key climate considerations, such as carbon footprint, greenhouse gas emissions or climate action. Lana Mitchell from Coolmine Community School, Clonsilla, won with her entry which examined the life cycle and environmental impact of paper. Ms Mitchel won a special tour of the Cool Planet Experience at the Powerscourt House, Wicklow, for her and her class. Commenting, Dr Jonathan Derham of the EPA, said: “The EPA was delighted to see ‘The Story of Your Stuff 2020’ competition attract such a strong calibre of entries from across the country, covering a wide range of topics. Soap and handwashing are essential parts of our everyday lives, now

"The EPA was delighted to see ‘The Story of Your Stuff 2020’ competition attract such a strong calibre of entries from across the country, covering a wide range of topics"

more than ever, and the winning entry is timely in this regard. "While all soap products that ensure good hand-hygiene are to be encouraged, the winning video asks viewers to consider more environmentally friendly soaps, that are made locally and with more natural materials, and which use less plastic packaging. These alternatives, where available, can act to reduce any negative environmental impact.” The Story of Your Stuff 2021 is coming soon! The Story of Your Stuff is an EPA competition for second level students aimed at highlighting sustainability, climate action and environmental protection. Students are invited to use their creative talents to tell the story of their ‘stuff’, which could be an object or activity, using a visual medium a n d t o u s e t h e E PA I r e l a n d ’s Environment resource and EPA website and other good sources of information to assist them. Education 11


Do you want your more about the School visits (including virtual visits) Staff visit schools to explain how the European Union works (in English agus as Gaeilge). School groups also visit us at the Representation and in view of the COVID-19 pandemic we are exploring online visits. The European Commission also has publications, posters and other materials, which may be of use to teachers and students in the classroom.

School Visit to Representation

Translation Workshop

Translation Workshop

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Translation Workshops/ Ceardlanna Aistriúcháin We work with universities to organise translation workshops for senior cycle secondary school students (in English agus as Gaeilge). Staff translators from the EU institutions explain what they do (and how they got their jobs). University lecturers set out the courses they have on offer for prospective translators. During the final part of the programme, the translators work with the students in smaller groups to see how they would handle a particular text. Other Events Ask us about celebrating the European Day of Languages (26 September) or Europe Day (9 May) in your school or visit our stands at the BT Young Scientists Exhibition (January) or at the Think Languages fair (December) for example. The European Parliament also organises an Ambassador Schools Programme (EPAS) which aims to c re a t e a n e t w o r k o f s t u d e n t s (Transition Year) and schools engaging with the European Parliament and with MEPs. For further information about any of these activities, please email comm-ie-info-request@ec.europa.eu, referring to the service or competition in the subject (i.e. ‘Model Council’).


students to know European Union? The European Commission Representation in Ireland and Secondary Schools Competitions Model Council of the European Union This is an annual debate for secondary schools. It is a simulation of a meeting of the Council of the European Union and involves teams from secondary schools around Ireland, each of which represents an EU Member State.

Buaiteoirí an Chomórtais Aistritheoirí Óga 2020

The event allows schools to learn about the EU's decision-making process. The 2020 event took place in February in Dublin Castle. The topic was the European Green Deal, specifically reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

Aistritheoirí Óga – comórtas uile-oileáin Is é an Coimisiún Eorpach i gcomhar le Rialtas na hÉireann a eagraíonn an comórtas seo. Is comórtas é le haghaidh daltaí meánscoile in Éirinn, thuaidh agus theas, a bhfuil 15 bliana slánaithe acu ar an 1 Méan Fómhair den scoilbhliain sin agus a bhfuil sé ar a gcumas aistriúchán a dhéanamh ó Bhéarla go Gaeilge, nó ó roinnt eile de theangacha oifigiúla an Aontais Eorpaigh go Gaeilge. Seoltar an comórtas i mí na Samhna/mí na Nollag gach bliain agus is san earrach a bhíonn Lá an Chomórtais.

Juvenes Translatores – the multilingual translation competition for secondary schools This annual translation competition is open to students across the European Union who are 17 years of age and who have the ability to translate between any two of the EU's 24 official languages. The competition is launched in September each year. All entries are then entered into a random draw and 705 schools are invited to proceed to the next stage. The final number of participating schools per country is equal to the number of MEPs representing that country – i.e. 13 for Ireland. The winners - one per country - are announced in early February and prizes are presented at a special ceremony in Brussels during the Spring.

Buaiteoirí an Chomórtais Aistritheoirí Óga 2018

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St. Angela’s College ready for 2020 students I N a n u n p re c e d e n t e d t i m e o f change, St. Angela’s College is looking forward to welcoming students as the new academic year commences. Following national guidelines, the College has put in place the measures required to ensure the safety of students and staff on campus. With many lectures offered online, the College plans to bring groups of students back on a phased basis when safe to do so. C o l l e g e P re s i d e n t ( A c t i n g ) , Amanda McCloat explains: "These challenging times have put additional strain on students and parents/ guardians alike and we want to assure everyone that our COVID-19 Steering Group continue to meet and assess developments as they happen". She continues: "Our students this year will have a very different College experience but supports and help is available, from an academic as well as a health and wellbeing perspective, we pride ourselves in our close sense of community and will continue to promote this virtually or otherwise".

gramme and gain valuable experience in a variety of settings. In just four years, BNSc students can register with the Nursing and Midwifery Board of Ireland and become fully recognised nursing practitioners. Home Economics The College continues to be the sole provider of Home Economics study in the country. With Home Economics Teacher Education as popular as ever, the College strives to meet this demand on a national level. This five-year course will see graduates complete a BA which is then followed by a Professional Master of Education (PME). Graduates will also be qualified to teach in a second elective subject (Biology, Religious Education or Gaeilge). In September 2019, the College launched a BA in Home Economics focusing on the three core disciples of Home Economics; Food Studies; Textiles, Fashion and Design; Family Resource Management. Graduates of this new BA will become Home Economists and will

acquire the skills and knowledge to work in the Community (advocating sustainable health and wellbeing of individuals, families and community "Following g ro u p s ) a s w e l l a s t h e F o o d / national guidelines, the Beverage Sectors (food advisors, product development). College has Graduates of the BA in Home put in place Economics may also explore teachthe measures ing, through further postgraduate required to studies at NUI Galway. ensure the safety of Food Industry students and With an emphasis on food and staff on nutrition, combined with business campus" management, the Bachelor of Applied Science in Nutrition, Food and Business Management continues to produce graduates who gain employment in Ireland’s many food and beverage companies, as well as "We pride abroad. The four-year course seeks ourselves in to prepare individuals for the chalour close lenges of producing foods safe for sense of human consumption, developing community more nutritious, healthier food and will options for dynamic, ever-changing continue to markets. promote this For more detail of these and all virtually or courses offered by the College see otherwise" www.stangelas.nuigalway.ie

Employment opportunities For those starting their Leaving Certificate year, we invite you to consider your CAO options at St. Angela’s College, a safe environment to learn in with high employment opportunities upon Graduation. Courses range from Nursing (General / Intellectual Disability); Home Economics Teacher Education; Home Economics; Nutrition, Food and Business Management. Nursing Bachelor of Nursing Science (General / Intellectual Disability) students contribute not only to the campus but to the local community with many placements at Sligo University Hospital as well as other HSE clinical settings here in the North West. BNSc students enjoy Clinical Placement each year of the proEducation 15


Uptake on the Logistics Associate Apprenticeship (LAA) increases SINCE the launch of the Logistics Associate Apprenticeship (LAA) in TU Dublin in September 2018 the number of apprentices participating on the programme has significantly increased. This is not a surprise, explains Anna Gorecka the Project Manager of the LAA. The programme has become the perfect entry point into the Freight, Logistics, Shipping and Distribution industry not only for school graduates but also for those who wish to change their careers and get into the sector. Upskilling opportunities It also offers upskilling opportunities for the existing employees, many of whom ended up working in the sector entirely by coincidence’ says Anna. They have years of experience, but the lack of relevant qualifications prevented them from progressing their careers in the past. Initially 27 apprentices com-

menced their journey on the programme since its official launch in 2018 with 17 employers signed up for the programme. Since then, an additional 63 apprentices have been recruited, and over 40 employers have joined. In 2019 Cork Institute of Technology (CIT) became the second education provider for this apprenticeship. The national coverage of the programme is meeting the criteria as defined by Apprenticeship Ireland and the speed that this has happened is testimony to the consortium and the coordinating providers who have long been setting ambitious targets to make this a successful programme. It has also grabbed the attention of the industry, and through our outreach programme is attracting young people into the industry which is a major benefit for the industry as a whole. This apprenticeship model provides the academic education and

"The programme has already been recognised and won the 2019 ‘Innovation Award at Fleet Transport Awards and ‘Logistics & Transport Team of the Year Award’ at the Irish Logistics & Transport Awards 2019"

"Apprentices get a broad overview of all the relevant aspects of logistics"

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practical training across the air, sea and road freight, logistics, shipping and distribution sectors. Apprentices attend college one day per week throughout the academic year and stay with an employer for the remaining four days. Apprentices get a broad overview of all the relevant aspects of logistics. As part of the programme they will complete a work-based project in year 2, which will help them to develop their analytical, problem solving skills. The work-based project will also directly benefit employing organisations. Each apprentice is assigned a work-based mentor by their employer who will be an experienced member of staff, and a College Academic Supervisor. The work-based mentor will use their specific organisational and industry knowledge to guide the apprentice helping them to navigate corporate culture and gain an understanding of their role and duties in the organisation. Blended learning The blended learning approach makes complete sense, apprentices gaining valuable work experience while at the same time learning the theory behind the practice. On successful completion of this 2-year programme a person is awarded with the Level 6 Higher Certificate in Logistics. From that point there are many routes of progression either into Level 7, or even Level 8 programmes - a person can apply for entry onto year 3 of a 4-year degree programme e.g. Bachelor’s degree in Supply Chain


Management to continue their studies. Little public knowledge of how the industry operates or of associated rewarding careers is one of the main reasons why people do not consider it as a career choice. Changing perceptions The LAA programme has started changing that perception, a lot of time and effort has been put into promoting the sector to the younger generation by increased engagement with Career Guidance Professionals at secondary schools and attending various career, apprenticeship and job fairs events across the country. It is vital to promote the sector to the younger generation and attract new entrants, the industry has a lot to offer in terms of career opportunities, well paid jobs in a high level of job security sector ‘goods will always have to be moved and there are numerous office based roles associated with managing this process throughout’, explains Anna. Key benefits of the apprenticeship for employers: - Upskilling opportunities for existing employees - Build loyalty amongst staff - Offers career progression opportunities - Help with succession planning - The programme is built around work related experience and work specific projects - Attracts new entrants into the sector Benefits for Apprentices: - Level 6 Award ‘Higher Certificate in Logistics’ - Earning while learning - Gaining valuable on the job experience - Accessing the Third level Education - Clear ladder of progression The programme has already been recognised and won the 2019 ‘Innovation Award at Fleet Transport Awards and ‘Logistics & Transport Team of the Year Award’ at the Irish Logistics & Transport Awards 2019. This helps in raising awareness and gaining recognition for the industry. For more information please visit www.laa.ie or contact Anna Gorecka on 01 8447516 or email agorecka@laa.ie. Education 17


CAO 2021

Think Mary Immaculate College IF you’re looking for career focussed degrees, a vibrant student scene, both on and off campus, along with a supportive learning environment look no further than Mary Immaculate College. According to Dr Geraldine Brosnan, Director of Student Life at MIC: “MIC prides itself on our highquality student experience on both our MIC Limerick and MIC Thurles campuses. "Part of our mission and vision is to create a community of scholars where staff and students work together and our aim is to provide services, activities, and resources that maintain the College’s educational enterprise while also supporting our students personally as they learn, grow, and change through their time at MIC.” Over 25 years MICs programmes include a Bachelor of Arts programme that has been running for over 25 years and

offers students the chance to choose from 13 subjects. The innovative BA in Contemporary and Applied Theatre Studies offers a mix of academic and practical learning with students having access to the beautiful 500-seater Lime Tree Theatre situated on the MIC Limerick campus. MIC’s BA in Early Childhood Care and Education is an exciting and challenging programme for those interested in working with young children. Range of programmes The College also offers a range of programmes in primary and postprimary school teaching. Two new programmes have were added to the MIC offering in 2020, namely the Bachelor of Education – International (MI004) at MIC Limerick and the Bachelor in Education, Mathematics and Business Studies (MI014) at MIC Thurles.

Speaking about the calibre of the p ro g r a m m e s o n o ff e r a t M I C Thurles, Dr Finn Ó Murchú, Head of School of Education (Post-Primary) "Built on noted: “We have a wonderful promoting a teacher preparation programme here caring learning in MIC Thurles, which is built on environment promoting a caring learning environthat fosters ment that fosters students’ talents students’ and goals by ensuring high quality talents and teaching, learning and assessment goals by experiences. ensuring high "The success of our approach is quality evidenced by the recent statistics teaching, that show approximately 90% of learning and MIC Thurles graduates successfully assessment secured teaching positions within the experiences" first year following graduation.” Applicant assistance Those thinking of applying to MIC should also note that there are a range of entrance scholarships, elite sports scholarships and a CAO Points Concession Scheme on offer. For more go to www.mic.ie Education 19


Cracking

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PICTURE the scene. You are the Principal of a school and you prepare to travel there after breakfast one morning but you see that the school’s Twitter account is posting strange messages. You start to receive queries from parents and you contact the IT manager. She informs you that the website is not accessible and that she cannot access the school network through her devices. On arrival at the school, administration staff informs you that all the screens are blue and are showing a request for payment of money. You realise you have been the target of a cyberattack and you need cyber security professional expertise to deal with it. This is a made up scenario but shows that even a school can be a target for cybercriminals and cybercrime.

digital world. Cyber security therefore seeks to protect both your data and your devices, and empowers you to make informed decisions about trusting others in the online world.

Can you explain cyber security? Cyber security is about protecting ourselves online. The Internet with its online platforms and social media offerings empowers us to connect to share experiences, to purchase goods and services to learn and have fun. The Internet was built to be open and interoperable and those who designed it overlooked the dark side of human nature. Online fraud, scams, defacing of web content, blocking access, impersonation via account hijacking, misinformation, stealing money or your personal data or even your device’s computing power are just some of the dangers known as threats that arise in our

How much more relevant or important is cybersecurity going to become in the coming years? In line with the digitalisation of our society, as everything becomes connected and machine to machine communication via 5G telecommunications networks takes place, we need to be assured that our data is confidential, that our infrastructure works as intended and that digital services remain available. Cyber security is about looking after what is important to us, namely our confidentiality, integrity and availability as a digital society. As long as there’s ingenuity, inno-

Can you explain the National Cyber Security Strategy 20192024 which you oversee? In a nutshell, the Strategy has 3 key objectives – protecting us, developing our capabilities to better manage the challenges and working together at both national level and internationally. I’m particularly focused on skills development aspects within cyber security. Previously I had worked as an expert in the European Commission focused on building up cyber security capabilities in the Member States of the European Union.


Cybersecurity James Caffrey works on implementing the National Cyber Security Strategy at the Department of Communications, Climate Action and Environment. He explains in detail what cyber security is and the important role it’s going to play in years to come. vation, agitation, protest, conflict and crime, and for so long as we use information communications technology, cyber security issues will be with us. What types of jobs can people get into if cyber security appeals to them? H i s t o r i c a l l y, c y b e r s e c u r i t y emerged from experience with IT security and so those with IT skillsets are well placed to avail of the opportunities arising. Those now involved in developing IT networks, systems administration and coding are now engaged in applying key cyber security principles such as network defence-in-depth and security by design computing. For those with a computer science background, you can work as cyber security analysts and consultants in undertaking security assessments, consultancy advice provision, organisational risk management, network defence, incident response, network investigations and forensic computing. Given that cyber security is about behaviour as much as about specialist computer science expertise, those interested in psychology, public relations and communications and crisis management can also find exciting careers. Awareness raising of good cyber security hygiene and role playing through cyber exercises help increase our preparedness and that of our organisations to be more resilient and be better able to withstand cyber incidents.

What type of STEM subjects should students consider if they want to get into cybersecurity? Those with aptitudes for problem solving and mathematical reasoning will have a head start. If you like mathematics and computer science cyber security is definitely worth "For those with considering. Those students interested in science and behavioural a computer aspects can also consider the human science dimension.Cyber is not just for the background, you can work ‘nerds’. Effective communication skills, a willingness to network and as cyber co-operate with others are all essensecurity tial attributes for cyber security analysts and consultants in teams in society. undertaking How might careers progress security for people who get into assessments, cybersecurity? consultancy There are a variety of roles for advice those involved in cyber security. provision, organisational These vary from compliance oriented auditing and risk assessment to cyber risk management, security operations involving security incident and event monitoring with network security operations centres. defence, Organisations need to defend incident what is critical to them through response, identifying critical assets and improvnetwork investigations ing resilience and security as part of their risk management. and forensic Those involved generally need to computing: be networking together with their peers, which does need to involve face to face meetings if trust has to be established for secure information sharing as part of the cooperation aspect to cyber security work. This generally takes place through conferences and seminars.

CHOOSING subjects to study in school and courses to do at third level can be tricky. Figuring out what career you want to do can be overwhelming. At smartfutures.ie, we want to help you discover the STEM subjects and careers that might be right for you. You have the opportunity to discover what types of STEM careers are available and hear from people who work in STEM related jobs. You will see the wide range of careers available, discover the people that are working in STEM ,the organisations they’re working in and what their interests and skills are. We have helpful tools and resources for parents, teachers and students in our Explore and Discover section. Discover whether your interests and skills could lead you to a career in STEM at smartfutures.ie. Smart Futures is coordinated and managed by Science Foundation Ireland (SFI), in partnership with over 200 organisations from research and academia. SFI is committed to engaging the Irish public in science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM). The website aims to provide career resources to students, teachers, guidance counsellors and parents and stimulate an interest in STEM subjects in secondary and third level. Education 21


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This course offers a broad introduction to the field of Psychology and its major sub-disciplines. Over 3 years (or 4 year part-time) learners engage with the core areas in psychology including developmental, social, and cognitive psychology, abnormal psychology and psychotherapy and neuropsychology.

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22 Education

01 230 0080

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Level 8 Full Time/Part Time

Designed for learners who wish to embark on a career in Montessori Teaching and Early Years Education and Care (ECEC), this course incorporates Montessori pedagogy and philosophy with the core knowledge and skills necessary to work in the early childhood sector. *This course is not recognised by the Teaching Council, but can provide an alternative route to Primary Teaching should students pursue aPME after graduating from SNMCI.

Important Dates to Remember at SNMCI 16 October 2020

Places Available ‘20/’21 Application Deadline

8 April 2021

Virtual Open Evening

12 November 2020

Virtual Open Evening

1 August 2021

‘21/’22 Application Deadline

Education 23


Careers in the Irish Defence Forces THE Irish Defence Forces is the military of Ireland. We encompass the Army, the Naval Service, the Air Corps and the Reserve Defence Forces. The Army is a standing force and provides the primary capabilities for joint military operations at home and combined military Peace Support Operations abroad. The Naval Service is the State's principal seagoing agency with a general responsibility to meet contingent and actual maritime defence requirements. It is tasked with a variety of defence and other roles. The role of the Air Corps under the Defence Act is to contribute to the security of the State by providing for the Military Air Defence of its airspace. Defence Forces personnel lead a "Life less Ordinary". No two days are the same in the lives of our personnel. All aspects of military life are varied and for each member of the Force each day may bring a new challenge. WHO WE LOOK FOR? General Service Recruitment The Irish Defence Forces are looking for motivated, physically fit, team orientated individuals to enlist as General Service Recruits. As a recruit, you will train to become an infantry soldier. On completion of the initial training program, successful recruits 24 Education

are promoted to the rank of Private 2*. Following a second period of basic training, applicants are promoted to the rank of Private 3*. Applicants should have: • The ability to work in disciplined military environment. • The ability to work with others in a team. • The ability to work well in a high pressure and physically demanding environment. • Be willing to serve aboard for extended periods of time. • Be a minimum of 18 years of age and under 25 years of age on the date deemed as the closing date for applications. On qualification recruits take up a position as a three star private in one of the following Service Corps — Infantry, Artillery, Cavalry, Supply & Transport or Communications Information Systems. After basic training, opportunities exist to undertake further training as anything from a heavy vehicle driver, to a chef, vehicle mechanic, armourer, IT technician, combat engineer, emergency medical technician and many other roles. Officer Cadetships The Defence Forces are also looking to enlist Officer Cadets. A Cadet is a Military Officer in training. Officers are the leaders, decision makers and managers of the

"The Irish Defence Forces are looking for motivated, physically fit, team orientated individuals to enlist as General Service Recruits"

Defence Forces. They are the platoon commanders in our Army, the pilots in our Air Corps, and the navigators and engineers in our Naval Service. An Officer leads, directs and motivates our frontline troops. The role comes with very real mental and physical challenges, with Officers being expected to lead from the front in all situations. Officer Cadets engage in 15 months training in the Military College, Curragh Camp, Kildare, covering many basic and practical soldier skills and military fields of study before taking up an operational appointment in the Permanent Defence Forces. The Defence Forces is looking for people who have the potential to: • Plan, prioritize and organise. • Analyse problems, in order to generate appropriate solutions. • Be clear, concise and with effective communication skills. • The ability to motivate others and work with a team. Can you do all of this while working in a very high pressure, mentally and physically demanding environment? After completing Officer training, cadets are commissioned into a Service Corp — Infantry, Artillery, Cavalry, Supply & Transport or Communications Information Systems. As a young Officer many more opportunities for development,


growth, variety and responsibility will come your way. Applicants must be 18 years of age or over and under 26 years of age on the date mentioned in the notice for the current competition. Trainee Military Aircraft Technician We also look to enlist Trainee Military Aircraft Technicians. The successful applicants will serve a 4 year apprenticeship program and will become Aircraft Technicians in our Air Corps. Technicians provide the maintenance and servicing of Air Corps aircraft, their engines, systems, equipment and weapons. The Air Corps is looking for young, enthusiastic and technically minded individuals who are looking for the opportunity not just to learn a new trade but also to practice it in chall e n g i n g s i t u a t i o n s . Tr a i n e e Technicians undergo their academic training at the Technical Training School, located in Casement Aerodrome, the home of the Air Corps. All Candidates must be 18 years of age and less than 23 years of age on the closing date for receipt of applications. WHEN DO WE RECRUIT? We normally recruit General Service Recruits in March and September. We advertise the Cadet Competition in January/February for induction in September. We also advertise for Air Corps Trainee Military Aircraft Technicians in January/February for induction in September WHEN AND HOW TO APPLY? All applications are made by completing the online application on our website. The online application is only available when we are running a recruitment competition. We do

NOT accept applications outside these times. WHAT IS THE TRAINING LIKE? General Service Recruit The training for General Service Recruits is initially for 15 weeks. The Recruit Training Syllabus is designed to produce a physically fit, disciplined and motivated Two Star Infantry Soldier with basic military skills. Recruit training is foundation military training. It is followed by 3 Star training and at a later stage by Trained Soldier Specialist Training courses. Recruits may be required to complete their training in any Defence Forces location and following their training, may be posted to any Defence Forces location subject to Defence Forces requirements. Once training is successfully completed the fully trained soldier will be sent to their allocated unit. Cadetships Cadets train for a total of 15 months. The training is conducted in the Military College, Defence Forces Training Centre, Co. Kildare. The purpose of cadet training is to develop character and leadership skills and instil a sense of duty and responsibility in the cadet. To benefit from that training, which is conducted in an environment of strict discipline, the cadet needs mental acuity and physical agility. During training an Army Cadet masters basic military skills, such as rifle marksmanship, as well as developing the leadership skills required of an Army Officer. Air Corps and Naval Service Cadets also undertake leadership and foundation military training before specialising as pilots, navigators or engineers. On commissioning the new Officer takes up a leadership position in one of the Army Corps.

