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Education Since 1987 | w: educationmagazine.ie t: 01-8329246 | e: education@clubi.ie

REFERENCE GUIDE

FIT and J.P. Morgan broaden skills access and opportunities Interview with Dr Padraig Walsh of QQI ■ Education Statistics ■ Smart Futures

Reference ■ Briefings ■ Listings ■ Calendars

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Education REFERENCE GUIDE

Foreword by Richard Bruton TD, Minister for Education and Skills ............................................. 5

Education Since 1987 | w: educationmagazine.ie t: 01-8329246 | e: education@clubi.ie

REFERENCE GUIDE

Studying Nursing or Midwifery at UCD ........................................................................................ 6 COVER STORY: FIT and J.P. Morgan broaden skills access and opportunities ............................... 8 Special Feature: Qualifications you can carry: Interview with Dr Padraig Walsh of QQI ............ 10 Cooking up a career with GMIT College of Tourism & Arts ........................................................ 14 News: Fitness to teach rules commence; IUA welcomes funding report; New admissions law in 2017; NASA selects UCD alumnus for undersea mission ........................ 16

FIT and J.P. Morgan broaden skills access and opportunities Interview with Dr Padraig Walsh of QQI n Education Statistics n Smart Futures

Reference n Briefings n Listings n Calendars

Special Feature: Education Funding - down to three options ................................................... 18 BRIEFING: Financial support for students .................................................................................. 23 Dundrum College of Further Education - A real alternative and better outcomes for students ... 25 Study for your university degree in the north west ..................................................................... 26 Shape a future with Saint Nicholas Montessori College Ireland .................................................. 27

Editor: Niall Gormley Production: Michael Farrell

Smart Futures: How teachers can help inspire the next generation in STEM ............................ 29 Innovation and modern teaching methods in a new university at University of Wales Trinity Saint David (UWTSD) .................................................................................................. 31 ETC Consult: Should we all be going to College? ...................................................................... 32

Publishers Ard Education Ltd. E: education@clubi.ie www.educationmagazine.ie

FESTO - Industry 4.0 is all about future production processes .................................................... 33

Design Real Issues 086-8986827

Peter Cahill Engineering - Ireland’s Leading Locker Manufacturer ............................................... 38

Printers Nicholson & Bass Ltd

Families, pre-schools, schools and businesses - collect and donate your old Lego to Jack & Jill... 35 Infographic: Graduate Ways: First Destination of 2014 Graduates ........................................... 36 Become a music or drama teacher with the Leinster School of Music and Drama ...................... 38 Horticulture as a career path at Teagasc College of Amenity Horticulture................................... 39 Making the right choice at Sallynoggin College of Further Education......................................... 41 BRIEFING: National Framework of Qualifications ....................................................................... 42 NLN - a stepping stone between secondary school and further education ................................. 45 BRIEFING: Travelling with your Irish qualification ....................................................................... 46 An enviable reputation for programme delivery at Stillorgan College of Further Education ........ 48 BRIEFING: The education system in numbers ............................................................................ 49 LISTINGS

At the time of press information in Education is believed to be accurate and authoritative. However, some information may change due to circumstances beyond our control. Acceptance of advertisements, does not constitute an endorsement of products or services by the publishers.

Š 2016. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited. ISSN 0791-6161

Careers Information ........................................................................................................50 Government Departments ...............................................................................................51 Government Services .......................................................................................................51 Education Institutes in Ireland ..........................................................................................52 Education and Training Boards ........................................................................................53 Education Centres ...........................................................................................................53 REFERENCE: Calendars for 2016 and 2017 .............................................................................. 54 Education 3