"The Recruit Training Syllabus is designed to produce a physically fit, disciplined and motivated Two Star Infantry Soldier with basic military skills"

"The purpose of cadet training is to develop character and leadership skills and instil a sense of duty and responsibility in the cadet"

Third Level Education Personnel of the Army, who were inducted as an Officer Cadet and successfully completed their Officer Cadet training and who have not previously attained an Honours Bachelor Degree (Level 8 of the National Framework of Qualifications) or equivalent may be assigned to a course of study leading to a degree at National University of Ireland, Galway or a course of study leading to a degree at some other third level college of education. On completion of the first year of training, Naval Service cadets spend the second year of the cadetship studying for a degree at the National Maritime College of Ireland. Trainee Military Aircraft Technicians Tr a i n e e M i l i t a r y A i r c r a f t Technicians initially complete basic military training of seven months duration before commencing their technical training. In total their training takes approximately 4 and a half years and is completed at the Air Corps Technical Training School, Casement Aerodrome, Baldonnel. The Air Corps Technical Training School is EASA (European Aviation S a f e t y A g e n c y ) a p p ro v e d a n d approved by DIT (Dublin Institute of Technology) to deliver the Bachelor of Engineering Technology Degree in M i l i t a r y Av i a t i o n Te c h n o l o g y. Through these programmes the trainee technicians will be instructed in all disciplines of aircraft maintenance including fixed and rotary wing aircraft, power plant and avionics. The EASA modules (Theory and Workshop Practical’s) and their associated examinations are completed entirely, prior to the trainees’ advancement through advanced access onto the Bachelor Engineering Technology Degree in Military Aviation Technology.

For more information on careers in the Irish Defence Forces visit www.military.ie/en/careers/army-careers/how-to-join/ Education 25


Reference Guide Briefing

The DARE route to THE Disability Access Route to Education (DARE) is a third level alternative admissions scheme for school leavers whose disabilities have had a negative impact on their second level education. DARE offers reduced points places to school leavers who, as a result of having a disability, have experienced additional educational challenges in second level education. DARE is for school leavers with a disability under the age of 23 as of 1 January 2020, who have been educationally impacted as a result of that disability. Applicants to DARE can present with an Irish Leaving Certificate, A-Levels and other EU qualifications. Mature students and students applying on the basis of Further Education and Training (FET) results have different admission routes. You can get further information on these routes from college and university websites. Is DARE for me? If you have one or more of the disabilities listed on the accesscollege.ie site and your disability has had a negative impact on your second level education, then you should apply to DARE. To be eligible for DARE, you must meet both the evidence of disability criteria and educational impact criteria.

Reduced Points If you apply to DARE and meet the application criteria (that is, are deemed eligible for DARE), you may be offered a place even if you do not have enough Leaving Certificate points for your preferred course. Each participating college and university has a reserved number of places to offer eligible DARE applicants at lower or reduced Leaving Certificate points. An example of a reduced points offer is that the Leaving Certificate points for a particular course is 366 points. An eligible DARE applicant could be offered a place with a lower points score, e.g. 356 points. This applicant would also, like all other applicants applying to college, need to meet the minimum entry requirements and any specific programme requirements before being considered for a DARE reduced points offer. The reduction in points for DARE places can vary every year. The number of points a particular course is reduced by is dependent on a number of factors, such as • The overall number of places on the course. • The number of reserved DARE places on the course. • The number of DARE eligible applicants competing for these reserved places. Information on the number of

"Each participating college and university has a reserved number of places to offer eligible DARE applicants at lower or reduced Leaving Certificate points"

Editorial source: accesscollege.ie

Participating colleges ■ Athlone Institute of Technology ■ Cork Institute of Technology ■ Dublin City University ■ TU Dublin ■ Dundalk Institute of Technology ■ Galway Mayo Institute of Technology ■ Institute of Art, Design and Technology Dun Laoghaire ■ Institute of Technology Carlow ■ Institute of Technology Tralee ■ IT Sligo ■ Limerick Institute of Technology ■ Letterkenny Institute of Technology 26 Education

■ Marino Institute of Education ■ Mary Immaculate College ■ Maynooth University ■ National College of Ireland ■ National University of Ireland, Galway ■ Pontifical University Maynooth ■ Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland ■ St Angela’s College, Sligo ■ Trinity College Dublin ■ University College Cork ■ University College Dublin ■ University of Limerick ■ Waterford Institute of Technology

reduced points places available per course and the method used by colleges for selecting eligible DARE students for those places is available on HEI websites and on each of the participating colleges’ page on the accesscollege.ie site. Prioritisation of Applicants Eligible for both DARE & HEAR Research has shown that students with disabilities from disadvantaged backgrounds face the greatest obstacles when it comes to progression to higher education. In order to increase the numbers of students facing this ‘double disadvantage’, colleges participating in DARE and HEAR have agreed to prioritise this group when allocating reduced points places. Prioritisation of Eligible DARE Applicants with a Physical or Sensory Disability Research has identified that students with physical and sensory (Blind/ Vision Impairment and Deaf/ Hard of Hearing) disabilities are particularly underrepresented in higher education in Ireland relative to all students with disabilities. In order to increase the numbers of DARE students with physical and sensory disabilities being admitted to higher education, the DARE colleges have agreed to prioritise these two groups when allocating reduced points places. College Supports You don’t have to be eligible for DARE to get support in college. All students with a verified disability, regardless of whether they come through DARE or not, can avail of a variety of academic, personal and social supports while studying at third level. College supports may include: • Orientation programmes. • Learning support. • Assistive technology. • Library support. • Exam accommodations.


Longitudinal: Total number of eligible HEAR applications

Reference Guide Briefing

5000

4112

3693

4000

3266 2782

66.0%

4276 69.8%

4221 69.4%

4287 69.3%

64.9%

61.0%

third level access 3000

Final number eligible

53.9%

2279

Final number ineligible

53.9%

2376

2000

46.1%

1950 46.1%

2086 39.0%

1944 35.1%

2119 34.0%

1851

2014

2015

1000

2010

2011

2012

2013

30.2%

1859 30.6% 2016

1899 30.7% 2017

Figure1: Based on Table 1.18 Longitudinal: Total number of eligible HEAR applications.

Longitudinal: Total number of eligible DARE applications 3,542

4000

3,076

3500

2,538

3000

2,284

2500 2000 1500 1000 500

1,279 948

59.2%

51.6%

888

48.4% 2010

881

1,515 63.2%

882

1,728

78.2%

67.8%

Final number eligible

66.8%

859

36.8%

33.2%

2012

2013

75.2%

79%

1086 32.8%

1166 735

819

24.7%

21.8%

21%

2015

2016

2017

Final number ineligible

40.8% 2011

2014

Source: DARE | HEAR FACTS AND FIGURES REPORT Summary 2018

Figure 2: BasedSupport on Table 2.18 Longitudinal: Total eligible DARE applications. of courses, it is useful to discuss any authorities (e.g.number NationalofUniversity • Educational Worker. • Academic tuition. • Disability Access Map

4| Check AHEAD AHEAD provides information to students and graduates with disabilities, teachers, guidance counsellors and parents on disability issues in education. AHEAD undertake national research relating to the inclusion of students with disabilities, contribute to national policy forums and provide professional development opportunities to develop the capacity of staff in FET and higher education to be more inclusive. See www.ahead.ie. Language Waivers Applying to DARE and applying for a language waiver are two separate processes. Therefore, DARE applicants who require a language waiver but haven’t yet applied for one need to apply to the relevant

questions or concerns you may have "Students with with the Disability/Access Service in disabilities and the college in which you are interDARE | HEAR F A C T S A N D F I G U R E S R e p o r t S u m m a r y 2 0 1 8 specific ested. learning difficulties can Financial Assistance and SUSI follow their Students applying to DARE are route to college encouraged to find out more inforwith the mation on the maintenance grant. Disability Additional information on other Access Map." Fitness to Practice sources of financial assistance for Students on most professional third level students is available at health/ teaching courses are required www.studentfinance.ie. to complete a medical declaration form confirming they do not have a Comprehensive information on disability/ significant on-going illness the DARE scheme is available that may delay or prevent them at www.accesscollege.ie. starting or completing the professional programme. If you are applying for these type of Ireland, Trinity College Dublin, University of Limerick, etc.). Further information on applying for language waivers is available on the accesscollege.ie site. If there is a language requirement in the specific programme requirements for your chosen course, you must have that language.

Education 27


in 2017). Of these, 36,034 graduates came from universities, with a response rate of 54%. A total of 1,411 graduated from colleges, with a response rate of 23%. A further 24,702 graduated from institutes of technology and the survey response rate was 48%. Individual institutional response rates are provided in Appendix 1.

REFERENCE GUIDE BRIEFING

Figure 1.1: Graduate Population – Institution Type and Response Rate 70,000

100%

60,000

90%

62,147

80%

50,000

Graduate Outcomes

70%

40,000

60%

54% 36,034

30,000

28

24,702

23%

30% 20%

10,000

10%

1,411

0

0%

COLLEGES

INSTITUTES OF TECHNOLOGY

TOTAL

Graduate Population Survey Response Overall, 82% of the total population came from full-time programmes, withRate 17% from part-time programmes and 1% from remote programmes, as shown in Figure 1.2.

Figure 1.2: Graduate Population – Mode of Study and Institution Type

16%

84%

UNIVERSITIES

Section 1: Graduate Population 12% 88% and Response Rates COLLEGES [continued] INSTITUTES OF TECHNOLOGY

19%

78%

Gender ALL HEIs Introduction

[continued]

Full-time

Part-time

Remote

Total

56%

41%

50%

54%

25%

COLLEGES

Colleges

22%

33%

N/A

23%

47%

49%

41%

48%

INSTITUTES OF

52%

HIGHER EDUCATION AUTHORITY GRADUATE OUTCOMES SURVEY – CLASS OF 2018

There little variation in response –rates survey gender, with a 52% response rate for males Figureis1.4: Graduate Population Fieldtoofthe Study andby Institution Type and a 50% response rate for females (see Table 1.2). Table 1.2: Response Rates –15% Gender10% and Institution UNIVERSITIES 9% 24% Type

57%

Colleges

All the infographics are from the HEA's Graduates Outcomes Report report. www.hea.ie 28 Education

48%

All Institutions 52% 44% 42% 51% The most popular area of study for graduates was Business, Administration and Law, with 25% of all graduates. The next most popular47% area was Health and Welfare (16%), followed 53% by Arts and ALL HEIs Humanities (14%) and Engineering, Manufacturing and Construction (10%). Figure 1.4 shows the most popular areas of study by sector. In the institutes of technology and the universities, the most 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% popular field of study was Business, Administration and Law at 26% and 24% respectively. In the college sector, the majority of graduates studied Education the remainder studying Male (57%), with Female Arts and Humanities (42%) and ICT (1%).

Universities COLLEGES

Denise Frawley, Valerie Harvey, Victor Pigott and Modesta Mawarire (Statistics Unit)

75%

Institutes of Technology

FieldTECHNOLOGY of Study

A report by the Higher Education Authority

56%

44%

Universities

June 2020

1%

A total of 53% of the0%total population were female, with 47% male. As shown in Figure 1.3, the gender 100% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% balance between males and females varies according to sector. In the universities, 56% of graduates Full-Time Part-Timeof technology, Remote while in the college are female and this compares to 48% of females in the institutes sector, 75% of graduates are female. Response rates vary by mode of study. Response rates for full-time graduates were 52%, compared GRADUATE OUTCOMES SURVEY Class ofand 2018 with 44% for part-time graduates 42% for remote graduates,Type as shown in Table 1.1. However, it Figure 1.3: Graduate Population – Gender and Institution should be noted that overall remote graduate numbers are small. UNIVERSITIES

CLASS OF 2018

3%

17%

82%

Table 1.1: Response Rates – Mode of Study and Institution Type

Graduate Outcomes Survey

50% 40%

20,000

UNIVERSITIES Mode of Study

What becomes of graduates after graduation?

51%

48%

INSTITUTES OF 10% Institutes of Technology TECHNOLOGY

26%

7%

9%

All Institutions 7%

TOTAL 0%

14% 10%

6% 20%

25% 30%

40%

10%

7%

17%

Male

Female

Total

54%

42% 53%

54%

19%

24%

23%

GRADUATE OUTCOMES SURVEY Class of 2018

49%15%

16% 47%

52%

50%

9% 50%

6%

60%

7%

10% 70%

11%

51% 16%

80%

48%

90%

5% 100%

Education Arts and humanities Business, administration and law

Social sciences, journalism and information Natural sciences, mathematics and statistics

Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs)

Engineering, manufacturing and construction

Agriculture, forestry, fisheries and veterinary

Health and welfare

Services

Table 1.3 shows that the highest overall response rate to the survey was gathered from graduates of Natural Sciences, Mathematics and Statistics (57%), while the lowest response rates came from Education graduates (43%). In universities, the highest response rates came from graduates of Engineering, Manufacturing and Construction (61%). The lowest university response rates came

29


Section 2:

Main Graduate Destination

Figure 1.5: Graduate Population – Programme Type and Institution Type 54%

UNIVERSITIES

% Difference from Average Graduate Earnings by LC Maths Grade

11%

30%

4%

11%

51%

5%

8%

-1.8%

Masters Taught

Masters Research

Doctorate

Total

40% Universities

58%

42%

52%

47%

50%

54%

Colleges 30%

19%

33%

32%

49%

42%

54%

42%

6%

1%

0%

42%

55%

50%

50%

1%

1%

1%

HD2

-6.2%

HD3

-8.3%

HFail 4.4%

-4.7%

OA2

-5.0%

OB1

49%

5%

4%

3%

OB3 OC1

-6.6%

OC2

Introduction [continued]

In terms of honours degree graduates working abroad, the most common countries include -9.9% OC3 Great Britain (25%), the United States (16%), Canada (11%), United Arab Emirates (6%) and -8.9% OD1graduated from Arts and Humanities courses, Spain (4%). Of those working overseas, 21% while a further 20% graduated-6.8% from Health OD2and Welfare related programmes.

48%

38% 4%

-6.7% -7.3%

51%

Taking into account the response ratesDUE above, the responses were weighted accordingOTHER to institution, WORKING WORKING TO ENGAGED IN ENGAGED IN UNEMPLOYED level of study andFULLmode of study. inAthe sections follow will weightings PART-TIME ANDindicate LOOKINGwhere ACTIVITY PART- The text START FULL-TIMEwhich TIME TIME JOB WITHIN FURTHER FURTHER FOR WORK are used in the analysis. The weightings are designed to give more accurate sample parameters THE NEXT 3 STUDY OR STUDY OR compared to the population than unweighted MONTHS data. TRAINING TRAINING

Section 3: Level 6 & 7 Graduates [continued] 2018

HD1

-6.6%

OA1

30%

N/A8

11% 13%

HC3

-2.5%

-7.1% Degrees OB2 Section 4: Honours Graduates [continued]

PG Diploma

6%

0.0%

HC2

21%

Honours Degree

Institutes 20%of Technology

1.9%

HC1

72% 71%

All Institutions 10%

1.3%

HB3

Table 1.4: Response Rates – Programme Type and Institution Type8 50%

7.4%

HB2

Figure rates 2.1: Most of All 2018 2017 Graduates Response to theImportant survey varyActivity by programme type, and a selected number of which are shown in Table 1.4. The response rate for honours degree graduates was 54%, while response rate for 80% postgraduate degrees was 49% overall.

60%

10.1%

HB1

As shown in Figure 2.1, there has been an increase in employment rates for graduates since the class of 2017, from 78% to 80%. Related to this, there has been a decrease in the proportion of 2018 0% 10% 20% 30% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% graduates in full-time study (from 13% for 201740% graduates to 11% for 2018 graduates). Furthermore, Other Undergraduate Degree Undergraduate Degree there has been a Ordinary one percentage point reductionHonours in those unemployed and looking forProgrammes work (from Postgraduate and point Diploma Masters Masters Researchactivity and PhD(from 5% to 4%) and a further one Certificate percentage reduction for Taught those engaged in another 4% to 3%).

70%

11.6%

HA2

Introduction [continued]

ALL HEIs

24.8%

HA1

Graduates of 2018 were asked what activities they were engaged in on 31st March 2019, and 5% 8%that they 17% COLLEGES to indicate the single activity that was most68% important to them and all activities were engaged in. Considering the single activity that was most important to graduates across all surveyed populations and fields of study, 80% were working or due to start work (72.4% fullINSTITUTES OF 29% 47% 8% time, 6.4% part-time and 1.3% due to start); 13% were engaged in further study 11% (11.5%4%full-time TECHNOLOGY and 1.1% part-time), 4% were unemployed; and 3% were engaged in a range of other activities.

2017

-8.9%of employment OD3 Figure 4.6 illustrates the sector for employed honours degree graduates. In total, 15% of such graduates were working -0.7% in human OFail health and social work activities, nine months after graduation. There is some notable variation across the sectors, with 18% of university, 12% of 7.6% Unknown institute of technology and 1% of college graduates working in this sector. The least popular sectors -20.0% -10.0% and fishing 0.0%and transportation 10.0% 20.0% with 1% 30.0% included agriculture, forestry and storage, of graduates 40.0% employed in each, across all sectors.

Figure 4.6: Honours Degree Graduates in Employment – Sector

Graduates were also asked about all the activities they were involved in, and this gave the graduates Figure 3.2: Most of 2018 and 2017 6 &simultaneously. 7 Graduates A total of 11% the opportunity toImportant indicate thatActivity they could be working and Level studying said they were both working and studying. This compares to 6% of 2017 graduates who indicated 70% the same response.

Introduction [continued] 60%

64%

8

40%rates for masters research and doctoral graduates in colleges are not provided due to low numbers in these categories. Response 30% GRADUATE OUTCOMES SURVEY Class of 2018

27%

20%

9% 9% 3% 2% 2% 2% <0.5%<0.5% 0% GRADUATE OUTCOMES SURVEY Class of 2018 WORKING WORKING DUE TO ENGAGED IN ENGAGED IN UNEMPLOYED FULLPARTSTART A FULL-TIME PART-TIME AND LOOKING TIME TIME JOB WITHIN FURTHER FURTHER FOR WORK THE NEXT 3 STUDY OR STUDY OR MONTHS TRAINING TRAINING 2018

1%

1%

OTHER ACTIVITY

2017

30%

Figure 3.3 gives the most important activity of 2018 level 6 & 7 graduates according to selected Figure 6& 7 Graduates Employment – Salary fields 3.7: Level of study. The graduates most in likely to be in further study were Generic Programmes and Qualifications (98%) followed by Natural Sciences, Mathematics and Statistics (77%) and Social 35% Sciences, Journalism and Information (68%). It is important to note the relatively low number of graduates in the Generic Programmes and Qualifications, Social Sciences, Journalism and Information 30% and Education categories. 25%

17%

11%

COLLEGES

5% 4%

5%

12%

18%

6%

72%

Employment Outcomes Introduction [continued] 11% 4% 6% 4% 8% TOTAL 33

14%

11%

6%

11% 15% 8% GRADUATE OUTCOMES SURVEY Class of 2018

In terms of the type of Degree employment for honours degree graduates, the vast majority (91%) Figure 4.4: Honours Graduates in Employment – Occupation were employees, 6% were on a graduate internship/placement and 3% were self-employed. In terms of contract type, over half of honours graduates (55%) were on permanent or open-ended UNIVERSITIES 60% 12% 7% 9% contracts, 25% were on fixed term contracts lasting 12 months, 10% were on fixed term contracts lasting less than 12 months and 9% were in temporary employment. INSTITUTES OF

6% 20% 7% 5% 8% 10% FigureTECHNOLOGY 4.7 illustrates the salary bands of39% honours degree graduates nine months after graduation for all respondents and for respondents excluding those who would rather not say. While 24% would rather not say, 20% were earning between €25,000 and €29,999 per year. A further 63% 4% 4% 4% 11% 8% 5% COLLEGES 18% were earning between €30,000 and €34,999. This increased to 26% and 23% respectively when those who would prefer not to say are excluded from the analysis. For information on the variation between sectors, see Appendix 5.

<0.5%

<0.5% <0.5%

30%

40%

50%

60%

Skilled trades occupations

70%

80%

90%

100%

Professional occupations

Associate professional and technical occupations Graduate Reflections Introduction [continued]

Administrative and secretarial occupations

Caring, leisure and other service occupations

Graduates were asked how likely or unlikely it is that they would study the same course again. Sales and customer service occupations Process, plant and machine operatives A total of 69% of honours degreeoccupations graduates said Postdoctoral that they were ‘likely’ or ‘very likely’ to study Elementary researchers I don't know/unknown the same course again, with some variation noted across sector (see Figure 4.12).

79 -€ 0

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10% of 2018 20% GRADUATE OUTCOMES0% SURVEY Class

Managers, directors and senior officials

99 €8 0, 00 0 ID I A + I’D PO M I RA S N TH ITIO AN N ER N O T SA Y

1% 2%

1% 2%

62

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99

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00

0

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00

0

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49

,9

99

4% 5%

4% 5%

99 -€ 0 00 5,

€5

99

,9

,9

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1% 1%

14%

17%

14%

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0

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SectionTOTAL 4: Honours Degrees Graduates15%[continued] 4% 52% 7% 5% 9%

10%

12%

15% 6% 8%

,9 24 -€

0

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4% 6%

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20%

Education graduates were most likely to be in employment or due to start a job (63%), followed by20% Services (47%) and Engineering, Manufacturing and Construction (35%) graduates. 15%

4%

This section will outline the employment outcomes for graduates of honours degree programmes. As previously described, in10% total, 75% degree 50% graduates in employment (either full0% 20% of honours 30% 40% 60% were70% 80% 90% 100% time, part-time or due toAgriculture, start a job in the in Figure 4.4, of those who Construction forestry andnext fishingthree months). Industry As shown were in employment, over half (52%) of such graduates were in professional occupations, with some Wholesale and retail trade Transportation and storage Accommodation andhonours food service activitiesgraduates Information andassociate communication variation across sector. In total, 15% of degree were in professional and Professional, scientific As andmay technical Financial, insurance and real estate activities service technical occupations and 9% were in sales and customer occupations. be activities expected, Administrative and support service activities Public administration and defence only 4% of all honours degree graduates were managers, directors and senior officials, nine months Education Human health and social work activities Other I don't know after graduation.

21%

10%

36

6%

INSTITUTES OF 13% 7% 6% 9% 11% 12% 6% 12% 12% Section 4: Honours Degrees Graduates [continued] TECHNOLOGY

57%

50%

10%

UNIVERSITIES

U

Section 3: Level Graduates [continued] Respondents 6 (%) & 7 Respondents (%) excluding those not indicating

In terms4.12: Honours of location of employment for honours degree graduates, were employed in Ireland Figure Degree Graduates – Study Same Course91% Again and 9% were employed overseas, with a slight variation noted across sectors (see Table 4.1).

The survey asked respondents if they took part in a placement, work experience or internship as part of their course, and if so, for how long. As shown in Table 3.1, over half (51%) of level 6 & 7 graduates participated in 7 some form of placement, work experience or internship. Figure 3.8: Level 6& Graduates in Employment – Relevance of Course to Job

Introduction [continued]

Table50% 3.1: Level 6 & 7 Graduates in Employment – Placement/Work Experience/Internship

46

45%

46%Total

GRADUATE OUTCOMES SURVEY Class of 2018

Yes, 40% this was a mandatory component of my course

48%

35%

Yes, this was an optional component of my course

3%

30%

No, I didn’t do any accredited work placement/work experience/internship

7% Table 4.1: Honours Degree Graduates in Employment – Location of Employment 7%

VERY UNLIKELY

14% Universities

7%

Ireland (inc. Northern Ireland) UNLIKELY

Overseas Total

Colleges

Total

94%

88%

91%

6%

12%

9%

100%

100%

100%

12% 90% 10% 10% 10% 11%

100%

10% 11%

NEITHER LIKELY NOR UNLIKELY

49%

25%

Total

Institutes of Technology

15%

13% 29%

100%

20%

LIKELY

20%

15%

Of those graduates who took part in these activities, 32% 15% indicated that it lasted more than 6 months 10% said it lasted 60 and 31% 11% more than six weeks but less than months. A further 22% took part in a 8% 5% placement/work experience/internship for between four and six months, while 15% indicated that it lasted 0%6 weeks or less. VERY

IRRELEVANT

SOMEWHAT

RELEVANT

VERY

Employed graduates were asked to rate the relevance of their course to their job. As shown in Figure IRRELEVANT RELEVANT RELEVANT 3.8, nearly half of graduates considered their course to be ‘very relevant’ with a further 20% indicating that it was ‘relevant’. In total, 11% of these graduates felt that their course was ‘very irrelevant’ to their current job, nine months after graduation.

Employed graduates were also asked if they felt they needed the qualification they recently obtained to get their job. As shown in Table 3.2, 38% of level 6 & 7 graduates felt that their qualification was a formal requirement. Furthermore, 24% of such graduates felt that while the qualification was not a formal requirement, it gave them an advantage. In total, 19% stated that they were already in the job

31%

30%

35%

GRADUATE OUTCOMES SURVEY Class of 2018

38%

VERY LIKELY

31% 0%

5% Universities

10%

15%

20%

Institutes of Technology

25%

30% Colleges

42%

39% 35%

40%

45%

Total

Education 29

189


30 Education


................................................................................................................................ NEWS

NCAD, IADT and UCD consortium receives €10 million funding for Creative Futures Academy THE Irish Government has awarded a NCAD, IADT and UCD consortium €10 million funding under the Human Capital Initiative (HCI) to establish an academy that will deliver creative education to learners at all stages of their careers. The collaboration – the Creative Futures Academy - aims to accelerate the professional growth and impact of the creative sector in Ireland by preparing graduates from a range of disciplines with sustainable and adaptable skills. It aims to develop a best-practice model of inter-institutional collaboration that may be scaled up and replicated across the regions. The funding was announced by Minister for Further and Higher Education, Research, Innovation and Science, Simon Harris TD as one of 22 projects to share in €197m of funding under the HCI's final stage, which focuses on innovation and skills in the higher education sector. “Together with NCAD’s partners – IADT and UCD – we are delighted to receive this funding award,” said NCAD’s Director, Professor Sarah Glennie. “It places creativ-

ity and creative-thinking at the heart of Ireland’s future and supports an HEI consortium that spans the creative sector to work together with industry towards a shared aim of empowering a dynamic creative sector”. “Crucially though it requires us to develop new skills and equip the next generation with the critical importance to the economy and the workplace of the future.” Higher Education Authority CEO, Dr Alan Wall, has congratulated all of the Higher Education institutions receiving funding under the HCI scheme. “It is great to see the culmination of this process as it represents hundreds of hours of work by the Higher Education Authority working with the Higher Education institutions and our international panel.” IADT President David Smith said the funding for the new academy was: “a significant endorsement and recognition of the value and potential of art, design and media – and the wider arts and humanities – to drive the creative economy and broader innovation agenda.”

Belfield 50 launched BELFIELD 50 marks the five decades since University College Dublin transferred its administration and the faculties of Arts, Commerce and Law from Earlsfort Terrace to join Science on the Belfield campus. To celebrate Belfield 50 includes a timeline exhibition, on display both inside and outside the lower ground floor of the main restaurant; a book Making Belfield, edited by Professor Finola O’Kane Crimmins and Dr Ellen Rowley, published by UCD Press; a photographic exhibition Conveying Space by Daniel Holfeld, on display in the plaza between Newman and Tierney; and a short film, Shaping Belfield, produced by Dr Ellen Rowley.

ETC Consult

Online career assessment WE have been asking our clients for 36 years to finish the following sentence: “I would love a job that………………” The most common responses have been: ……would enable me to help others …...would allow me to use my strengths …...would be interesting …...would offer me a challenge …...would not be the same every day …...would pay well Our new, online Career Fit programme provides our clients with a personalised list of the jobs that will fit those criteria based on their individual mix of interests and aptitudes as well as unfolding job opportunities. What is Career Fit? Career Fit is a scientifically-validated online career assessment created by ETC Consult. At ETC Consult, our Managing Director Pat Shortt and his team have 37 years of experience of using aptitude and interest assessments to help thousands of people find their ideal job and career. If you are looking for a professional, accredited and inexpensive career guidance assessment to help you, or your students or your children to make the best career choice for them, then Career Fit is the optimal approach to take. However, Career Fit not only tells our clients what jobs are right for them - it also describes them and advises on the best ways to get into them. FIND OUT MORE: www.careerfit.com I www.etcconsult.com Education 31


SCFE students step up to a bright future IT’S that time of the year again when school leavers and other adults are planning for next September. The value of Further Education or Post Leaving Certificate courses as an alternative pathway to higher education is now widely understood especially by students who find the Leaving Certificate model of assessment does not work for them. Sallynoggin College of Further Education has a long history of providing courses at QQI Level 5 and Level 6 as well as other industry recognised certification including ITEC, REPS Ireland, The Irish Board of Speech and Drama, IAOT and the State Junior Trade examinations. These qualifications ensure that students have the relevant expertise, skills and experience to gain employment in their chosen field with the option of progressing to higher education if they wish. SCFE College has a truly diverse range of courses on offer, including our newly introduced courses; Pre University Primary and Post Primary Teacher Training, Inclusive Education and Training, Pilates Teacher Training and Musical Theatre and Dance. We are delighted to offer a new traineeship in Pilates Teaching and Sports Therapies for people working in the fitness and wellbeing industries.

Design by Susan Clandillon Fashion Design student 2019/2020

32 Education

Choose what’s right for you, and the staff of Sallynoggin College will be there to help and support you on every step of your journey. Step up to Fashion at SCFE: Keeping it Sustainable SCFE has a long history of success in the area of fashion design, fashion buying, styling and visual merchandising and fashion industry practice. In planning for the future the SCFE Fashion Design department are commitment to teaching ethical and sustainable fashion design. This term our Fashion Design students are working hard to finish their garments for our ‘Step Up’ Fashion Show to be held in the college on 2 April 2020. The show this year looks at stepping up to commit to circular fashion to help against the climate crisis and global warming. Level 5 students are upcycling beach-found clothing, donated by An Taisce’s Clean Coasts collected on Sandycove beach last summer. Former students step up to the future of fashion The success of former SCFE students reflects the quality of the opportunity that choosing a PLC course provides. Jake McGoldrick a SCFE Fashion Design graduate, currently a second y e a r s t u d e n t i n We s t m i n s t e r University was recently shortlisted by Rihanna as one of four fashion design students with the possibility of interning with her Fenty Label in Paris for a year. Recent graduate Sophie Murphy, having progressed to Grafton Academy has become one of the big names in streetwear for women with

her Sewphie label. Multi award winning designer and SCFE graduate Sarah Murphy who specialises in easy-to-wear eveningwear recently made a bespoke dress for Sinead Burke’s Late Late Show appearance. Sinead later posted that she was: “honoured to wear an "These incredible dress by a young Irish qualifications designer”. ensure that Beba Apparel is a Label produced students have by Laura McCormack who went the relevant straight into business producing expertise, festival and leisure-wear as soon as skills and experience to she graduated. Stylist Courtney Smith recently gain featured her own wardrobe in The employment in Gloss magazine, encouraging us to their chosen choose our clothing carefully and to field with the buy for lasting appeal. option of Watch out for Tuul Dovdon who progressing to is launching an ethical and sustainhigher able cashmere collection in the very education if near future. The future is indeed they wish" bright.

Design by Susan Clandillon Fashion Design student 2019/2020

SCFE The International Dimension SCFFE is keen to promote learning at an international level. Our Advanced Early Childhood Care and Education students have just returned from a very exciting and informative trip to Norway with our partner KVT College in Trondheim where they undertook a two-week work experience placement in Norwegian early years education services. This once-in-a-lifetime opportunity has not only greatly improved the professional skills and employment potential of the students involved but has also enhanced their lives in many other ways.

FIND OUT MORE: Check us out at www.scfe.ie for a full list of courses. Contact us: reception@scfe.ie Tel: 01 285 2997 Follow us on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter @ SCFEOfficial


Another group of students from the Advanced Hospitality, Travel & Event Management course have completed a three-week work placement in top hotels and resorts in Tenerife. This experience has ensured that our students have a very attractive CV to present to employers when they graduate this year. In March SCFE hosted a group of Childcare students and their teachers from KVT Trondhiem who spent two weeks in Dublin. Following this SCFE is continuing to expand the international aspect of our programmes by promoting partnerships with other European colleges. And of course if you are a student of fashion you must visit the Paris the home of style. Our Fashion Design Students visited the the Premiere Vision Fabric Trade Fair in Paris in February. Meanwhile the Fashion Industry Practice students travelled to Paris in January to visit “Who’s Next” the ready-to-wear trade show showing the Autumn/Winter collections for 2020/2021. Future proofed SCFE continues to ensure that our courses are up to date, relevant and future proofed to give our students the edge in their chosen field. To find out more visit www.scfe.ie. Apply online at scfe.ie Email: reception@scfe.ie Tel: 01 285 2997

SCFE Students and work colleagues at Hotel Gala Tenerife

Fashion Buying Styling and Visual Merchandising Students prepare for the Photoshoot

LIST OF CERTIFICATE AND DIPLOMA COURSES CREATIVE STUDIES QQI Level 5: Art, Craft & Design - Portfolio Preparation QQI Level 6: Advanced Art & Design QQI Level 5: Photography QQI Level 5: Professional Floristry DANCE/PERFORMING ARTS QQI Level 5: Musical Theatre & Dance QQI Level 5: Performing Arts for Theatre, TV and Film including the Diploma of Associate in Acting Performance QQI Level 6: Advanced Performing Arts FASHION, HAIR & BEAUTY QQI Level 5: Fashion Buying, Styling & Visual Merchandising QQI Level 6: Advanced Fashion Industry Practice QQI Level 5: Fashion Design QQI Level 6: Advanced Fashion Design QQI Level 5 & ITEC: Hairdressing and Beauty Therapy QQI Level 6 & ITEC: Advanced Hairdressing and Beauty Therapy FITNESS, HEALTH AND WELLBEING All Courses recognised for membership of REPS Ireland QQI Level 5 & ITEC: Fitness Instruction & Exercise QQI Level 6 & ITEC: Personal Training and Sports Therapies Including Sports Massage & Physiotherapy Assistant QQI Level 6 & ITEC: Personal Training and Strength & Conditioning QQI Level 5 & ITEC: Yoga Teaching including Wellbeing and Holistic Studies QQI Level 6 & ITEC: Pilates Teaching including Somatic Studies QQI Level 6: & ITEC Traineeship in Pilates Teaching and Sports Therapies CHILDHOOD EDUCTION QQI Level 5: Early Childhood Care and Education with Montessori QQI Level 5: Early Childhood Care and Education including Special Needs Assistant QQI Level 5: Early Childhood Education and Training with Childminding Practice QQI Level 5: Pre University Primary and Post Primary Teacher Training QQI Level 6: Advanced Early Childhood Care and Education QQI Level 6: Advanced Special Needs Assisting SOCIAL STUDIES, YOUTHWORK AND DISABILITY STUDIES QQI Level 5: Social Studies including Criminology and Addiction Studies QQI Level 6: Advanced Social Studies including Advocacy QQI Level 5: Youth Work and Community Development including Criminology and Addiction Studies QQI Level 6: Inclusive Education and Training, Disability Studies and Special Needs Assisting TOURISM & TRAVEL QQI Level 5: Airline and Travel Industry Studies QQI Level 5: Hospitality & Tourism Industry Studies QQI Level 6: Advanced Hospitality, Travel & Event Management

SCFE students taste outdoor life in Trondhiem Norway.

CHECK OUT OUR WEBSITE WWW.SCFE.IE FOR DETAILS Fully funded work experience placements in European countries available for some of our courses

Our QQI Qualifications provide access to Degree courses and/or employment No CAO points required for Leaving Certificate Students Mature students welcome Recognised for SUSI Grant funding available for Social Welfare recipients and exemptions for medical card holders

For more information check us out at www.scfe.ie or email reception@scfe.ie or phone 01 2852997

Applications for September 2021 Open November 2020 Apply on line www.scfe.ie View our brochure online

Sallynoggin College of Further Education is a Constituent College of Dublin & Dún Laoghaire Education & Training Board

Sallynoggin College of Further Education is a Constituent College of Dublin & Dún Laoghaire Education & Training Board

Education 33


Services at Carlow ETB TRAINING Services at Kilkenny and Carlow ETB offer an extensive range of free full time training programmes for young people and adults who wish to develop the skills and competencies that are required for the workplace and/or progression to further education and training opportunities. All of our courses lead to nationally and internationally industry recognised accreditation. Furthermore, many of our courses lead directly into employment. Traineeships A Traineeship is an occupational skills development programme which is designed to provide flexible training solutions to the identified needs of Irish industry and local businesses. Traineeships gives participants the opportunity to develop cutting edge skills and knowledge on-the-job, making them more skilled, more employable and enhancing their career options and enables employers to access a pipeline of talent and learners. Traineeships are structured learning programmes which lead to awards at NFQ levels 4-6. They are between 6-20 months in duration and learners will complete at least 30% of learning on the job. For further information visit www.traineeship.ie Generation Apprenticeships The SOLAS Standards Based Apprenticeship is a system of employment focused training and 34 Education

education which enables an individual to obtain the knowledge, skills and competencies required to perform effectively as a craft person in industry. It also enables the individual to progress through further education and training within the national framework of qualifications leading to a QQI level 6 Advanced Craft Certificate. Apprenticeship has long been an accelerator for individual and corporate development in Ireland. Generation Apprenticeship is a major expansion project to more than double the number of learners of all ages and backgrounds taking the apprenticeship route. This promises to be a huge source of inspiration in opening apprenticeship into a full range of twenty-first century industries and skill sets. SOLAS has the responsibility for promoting and overseeing the training and education of all the apprentices in the current 27 designated crafts. A national standard is delivered for each craft based on the occupational analysis of that craft, written as key learning outcomes and structured in modular format. New Apprenticeships New Apprenticeships are currently available and are being developed in conjunction with SOLAS and lead industrial consortia across a wide range of industries and sectors, some of which include New Apprenticeships will combine

The 27 designated crafts are as follows:

"All of our courses lead to nationally and internationally industry recognised accreditation. Furthermore, many of our courses lead directly into employment"

• Agricultural Mechanics * • Aircraft Mechanics * • Brick and Stonelaying • Carpentry & Joinery • Construction Plant Fitting * • Electrical * • Electrical Instrumentation * • Electronic Security Systems * • Farriery • Floor & Wall Tiling * • Heavy Vehicle Mechanics * • Industrial Insulation • Instrumentation * • Metal Fabrication • Motor Mechanics* • Painting & Decorating * • Pipefitting • Plastering • Plumbing * • Print Media * • Refrigeration & Air Conditioning * • Stonecutting & Stonemasonry • Sheet Metalworking • Toolmaking • Vehicle Body Repairs * • Wood Manufacturing and Finishing • Mechanical Automation and Maintenance - MAMF * * A person wishing to become an apprentice in one of the trades marked * must pass a colour– vision test approved by SOLAS.


In Training Services we run traineeships in the following areas

Culinary Skills

Engineering

Hospitality

Professional Bus and Coach Driving

Software Developer

Van Delivery Driver

Healthcare Assistant

Office Administration

practical on-the-job learning in sponsor companies, with off-the-job training, which will be delivered by the ETBs and/ or recognised training and education providers. This will allow Apprentices to develop technical knowledge through formal qualifications, as well as key workplace skills and competencies through experiential learning. The programmes will lead to QQI awards from level 5 to 9 on the NFQ. The duration of these apprenticeships will range from two to four years, depending on the chosen field of learning and the degree of difficulty involved in meeting the learning outcomes for the particular apprenticeship programme. Community Training The community Training centres (CTC’s) provide training to early school leavers aged between 16 and 21 years, who are most in need of basic vocational training. This training provision is divided between in centre learning and linked work experience. Courses lead to Major awards at QQI Level 3 and 4 or VTCT awards.

New Apprenticeships are currently available and are being developed in conjunction with SOLAS and lead industrial consortia across a wide range of industries and sectors, some of which include: • Accounting Technician, Level 6 • Industrial Electrical Engineer, Level 7 • Commis Chef, Levels 6 • Financial Services, Levels 6-8 • Insurance Practitioner, Level 8 • Manufacturing Engineer, Level 7 • Polymer Processing Technologist, Level 7 • Manufacturing Technician, Level 7 • ICT Network Engineer, Level 6 • ICT Software Developer, Level 6

Our Contact Details: Office: Training Services, Kilkenny and Carlow Education and Training Board, Unit 4 Danville Business Park Kilkenny 056 7813014

www.kcetbtraining.ie Training Centre: Unit K, IDA Business Park, Purcellsinch, Dublin Rd, Kilkenny 056 789456 Education 35


Launch your beauty career WITH graduates including Suzanne Jackson, Rose Connolly, Lyndsey Cavanagh, Michelle Regazzoli (Mrs Make Up) and Jennifer Rock (The Skin Nerd), to name but a few, Blackrock Further Education Institute (BFEI) is justifiable proud of the success of its beauty and make up graduates. International awarding bodies, ITEC and CIDESCO, certify BFEI’s full time, one and two year courses, in a wide range of skill areas including Beauty Therapy, Nail Technician with Eyelash and Eyebrow Treatments, Holistic Therapies and Theatrical, Media and Fashion Make Up Artistry. Excellent working knowledge Using professional product ranges and state-of-the-art equipment, students studying at BFEI will gain an excellent working knowledge of a range of treatments, and will learn the professional skills required for a successful career in this thriving industry. We are proud of our long association with professional skin care company, Dermalogica, and honoured to have been selected as Ireland’s first Dermalogica School of Excellence, in 2019, receiving recognition for training our students in a simulated Salon environment to the highest standard using a wide range of Dermalogica products. Students are also trained to use the Matis skincare range and are provided with an opportunity to compete in the Matis Student of the Year competition each year to win the opportunity to travel on an allexpenses paid trip to the exclusive Matis headquarters in Paris. Holistic and Sports Massage Students on our Holistic and Sports Massage courses study for qualifications in Anatomy and Physiology, Holistic Body Massage, Reflexology, Nutrition, Sports 36 Education

"Students studying at BFEI will gain an excellent working knowledge of a range of treatments, and will learn the professional skills required for a successful career in this thriving industry"

Massage, Aromatherapy, Stone and On-Site Massage. Our Theatrical, Media and Fashion Make Up Artistry course is well established, and we have over time, developed excellent relationships with employers including Inglot, Monroe Recruitment and Benefit Cosmetics. These companies recruit directly from BFEI assured of the quality of graduates who have undertaken a one year full time course. The additional industry standard training provided to students on the course including training in Tanning, Advanced Special SFX, Drag training and hair styling including Up Styling, enhances graduates employment prospects.

Management roles In September 2019, we launched a new one year, full time, course in Salon Management. This course is aimed at students who aspire to management roles within the beauty industry. "This new Course content includes managing initiative seeks clients, scheduling and managing to address the staff, marketing and promotion and current health and safety. This course will recruitment provide graduates with the necessary crisis in the skills and confidence to avail of a Beauty range of management employment Therapy opportunities in the industry. industry and will enable Erasmus opportunities BFEI graduates BFEI has been involved in to avail of the Erasmus+ mobility projects since many 2018. Students from our beauty employment therapy courses are provided with an opportunities opportunity to undertake a 3 week currently work experience placement in 4 and available in 5 star spas and salons in Tenerife, the Spa Spain, in March each year. industry" This year, for the first time, our Make Up students spent three weeks working with a designer in Tenerife to prepare for the Carnival of Santa Cruz de Tenerife, one of the largest carnivals in the word.

Funding is provided to students to cover the cost of flights, accommodation and living expenses, under Erasmus+, the EU's programme to support education, training, youth and sport in Europe and is coordinated by Ireland’s national agency Léargas. Students who have participated have improved both their technical and personal skills and have described it “the experience of a lifetime!” Internship programme Exciting plans are currently underway to develop an internship programme for Beauty Therapy students in partnership with the Irish Spa Association. Second year beauty therapy students attending BFEI will be provided with an opportunity to work in a luxury Spa one day per week while continuing to attend College for the remaining four days to add to the portfolio of qualifications gained in first year. This new initiative seeks to address the current recruitment crisis in the Beauty Therapy industry and will enable BFEI graduates to avail of the many employment opportunities currently available in the Spa industry. There are many benefits to participating in an internship programme including providing students with valuable hands on experience that cannot be obtained in a classroom, increasing their confidence and providing an opportunity to develop and refine both practical and soft skills while networking with professionals in the beauty industry. BFEI is delighted to be involved in this new initiative and we look forward to working with the Irish Spa Association and its partners to offer students the opportunity to participate in this new internship from September 2020.

Visit www.bfei.ie


Education 37


38 Education


..........................................................NEWS

Pembroke College

International School of Health, Beauty and Body Therapy

UCC interim President John O'Halloran and Taoiseach Micheál Martin

Taoiseach visits UCC's Tyndall National Institute TAOISEACH Micheál Martin TD recently visited University College Cork's Tyndall National Institute, one of Europe’s leading ICT research centres. The focus of the visit was a discussion on the ambitious expansion of Tyndall and the official opening of the new Electron Beam Lithography Lab, which is unique in Ireland. The capabilities of the lab allows us to rapidly transition from fundamental research, to prototype

and manufacture with industry. This is a critical enabler for the high-tech industry in Ireland. Tyndall’s expansion plan will see investment of €75M in a campus expansion and new building to accommodate Tyndall’s anticipated doubling in size and impact by 2027. Tyndall is a partnership of University College Cork (UCC) and Government, and has a total income of over €41m per annum.