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Foreword by Richard Bruton TD, Minister for Education and Skills I am very pleased to be invited to write the foreword for the Education Reference Guide 2016. This year’s edition covers a range of issues that will be of interest to students, learners, parents and educationalists alike. Investment in education is a key priority in the Programme for a Partnership Government. Without a strong economy it is impossible for us to build a compassionate society. Without a fair society it is impossible for us to create a growing economy. Improving the quality of our education and training system is central to the Government’s commitment to increasing economic growth and competitiveness. The ability to attract new jobs, and having our people fill those jobs, is dependent on having a well-educated, well-skilled and adaptable work force. In this context qualifications play an increasingly important role. Quality and Qualifications Ireland (QQI) is the national agency with responsibility for qualifications across the further and higher education and training sectors. One of QQI’s core responsibilities is to act as custodian for I r e l a n d ’s N a t i o n a l F r a m e w o r k o f Qualifications. The National Framework of Qualifications

is a system of ten levels used to describe the Irish qualifications system. The Framework is designed to support and promote access and progression opportunities for learners, improve the transparency of skills and qualifications and facilitate the mobility of qualifications both into and out of Ireland. These issues are explored further in this edition in an interview with Dr. Padraig Walsh, CEO of QQI. Providing financial supports for learners is also vital to achieving increased participation rates in education. A number of improvements to the student support scheme for 2016 have been announced by my Department. These include an extension to the qualifying criteria for receiving the special rate of maintenance grant and the inclusion of a number of additional income disregards. In addition, my Department will also be initiating a review of the Student Support Act, which is now 5 years old. This will ensure that the legislation in this area is reflective of the many changes that have taken place in Irish society since 2011. Further information on the financial supports that are available to students are outlined in this edition.

PEOPLE’S COLLEGE For Adult Education 31 Parnell Square, Dublin 1

The People’s College for Adult Education organises adult education in a wide range of subjects for trade unionists, their families and the general public at very reasonable prices. Most are evening classes but Spanish, Yoga and Creative Writing are offered in the morning. Courses offered include Creative Writing, Languages, Music & Art Appreciation, Yoga, Painting, Photography and History, Film Appreciation. Qigong, Felting and Positive Psychology. The college also has a choir, debating society and a drama group.

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UCD School of Nursing, Midwifery and Health Systems Are you looking for a rewarding, challenging and respected career? Then a career in Nursing or Midwifery is the right career for you. The UCD School of Nursing and Midwifery is Ireland’s leading University School of Nursing and Midwifery and we offer a choice of four major programmes in:

• General Nursing • Mental Health Nursing • Children’s and General Nursing (Integrated) • Midwifery As a UCD student nurse or midwife you will have a unique opportunity to engage in hands-on clinical practice in one of our partner hospitals: • Mater Misericordiae University Hospital • St Michael’s Hospital • St John of God Hospital

Visit UCD for the UCD Open D Saturday 5 ay th November 2016

• St Vincent’s University Hospital • Our Lady’s Children’s Hospital • National Maternity Hospital

These hospitals are centres of clinical excellence and will provide you with a variety of unrivalled clinical learning opportunities and experiences.

For further information about the programmes and the clinical placements visit our website:

www.nmhs.ucd.ie Telephone: +353 1 7166407 / 6569 • email: nursing@ucd.ie

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UCD School of Nursing, Midwifery and Health Systems