Considering a career in Beauty and holistic Therapies? We offer Full time & Part time courses leading to ITEC, CIBTAC and CIDESCO Internationally recognised qualifications.

Pembroke Graduates get jobs!!!

Contact us now to secure your future... PEMBROKE COLLEGE, 123 O CONNELL STREET, LIMERICK | ESTD 1987

Ph: 061 410628 | www.pembrokebeautycollege.ie

Committed to providing education and training of the highest quality All our courses range from QQI(FETAC) levels 4, to levels 5 and 6. They are accredited by Quality and Qualifications Ireland (QQI). They are qualifications in themselves but can also be used to progress onto Third Level. NEW Environmental Science (Envir. Science) NEW Pre Emergency Services (Pre Emergency)

We welcome all ages from school leavers to Mature students. PLC Grants; Back to Education Allowances; Vocational Training and Opportunities scheme (VTOS) are available. If you are an early school leaver, unemployed, wanting to upskill, seeking to go on to Third Level - we offer We are situated 5 minutes you a platform. from Kille ster Dart Station which is two stops from Connolly Station.

HERE IS A TASTE OF WHAT WE OFFER: PRE UNI SCIENCE | PHARMACY ASSISTANT | HORTICULTURE ANIMAL SCIENCE | BUSINESS | COMPUTER NETWORKS & CYBER SECURITY CHILDCARE | MONTESSORI | SNA | CARE SUPPORT PRE UNI ARTS | LOGISTICS

Education 39


Post Leaving Cert Courses at QQI Level 5 & 6 • • • • • • • • • •

Applied Social Studies Youth and Community Work *New Applied Psychology Criminology and Psychology *New Childcare/Special Needs Assistant * Nursing Studies Health Service Skills * Pre-Paramedic Fire and Ambulance *New Nutrition, Health and Well Being Pharmacy Assistant

• • • •

Pre-University Arts Pre-University Liberal Arts Pre-University Teaching Pre-University Journalism, Digital Media and Public Relations *New Pre-University Law Pre-University Business Law Pre-University Science/Agricultural Science Pre-University Forensic Science *New Pre-University Environmental Science *New Pre-University Sports and Food Science

• • • • • •

• Pre-University Business • Pre-University Business and Accounting *New • Office Accounts, Administration and Information Processing (Family Friendly Timetable) *New • Online Marketing • Legal and Medical Secretary/Office Administration • Creative Digital Media * • Computer Systems and Networks • Architectural Technology and Design *New • Graphic Design • Media and Film Production

• • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Tourism and Travel * Airline Studies Beauty Therapy * Hairdressing * Animal Care * Horsemanship and Equine Business/Science * Professional Cookery * Sports Management & Coaching * Sports Injury Prevention Physiotherapy Studies *New Music Performance Sound Production Art Portfolio (Fine Art & Design 2D Options) *New Animation * Level 6 Option Offered

• Pre-University Journalism, Digital Media and Public Relations • Pre-University Forensic Science • Pre-University Environmental Science • Pre-University Business and Accounting • Criminology and Psychology • Community and Youth Work • Office Accounts, Administration and Information Processing • Architectural Technology and Design • Physiotherapy Studies • Art Portfolio with Fine Art and Design 2D Options • Pre-Paramedic Fire and Ambulance

APPLY ONLINE - www.dunboynecollege.ie ‘–ƒ…–‘ˆˆ‹…‡‘ǣDunboynecollege@Lmetb.ie‘”ǤǣͲͳͺͲʹ͸ͷ͹͹ —„‘›‡ ǡ—„‘›‡—•‹‡••ƒ”ǡ—„‘›‡ǡ‘Ǥ‡ƒ–Šͺ͸ͻͳ

Dunboyne College of Further Ed

@Dunboyne College FE

@DunboynecollegeFE


Getting third level education off to the right start IN September 2020 Dunboyne College of Further Education commenced its 17th year of offering a quality education product to Meath, west Dublin, north Kildare and surrounding areas. We have grown to over 900 students doing QQI level 5 and 6 courses at our campus in Dunboyne Business Park. As well as being the only dedicated PLC further education college in County Meath, west Dublin, north Kildare and the surrounding areas, over 90% of the students who have achieved a full QQI level 5 award with Dunboyne College in recent years have received third level offers and countless others have proceeded directly to employment. New skills and confidence The feedback on the courses from students has been excellent in terms of the new skills and confidence; students felt they received the confidence to go on to future learning, to build up their skills, and to access

job opportunities. Courses are increasing in popularity with this year over 2300 students applying for 900 places. One year QQI level 5 Programmes like the majority run in Dunboyne are an ideal way to pursue a course in an area of interest and to access a third level course. Flexible options By having a day a week in work experience students can also put into practice their skills and assess their competency. The flexible options in Dunboyne allow students to sample various modules in September to make sure they are pursuing the correct course choice. DCFE also runs a week of short courses in subject related skills to make sure everyone is suitably equipped to fully engage in their programme. Students often do far better at further education level as they are now studying in an area of their pas-

"As students also learn referencing, research and self-directed learning they tend to stay the full third level course afterwards, unlike many who go straight from Leaving Cert and not be fully sure of their options"

sion and aptitude like nursing, sports, computers or science rather than in the Leaving Cert where Irish English Mathâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s etc were compulsory. As students also learn referencing, research and self-directed learning they tend to stay the full third level course afterwards, unlike many who go straight from Leaving Cert and not be fully sure of their options. Dropout rates of less than 3% at higher education for those who do a further education course like those in Dunboyne College first, can be compared to an average of 8 to 10% drop out rate in the universities and 20% in the IT colleges. Expanding into new areas Dunboyne College will be expanding into many new areas of educational opportunity in the coming years and anyone wishing to obtain further information on these opportunities should find us online at www.dunboynecollege.ie or on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter. Education 41


Want to go to college?

Sorted... WHEN summer is over, seaside towns have more to offer than icecream cones and candy floss, and the Victorian seaside town of Dún Laoghaire is no exception. In the quiet end, bordering on leafy Monkstown, a restrained revolution is playing out in a modest building on Cumberland Street. The warriors are students and teachers carrying the banner for that educational sector that does not receive the same media attention as other educational sectors; extraordinary when you think that it is Further Education colleges like DFEi that are very real channels into third level institutions for school leavers who are disappointed with their Leaving Certificate results, and mature students who are looking to improve their prospects. It’s what a casual observer would call a win, win situation in the educational stakes. Personal missions So, let’s dust off our imaginary satchels and go inside the building where we will be met by a veritable ant colony – stairs and corridors filled with students of all ages and from diverse backgrounds, each focused on their own very personal mission. The short-term mission might be getting a seat in the canteen; the longer term one will, of course, be getting a place in a third level college or finding employment; but students always work better on a full stomach, so, while the queue for the canteen moves at its own pace let’s take a quick tour of DFEi. IIf you are lost, Kieran at reception will point you in the right direction, so don’t hesitate to ask him. Perhaps you would like to see the Learning Centre, and why not? It is a very bright and attractive space, specifically designed as a study hub replete with banks of computers. It is also 42 Education

on this corridor that you will get that recognisable smell of newly sawn wood. If you dream of designing and making your own furniture, or making and repairing musical instruments, this is where you need to fulfil that dream. Or perhaps you look at the bigger picture – the buildings that house the furniture and the musical instruments. If this is the case, you need to look at DFEi’s Architectural Te c h n o l o g y & D e s i g n o r Construction & Engineering Technology courses. STEM cells It may seem insincere to say that STEM is a ‘no brainer’ but when you think about it, it’s true. Courses related to Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics have proven to be reliable and sustainable routes to gainful employment. DFEi’s Pre-University Science courses in Laboratory Techniques and Food Science & Nutrition are the perfect first steps to a STEM career. Indeed, the Expert Group on Future Skills Needs has identified a dearth of graduates to fill available scientific jobs. If you are more attracted to the binary than the organic, a bit ‘nerdy’ perhaps, or a fan of the IT Crowd, you need to check out DFEi’s Computing & Electronic Technology or Software Development courses. These courses are supported by FIT (Fast Track into IT); a unique IT led initiative giving students the opportunity gain the skills that lead to employment. It’s true then; STEM is a ‘no brainer’. ‘Front of house’ roles Of course, while the STEM people are beavering away in the background, other personality types like to be ‘front of house’, or managing situations. If you fall into this category you should consider DFEI’s courses in Marketing & Event

Management, Business Studies with Law, or Police & Security Studies. If your desired theatre of action falls into the medical sphere, DFEi’s Community & Social Care course will get you started on the path that will enable you to work with dementia sufferers, or people with disabilities, mental health or social issues. If your heart is set on the nursing profession, you need to consider DFEi’s very popular Nursing Studies course. The success rates from this course are very high for progression to third level nursing degree programmes in Ireland and the UK. Some people are attracted to the unconditional love of animals; and where would the world be without domestic pets, farm animals and wildlife? Delivered by practicing professionals, DFEi’s Animal Health Care courses boast state of the art facilities and provide regular field trips. On occasion, you might be surprised by a preponderance of dogs around the building; probably a clue that the animal grooming class has gone ‘live’ or the canine obedience class needs willing woofters. You will be relieved to learn that the large farm animals do not stalk the corridors of DFEi but are instead receive visits from the animal care students. Going digital The doings of humans, animals, and machines make for an interconnected machine in a complex world; a world that needs to be interpreted, entertained, investigated, and reported on. We’ve got it all covered at DFEi with courses in TV & Digital Film, Digital Radio Production, Journalism for the Digital Age, Sound Production, and Music Production. The Higher National Diploma in Music Production is taught by working professionals. On each of these courses you will use industry standard equipment and software. You can do your own


Don’t have enough points?

come to DFEi recording in the sound studio, broadcast your own show in the radio studio, or edit your own programme in the TV studio. Why not tune in to 107.8fm and listen to DFEi’s very own radio station, The Wave? You will find an archive of accomplished documentaries. Of course, nothing goes unnoticed by journalists, and the journalism students in DFEi are given every opportunity to report on the doings of the humans, animals and machines that make for that interconnected machine in a complex world. Having visited the Criminal Courts of Justice and listened to the evidence in a murder trial, sat in on a Dail debate, or grappled with the spectres of Brexit and Trump, the journalism students have plenty to write about.

will be taught basic research skills, referencing systems, and general academic conventions across all courses. Experience at DFEi has taught us that every student does not learn in the same way or at the same pace. If you have particular learning support requirements, they will be met at DFEii. A tried and tested way DFEi’s quality assured courses are open to anyone who is seeking the knowledge, skills and competencies to enhance their employment opportunities or educational progression. If you did not get enough points for your chosen third level course, consider spending a year in DFEi. It’s another tried and tested way to get a place in college, as incidentally, is our legendary Arts, Culture & History course – an excellent founda-

"The academic life of DFEi is punctuated by a vibrant calendar of social events showcasing the talents of the students. If you like an audience, there’s a captive one in DFEi.

tion for pursuing an arts degree in NUI. With subjects like archaeology, folklore and local history, this course is perfect for those of you who want to use your fascination with the past to propel your academic career forward. The formula is simple – eight QQI Level 5 or Level 6 modules with as many distinctions as you can get. But it takes work on your part. You need to come to class, complete assignments on time and prepare for exams. The teachers are there for you every step of the way if you are there for them. Find out more Look at our website on www.dfei. ie; it’s really rather attractive and the menu is quite tempting; our brochure is not bad either. We don’t offer ice-cream or candy floss but we do offer a fine education.

Showcasing talent The academic life of DFEi is punctuated by a vibrant calendar of social events showcasing the talents of the students. If you like an audience, there’s a captive one in DFEi. Sound Production students compose their own material to audition for the annual college album release. The skills of the Event Management, Office Administration and Security students are always sought for college events. Gigs, concerts, and talent shows are enjoyed by both students and staff, usually in the canteen, also known as The Hub, which as well as providing hot food, is equipped with a stage, sound booth and acoustic panelling. Ladder to a third level DFEi’s courses are designed to meet current industry standards. Students are taught the fundamental skills and survival techniques that will put them on the ladder to a third level qualification. You will be taught how to present work in written and oral format. You Education 43


Your Progression Starts Here


.....................................................................................................................GREEN NEWS

Go Green: The UL €10.5 EU project to MU Campus wins transform environmental and human health Green Flag Pollinator A €10.5m European project that aims to transform both environmental and human health is to be led by University of Limerick. Details of the Go Green Routes project, which has almost 40 different stakeholders, were announced at a virtual launch hosted by UL recently. The four-year project, which applies visionary and integrated solutions to improve health in cities, will commence in September, coordinated by the Health Research Institute at UL.The overall objective is to position European cities as world ambassadors of urban sustainability. It will take Covid-19 into consideration and will evaluate the impact of reduced air pollution during lockdown and its aftermath, as well as the impact on mental

health of urban citizens and their views on re-greening their cities. UL will receive €1.6m to fund a team of doctoral and post-doctoral researchers and a project manager. The consortium will cultivate technological and nature-based solutions for health across six cities - Burgas, Bulgaria; Lahti, Finland; Umea, Sweden; Versailles, France and Limerick - and lay a foundation for future implementation in Munich, Germany, the Murcia region of Spain and in the Gzira municipality of Malta. “Evidence is emerging that people flocked to green spaces during lockdown for mental health, physical activity and connectivity with their communities,” said Dr Tadhg MacIntyre, a lecturer in psychology at UL and coordinator of the Go Green Routes project. “The impact on social cohesion, connection to nature and their perceptions of their cities may be long lasting. A solution to the psychological consequences of confinement is spending time outdoors in greenspace, which will be addressed by the project."

Project Award

MAYNOOTH University campus has won the 2020 Green Flag Pollinator Project Awards, jointly run by An Taisce and the National Biodiversity Data Centre. The Pollinator Project Award was established for Green Flag parks or gardens that support the local pollinating insect populations, or to promote their importance. Maynooth campus retained its prestigious Green Flag accreditation for 2020 and was specially identified as “a site that features not only pollinator friendly planting and gardening, but also makes a great effort to educate the public and to promote these efforts through its website and social media.” The 2020 Green Flag Awards were announced in September for Ireland’s top parks and best gardens. This year’s awards saw 84 Irish Parks and Gardens from across the Republic of Ireland receive their 2020 Green Flags.

Education 45


Irish Language Courses For further information or application forms contact us on

01-8259342 or eolas@cnb.ie Ionad Óige na hÉireann, Coláiste na bhFiann, Droim Rí, Co. na Mí

www.cnb.ie School Tour as Gaeilge?

Need a school tour with a difference? Our residential school tours will be tailor made to suit YOUR school. We help you choose from some or all of the following depending on the length of your stay with us: Team Building Exercises, Vocabulary Development Games, Climbing Wall, Workshops in African Drumming, Sean-Nós Dancing, Hip Hop, Music, Arts & Crafts, Sport, Yoga, Drama, Archery, Treasure Hunts, Tour to Hill of Tara & Trim Castle. For more information contact us on +353 1 8259342 or eolas@cnb.ie Ionad Óige na hÉireann, Coláiste na bhFiann, Droim Rí, Co. na Mí

www.cnb.ie


Lee Brothers

Achievement Recognition and Commemoratives WHETHER in sport, academia or business exceptional performance requires recognition, a way of showing the achiever that his or her efforts are appreciated by those who have contributed to and facilitated their success. Show your appreciation Irish company Lee Brothers aims to make the process of reward as easy as possible. Calling on their long experience of supplying the highest quality awards they will assist you in choosing the best way to show your appreciation whether it be through striking a medal, custom engraving an award or providing a customised trophy.

In addition, the company has a long track record in the field of commemoratives, from historical figures to the marking of the anniversaries of companies, clubs and institutions. Individual portraits or an image of a building can be rendered with exceptional detail into metal with the addition of lettering, dates etc. A complete service The company offers a complete service from consultation, through design, to supply, providing detailed graphics throughout the process to assist you in visualising the end result. The companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work in metals, precious metals and a variety of

"The company has a long track record in the field of commemoratives, from historical figures to the marking of the anniversaries of companies, clubs and institutions"

other materials using traditional methods and with the application of state of the art technology. Skill and expertise In 2018 Lee Brothers marked 75 years in business and put their knowledge, skill and expertise at your disposal to make sure your highest achievers are properly rewarded, and your institutionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s landmarks are commemorated appropriately. In addition, Lee Brothers can supply medals and trophies for sports, and stock a range of school badges. Medals and badges can be custom made with school crest and any other details required.

Education 47


Reference Guide Briefing

The HEAR alternative THE Higher Education Access Route (HEAR) is a college and university scheme that offers places on reduced points and extra college support to school leavers from socio-economically disadvantaged backgrounds who are resident in the Republic of Ireland. HEAR has been set up by a number of colleges and universities, as evidence shows that socio-economic disadvantage can have a negative effect on how well a student does at school and whether they go on to college. HEAR applicants must meet a range of financial, social and cultural indicators to be considered for a reduced points place and extra college support. HEAR is for school leavers under the age of 23 as of 1 January 2021 who are resident in the Republic of Ireland. Mature and FET (Further Education and Training) students have their own admissions routes and should contact college admissions offices for more information. Applications to HEAR can only be made online through the CAO. Reduced Points If you apply to HEAR and meet the application criteria (that is, are deemed eligible for HEAR) you may be offered a place even if you do not have enough Leaving Certificate

points for your preferred course. Each participating college and university has a reserved number of places to offer eligible HEAR applicants at lower or reduced Leaving Certificate points. An example of a reduced points offer is that the Leaving Certificate points for a particular course is 366 points. An eligible HEAR applicant could be offered a place with a lower points score, e.g. 356 points. This applicant would also, like all other applicants applying to college, need to meet the minimum entry requirements and any specific programme requirements before being considered for a HEAR reduced points offer. The reduction in points for HEAR places can vary every year. The number of points a particular course is reduced by is dependent on a number of factors, such as: • The overall number of places on the course. • The number of reserved HEAR places on the course. • The number of HEAR eligible applicants competing for these reserved places. Information on the number of reduced points places available per course and the method used by colleges for selecting eligible HEAR students for those places is available on some HEI websites and on the

page of each of the participating colleges on the accesscollege.ie site. College Supports If you get a place through HEAR, "Evidence you will receive a variety of acashows that demic, personal and social supports socio-economic while at college. disadvantage College supports may include: can have a • An Orientation Programme to negative effect introduce you to university/ on how well a college. student does at • Extra tuition if required, study school and skills and exam preparation. whether they • One-to-one meetings with go on to student advisers. college" • Social gatherings/mentoring. • Extra financial assistance when available/advice regarding grants and scholarships. Prioritisation of Applicants Eligible for both DARE & HEAR Research has shown that students with disabilities from disadvantaged backgrounds face the greatest obstacles when it comes to progression to higher education. In order to increase the numbers of students facing this ‘double disadvantage’, colleges participating in DARE and HEAR have agreed to prioritise this group when allocating reduced points places. Editorial source: accesscollege.ie

Participating colleges ■ Athlone Institute of Technology ■ Cork Institute of Technology ■ Dublin City University ■ TU Dublin ■ Dundalk Institute of Technology ■ Galway Mayo Institute of Technology ■ Institute of Art, Design and Technology Dun Laoghaire ■ Institute of Technology Tralee ■ IT Sligo ■ Letterkenny Institute of Technology ■ Limerick Institute of Technology 48 Education

■ Marino Institute of Education ■ Mary Immaculate College ■ Maynooth University ■ National College of Ireland ■ National University of Ireland, Galway ■ Pontifical University Maynooth ■ Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland ■ St Angela’s College, Sligo ■ Trinity College Dublin ■ University College Cork ■ University College Dublin ■ University of Limerick

What HEAR is not HEAR is not your maintenance grant (SUSI grant). The maintenance grant is the main source of financial assistance available from the Irish State for students in full-time Post Leaving Certificate Courses (PLCs) and full-time higher education undergraduate courses. HEAR is an admissions scheme to help students who may not traditionally go on to third level. Financial Assistance and SUSI Students applying to HEAR are encouraged to find out more information on the maintenance grant. Additional information on other sources of financial assistance for


Overall, the average HEAR applicant in 2015-2017 was more likely to be female than male, to be aged between 17 and 18, to have Irish nationality but not necessarily to have been born in Ireland. Approximately a quarter of all applicants lived in Dublin. Finally, they were more likely to be in a DEIS school (participating in the Delivering Equality of Opportunity in Schools scheme) than applicants to DARE.

As was the case in 2015-2016, the growth in number of applications to DARE from 2016 to 2017 (18.3%; Fig. 2) was greater than the growth in applications to HEAR (which was down 1.3%; Fig. 1) and to the overall Central Applications Office (CAO; 5.2%). Longitudinally, while pointing to significant growth in applications to HEAR from 2010 to 2014, applications to this scheme appear to have reached a plateau. The number of dual eligible applicants, i.e. those eligible for DARE and HEAR, increased by 36% in 2016 and a further 35% in 2017. The increase is likely due to the prioritisation of dual eligible applicants for a reduced points place from 2016 onwards.

Reference Guide Briefing

route to third level Overall, the average DARE applicant in 2015-2017 was equally likely to be male or female, more likely to be aged between 17 and 18, to have Irish nationality and to have been born in Ireland. Approximately a quarter of all applicants lived in Dublin. Finally, they were less likely to be in a DEIS school than applicants to HEAR but were more likely to be in a DEIS school than those who applied in 2011.

Longitudinal: Total number of eligible HEAR applications 5000

4112 3693

4000

3266 2782

3000

2279

66.0%

4276 69.8%

4221 69.4%

4287 69.3%

64.9%

61.0%

Final number eligible

53.9%

Final number ineligible

53.9%

2376

2000

1950

46.1%

46.1%

2086 39.0%

1944 35.1%

2119 34.0%

1851

2014

2015

1000 2010

2011

2012

2013

30.2%

1859 30.6% 2016

1899 30.7%

Source: 2017 DARE | HEAR FACTS AND FIGURES REPORT Summary 2018

Figure1: Based on Table 1.18 Longitudinal: Total number of eligible HEAR applications.

adults have attained third level edubelong to a group that is underrepcation. resented in higher education based You must meet Indicator 1, the on the occupation and employment "If you get a HEAR Income Limit, plus a correct s t a t u s o f y o u r p a r e n t ( s ) o r Should I apply? Longitudinal: Total number of eligible DARE applicationsplace through combination of 2 other indicators to HEAR applicants must meet a guardian(s). The underrepresented HEAR, you be eligible for HEAR. The combinarange of financial, social and cultural groups are the Non-Manual Workers will receive a 4000 3,542 75.2% tions are: indicators (criteria) to be considered Group and the Semi and Unskilled 3,076 variety of 3500 79% Indicator 1 + 2 + 4 or 5 or 6 for a reduced points place and extra Manual Workers Group. academic, 2,538 3000 78.2% Indicator 1 + 3 + 4 or 5 or 6 5. DEIS School You personal and college support. Here is a list of all 2,284 Attendance: 67.8% years in a second Indicator 1 + 4 eligible + 5 or 6 completed five the2500 HEAR indicators: Final number social supports 1,728 Indicator 1 + 5 +6 1. Income: Your family income falls level 1,515 66.8% school that takes part in the 2000 while at 1,279 63.2% Final number ineligible 1166 Indicator 1, the HEAR Income Delivering Equality of Opportunity on 1500 or below the HEAR Income Limit 1086 59.2% college" 24.7% 948 859 32.8% 819 882 735 51.6%2018 (see page 4 for Limit, is calculated by how many in 33.2% Schools (DEIS) scheme run by the for the year 21% 36.8% 21.8% 881 1000 888 children there are in your family and Department of Education and Skills. details of the48.4% HEAR Income 40.8% Limit). 500 how many people in your family are 6. Area Profile: You live in an area 2. Medical / GP Visit Card: Your 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 in full time education. family has a Medical Card / GP Visit where there is concentrated disadC a r d t h a t w a s i n d a t e o n 3 1 vantage â&#x20AC;&#x201C; in other words an area where, for example, is highDARE applications. December 2019. on Table 2.18 Longitudinal: Figure 2: Based Total numberthere of eligible 3. Means Tested Social Welfare: unemployment and poverty and Your family received a means-tested where only a small proportion of payment from the Department of Employment Affairs and Social 4| DARE | HEAR F A C T S A N D F I G U R E S R e p o r t S u m m a r y 2 0 1 8 Protection for at least 26 weeks in 2018. 4. Socio-economic Group: You third level students is available at www.studentfinance.ie.

Education 49


See your career going places with the ESB Networks Apprenticeship Programme OVER 200 apprentices have been recruited, since 2016. We will be recruiting apprentices across the country again in February, 2021. Applications will be accepted via the ESB Networks website from the middle of February. Since then, over 200 apprentices have been recruited, with 84 new recruits; 13 females and 61 males starting in our Networks Training Centre in September 2019. We will be recruiting up to 60 apprentices across the country again in 2020. Applications will be accepted via the ESB Networks website from the middle of February. High level of interest The 2020 ESB Networks Apprenticeship Programme recruitment campaign received over 6000 applications, highlighting the level of interest in the programme and a career that is diverse and challenging. As an Apprentice Network Technician (Electrician), recruits receive on the job training, working

as part of front-line teams, as well as classroom-based learning. Apprentices benefit from varied work experience, working indoors and outdoors, and learning about technology, customer service, and delivering results under pressure. They learn a variety of electrical and practical skills and, upon completion of the programme obtain a QQI Advanced Level 6 Electrical Trade Certificate. Seven phases The ESB Networks Electrical Apprenticeship is SOLAS standardsbased, consisting of 208 weeks over four years. During this time, there are seven SOLAS phases and ESB Networks off job training, including phases 1, 3, 5 and 7 are on the job, working closely with a qualified Network Technician on varied sites across ESB Networks. The SOLAS phases 2, 4 and 6 consist of off-the-job training modules, with phases in a SOLAS Training Centre and one of the IT Colleges around the country. Finally,

How to apply For those, who are interested in becoming an ESB Networks Apprenticeship, the programme will open to applicants on the February, 2020. All Interviews will take place from the middle of April to the Middle of May. With offers been made the last week in July/ first week in August. All new recruits will start their apprentices with ESB Network in late August / early September, 2020. The programme is open to individuals over 16 years of age on 1st June 2020. At the time of application, candidates must have obtained the following minimum educational qualifications: Junior Certificate (Ordinary Level) Grade C or higher at Ordinary Level (or Grade D or higher at Higher Level) in the Junior Certificate (or equivalent) in the 50 Education

"Having completed the four-year programme, apprentices will have gained experience working with a leading utility company" "A critical part of the Programme is the training and peer support given to the apprentices"

following subjects: 1) Irish or English 2) Mathematics 3) Science* 4) Any 2 other subjects * If you have not obtained the required grade in Science, Grade C or higher at Ordinary Level in any one of the following subjects is acceptable: Technology, Art

there are 24 weeks of ESB Networks off the job training which takes place in the ESB Networks Training Centre, Portlaoise. Having completed the four-year programme, apprentices will have gained experience working with a l e a d i n g u t i l i t y c o m p a n y. E S B Networks serves 2.3 million customers in Ireland, providing a safe and reliable electricity supply to homes, businesses and communities throughout the country - ESB Networks apprentices play an important part in delivering this service. Role combines both physical and logical Customer service is at the heart of ESB Networks, through their experience, ESB Networks apprentices will be at the fore in delivering and providing services to our customers. Though the job requires an element of physicality, there is much more to the programme than climbing poles and heavy lifting, the role combines both physical and logical activity. True to the fact that no two days

Craft and Design, Technical Graphics, Materials Technology (Wood), Home Economics or Metalwork. Leaving Certificate Grade D / O6 or higher at Ordinary Level in the Leaving Certificate (or equivalent) in the following subjects: 1) Irish or English 2) Mathematics 3) Science Subject (Agricultural Science, Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Physics & Chemistry)* 4) Any 2 other subjects * If you have not obtained the required grade in any of the above Science subjects, the following is acceptable at Leaving Certificate Level (Grade D/O6 or higher at Ordinary Level) : Art, Construction Studies, Design and Communication, Graphics, Engineering, Home Economics, Technical Drawing and Technology.


are the same in the programme, apprentices will be assisting and dealing with a wide range of customerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s needs. In their day-to-day work activities they can be responding to faults and fault finding to maintain customer supply, connecting new customers, both residential and commercial to the electricity network, replacing and maintaining electrical assets and installing new elements to the electricity network like overhead wires and unground cable technologies. Peer support A critical part of the ESB Networks Apprenticeship Programme is the training and peer support given to the apprentices. Throughout the programme, apprentices work alongside and closely with experienced Network Technicians. While the job may be challenging, the apprentice is always part of a team who will be there to assist and support throughout the programme. ESB Networks greatly fosters and encourages the idea of creating a team and peer support network.

"Recruits receive on the job training, working as part of front-line teams, as well as classroombased learning. pressure"

Education 51


Hearing from 'The Apprentice' Identifying a progressive and future-proof career path for your students – via an Accounting Technician Apprenticeship – in these unsettled times

"I feel I have gained a lot of experience in a short time and continue to learn new things every day"

"There is no stigma around being younger or inexperienced, and even the partners are very approachable and easy to talk to"

52 Education

ACHIEVING over 550 points in his Leaving Cert, twentytwo-year-old Matthew Casey, surprised family and friends by turning down a place on UCC’s commerce course, instead taking up an apprenticeship to become an Accounting Technician. “Yes, people thought it was the wrong move,” explains Matthew. “There is a feeling that the best pathway when you finish is college. I have proven them wrong with a valuable qualification, and I got to earn money at the same time.” Initially only applying to the Apprenticeship as a fallback option, a summer working in a restaurant led Matthew to a decision to gain experience in his chosen field of accounting and finance from the get-go. Following two years apprenticing with Clonakilty firm, Crowley and McCarthy Chartered Accountants, Matthew is part of the first cohort of students to graduate from the Accounting Technician Apprenticeship and is now on his way to becoming a Chartered Accountant. Skills to progress The Accounting Technicians Ireland Apprenticeship is a two-year, work-based programme which enables participants to work in the office for four days a week during the academic year, and study with a local college one day a week. With two intakes in January and September each year, and applications opening early next spring for the September 2021 intake, students have the opportunity to gain a two-year contract with a local employer, an

in-demand accountancy QQI Level 6 award, whilst having their college tuition fully funded by SOLAS, the further education and training agency. The qualification equips students with the skills to progress both within their role and organisation, bringing real value to core business functions such as accounts preparation, recording receipts and payments, processing invoices, payroll, and budgeting. Adrianna’s first year experience Adrianna Rup, aged twenty-one from Finglas, is a now second-year apprentice with Grant Thornton and cites the ability to earn while you learn as a big draw when considering what to do after sixth year as she wanted to be able to contribute financially at home. Recommending the programme as an ideal jumpingoff point for secondary school students to enter the professional world, Adrianna says of her own experience: “There is no stigma around being younger or inexperienced, and even the partners are very approachable and easy to talk to. “I completed my Leaving Cert in 2019 and didn’t have much work experience other than babysitting, waitressing and shop assistant roles. I stumbled across the apprenticeship online by chance while looking for options. “I feel I have gained a lot of experience in a short time and continue to learn new things every day. You gain a very in-depth knowledge of what you are studying and witness first-hand how an accountancy firm operates.”


Accounting Technician Apprentice, Matthew Casey: “People thought it was the wrong move. I have proven them wrong with a valuable qualification, and I got to earn money at the same time.” Photograph: Billy MacGill

High employment rate With such economic uncertainty at the moment and with the traditional college experience undergoing huge upheaval, apprenticeship as a way to gain a qualification and earn a salary at the same time, is an appealing route for students. Following the two-year Accounting Technician Apprenticeship, students not only achieve an excellent qualification, but also a wide encompassing range of work experience which will stand to them in future roles. Many apprentices are retained by their employer, helping to contribute to the high employment rate of qualified apprentices after their completion of the programme. The employer experience Cavan town firm, KBG Accountants, have taken on four Accounting Technician Ireland apprentices and according to partner Mark Reilly, the programme has huge benefits for both the apprentice and employer. “We have found that apprentices who choose this route from Leaving Certificate are just as capable as graduates who spent three to four years at third-level,” explains Mark. “It offers an accelerated option to becoming a Chartered Accountant within five years. We train the apprentices from the very beginning as to how exactly jobs are to be completed and can mould them into what they need to be.” Indeed, apprentices under the Accounting Technicians

Accounting Technician Apprentice, Adrianna Rup: “You gain a very in-depth knowledge of what you are studying and witness first-hand how an accountancy firm operates.” Photograph: Fintan Clarke

Ireland programme enjoy exemptions from the full-range of professional accountancy bodies including Chartered Accountants Ireland, CPA, ACCA and CIMA. “Our students, when they complete the apprenticeship, gain a much in-demand accountancy QQI Level 6 award and two years of solid work experience, placing them in a strong position to progress in business or to further study,” confirms Gillian Doherty, ATI Chief Operations Officer. Upon graduating, apprentices can also apply for Membership of Accounting Technicians Ireland, joining a busy professional network of accounting and finance professionals based across Ireland and abroad, and are able to use the professional letters MIATI after their name The Accounting Technician Apprenticeship provides a real alternative for students sitting their Leaving Certificate next June, who prefer practical training to a full-time college programme. The September 2021 Apprenticeship will be based in Dublin, Wicklow, Cork, Waterford, Limerick, Galway and Monaghan and applications will open in early spring 2021.

"Our students, when they complete the apprenticeship, gain a much in-demand accountancy QQI Level 6 award and two years of solid work experience, placing them in a strong position to progress in business or to further study"

FIND OUT MORE: If you would like to find out more about the Accounting Technician Apprenticeship, you can get in touch with the team at: apprenticeship@accountingtechniciansireland.ie accountingtechniciansireland.ie/study-ati Education 53


meet our draduates @thisisfet

thisisfet.ie


How finding your feet in FET can increase your chances of success at Third Level and beyond FOLLOWING a strange start to 2020, to many it may seem as though options have been extremely curtailed in recent months. A cancelled Leaving Certificate and the prospect of a socially distanced college experience may seem hard to imagine, but despite the restrictions and the changes to our understanding of ordinary life, recent school leavers now have a world of choice when it comes to taking their next big step in Further Education and Training (FET). The established route from school to university is not a one size fits all model. Post-Leaving Certificate (PLC) courses have much to offer recent school leavers. There are one and two-year programmes offering awards at NFQ Levels 5 and 6 in a wide variety of subjects, including Multimedia Web Development and ICT, Sport, Anatomy and Nutrition, Art and Design, pre-university Science, among many others. Ready for the world of work Applied learning courses means that students apply classroom theory to real life situations, meaning that upon completion, students are ready for the world of work, or prepared for further learning. PLC courses are not accessed via the Central Applications Office (CAO). Instead, interested students can apply directly to the colleges or through fetchcourses.ie. Many students who take up PLCs decide to continue studies upon completion and these courses can act as a steppingstone to third-level study. Recent research has shown

the third level completion rate for students with a foundation in a PLC rises to 75 per cent, meaning those who first consider Further Education and Training options as a pathway to Higher Education are successful in choosing the right courses and securing their degree. Many universities, colleges and Institutes of Technology have programmes in place to recognise further education and training qualifications as a route to entry. If a student completes a PLC programme with good results and meets specific criteria, they have a good chance of securing a place on a third level course. A database of such linked programmes is available on careersportal.ie. Apprenticeships In addition to PLC options, the range of apprenticeships in Ireland has expanded greatly in recent years. The â&#x20AC;&#x153;earn as you learnâ&#x20AC;? model is becoming ever more popular with school leavers who want to fasttrack their careers but still earn a qualification. Apprenticeships are now available in a wide variety of areas, including international financial services, recruitment, auctioneering, engineering, hospitality and insurance

"The established route from school to university is not a one size fits all model"

"The Government will encourage employers to take on new apprentices in 2020 and 2021, which means even more apprenticeship opportunities will be available to school leavers"

practice, with even more set to be announced within the coming months. In terms of qualifications, apprenticeships can take you from Leaving Certificate as far as you want to go, in some cases, all the way to NFQ Levels 9 and 10, the equivalent of a Masters and Doctoral degree. Traineeships A third option is to undertake a Traineeship. Traineeships typically take from 6-20 months full-time to complete. They provide occupationspecific training and integrate formal classroom training and workplace coaching with a host employer. Courses facilitate those entering the labour market for the first time and persons wishing to up-date or acquire new skills In August 2020, the Minister for Further and Higher Education, Research, Innovation and Science, Simon Harris, announced a number of financial incentives to support the uptake of apprenticeships in Ireland. The Government will encourage employers to take on new apprentices in 2020 and 2021, which means even more apprenticeship opportunities will be available to school leavers, despite the effects of COVID-19. Whatever your chosen career, Further Education and Training can take you there. For more information on FET courses and apprenticeships, visit thisisfet.ie and apprenticeship.ie. We are the makers. The future is what you make it. Education 55


Clerical Administration Computer Hardware / Networks / Programming

Engineering

Manufacturing

Transport & Logistics

Health & Beauty

THE Cork Training Centre is now part of the Cork Education & Training Board. Their large training facility is located in Rossa Avenue, Bishopstown, Cork. Their aim is to deliver courses which provide people with the skills & competencies that lead to employment. They work closely with local industry to insure their courses reflect the needs so that their learners have the skills & competencies that companies require. They develop new courses to support local business and job opportunities and actively seek both learner and company feedback to ensure their courses remain up to date. The Centre offers a variety of full time courses in IT, Administration, Healthcare, Construction, Sport & Apprenticeship to name a few. Courses run Monday – Thursday from 8.30am – 3.45pm and Friday from 8.30am – 12.45pm. These courses are available to everybody, you do not have to be in receipt of a payment from Social Welfare to attend these courses. All courses are fully funded & no fees apply. Range of courses Courses are run in both the Training Centre in Rossa Ave Bishopstown, their Biopharma facility in Carrigaline and in various locations around Cork City & County. The Centre also offer a range of Online and Evening Courses which suit individuals who cannot commit to full time training. Night Courses run Mon – Thursday from 7-10pm. For further information on these courses and how to register you can visit their website www.corktrainingcentre.ie Alternatively you can follow them on FACEBOOK to get regular updates or feel free to drop into one of their Training Centres, where their staff will be only too happy to give you additional information.

Cork Training Centre, Bishopstown, Cork | t: 021-4856200 www.corktrainingcentre.ie

56 Education


u m bing

THE CETB (Cork Education and Training board) is the administrating body on behalf of SOLAS for the apprenticeship program in Cork. Apprenticeship is defined as a programme of structured education and training which formally combines and alternates learning in the workplace with learning in an education or training centre. It is a dual system, a blended combination of on-the-job employer-based training and

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off-the-job training. The further education and training authority SOLAS is the lead agency responsible for apprenticeship on behalf of Government, working in close partnership with the Higher Education Authority, Quality and Qualifications Ireland, industry and education and training providers across further and higher education. SOLAS' responsibility includes maintenance of a national register of employers

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approved to take on apprentices and a national register of apprentices. Apprentices earn while they learn and build valuable work-ready skills in a chosen occupation. Apprenticeships open up exciting and rewarding careers, with learning grounded in the practical experience of undertaking a real job. For further information on Apprenticeship in Ireland please visit www.apprenticeship.ie

www.apprenticeship.ie Education 57


Tourism – a world in an exciting and LYIT School of Tourism, formerly the Tourism College Killybegs, is the oldest campus outside Dublin dedicated to education and training in Culinary Arts, Hospitality Operations and Management, and Tourism. Established in 1969, and celebrating its 50th anniversary in 2019, the campus has produced graduates who are renowned all over the world, ensuring that today’s graduates will be recognised as having received the education and training required to reach the top levels of the industry. Our education offering is expanded through a range of academic partners throughout Europe, where students can choose to study or complete an internship for a semester, supported through Erasmus+. We have partners in Germany, France, Spain, Italy, Malta, Romania and Turkey, and we are constantly enlarging our network to benefit our students. Our US industry partners visit Killybegs every year to recruit for Summer placements, Internships and Graduate Programmes. To facilitate our expansion plans we have completed a renovation project to include a new state-of-the-art training bar, collaborative learning room for group work and a new library/research facility. €1.8m has been invested for additional work in Summer 2020 in preparation for our expanded programme offering. On completion of a programme of study at the School of Tourism, you will be perfectly placed to take the first step on your career, which will inevitably be exciting and fulfilling.

Tourism – a world of opportunities in an exciting and global industry Tourism is Ireland’s largest indigenous industry employing 230,000 people nationally, one in every ten of the labour-force. The industry is twice the size of agriculture and far bigger in employment than the construction industry, the IT industry, or the financial services sector. It crucially cannot be outsourced or off-shored and its economic benefits are experienced both in our cities but also right throughout rural Ireland. 10 per cent of the total workforce in Ireland is employed in the tourism industry, and this rises to 14 per cent in rural locations. On a global scale, growth in tourism is most significant outside of our normal markets of Europe and the USA, with significant business growth in Asia and Africa. Tourist profiles are changing and those working in tourism now require a set of skills that reflect the global nature of the industry. Why study a programme in Hospitality, Tourism or Culinary Arts? Career opportunities, both here in Ireland and abroad, are almost limitless in the sector. The structure of all our programmes allows students to undertake work placements and internships at home and overseas, so that they are best placed to enter the world of work on graduation.

Graduate case study - taking opportunities available GIRTS Mihalkins graduated in 2016 with a BA in Hotel, Restaurant and Resort Management. As a student he stood out as a consummate professional, displaying a flair for perfection in practical settings. He gladly took the opportunities available to compete in a range of national and international competitions, winning gold medals and acclaim from industry mentors. This extra-curricular activity allowed Girts to work with the Capella group, at home, but also for his third year internship, at their Washington DC property in the USA, managing their rooftop bar operation. He returned to Donegal to take up the position of Assistant Conference and Banqueting Manager at Co Donegal’s only 58 Education

5* property, Solis Lough Eske Castle. In September 2018, he enrolled in the BA (Hons) in Hotel Management, and on completion of this one-year, add-on, programme he is ready to take on a senior role in a luxury hotel anywhere in the world. He is now ready for his next challenge and is happy to seek the assistance and support of the School of Tourism and our global industry recruitment partner HOSCO. He has recently been offered two management roles in the Seychelles and Dubai, and has taken the role of Assistant Outlet Manager at the Kempinski Emerald Palace in Dubai. We wish him well in this next stage of his exciting career.


of opportunities global industry The School of Tourism continues to develop its professional network to facilitate and support students in selecting their career paths. When choosing a career in the tourism industry, you are setting yourself apart from the many thousands of individuals who work in the industry on a casual basis, either while studying for other careers or while between jobs. Graduates of specialist programmes are destined for senior career roles, many of which are new to the industry. Non-traditional roles such as Digital Media Managers are now as common as traditional roles such as Food and Beverage Director, Revenue and Reservations Managers or Destination Travel Executives, and programmes are designed to open up more opportunities in a range of industries with links to tourism, from Finance, IT, Media and Marketing and Outdoor / Extreme Travel Experiences.

Dr Ciarรกn ร“ hAnnrachรกin, School of Tourism, LYIT

Education 59


National Framework LEVEL 1 CERTIFICATE (NFQ LEVEL 1) Class of award-type: Major Volume: Small Level 1 and 2 Certificates are designed to meet the needs of learners, both young and old, including those with intellectual and other disabilities, adults returning to training, and learners with few or no previous qualifications, including those within the workforce. These awards provide certification for learners who may progress to higher levels and also for those whose principal achievements rest at these levels. Each certificate comprises a number of components, most often in basic literacy and numeracy, which the learner can achieve at their own pace and accumulate over time towards one of the named certificates above. QQI Award-Further Education & Training Award Awarded by: Quality and Qualifications Ireland. LEVEL 2 CERTIFICATE (NFQ LEVEL 2) Class of award-type: Major Volume: Medium Level 1 and 2 Certificates are designed to meet the needs of learners, both young and old, including those with intellectual and other disabilities, adults returning to training, and learners with few or no previous qualifications, including those within the workforce. These awards provide certification for learners who may progress to higher levels and also for those whose principal achievements rest at these levels. Each certificate comprises a number of components, most often in basic literacy and numeracy, which the learner can achieve at their own pace and accumulate over time towards one of the named certificates above. QQI Award - Further Education and Training Award Awarded by: Quality and Qualifications Ireland.

60 Education

LEVEL 3 CERTIFICATE (NFQ LEVEL 3) Class of award-type: Major Volume: Large The Level 3 Certificate enables learners to gain recognition for, specific personal skills, practical skills and knowledge, basic transferable skills, the enhancement of individual talents and qualities and achievements and learning relevant to a variety of progression options. QQI Award - Further Education and Training Award Awarded by: Quality and Qualifications Ireland. JUNIOR CERTIFICATE (NFQ LEVEL 3) Class of award-type: Major Volume: Large The Junior Certificate is an award given to students who have successfully completed examinations from the junior cycle which is the first three years of secondary education. The Junior Certificate may lead to progression to a programme leading to the Leaving Certificate or to a programme leading to a Level 4 Certificate, or at a higher level. Awarded by: State Examinations Commission (Department of Education and Skills).