Studying Nursing or Midwifery at UCD DO you love working with and for the benefit of people of all ages and from diverse backgrounds? Choosing nursing or midwifery as a career opens up a world of job opportunities that will sustain you throughout your working life. Once qualified as a nurse or midwife you can choose from a broad range of graduate programmes to build your own career pathway that reflects your own personal interests and talents. Whatever your interests (e.g. cancer care, palliative care, diabetes, emergency or critical care, research or education), wherever you choose to work (e.g. the EU, USA, Canada or Africa) the career opportunities are endless. You will become a professional clinician capable of integrating scientific and technical knowledge with the art of caring. You will never stop learning - about health, about illness, about people and the world we live in - nurses continually engage in ongoing professional education and UCD provides a wide range of postgraduate opportunities to suit your personal and professional needs throughout your career. You will rarely have two days that are the same nursing and midwifery are dynamic professions and offer enormous variety and challenges. Although many qualified nurses and midwives work in hospitals, they can also work in a variety of settings, including community setting, e.g. as a Public Health Nurse, mental health services, management and administration, policy making, teaching and research. Why UCD Nursing or Midwifery? Developments in healthcare are transforming the roles of nurses and midwives, leading to new and exciting career opportunities. The UCD School of Nursing, Midwifery and Health Systems has developed innovative programmes to prepare our graduates to respond to these changes and meet changing patient-care needs. Our innovative degree programme is taught by experienced lecturers in a friendly and supportive environment, with state-of-the art facilities, including a top-class clinical skills centre. You will be guided by academics who are experts in the field, and you will gain clinical experience at our renowned clinical partner sites. Our support structures ensure that each student is allocated a Personal Tutor from day one on your programme to provide advice and guidance. Our links with international partner schools allows students to choose 12 week international placements as part of their studies. By choosing to study with us, you become part of a greater community of people working together to shape the future of nursing and midwifery in Ireland and abroad. Education 7

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ICT Education

FIT and J.P. Morgan broaden skills access and opportunities TRAINING and skills organisation FIT launched a new partnership with J.P. Morgan in July 2016, a partnership to widen access and support diversity through the FIT ICT Associate Professional programme. With support from the JPMorgan Chase Foundation, FIT said it is aiming to attract women and men from diverse backgrounds to consider careers in ICT, as demand grows for skilled entrants. The FIT ICT Associate Professional programme is aimed at those who have an interest in and a passion for technology, but perhaps have not had the opportunities to develop those interests, either academically or professionally. The programme provides training and experience in software development and network engineering. The dual education nature of the courses, combining college-based learning with work-based training, broadens the choices available to people, says FIT, particularly those who favour learning by doing. Candidates gain a qualification that will position them well for a career in a technology role across any sector. Carin Bryans, Senior Country Officer of Ireland, J.P. Morgan said: “While the overall labour market situation has improved, young people without university degrees and long-term unemployed still find it difficult accessing quality jobs. "We know that quality training and development of key in-demand skills, including Software Development and Network Engineering, is a powerful strategy for expanding access to opportunity and promoting economic mobility.

"We are excited to support the mainstreaming of apprenticeships in high growth sectors in the economy, like technology, and scaling the ICT Associate Professional apprenticeship-style programme is a great way of doing this.” Mr. Liam Ryan, FIT Chairperson and Managing Director of SAP Ireland said: “The gap between those qualifying with relevant skills and the number of opportunities available in technology roles continues to grow - demanding a new and innovative response. " We b e l i e v e t h a t t h i s n e w approach to education will play a critical part in providing access to a new pool of people with the right skills that are in demand by industry now. Employers have the opportunity to directly influence the skills that form part of the qualification – the ‘on the job’ learning is a critical component – ideal for a student but also for the employer as it means that someone is ready for work – and indeed already working for them – on the day that they qualify.” Harnessing efforts At an event in the Clock Tower in the Department of Education in Dublin, Minister for Training and Skills John Halligan TD officially launched the partnership, pledging his support for the work of FIT. “The collaboration between FIT, J.P. Morgan, the ICT industry and Education and Training Boards (ETBs) is an example of how we can harness our joint efforts and create excellent opportunities for people to gain skills and thereby enter quality careers. I am particularly pleased with the

"We know that quality training and development of key in-demand skills, including Software Development and Network Engineering, is a powerful strategy for expanding access to opportunity"

With the support of

J.P. Morgan inclusive approach adopted by FIT and commend and welcome the support for this from J.P. Morgan. This type of initiative complements the existing actions in the ICT Action Plan and I will follow with great interest the progress of the initiative and the lessons we can learn from it.” The Minister emphasised that demand is such in the high tech industry in Ireland that the output of third level graduates and beyond cannot be relied upon alone to meet demand. He said that such a move would “leave thousands behind”.