LEVEL 4 CERTIFICATE (NFQ LEVEL 4) Class of award-type: Major; Volume: Large The Level 4 Certificate enables learners to gain recognition for the achievement of vocational and personal skills, knowledge and understanding to specified standards, the enhancement of individual talents and qualities and the achievement and learning relevant to a variety of progression options, including employment at an introductory vocational level, and programmes leading to a Level 5 Certificate. QQI Award - Further Education and Training Award Awarded by: Quality and Qualifications Ireland. LEVEL 5 CERTIFICATE (NFQ LEVEL 5) Class of award-type: Major; Volume: Large The Level 5 Certificate enables learners to develop a broad range of skills, which are vocationally specific and require a general theoretical understanding. They are enabled to work independently while subject to general direction. The majority of certificate/module holders at Level 5 take up positions of employment. They are also deemed to meet the minimum entry requirements for a range of higher education institutions/programmes. QQI Award - Further Education and Training Award Awarded by: Quality and Qualifications Ireland


of Qualifications LEAVING CERTIFICATE (NFQ LEVEL 4 AND 5) Class of award-type: Major Volume: Large Leaving Certificate and its various programmes is placed at Levels 4 and 5. It is the final course in the Irish secondary school system. It takes a minimum of two years preparation, but an optional Transition Year means that for some- students it takes place three years after the Junior Certificate Examination. This award may lead to progression to a programme leading to a further education and training award at Level 5 or at a higher level or to a higher education and training award at Level 6 or higher. Awarded by: State Examinations Commission (Department of Education and Skills). ADVANCED CERTIFICATE (NFQ LEVEL 6) Class of award-type: Major Volume: Large An Advanced Certificate award enables learners to develop a comprehensive range of skills, which may be vocationally specific and/or of a general supervisory nature, and require detailed theoretical understanding. Modules include advanced vocational/occupational skills, enabling certificate holders to work independently or progress to higher education and training. The majority of certificate/module holders at Level 6 take up positions of employment, some of whom may be self- employed. QQI Award - Further Education and Training Award Awarded by: Quality and Qualifications Ireland. HIGHER CERTIFICATE (NFQ LEVEL 6) Class of award-type: Major Volume: Large The Higher Certificate is normally awarded after completion of a programme of two years duration (120 ECTS credits). Entry to these programmes is generally for school leavers and those with equivalent qualifications. A Certificate holder at this level may transfer to a programme on the next level of the framework. Awarded by: Institutes of Technology, Quality and Qualifications Ireland, and some Universities.

ORDINARY BACHELOR DEGREE (NFQ LEVEL 7) Class of award-type: Major Volume: Large The Ordinary Bachelor Degree is normally awarded after completion of a programme of three years duration (180 ECTS credits). Entry to a programme leading to an Ordinary Bachelor degree is typically for school leavers and those with equivalent qualifications. In addition, there are transfer arrangements in place across higher education and a number of programmes of one year duration leading to the Ordinary Bachelor Degree for holders of the Higher Certificate. The Ordinary Bachelor Degree is compatible with the Bologna First Cycle descriptor, though holders of this award do not generally immediately access programmes leading to Second Cycle awards in Ireland. Awarded by: Institutes of Technology, Quality and Qualifications Ireland, and Universities. HONOURS BACHELOR DEGREE (NFQ LEVEL 8) Class of award-type: Major Volume: Large The Honours Bachelor Degree is normally awarded following completion of a programme of three to four years duration (180-240 ECTS credits), although there are examples of longer programmes in areas such as architecture, dentistry and medicine. Entry is generally for school leavers and those with equivalent qualifications. In addition, there are transfer arrangements across higher education, and a number of programmes of one year duration leading to Honours Bachelor Degrees for holders of the Ordinary Bachelor Degree. The Honours Bachelor Degree is a Bologna First Cycle qualification. Awarded by: Institutes of Technology, Quality and Qualifications Ireland, and Universities. HIGHER DIPLOMA (NFQ LEVEL 8) Class of award-type: Major Volume: Large The Higher Diploma is normally awarded following completion of a programme of one year duration (60 ECTS credits). Entry to a programme leading to a Higher Diploma is typically for holders of Honours Bachelor Degrees but can also be for holders of Ordinary Bachelor Degrees. It is of note that the Higher Diploma is typically in a different field of learning than the initial award. The Higher Diploma is a qualification at the same level as completion of the Bologna First Cycle. Awarded by: Institutes of Technology, Quality and Qualifications Ireland, and Universities. MASTERS DEGREE (NFQ LEVEL 9) Class of award-type: Major Volume: Large There are two types of Masters Degree in Ireland: taught Masters Degrees and research Masters Degrees. The taught Masters Degree is awarded following the completion of a programme of one to two years duration (60-120 ECTS credits). Entry to a programme leading to a taught Masters Degree is typically for holders of Honours Bachelor Degrees. In some cases, entry to such programmes can be permitted for those with Ordinary Bachelor Degrees or equivalent. Research Masters Degree programmes are typically of two years duration (120 ECTS credits)

REFERENCE GUIDE BRIEFING

though not all such programmes are credit rated. The Irish Masters Degree is compatible with completion of the Bologna Second Cycle. Awarded by: Institutes of Technology, Quality and Qualifications Ireland, and Universities.. POST GRADUATE DIPLOMA (NFQ LEVEL 9) Class of award-type: Major Volume: Large The Postgraduate Diploma is normally awarded following completion of a programme of one year duration (60 ECTS credits). Entry to a programme leading to a Postgraduate Diploma is typically for holders of Honours Bachelor Degrees but can also be for holders of Ordinary Bachelor Degrees. The Post-graduate Diploma is an intermediate qualification within the Bologna Second Cycle. Awarded by: Institutes of Technology, Quality and Qualifications Ireland, and Universities. DOCTORAL DEGREE (NFQ LEVEL 10) Class of award-type: Major; Volume: Large Possession of an Honours Bachelor Degree is normally required for entry to a doctoral programme. In some disciplines, a Masters Degree is also preferred. Normally those entering a doctoral programme with an Honours Bachelor Degree initially register for a research Masters Degree or provisional doctoral candidature. Upon successful completion of this initial stage, the candidate acquires full doctoral candidature. Doctoral programmes are between three and four years in duration. ECTS credits are used in doctoral programmes for taught elements only. Varying doctoral programmes now exist, including professional and performance/practice based doctorates. The Irish Doctoral Degree is compatible with completion of the Bologna Third Cycle. Awarded by: Institutes of Technology, Quality and Qualifications Ireland, and Universities. HIGHER DOCTORATE (NFQ LEVEL 10) Class of award-type: Major; Volume: Large This award largely recognises excellent and distinguished contributions to learning. It may be used for career progression to advanced levels of academia and research. This award is never based on a providerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s programme and, as such, is not subject to validation but is assessed by the awarding body for each individual provider. Normally, the learner already holds a first doctorate or equivalent for some period of time prior to becoming a candidate for the higher doctorate. The Irish Higher Doctorate is compatible with completion of the Bologna Third Cycle. Awarded by: Institutes of Technology, Quality and Qualifications Ireland, and Universities.

Education 61


Did you get in this summer?

Know what you’re getting into… A Lifeguard qualification opens the door to jobs nationwide and abroad. For more see www.watersafety.ie 62 Education


Make a positive mental health connection today! Poor mental health is touching our lives in ways it has never done before. People across all walks of our society are facing mental health struggles every day. Talking therapies have been proven to be an effective means of easing the effects of poor mental health. The Irish Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy (IACP) and our members are committed to promoting safe and effective talking therapy for all people living in Ireland, from any background of any age. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to help all those in need to take first steps towards positive mental health by connecting them with our members. Someone to Listen There are times in our lives when we or someone we know might struggle with mental health and need someone to talk to in a non-judgemental manner in a safe environment. Someone who is a qualified, accredited and vetted mental health professional. Many people in this situation are unclear where to find a qualified professional. The IACP can help you to make this first connection. When speaking with IACP staff,

you can be assured of the strictest confidentiality. Call us today on 01 230 35 36 to help you find an accredited therapist in your area. Alternatively, you can visit www.iacp.ie, where you will see our online directory. In our directory, you can find a list of our members in your area. These members can help with a range of issues including: Anxiety, Bereavement, Trauma, Stress, Self-Esteem Issues, Relationship Difficulties, Anger, Depression, Childhood Issues, Cancer Support, Work Related Issues, Addictions, Abuse, Adoption, Autism, Cultural issues, Dementia, Disability, Eating Disorders, Financial Issues, Infertility, Obsessions, Personal Growth, Phobias, PTSD, Sexuality, Self-harm, Suicidal Feelings, and Pregnancy. Who are we? The IACP is the leading and largest professional body for counselling and psychotherapy in Ireland with over 4,200 members.

"There are times in our lives when we or someone we know might struggle with mental health and need someone to talk to in a nonjudgemental manner in a safe environment"

Go to iacp.ie or call us on 01 230 35 36 today to take the first step to a positive mental health connection.

WHO'S LISTENING? WE ARE OUR STAFF CAN HELP CONNECT YOU TO AN ACCREDITED COUNSELLOR / PSYCHOTHERAPIST NEAR YOU. IACP IS COMMITTED TO PROMOTING SAFE AND EFFECTIVE PRACTICE OF COUNSELLING AND PSYCHOTHERAPY

CALL 01 230 35 36 OR LOG ON TO IACP.IE TODAY

Education 63


HPV is a common virus that can cause cancer in both men and women. The HPV vaccine protects young people from getting the HPV virus when they grow up. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s now being offered to boys and girls in first year of secondary school. The more young people are vaccinated, the more will be protected from HPV related cancers.

Get the facts, Get the vaccine. #ProtectOurFuture Find out more at hpv.ie from the HSE. This is the only website in Ireland approved by the World Health Organization to provide vaccine information.

Nolan Coaches is a family run business which now has three generations of experience in the coach hire business.

Based just 5 minutes from Dublin Airport, Nolan Coaches provides quality Irish coach and bus hire services around the Dublin area.

The business was founded in the 1940â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s by Jimmy Nolan. Today the company is run by David Nolan, who has been running the operation since 1993.

Whatever your coach hire needs, from sports club to weddings to school day trips to private hire, Nolan Coaches will ensure your group has a great experience.

UNIT 18, BLOCK 5, PORT TUNNEL BUSINESS PARK, CLONSHAUGH, DUBLIN 17, D17 HW65

01 847 3487 | info@nolancoaches.ie

www.nolancoaches.ie 64 Education

Email: generalate@fmsa.net


Protect our future Immunisation against potentially life-threatening infectious diseases is one of modern medicine’s greatest successes.

THE World Health Organization has reiterated the importance of continuing immunisation programmes during the Covid-19 Pandemic. Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General advises: “The avoidable suffering and death caused by children missing out on routine immunizations could be far greater than COVID-19 itself. "But it doesn’t have to be that way. Vaccines can be delivered safely even during the pandemic, and we are calling on countries to ensure these essential lifesaving programmes continue.” School immunisation programmes are a very important part of our immunisation programme in Ireland, and offer children protection against life-threatening diseases such as meningitis, tetanus and HPVrelated cancers. Giving students vaccines in a school setting reduces inequalities in vaccine uptake. In school, all students have an equal opportunity to be vaccinated and barriers that may affect vaccine uptake are removed e.g. travel to a clinic, parents requiring time off work to accompany students etc. As a result of Covid-19, schools, as well as our health services are facing significant challenges. HSE school immunisation teams are making contact with schools to work with them during these challenging times, on how to ensure the safe delivery of the

schools immunisation programme. During the 2020/2021 school year, HSE school vaccination teams will provide three different vaccines to students in secondlevel schools. These are HPV, Tdap and Men ACWY vaccines which are offered to all students in 1st year of 2nd level school. These vaccines are usually offered during two visits to the school, one in the 1st term and one 5 to 6 months later. HPV vaccine HPV vaccine protects against 9 types of HPV virus. HPV virus can cause a range of pre-cancerous lesions in both men and women. HPV virus causes: Almost all cervical cancers • 5 out of 10 vulval cancers • 7 out of 10 vaginal cancers • 9 out of 10 HPV-related anal cancers • 9 out of 10 incidences of genital warts. HPV infection is also associated with cancers of: • The mouth and throat (oropharynx) • The back passage (the rectum) • The penis MenACWY vaccine MenACWY (Nimenrix) vaccine protects against four types of meningococcal disease which can cause meningitis and /or septicaemia. MenACWY vaccine reduces meningococcal bacteria in nasal passages

and so can also prevent transmission of disease to other children and teenagers MenACWY vaccine was introduced in the school immunisation programme during 2019/2020 school year, because of an increase in cases of invasive meningococcal disease caused by serogroups W and Y between 2015 and 2018. Tdap vaccine Tdap vaccine protects against: • Tetanus (tetanus toxin from Clostridium tetani bacteria can cause painful muscle spasms and convulsions) • Diphtheria (bacteria that can cause a sore throat and severe breathing difficulties) • Pertussis (whooping cough) (a bacteria also known as whooping cough and causes severe coughing and vomiting) As children, students will have received 4 doses of tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis. A 5th dose of tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis in Tdap is required to boost protection against infection in students at the age they are in 1st year. Immunisation is the best protection against these serious infections and schools have an important role to play. By working together, schools and HSE school immunisation teams can ensure this essential service can continue so that our students are protected. More information at www.immunisation.ie Education 65


Reference Gu

Irish and British quali

Bachelor’s degrees with honours /Honours Bachelor Degrees Irish Higher Diplomas Bachelor’s degrees/ Ordinary Bachelor Degree Graduate diplomas Graduate certificates Foundation Degrees (for example FdA, FdSc) Diplomas of Higher Education (DipHE) Higher National Diplomas (HND) Irish Higher Certificates Higher National Certificates (HNC) Certificates of Higher Education (CertHE)

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10 6

8

First cycle (end of cycle) qualifications

7 9

Intermediate qualifications within the first cycle Short cycle qualifications

5

8

4

7

6

Intermediate qualifications within the short cycle

6

Must include a qualification

Modern Apprenticeship

Modern Apprenticeship

Must lead to an existing qualification type

5

Apprenticeship

7 Apprenticeship

4

5

6

Must include a qualification

Foundation Apprenticeship

2

Apprenticeship

3

4

Higher Apprenticeship

Bachelor’s Degree with Honours, Bachelor’s Degree, Professional Graduate Certificate in Education (PGCE), Graduate Diploma, Graduate Certificate

Branding and marketing exercise in 2019/20 may lead to differentation between the HLAs at the

Levels 4-8: primarily based on a single higher-level qualification at each level

Traineeships NI

Higher Level Apprenticeship

Apprenticeships NI

Foundation Degree, Diploma of Higher Education (DipHE), Higher National Diploma (HND)

Higher/Advanced/ Intermediate Apprenticeship: May include a qualification

Access to HE Diploma*

Degree Apprenticeship: Must include a Degree

2 Intermediate Apprenticeship

3 Advanced Apprenticeship

3

Higher National Certificate (HNC), Certificate of Higher Education (CertHE)

4

Higher Apprenticeship

5 5

Master’s Degree, Integrated Master’s Degree, Postgraduate Diploma, Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE), Postgraduate Certificate

Higher Apprenticeship

Apprenticeship

7

Higher Apprenticeship

6

*The Access to HE Diploma is regulated by QAA but is not part of the FHEQ

2

Higher Level Apprenticeship

7 Higher Level Apprenticeship

Progression to skilled employment Continuation of secondary education

3

Modern Apprenticeship, Foundation Apprenticeship

Technical Apprenticeship, Higher Apprenticeship

Apprenticeship

8

8

Graduate Apprenticeship, Technical Apprenticeship

Professional Apprenticeship, Graduate Apprenticeship

10

Apprenticeship

9

Apprenticeship, Not yet developed

10 8

Higher level Apprenticeship, Not yet developed

9

Professional Apprenticeship, Graduate Apprenticeship

11

12

Scotland Ireland

Qualified/Skilled worker Entry to higher education Completion of secondary education

Doctoral Degree

4

Postgraduate certificates

Intermediate qualifications within the second cycle

Higher Apprenticeship

9

6

11

5

Degree Apprenticeship, Higher Apprenticeship

7

6

4

6

Postgraduate diplomas

Second cycle (end of cycle) qualifications

7

7

Master’s degrees (including Integrated Master’s)

Third cycle (end of cycle) qualifications

8

Degree Apprenticeship, Higher Apprenticeship

10

Specialised education and training

7

12

LEVEL

8

8

NFQ Corresponding IE FQ-EHEA cycle level

Framework for higher education qualifications in England, Wales and Northern Ireland www.qaa.ac.uk

Degree Apprenticeship, Higher Apprenticeship, Not yet developed

Doctoral degrees

FHEQ FQHEIS/ level SCQF level

Entry to professional graduate employment

8

Typical higher education qualifications within each level

For more information on compatibility with these frameworks see: http://ec.europa.eu/eqf/home_en.htm and www.enic-naric.net.

Table 2 shows the outcome of verifying the compatibility of higher education frameworks for Scotland (FQHEIS/SCQF), for England, Wales and Northern Ireland (FHEQ) and for the NFQ for Ireland (NFQ IE) with the FQ-EHEA as follows:

Higher education Advanced Skills Training

Wales

10 9 8/7 6 5 4 3 2/1

Northern Ireland

12 11 10/9 8/7 6 5 4 3 2 1

England

8 7 6 5/4 3 2 1 E3 E2 E1

The National Framework of Qualifications for Ireland (NFQ IE)

Scope of Apprenticeships across the UK and Ireland

8 7 6 5/4 3 2 1 E3 E2 E1

Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework (SCQF)

Level

8 7 6 5/4

Credit and Qualifications Framework for Wales (CQFW)

Level

8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

Regulated Qualifications Framework England/ Northern Ireland (RQF)

Level

Framework for Higher Education Qualifications in England/ Northern Ireland (FHEQ)

Professional or postgraduate education, research or employment

Level

Table 1 shows the correspondence of levels established between national qualifications frameworks and the EQF:

Qualifications can be taken at any age in order to continue or return to education or training

Level

Within Europe, two overarching qualifications frameworks exist to which the national qualifications frameworks of the UK and Ireland relate: The European Qualifications Framework (EQF) and the Framework for Qualifications of the European Higher Education Area (FQ-EHEA) also known as the Bologna Framework.

Professional Apprenticeship, Not yet developed

Main stages of education/employment

Correspondences between UK and Irish frameworks with European qualifications frameworks

European Qualifications Framework (EQF)

Qualifications are different in different countries. However, there are some clear stages people move through in education, training and work that are common to most countries. Primary education is followed by secondary education and then initial entry into employment and/or further higher education or training. The main table gives an indication of how you can compare qualifications across national boundaries. Examples of major qualifications at each level are provided. For more detail of the current qualifications in each country, you will need to consult the website

Higher Level Apprenticeship

Recruiting people with Irish qualifications in the UK or people with UK qualifications in Ireland? You may be interested in the answer to these questions. ■ How do I know what a qualification from another country means in terms of level?

■ Which national qualification should I compare this qualification to? ■ Where can I find more detailed information about the content and level of qualifications?

5

ARE you thinking of working or studying in the UK or Ireland? You may be interested in the answer to one or more of these questions: ■ What do they call the qualification which compares most closely with mine? ■ Will I get some recognition for the qualifications I have? ■ What kind of job or course can I apply for with my current qualification?

The table gives an indication of how you can compare qualifications across national boundaries. Examples of major qualifications at each level are provided. Secondary education. Initial entry into For more detail of the qualifications Regulation employment or further education that are current and legacy at the time QAA SCQF Partnership CCEA Regulation of publication in each country, will Southgate House 201 West George Street 29 Clarendon Road, you Clarendon Southgate Street Glasgow Belfast BT1given 3BG at the need to consult Dock, the website Gloucester, GL1 1UB G2 2LW Tel: +44 (0)28 9026 1200 Qualifications can cross boundaries head of each column. +44 (0)1452 557050 Email: info@scqf.org.uk Email: info@ccea.org.uk - a Tel: guide to comparing qualifications www.qaa.ac.uk www.scqf.org.uk www.ccea.org.uk This leaflet is designed to give some in the UK and Ireland, information to help you begin this Seventh edition published process, for example, by telling September 2019 you what your qualification, Ofqual CQFW, Welsh Government and Qualifications Ireland or qualificationsQuality you are interested Earlsdon Park Sarn Mynach (QQI) in studying, are broadly comparable 53-55 Butts Road Llandudno Junction 26-27 Denzille lane Coventry, CV1 3BH Conwy Dublin to in other countries. Tel: +44 (0)300 303 3344 LL31 9RZ Email: public.enquiries@ofqual.gov.uk Email: cqfw.enquiries@gov.wales www.gov.uk/ofqual www.cqfw.net

D02 P266 Tel: +353 (0)1 905 8100 www.qqi.ie


uide Briefing:

ifications comparison given at the heading of each column. Qualifications in each of these frameworks change from time to time and you need to check the relevant websites for the latest versions (as well as for earlier versions of the framework where these are available). Entry requirements for jobs and courses often vary within a country. This means you will need to check specific requirements with the employer or institution for the job or course that you are interested in. How to use the main table: ■ The table provides information that allows you to look at the ways qualifications are organised in the UK and Ireland. ■ It shows which qualifications in other countries are broadly comparable to your qualifications (or those that you are interested

Regulated Qualifications Framework for England and Northern Ireland www.ofqual.gov.uk www.ccea.org.uk LEVEL

8

7

6

Vocational, Technical and Professional Qualifications

Vocational, Technical and Professional Qualifications

Vocational, Technical and Professional Qualifications

Credit and Qualifications Framework for Wales www.cqfw.net

LEVEL

8

Doctoral Degree, Vocational Qualifications

7

Master’s Degree, Vocational Qualifications, Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE)

6

Honours Degree, Vocational Qualifications, Professional Certificate in Education

in taking). ■ On the left side of the table you will find the main stages of education or employment - you can find where you are in these stages. ■ To the right of this you can see the nearest levels and similar kinds of qualifications that are used in each country. ■ This makes it possible to draw broad comparisons, rather than direct equivalences, between qualifications and their levels for each country. ■ The left table indicates how Irish and UK qualifications frameworks relate to qualifications frameworks in Europe. ■ These tables are updated periodically. Check one of the websites for the most up-to-date version.

National Framework of Qualifications for Ireland www.qqi.ie

LEVEL

10

Doctoral Degree, Higher Doctorate

9

Master’s Degree, Postgraduate Diploma

8

Honours Bachelor Degree, Higher Diploma

Ordinary Bachelor Degree

LEVEL

Doctoral Degree, Professional

12 Apprenticeship, Professional

Development Award (PDA), Award

11

Master’s Degree, Integrated Master’s Degree, Postgraduate Diploma, Postgraduate Certificate, Professional Apprenticeship, Graduate Apprenticeship, PDA, SVQ, Award

10

Bachelor’s Degree with Honours, Graduate Diploma, Graduate Certificate, Professional Apprenticeship, Graduate Apprenticeship, PDA, SVQ, Award

9

Bachelor’s/Ordinary Degree, Graduate Diploma, Graduate Certificate, Graduate Apprenticeship, Technical Apprenticeship, PDA, SVQ, Award

8

Higher National Diploma (HND), Diploma of Higher Education (DipHE), Technical Apprenticeship, Higher Apprenticeship, PDA, SVQ, Award

7

Higher National Certificate (HNC), Certificate of Higher Education (CertHE), Modern Apprenticeship, PDA, SVQ, Scottish Baccalaureate, Advanced Higher, Award

5

Foundation Degree, Vocational Qualifications, Higher National Diploma (HND)

4

Vocational, Technical and Professional Qualifications, Higher National Certificate (HNC)

4

Higher National Certificate (HNC), Certificate of Higher Education (CertHE), Vocational Qualifications

3

Vocational, Technical and Professional Qualifications, GCE AS and A Level

3

Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced, Vocational Qualifications, GCE, AS and A Level, Access to HE

5

Level 5 Certificate, Leaving Certificate

6

Modern Apprenticeship, Foundation Apprenticeship, National Progression Award (NPA), National Certificate, PDA, SVQ, Award

2

Vocational & Technical Qualifications, GCSE at grade A*-C and grade 9-4, Functional Skills (England), Essential Skills Qualification (NI)

2

Welsh Baccalaureate National, Vocational Qualifications, Essential Skills Wales Qualifications, GCSE at grade A*-C

4

Level 4 Certificate, Leaving Certificate

5

National 5, Modern Apprenticeship, SVQ, NPA, National Certificate, Award

1

Vocational & Technical Qualifications, GCSE at grade D-G and grade 3-1, Functional Skills (England), Essential Skills Qualifications (NI)

1

Welsh Baccalaureate Foundation, Vocational Qualifications, Essential Skills Wales Qualifications, GCSE at grade D-G

3

Level 3 Certificate, Junior Certificate

4

National 4, SVQ, NPA, National Certificate Award

2

Level 2 Certificate

3

National 3, NPA, National Certificate, Award

Entry Level Certificate (sub levels 1-3), Functional Skills (England), Essential Skills Qualifications (NI)

Entry Level

7

Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework www.scqf.org.uk

2

National 2, NPA, National Certificate, Award

1

National 1, Award

Entry Level

5

Vocational, Technical and Professional Qualifications, Higher National Diploma (HND)

Entry Level Qualifications, Essential Skills Qualifications

6

1

Advanced Certificate, Higher Certificate

Level 1 Certificate

Education 67


Lullymore - exciting new venue for Field Trips and Environmental Tours LULLYMORE Heritage & Discovery Park in Rathangan, Co. Kildare is now offering Leaving Cert Biology Field Trips and Environmental Tours designed for Junior Cert/Transition Year Geography/Science students and can also be adapted for Third Level students. The Park, set on 60 acres of ancient woodland and rehabilitating peatland, won Best Environmental Innovation at the Irish Tourism Industry Awards in 2017 and is renowned for its biodiversity and unique combination of mineral soil and acidic peatland habitats. Students will get the opportunity to explore the plant and animal life present on these habitats and get a comprehensive insight into the peatlands and the people who have lived around them for millennia. The Field Trips immerse students in a woodland habitat and cover mapping, biotic/abiotic/qualitative/quantitative (quadrats)/line & belt transects/adaptations/food webs and prepare students in a very practical way for exams. Workbooks are provided for each Field Trip student. Cost per student is â&#x201A;Ź13.00 for Field Trips and â&#x201A;Ź12.00 for Environment Tours. Cafe on site can cater for up to 200 for lunches. FIND OUT MORE: To book call 045 870 238 or contact Ray by email:ray@lullymoreheritagepark.com. Website: www.lullymoreheritagepark.com

Just one donation can save up to 3 lives We need over 3,000 units of blood every week

Creative, Hands on Educational & Fun Pottery School Tours & Pottery Parties for all ages

National & Secondary Schools BALLYMORRIS, CRATLOE, CO CLARE.

P: 061 357118 www.ballymorrispottery.ie 68 Education

Download the "Blood Donor Schools Education Pack" at giveblood.ie or call us on 01 432 2800 for more information.

Every new donor, every new donation saves many lives. #EveryOneCounts Follow us for more updates and news


Great experiences in a stunning environment DELPHI Resort is nestled in the heart of the Delphi valley, Connemara, an area of outstanding natural beauty. Located on a 200 acre forest site along Ireland’s Wild Atlantic Way, breathtaking mountain vistas provide a dramatic backdrop to the Resort which overlooks the banks of the Bundorragha River. Delphi Resort has undergone a huge transformation over the last 30 years, without losing its roots as a premier adventure destination in Ireland. Established over 35 years ago as an adventure centre and hostel catering for both domestic and international school children, Delphi Resort has evolved into one of Irelands' leading destinations and now boasts a newly built 206-bed Failte Ireland ‘Welcome Standard’ approved hostel, 4* Hotel, Restaurant, Bar, Spa, Yoga Studio, Cafe, and onsite Adventure Centre. Outdoor education Throughout the years the schools and youth group outdoor education and adventure programmes have remained at the heart of Delphi Resorts’ offering. Delphi Resort’s stimulating environment helps to change perspectives and broaden the horizons of pupils. There is something exhilarating about being outdoors and Delphi Resorts’ multi-activity programmes encourage students to experience the great outdoors through an exciting itinerary of land and water-based activities. Everything from a Gaisce hike to kayaking the Killary Fjord, the infamous Bog Challenge, Aerial Zip-Line and Trekking, Archery, Climbing and much, much more. Building students' skills These activities help build students’ self-confidence and develop greater emotional intelligence, inter-personal skills and team spirit in a safe and awe-inspiring environment. Delphi Resort offers all-inclusive actionpacked school/youth group packages with activities running from 9.30am-9pm daily and 24 hour supervision provided for students. One teacher travels free of charge per 15 students, with teachers accommodation provided in the 4* Hotel. Over 200 school/youth groups choose Delphi Resort annually for their adventure trip, with over 99% of the school’s and youth groups Delphi welcomed last year planning a return trip. Some of the feedback from past groups include “Delphi just keeps getting better and better” and “Best school tour bar none!” More than an adventure centre Today, Delphi is far from just an adventure centre, it is an experience – one that warmly welcomes all visitors, from those seeking adrenaline-fuelled adventures, action-packed school and youth group tours, corporate team bonding trips to romantic getaways, quality-time family trips or those seeking pure relaxation. Education 69


Explore Ireland’s marine environment and biodiversity GALWAY Atlantaquaria is the National Aquarium of Ireland. As Ireland’s largest Native Species Aquarium, we are the perfect location for school tours, field trips and workshops based around Ireland’s diverse marine environment and biodiversity, sustainability, environmental awareness, care and ecology investigation. We cater for students of all ages, with options available to pre-school, primary, secondary and third level educational needs. We are located on the seafront in Salthill, within easy access to parking, food service providers and habitats to explore.

70 Education

·

· · · · ·

Educational options Our educational options include: Galway Field Studies Modules including Grassland and Seashore Ecology Investigations (secondary level only) Seashore Safaris (preschool and primary)* Animal anatomy workshop based around a squid dissection (primary and secondary)* Engineering Workshops based on designing flood defences* (primary and secondary) Maths Workshop based around tank design in the aquarium (primary and secondary) Sustainability Workshop based on

fisheries and sustainable food production (secondary) · Marine Litter Workshop based on materials and environmental "We cater for awareness and care, and students of all responsible personal choices. ages, with Option to include a beach clean options on our local shore available to available to schools. (primary and secondary) pre-school, · Water Investigations Workshop primary, based on the properties and secondary and characteristics of water and the third level oceans. (pre-school and educational primary)* needs" *DPSM accredited workshops. All workshops include a one hour guided tour of the aquarium.


Christian Brothers

Edmund Rice and the Christian Brothers

Christian Brothers

B

LESSED Edmund Rice founded the Christian Brothers in 1802. His life had led him to explore at a deeper level his experience of religious faith while also reaching out to the neediest in society. He decided to found schools for the education of poor boys. The Christian Brothers have followed and adapted this tradition in more than twenty-six countries throughout the world. In the developing world, there is still a pressing call to provide education for the poor as a pathway to liberation and human dignity. Nowadays, Brothers also work in townships, villages and slum areas as teachers while also co-ordinating health, social services and adult education among the people of these communities. In the western world, Brothers still teach in schools and colleges. In more recent times they are engaging in projects for youth, the disadvantaged and migrant peoples. They run centres for spiritual development, educational life centres and adult education. Christian Brothers today recognise the need to engage in a new spiritual search and in a new search for meaning. There has been a rapid change in the faith and consciousness of people in the twenty-first century. Scientific and religious knowledge are discovering each other in new and creative ways. The challenge today is for education in a new experience of religious meaning and purposefulness in the world.

In a new search for – Meaning Spiritual Living Justice with Peace To make a difference – By living a full life with a new mission in brotherhood

For more information contact: Brother David Gibson, Christian Brothers Province Centre, Griffith Avenue, Marino, Dublin 9. Email: gibson@edmundrice.eu

Education 71


S E I T R E E B

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G E L L O S C R A E Y 0 5

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72 Education

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Start Learning Something New. Apply online at www.libertiescollege.ie

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Our new pre-apprenticeship course in ICT/Networking opens doors to careers in IT.

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With QQI Level 5 and Level 6 qualifications, our students greatly improve their prospects for a third level qualification.

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Reference Guide Briefing:

The education system in numbers Number of full-time students in institutions aided by the Department of Education, 2019/2020

Number of teachers/academic staff in institutions aided by the Department of Education

Level First Level

Level

Students 567,716

Primary Schools

559,365

Special Schools

8,351

Second Level (excluding PLC students)

371,450

Secondary

201,778

Vocational

108,303

Community and Comprehensive

61,369

Second-level Students in PLC Courses

24,161

Number of Teaching Staff (Full-time Equivalent Posts) 2018/19 2019/20

First Level All Sceond Level Second Level Excluding PLC PLC

No. of teachers/academic staff 2018/19 2017/18 37,341 37,839 30,062 30,623 28,474 29,122 1,588 1,501

Number of schools aided by the Department of Education 2016/2017 2018/19

2019/20

First Level

3,240

3,240

Primary Schools (Mainstream)

3,106

3,106

Special Schools

134

134

First Level

37,341

37,839

Second Level

30,062

30,623

Second Level

722

723

Second Level excluding PLC

28,474

29,122

Secondary

378

381

1,588

1,501

Vocational

248

246

96

96

3,962

3,963

PLC

Overview of Pupil-Teacher Ratio at First and Second Level 2018/19 2019/20 First Level

15.2

15.0

Second Level

13.0

12.9

Second Level excluding PLC

12.7

12.7

PLC

18.5

16.1

School Size at First and Second Level in 2019/2020

Community and Comprehensive Total

The Pupil Teacher Ratio in National Schools Total enrolment in all national schools (at the start of the school year) Total number of allocated posts (as at the 30th June in the given school year)

2018/19

2019/20

567,772

567,716

37,341

37,839

15.2

15.0

553,319

552,543

First Level

Second Level

Fewer than 50 pupils

578

10

50 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 99

673

15

Total enrolment in mainstream classes

100 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 199

742

63

Teaching teachers of mainstream classes

22,747

22,970

200 - 299

546

93

300 - 499

429

183

Average class size in mainstream classes

24.3

24.1

2018 62,562 57,150

2019 64,331 58,787

51,445 2,556 439 2,710 119,712

52,965 2,726 380 2,716 123,118

500+

138

359

Total

3,106

723

Expenditure per Student (euro 2015 prices) 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015

Primary 6,418 6,417 6,326 6,005 6,295

Secondary 8,860 8,939 8,320 8,115 8,257

Third Level 9,223 8,721 8,194 7,591 7,576

Pupil-teacher ratio in all national schools

Public Examination Candidates Junior Certificate Candidates Leaving Certificate Candidates of which Leaving Certificate School Candidates External Candidates VTOS/PLC Candidates Leaving Certificate Applied Total Exam Candidates

Past Enrolments of Full-time Students in Institutions Aided by Department of Education & Skills Level

1979/1980

1989/1990

1999/2000

2009/2010

2019/2020

First Level

547,431

552,182

444,310

505,998

567,716

Second Level (excludes PLC)

292,280

339,649

330,482

312,159

371,450

-

-

24,337

38,528

24,161

839, 711

891,831

799,129

856,685

963,327

PLC Total (includes PLC figure, where applicable)

Education 73


Education REFERENCE GUIDE

Listings Careers Information . . . . . . . . 74, 75 Government Departments . . . . . . .75 Government Services . . . . . . . . . .75 Education Institutes . . . . . . . . . . .76 Education and Training Boards . . .77 Education Centres. . . . . . . . . . . . .77

Careers Information AONTAS National Association of Adult Education 2nd Floor, 83/87 Main St, Ranelagh, Dublin 6. ☎ 01 4068220  www.aontas.com The Arts Council 70 Merrion Sq, Dublin 2. ☎ 01 6180200  www.artscouncil.ie Association of Advertisers in Ireland Ltd 120 - 121 Lower Baggot Street, Dublin D02 FD45. ☎ 01-6599457  www.aai.ie Association of Chartered Certified Accountants La Touche House, 1st Floor IFSC, Dublin 1.D01 R5P3. ☎ +44 (0)141 582 2000  www.accaglobal.com/ie Chambers of Commerce of Ireland 11 St Stephen's Green, D2 D02 FY84. ☎ 01 4004300  www.chambers.ie Association of Consulting Engineers of Ireland 46 Merrion Sqr, Dublin D02 VF66. ☎ 01 6425588  www.acei.ie Association of Garda Sergeants & Inspectors 6th Floor, Phibsborough Tower, Dublin 7. ☎ 01 8303166  www.agsi.ie Association of Occupational Therapists of Ireland 18 Herbert St, Grand Canal Dock, Dublin, D02 FK19. ☎ 01 874 8136  www.aoti.ie Association of Secondary Teachers of Ireland Thomas MacDonagh House, Winetavern Street, Dublin D08 P9V6. ☎ 01 6040160  www.asti.ie An Bord Altranais 18/20 Carysfort Ave, Blackrock, Dublin. A94 R299 ☎ 01 6398500  www.nmbi.ie

74 Education

Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport 1 Fitzwilliam Plc, Dublin 2. D02 DT68 ☎ 01 6763188  www.cilt.ie Chartered Institute of Management Accountants Upper Floor Unit 11, 44 -45 The Seapoint Building, Clontarf Road. D03P 657. ☎ 087 2213443  www.cima.ie Chartered Institute of Personnel & Development A3 The Locks, Charlotte Quay Dock, Dublin 4 ☎ 01 6780090  www.cipd.ie Computers in Education Society of Ireland c/o Drumcondra Education Centre, Drumcondra, D9.  www.cesi.ie Construction Industry Federation Construction House, Canal Road, Dublin 6. ☎ 01 4066000  www.cif.ie Design and Crafts Council of Ireland Castleyard, Kilkenny. R95 CAA6 ☎ 056 7761804  dcci.ie Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies 10 Burlington Road, Dublin. D04 C932. ☎ 01 6140100  www.dias.ie Dublin Adult Learning Centre 3 Mountjoy Square, D1. ☎ 01 8787266  www.dalc.ie Economic and Social Research Institute Whitaker Square, Sir John Rogerson’s Quay, Dublin D02 K138. ☎ 01 8632000  www.esri.ie Education Research Centre DCU St. Patrick’s College, Drumcondra. D09 AN2F. ☎ 01 8373789  www.erc.ie Engineers Ireland 22 Clyde Road, Ballsbridge, Dublin 4. D04 R3N2 ☎ 01 6651300  www.engineersireland.ie

Gorta Self Help Africa, 17 - 22 Parkgate Street, Dublin D08 NRP2 ☎ 01 6615522  www.selfhelpafrica.org

Institute of Public Administration 57/61 Lansdowne Rd, Dublin D04 TC62 ☎ 01 2403600  www.ipa.ie

Honourable Society of King’s Inn Henrietta Street, Dublin 1. ☎ 01 8744840  www.kingsinns.ie

Institute of Industrial Engineers Great George's Street, Waterford City. X91 AH9K. ☎ 01 5252527  www.iie.ie

Irish Institute of Training and Development 4 Sycamore House, Millennium Business Park, Naas, Co Kildare. W91 TF95 ☎ 045 881166  www.iitd.ie

Insurance Institute of Ireland Insurance Centre, 5 Harbourmaster Place, IFSC, Dublin 1, D01 E7E8. ☎ 01 6456600  www.iii.ie

Insurance Ireland Insurance Centre, 5 Harbourmaster Place, IFSC, Dublin 1, DO1 E7E8 ☎ 01 676 1820  www.insuranceireland.eu

Irish Association of Social Workers 114 Pearse St., Dublin 2. ☎ 086 024 1055  www.iasw.ie

Irish Management Institute Sandyford Road, Dublin 16. ☎ 1800 22 33 88  www.imi.ie

Society of Chartered Surveyors Ireland 38 Merrion Square, Dublin 2. D02 EV61 ☎ 01 6445500  www.scsi.ie

NewsBrands Ireland Clyde Lodge, 15 Clyde Road, Ballsbridge, Dublin 4. ☎ 01 668 9099  newsbrandsireland.ie

Law Society of Ireland Blackhall Place, Dublin 7. D07 VY24. ☎ 01 6724800  www.lawsociety.ie Accounting Technicians Ireland 47-49 Pearse Street, Dublin 2. D02 YN40 ☎ 01 649 8100 accountingtechniciansireland.ie Institute of Advertising Practitioners in Ireland 12 Clanwilliam Square, Grand Canal Quay, Dublin 2. D02 CD51 ☎ 01 6765991  www.iapi.ie

Irish Fish Producers' Organisation 8 Anvil Court, Killybegs, Co Donegal. ☎ 074 9741468  www.ifpo.ie

The Institute of Banking IFSC, 1 North Wall Quay, Dublin 1. D01 T8Y1 ☎ 01 6116500  www.iob.ie

Irish Congress of Trade Unions 31/32 Parnell Sq, Dublin 1. ☎ 01 8897777  www.ictu.ie

Institute of Certified Public Accountants in Ireland 17 Harcourt Street, Dublin 2. D02 W963 ☎ 01 4251000  www.cpaireland.ie

Irish Council for International Students 41 Morehampton Road, Dublin 4. D04 AE28 ☎ 01 6605233  www.internationalstudents.ie

Chartered Accountants Ireland Chartered Accountants House, 47 Pearse St, Dublin 2. ☎ 01 6377200  www.charteredaccountants.ie

Irish Dental Association Unit 2, Leopardstown Office Park, Sandyford, Dublin 18. ☎ 01 2950072  www.dentist.ie

Institute of Guidance Counsellors 17 Herbert Street, Dublin 2. ☎ 01 6761975  www.igc.ie

Irish Farmers Association Irish Farm Centre, Bluebell, Dublin 12. ☎ 01 4500266  www.ifa.ie

Irish Pharmacy Union Butterfield House, Butterfield Ave., Dublin 14. ☎ 01 4936401  www.ipu.ie

Institute of Professional Auctioneers & Valuers 129 Lower Baggot Street, Dublin 2. ☎ 01 6785685  www.ipav.ie

Irish Recorded Music Association IRMA House, 1 Corrig Ave, Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin.  www.irma.ie

Irish Professional Photographers Association 38/39 Fitzwilliam Square, Dublin 2. ☎ 01 401 6878  www.irishphotographers.com

Irish Medical Organisation 10 Fitzwilliam Place, Dublin D02 Y322 ☎ 01 6767273  www.imo.ie Irish National Teachers Organisation 35 Parnell Square, D1. ☎ 01 8047700  www.into.ie Irish Nurses and Midwives Organisation The Whitworth Building, North Burnswick St, Dublin D07 NP8H ☎ 01 6640600  www.inmo.ie


Careers Information (cont) Irish Society of Chartered Physiotherapists College of Surgeons St. Stephen’s Green, Dublin. D02 H903 ☎ 01 4022148  www.iscp.ie Irish Taxation Institute South Block, Longboat Quay, Grand Canal Harbour, Dublin. D02 H927 ☎ 01 6631700  www.taxinstitute.ie Education and Training Boards Ireland (ETBI) Piper's Hill, Kilcullen Road, Naas, Co Kildare Phone: 045-901070 / 045-901698  www.etbi.ie Marketing Institute of Ireland South County Business Park, Leopardstown, Dublin 18. D18 E659 ☎ 01 2952355  www.mii.ie

Meet in Ireland Amiens Street, Dublin 1. ☎ 01 884 7134  www.meetinireland.com The Olympic Federation of Ireland Olympic House, Harbour Rd, Howth, Co Dublin. D13 XK75 ☎ 01 8660555  www.olympics.ie Pharmaceutical Society of Ireland PSI House, Fenian Street, Dublin 2. D02 TD72 ☎ 01 2184000  www.thepsi.ie Irish Photographic Federation ✍ info@irishphoto.ie  www.irishphoto.ie

Public Relations Institute of Ireland 84 Merrion Square, Dublin 2. D02 T882 ☎ 01 6618004  www.prii.ie

The College of Progressive Education 38-40 Parliament Street, Dublin 2. ☎ 01 4884300  progressivecollege.ie

Royal Institute of Architects of Ireland 8 Merrion Square, Dublin 2. ☎ 01 6761703  www.riai.ie

Society of Actuaries in Ireland Clanwilliam House Clanwilliam Place Dublin D02 AV90 ☎ 01 634 0020  www.actuaries.ie

Teagasc Oak Park, Carlow. R93 XE12 ☎ 059 9170200  www.teagasc.ie Association of Optometrists Ireland Kevin Culliton Rooms, 13 Greenmount House, Harolds Cross Rd, Dublin 6W. ☎ 01 453 8850  www.optometrists.ie

Society of the Irish Motor Industry 5 Upper Pembroke Street, Dublin 2. ☎ 01 6761690  www.simi.ie Teachers Union of Ireland 73 Orwell Road, Rathgar, Dublin 6. ☎ 01 4922588  www.tui.ie

Union of Students in Ireland The Union of Students in Ireland, 14 Mount Street Upper, Dublin 2. D02 EY24. ☎ 01 7099300  www.usi.ie VECSI Student Cultural Exchange Association Scotsmans Rd, Monkstown, Cork. ☎ 0214841470  www.vecsi.com Veterinary Ireland 13 The Courtyard, Kilcarbery Park, Nangor Road, Dublin 22. D22 XH05 ☎ 01 4577976  www.veterinaryireland.ie Vocations Ireland 36 Cloran Court, Athboy, Co Meath, C15H2CS ☎ 01 260 3707  www.vocationsireland.com

Government Departments Dail Eireann Leinster House, Dublin D02 XR20 ☎ 01 6183000  www.oireachtas.ie Dept of Agriculture, Food & the Marine Kildare Street. D02 WK12 ☎ 01 6072000  www.agriculture.gov.ie Department of Business, Enterprise and Innovation 23 Kildare Street, Dublin D02 TD30 ☎ 01 6312121  www.dbei.ie Department of Children and Youth Affairs Block 1, Miesian Plaza, 50-58 Baggot Street Lower, Dublin 2. D02 XWI4. ☎ 01 6473000  www.dcya.gov.ie

Department of Environment, Climate & Communications 29/31 Adelaide Rd, Dublin 2. ☎ 01 6782000 /  www.gov.ie/decc Department of Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht 23 Kildare Street, Dublin D02 TD30 ☎ 01 6313800  www.chg.gov.ie Department of Defence Station Road, Newbridge, Co. Kildare. W12 AD93 ☎ 045 492000  www.defence.ie

Store Street. Dublin 1. ☎ 01 7043000  www.gov.ie/deasp Department of Finance Upper Merrion Street, Dublin D02 R583 ☎ 01 6767571  www.gov.ie/finance Department of Foreign Affairs Iveagh House, 80 St. Stephen’s Green, D02 VY53 ☎ 01 408 2000  dfa.ie

50 – 58 Lower Baggot Street, Dublin, D02 XW14 ☎ 01 6354000  www.gov.ie/health Department of Housing, Local Government and Heritage Custom House, Dublin D01 W6X0 ☎ 01 8882000  www.housing.gov.ie Department of Justice and Equality 51 St Stephen’s Green, Dublin D02 HK52 ☎ 01 6028202  www.justice.ie

Department of of Public Expenditure and Reform Government Buildings, Upper Merrion St, Dublin D02 R583 ☎ 01 676 7571  www.per.gov.ie Department of Rural and Community Development Trinity Point, 10-11 South Leinster Street , Dublin 2 , D02 EF85 ☎ 076 106 4900  www.gov.ie/drcd

Dept of Education and Skills Marlborough St, Dublin D01 RC96 ☎ 01 8896400  www.education.ie

Department of Further and Higher Education, Research, Innovation and Science Marlborough Street, Dublin 1, D01 RC96 ☎ 01 889 6400  www.gov.ie/dfheris

Department of Employment Affairs and Social Protection

Department of Health Block 1, Miesian Plaza,

Department of Tourism, Culture, Arts, Gaeltacht, Sport and Media 23 Kildare Street, Dublin 2, D02 TD30 ☎ 01 8882000  www.gov.ie

Garda Siochana Phoenix Park, Dublin D08 HN3X. ☎ 01 6660000  www.garda.ie

Ombudsman 6 Earlsfort Terrace, Dublin 2, D02 W773 ☎ 01 639 5600  www.ombudsman.ie

Passport Office 42-47, Lower Mount Street, Dublin D02 TN83 ☎ 01 6711633 dfa.ie/passports

HEAnet 5 George’s Dock, IFSC, Dublin D01 X8N7 ☎ 01 6609040  www.heanet.ie

Ordnance Survey of Ireland Phoenix Park, Dublin D08 F6E4 ☎ 01 8025300  www.osi.ie

Irish Prison Service IDA Business Park, Ballinalee Road, Longford. ☎ 043-3335100  www.irishprisons.ie

Department of the Taoiseach Upper Merrion Street, Dublin D02 R583 ☎ 01 6194000  www.taoiseach.gov.ie Department of Transport Leeson Lane, Dublin D02TR60. ☎ 01 6707444  www.gov.ie/transport

Government Services An Bord Pleanála 64 Marlborough Street, Dublin D01 V902 ☎ 01 8588100  www.pleanala.ie

Courts Service of Ireland 15/24 Phoenix Street North, Smithfield, Dublin 7. ☎ 01 8886000  www.courts.ie

Central Statistics Office Skehard Road, Cork. T12 X00E ☎ 021 4535000  www.cso.ie

Data Protection Commissioner 21 Fitzwilliam Square South, Dublin 2. D02 RD28  www.dataprotection.ie

Met Eireann Glasnevin Hill, Dublin D09 Y921 ☎ 01 8064200  www.met.ie

Office of Public Works Jonathan Swift Street, Trim, Co. Meath C15 NX36. ☎ 046 942 6000  www.opw.ie

Revenue Dublin Castle, Dublin 2. ☎ 01 6792777  www.revenue.ie

Education 75


Educational Institutes in Ireland American College Dublin 2 Merrion Square, Dublin 2. D02 NH98 ☎ 01 676 8939  www.iamu.edu Athlone Institute of Technology Dublin Road, Athlone, Co. Westmeath. ☎ 090 6468000  www.ait.ie Burren College of Art Newtown Castle, Ballyvaughan, Co. Clare. ☎ 065 7077200  www.burrencollege.ie Carlow College College Street, Carlow R93 A003 ☎ 059 9153200  www.carlowcollege.ie Cavan Institute Cathedral Rd, Drumalee, Cavan, H12 E426 ☎ 049 433 2633  www.cavaninstitute.ie Church of Ireland Theological Institute Braemor Park, Dublin D14 KX24 ☎ 01 492 3506  www.theologicalinstitute.ie Cork Institute of Technology Bishopstown, Cork T12 P928 ☎ 021 4326100  www.cit.ie CIT Cork School of Music Union Quay, Cork T12 E9HY ☎ 021 480 7310  csm.cit.ie CIT Crawford College of Art & Design Sharman, Crawford St, Cork. ☎ 021 4335200  crawford.cit.ie DCU Church of Ireland Centre CIC Office, AHCDG09 , Dunboyne House, DCU All Hallows. ☎ 01 700 6074  www.dcu.ie/ church-of-ireland-centre DCU Institute of Education DCU St. Patrick's Campus, Drumcondra, Co. Dublin. ☎ 01 884 2212  dcu.ie/instituteofeducation Dublin Business School 13-14 Aungier Street, Dublin D02 WC04 ☎ 01 4177500  www.dbs.ie Dublin City University Dublin 9. ☎ 01 7005000  www.dcu.ie

76 Education

Dundalk Institute of Technology Dublin Road, Dundalk, Co. Louth. A91 K584 ☎ 042 9370200  www.dkit.ie Dun Laoghaire Institute of Art Design & Technology IADT Kill Avenue, Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin. A96 KH79 ☎ 01 2394000  www.iadt.ie

Limerick Institute of Technology Moylish Pk, Limerick. V94 EC5T ☎ 061 293000  www.lit.ie Marino Institute of Education Griffith Avenue, Dublin 9. ☎ 01 8057700  www.mie.ie Mary Immaculate College South Circular Road, Limerick. ☎ 061 204300  www.mic.ul.ie

Maynooth University Froebel Department of Primary and Early Childhood Education ☎ 01 474 7400  www.nuim.ie/froebel

Maynooth University Maynooth, Co. Kildare. ☎ 01 7086000  www.maynoothuniversity.ie

Galway-Mayo Institute of Technology Old Dublin Road, Galway H91 T8NW ☎ 091 753161  www.gmit.ie

Milltown Institute of Theology & Philosophy Milltown Park, Sandford Road, Ranelagh, Dublin 6. ☎ 01 269 8388  milltown-institute.ie

Griffith College Cork Mews House, 62 Wellington Rd, Montenotte, Cork, T23 P5PC. ☎ 021 4507027  www.griffith.ie/cork

National College of Art and Design 100 Thomas Street, Dublin 8. D08 K521 ☎ 01 6364200  www.ncad.ie

Griffith College Dublin South Circular Road, Dublin DO8 VO4N ☎ 01 4150400  www.griffith.ie/dublin Griffith College Limerick 3 Quinlan St, Limerick. V94 DK23. ☎ 061-31 00 31  www.griffith.ie/limerick Hibernia College Block B, The Merrion Centre, Merrion Road, Dublin 4. ☎ 01 6610168  www.hiberniacollege.com Institute of Technology, Carlow Kilkenny Road, Carlow. ☎ 059 9175000  www.itcarlow.ie Institute of Technology, Sligo Ash Lane, Ballinode, Co. Sligo. F91 YW50 ☎ 071 9155222  www.itsligo.ie Institute of Technology, Tralee Tralee, Co. Kerry. ☎ 066 7145600  www.ittralee.ie Letterkenny Institute of Technology Port Rd, Letterkenny, Co. Donegal. F92 FC93 ☎ 074 9186000  www.lyit.ie

National College of Ireland (NCI) Mayor Street, International Financial Services Centre, Dublin 1. ☎ 1850 221 721 www.ncirl.ie NUI Galway University Road, Galway H91 TK33 ☎ 091 524411  www.nuigalway.ie Portobello Institute 43 Dominick Street Lower, Dublin 1. ☎ 01 8920000  www.portobelloinstitute.ie Queens University Belfast University Road, Belfast BT7 1NN ☎ 0044 2890 245133  www.qub.ac.uk Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland 123 St. Stephens Green Dublin 2. ☎ 01 4022100  www.rcsi.ie St. Angela’s College Lough Gill, Sligo F91 C634 ☎ 071 9143580  www.stangelas.nuigalway.ie St. Patrick’s College Maynooth Co. Kildare W23 TW77 ☎ 01 7083600  www.maynoothcollege.ie

Shannon College of Hotel Management Shannon Airport, Co. Clare. ☎ 091 497200  nuigalway.ie/ shannoncollege Trinity College Dublin College Green, Dublin 2. D02 PN40 ☎ 01 8961000  www.tcd.ie Technological University Dublin Blanchardstown:01 885 1000 City Centre: 01 402 3000, Tallaght: 1 404 2000  www.tudublin.ie University College Cork Western Road, Cork T12 YN60 ☎ 021 4903000  www.ucc.ie University College Dublin Belfield, Dublin D04 V1W8 ☎ 01 7167777  www.ucd.ie University of Limerick National Technological Park, Limerick V94 T9PX ☎ 061 202700  www.ul.ie University of Ulster Belfast/Coleraine/ Jordanstown/Magee York Street, Belfast, Co. Antrim, BT15 1ED ☎ (048) 7012 3456  www.ulster.ac.uk Waterford Institute of Technology Cork Road, Waterford. X91 K0EK ☎ 051 302000  www.wit.ie OTHER INSTITUTIONS Open University in Ireland 2 Holles St, Saint Peter's, Dublin 2, D02 FP40 ☎ 01 678 5399  www.open.ac.uk/ republic-of-ireland St. Mary’s University College 191 Falls Road, Belfast BT12 6FE, ☎ 048 90327678  www.stmarys-belfast.ac.uk St. Nicholas Montessori College Block C, Century Court George’s Street Upper Dún Laoghaire. A96 R2V3. ☎ 01 230 0080  www.smsi.ie

The College of Progressive Education 38-40 Parliament Street, Dublin 2. ☎ 01 4884300  progressivecollege.ie Stranmillis University College Stranmillis Road, Belfast BT9 5DY. ☎ (048) 90381271  www.stran.ac.uk BUSINESS COLLEGES UCD Lochlann Quinn School of Business Belfield, Dublin 4 ☎ 01 716 4842  www.ucd.ie/quinn UCD Michael Smurfit Graduate Business School Carysfort Avenue, Blackrock, Co Dublin, A94 XF34 ☎ 01 716 8934  www.smurfitschool.ie DCU Ryan Academy Innovation Campus, DCU Alpha, Old Finglas Road, Glasnevin, Dublin 11 ☎ 01-7006786  www.ryanacademy.ie Kemmy Business School University of Limerick ☎ 061 202 700  www.ul.ie/business AGRICULTURAL COLLEGES College of Agriculture, Food & Rural Enterprise (CAFRE) Enniskillen Campus, Co Fermanagh ☎ 028 6634 4853 Greenmount Campus, Co Antrim ☎ 028 9442 6601 Loughry Campus, Co Tyrone ☎ 028 8676 8101  www.cafre.ac.uk Teagasc - Ballyhaise College Ballyhaise, Co Cavan ☎ 01 4338108  www.teagasc.ie/ballyhaise Teagasc College of Amenity Horticulture National Botanic Gardens, Glasnevin, Dublin. ☎ 01 805 9715  www.teagasc.ie/education/ teagasc-colleges/botanicgardens Teagasc - Clonakilty Agricultural College ☎ 023 883 2500  www.teagasc.ie/clonakilty Teagasc - Kildalton College Piltown, Co Kilkenny ☎ 051 644400  www.teagasc.ie/kildalton


Education and Training Boards Education and Training Boards Ireland (ETBI) Piper's Hill, Kilcullen Road, Naas, Co Kildare. ☎ 045-901070 / 045-901698  www.etbi.ie Cavan & Monaghan Education & Training Board info@cmetb.ie  cavanmonaghan.etb.ie Cork Education & Training Board 21 Lavitt's Quay, Cork T12 HYT9 info@corketb.ie  cork.etb.ie City of Dublin Education & Training Board CDETB Administrative Offices, Town Hall, 1-3 Merrion Road Ballsbridge, Dublin 4 ☎ 01 688 0614  cityofdublin.etb.ie Donegal Education & Training Board Administrative Offices Ard O’Donnell Letterkenny. F92 DP98 ☎ 074 916 1600  www.donegaletb.ie

Dublin & Dun Laoghaire Education & Training Board 1 Tuansgate, Belgard Square East, Tallaght, Dublin 24. D24X62W ☎ 01 452 9600  www.ddletb.ie

Kilkenny & Carlow Education & Training Board Kilkenny Office 056 777 0966 Carlow Office ☎ 059 913 8560 HQ: Athy Road, Carlow.  www.kcetb.ie

Galway & Roscommon Education & Training Board Head Office - 091 874 500 County Galway Office ☎ 091 874 500 Roscommon Office ☎ 090 662 6151  galwayroscommon.etb.ie

Laois & Offaly Education & Training Board Laois Office Ridge Road, Portlaoise ☎ 057 862 1352 Offaly Office Castle Buildings, Tara Street, Tullamore, Co. Offaly ☎ 057 934 9400  www.loetb.ie

Kerry Education & Training Board Centrepoint, John Joe Sheehy Road, Tralee, Co. Kerry V92 P2FE ☎ 066 712 1488  www.kerryetb.ie Kildare & Wicklow Education & Training Board Kildare Office Áras Chill Dara, Devoy Park, Naas. ☎ 045 988 000 Wicklow Office Church Street, Wicklow Town, Co. Wicklow ☎ 0404 60 500  kildarewicklow.etb.ie

Limerick & Clare Education & Training Board Limerick Office ☎ 061 442 100 Clare Office ☎ 065 682 8107  limerickclare.etb.ie Longford & Westmeath Education & Training Board Longford Office ☎ 043 3334004 Westmeath Office ☎ 044 934 8389 HQ: Mullingar  longfordwestmeath.etb.ie

Louth & Meath Education & Training Board Dundalk Office Chapel Street, Dundalk, Co. Louth ☎ 042 933 4047 Meath Office Abbey Road, Navan. ☎ 046 906 8200 HQ: Drogheda  www.lmetb.ie Mayo, Sligo & Leitrim Education & Training Board Mayo Office Administrative Offices, Newtown, Castlebar, Co. Mayo. F23 DV78 ☎ 094 902 4188 Sligo Office Quay Street Sligo. F91 XH96 ☎ 071 91 94800 Leitrim Office Administrative Offices, St. George’s Terrace, Carrick-on-Shannon, Co. Leitrim. N41 W2X7 ☎ 071 96 21362  mayosligoleitrim.etb.ie

Tipperary Education & Training Board Nenagh Office Office Church Road, Nenagh, Co. Tipperary. E45 XD59 ☎ 067 31250 Clonmel Office Western Road, Clonmel, Co. Tipperary. E91 WK13 ☎ 052 612 1067  tipperary.etb.ie Waterford & Wexford Education & Training Board HQ/Wexford Office Unit 1, Ardcavan Business Park, Wexford. Y35 P9EA ☎ 053 912 3799 Waterford Sub Office WWETB Training Centre Waterford Industrial Park Cork Road Waterford X91 PX02 ☎ 051 301 500 Dungarvan Sub Office Dungarvan Shopping Centre, Dungarvan, Co Waterford. X35 DE93 ☎ 058 51401  waterfordwexford.etb.ie

Education Centres Athlone Education Centre Moydrum Road, Athlone, Co. Westmeath. ☎ 090 6420400  athloneeducationcentre.com

Ionad Múinteoirí Chonamara Aird Thiar, Cárna, Conamara, Co. na Gaillimhe. ☎ 087 791 6876  www.imchonamara.com

Dublin West Education Centre Old Blessington Road, Tallaght, Dublin 24. ☎ 01 4528000  www.dwec.ie

Limerick Education Centre 1st Floor, Marshal House, Dooradoyle Rd, Limerick. ☎ 061 585060  www.lec.ie

Tipperary Education Centre St. Patrick's College, Thurles, Co. Tipperary. ☎ 086 - 6008860  www.tippec.com

Blackrock Education Centre Kill Ave., Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin. ☎ 01 2365000  www.blackrockec.ie

Cork Education Support Centre Western Road, Cork. ☎ 021 4255600  www.cesc.ie

Galway Education Centre Wellpark, Galway. ☎ 091 745600  www.galwayec.ie

Mayo Education Centre Westport Road, Castlebar, Co. Mayo. ☎ 094 9020700  mayoeducationcentre.ie

Tralee Education Centre North Campus, Dromtacker, Tralee, Co Kerry. ☎ 066 719 5000  www.edcentretralee.ie

Ionad na Múinteoirí Ionad Oideachais Ghort a' Choirce Gort A Choirce, Leitir Ceanainn, Co. Dún na nGall. ☎ 074 9165556 ✉ inmr@eircom.net

Monaghan Education Centre Knockaconny, Armagh Road, Monaghan. ☎ 047 74000  www.metc.ie

Tuam Education Centre St Patrick’s Primary School Dublin Road, Co. Galway. ☎ 093 25877  www.tuamec.ie

Donegal Education Centre Floor 2/3, Pier 1, Quay Street, Donegal. ☎ 074 9723487  www.donegaledcentre.ie

Kildare Education Centre Friary Road, Kildare Town, Co. Kildare. ☎ 045 530200  www.eckildare.ie

Navan Education Centre Athlumney, Navan, Co. Meath. ☎ 046 9067040  www.ecnavan.ie

Waterford Teachers' Centre Newtown Road, Waterford. ☎ 051 311000  www.wtc.ie

Cavan Education Centre Co. Cavan ETB Administrative Offices, Church View Square, Cavan.☎ 049-4332259  www.cavanec.ie

Drumcondra Education Centre Drumcondra, Dublin 9. ☎ 01 8576400  www.ecdrumcondra.ie

Kilkenny Education Centre Seville Lodge, Callan Road, Co. Kilkenny. ☎ 056 7760200  www.eckilkenny.ie

Sligo Education Centre IT Sligo Campus, Ballinode, Sligo. ☎ 071 9138700  www.ecsligo.ie

West Cork Education Centre The Square, Dunmanway, Co Cork ☎ 023 - 8856757  westcorkeducationcentre.com

Clare Education Centre Government Buildings, Kilrush Road, Ennis. ☎ 065 6845500  www.clareed.ie

Dundalk Education Centre 1 Brickfield Gdns, Newry Rd, Dundalk, Co. Louth. ☎ 086 7707400  www.dundalkec.ie

Laois Education Centre Block Road, Portlaoise, Co. Laois. ☎ 057 8672400  www.laoisedcentre.ie

Tarbert Education Centre Comprehensive School, Tarbert, Co. Kerry. ☎ 069 60005  www.tarbertesc.ie

Wexford Education Centre Milehouse Road, Enniscorthy, Co. Wexford. Y21 T271 ☎ 053 9239100  www.ecwexford.ie

Carlow Education Centre Kilkenny Road, Carlow. ☎ 087 2079448  www.eccarlow.ie Carrick-on-Shannon Education Centre, Marymount, Carrick-on-Shannon. ☎ 071 9620383  www.carrickedcentre.ie

Ionad Oideachas An Daingean An Chuillin, An Daingean, Co. Kerry. ☎ 066-9151866  iocdad@eircom.net

Education 77


Reference Guide Briefing:

Calendars for 2020 and 2021 January 2020 M 6 13 T 7 14 W 1 8 15 T 2 9 16 F 3 10 17 S 4 11 18 S 5 12 19

20 21 22 23 24 25 26

27 28 29 30 31

May 2020 M 4 T 5 W 6 T 7 F 1 8 S 2 9 S 3 10

18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25 26 27 28 29 30 31

11 12 13 14 15 16 17

February 2020 M 3 10 T 4 11 W 5 12 T 6 13 F 7 14 S 1 8 15 S 2 9 16

17 18 19 20 21 22 23

June 2020 M 1 8 T 2 9 W 3 10 T 4 11 F 5 12 S 6 13 S 7 14

15 16 17 18 19 20 21

March 2020 M 2 9 T 3 10 W 4 11 T 5 12 F 6 13 S 7 14 S 1 8 15

16 17 18 19 20 21 22

23 30 24 31 25 26 27 28 29

April 2020 M 6 T 7 W 1 8 T 2 9 F 3 10 S 4 11 S 5 12

22 29 23 30 24 25 26 27 28

July 2020 M 6 T 7 W 1 8 T 2 9 F 3 10 S 4 11 S 5 12

13 14 15 16 17 18 19

20 21 22 23 24 25 26

August 2020 M 3 10 17 T 4 11 18 W 5 12 19 T 6 13 20 F 7 14 21 S 1 8 15 22 S 2 9 16 23

November 2020 M 2 9 16 23 30 T 3 10 17 24 W 4 11 18 25 T 5 12 19 26 F 6 13 20 27 S 7 14 21 28 S 1 8 15 22 29

December 2020 M 7 14 21 T 1 8 15 22 W 2 9 16 23 T 3 10 17 24 F 4 11 18 25 S 5 12 19 26 S 6 13 20 27

24 25 26 27 28 29

27 28 29 30 31

13 14 15 16 17 18 19

September 2020 M 7 14 21 28 T 1 8 15 22 29 W 2 9 16 23 30 T 3 10 17 24 F 4 11 18 25 S 5 12 19 26 S 6 13 20 27

October 2020 M 5 12 T 6 13 W 7 14 T 1 8 15 F 2 9 16 S 3 10 17 S 4 11 18

19 20 21 22 23 24 25

January 2021 M 4 11 T 5 12 W 6 13 T 7 14 F 1 8 15 S 2 9 16 S 3 10 17

18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25 26 27 28 29 30 31

February 2021 M 1 8 15 T 2 9 16 W 3 10 17 T 4 11 18 F 5 12 19 S 6 13 20 S 7 14 21

22 23 24 25 26 27 28

March 2021 M 1 8 T 2 9 W 3 10 T 4 11 F 5 12 S 6 13 S 7 14

15 16 17 18 19 20 21

22 29 23 30 24 31 25 26 27 28

April 2021 M 5 T 6 W 7 T 1 8 F 2 9 S 3 10 S 4 11

May 2021 M 3 T 4 W 5 T 6 F 7 S 1 8 S 2 9

17 18 19 20 21 22 23

24 31 25 26 27 28 29 30

June 2021 M 7 T 1 8 W 2 9 T 3 10 F 4 11 S 5 12 S 6 13

21 28 22 29 23 30 24 25 26 27

July 2021 M 5 T 6 W 7 T 1 8 F 2 9 S 3 10 S 4 11

12 13 14 15 16 17 18

19 20 21 22 23 24 25

August 2021 M 2 9 16 T 3 10 17 W 4 11 18 T 5 12 19 F 6 13 20 S 7 14 21 S 1 8 15 22

18 19 20 21 22 23 24

November 2021 M 1 8 15 22 29 T 2 9 16 23 30 W 3 10 17 24 T 4 11 18 25 F 5 12 19 26 S 6 13 20 27 S 7 14 21 28

10 11 12 13 14 15 16

September 2021 M 6 13 20 T 7 14 21 W 1 8 15 22 T 2 9 16 23 F 3 10 17 24 S 4 11 18 25 S 5 12 19 26

78 Education

27 28 29 30

14 15 16 17 18 19 20

October 2021 M 4 11 T 5 12 W 6 13 T 7 14 F 1 8 15 S 2 9 16 S 3 10 17

26 27 28 29 30 31

25 26 27 28 29 30 31

26 27 28 29 30 31

12 13 14 15 16 17 18

20 21 22 23 24 25 26

27 28 29 30

24 31 25 26 27 28 29 30

19 20 21 22 23 24 25

28 29 30 31

26 27 28 29 30

23 30 24 31 25 26 27 28 29

December 2021 M 6 13 20 T 7 14 21 W 1 8 15 22 T 2 9 16 23 F 3 10 17 24 S 4 11 18 25 S 5 12 19 26

27 28 29 30 31


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80 Education

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Education Reference Guide 2020-2021  

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