■ Minister for Training and Skills John Halligan TD launching the partnership

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■ (Left to right) BACK ROW Liam Ryan SAP, Michael Moriarty ETBI, Minister for Training and Skills John Halligan T.D., Carin Bryans J.P. Morgan, George Ryan FIT, FRONT ROW Edel Hesnan FIT, Betty McLaughlin President IGC

Programme graduates Two graduates of the programme spoke of their experiences leading up to and after their FIT engagements. Shara O’Toole had been a fully qualified and working hairdresser when the salon in which she was employed closed down. Having had various office administration jobs since, she had been exposed to and realised an aptitude for all things ICT. Having, through FIT, achieved FETAC level 5 & 6 qualifications in both Microsoft and Cisco environments in the systems and networks tracks, she now works on the support desk for Fujitsu. O’Toole emphasised that her qualifications alone, though impressive, were insufficient to get a job. She said that FIT’s work placements allowed her to gain the experience she needed to complement those qualifications. Anthony Carroll had trained as an architectural technician and worked with a construction firm, however, the recession left him facing redundancy. With a slight change in focus toward property management, he again faced redundancy a few years later and made the decision to capitalise on his ICT skills through FIT. Carroll now works for SAP Ireland in its enterprise support services.

With a different situation every day, Carroll said he thrives on the diversity of the job. This was a point picked up on by Paul Sweetman, director, ICT Ireland. Sweetman emphasised that those who come through the likes of apprenticeship based programmes, and the dual vocational programmes such as the FIT ICT AP, often have the ability to cope with ambiguity and fluid situations thanks to life and work experience from outside the sector. Game changer “Ireland has had incredible success in establishing a vibrant multinational and indigenous tech sector, but we can’t take future success for granted. Competitor economies are upping their game and we need to compete aggressively. The ICT Associate Professional is a game changer and will enable Ireland to become a global technology powerhouse. Today’s partnership between FIT and J.P. Morgan strongly reinforces this ambition,” said Sweetman. “FIT is delighted that J.P. Morgan is supporting FIT to broaden opportunity for smart people with smart skills,” said Peter Davitt, CEO, FIT. “Over the last 15 years, FIT has

"Ireland has had incredible success in establishing a vibrant multinational and indigenous tech sector, but we can’t take future success for granted"

supported people from diverse backgrounds to enter the tech sector and build great careers. "Developing this new ‘earn and learn’ route is already proving to be a success and is made possible with the active collaboration and support of SOLAS, ETBI, ICT Ireland and the participating ETBs in Dublin, Cork, Galway, Athlone, Monaghan and Dundalk.” FIND OUT MORE: See www.fit.ie Education 9

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Qualifications y Quality and Qualifications Ireland has the task of making Ireland's QUALIFICATIONS are the currency of the education system. They are the paper you have earned from your time learning that you can exchange for a career, for employment or for more education. Qualifications should therefore have many of the same characteristics of currency such as credibility, uniformity, limited supply, convenience and portability. In recent years we have witnessed a splintering and diversification in education provision. Colleges of further education have proliferated, international travel has become even easier and the online world is promising to radically change education. For the end users and consumers of knowledge this increases the risks. How do know that your structural engineer or historian can do what they say they can do? What is the value or depth of their training? Should every public and private sector organisation operate its own entry exams. Add into this mix accusations of dumbing down, yellow-pack education and grade inflation and the entire education systems faces a credibility crisis. The new era in qualifications In Ireland various awards bodies arose over the years. A consolidation became a necessity and an inevitabil-

■ QQI CEO Dr Padraig Walsh

ity. So in 2012 the Government passed the Quality Assurance and Qualifications (Education and Training) Act 2012. This act created Quality and Qualifications Ireland (QQI) and included those functions previously carried out by the Further Education a n d Tr a i n i n g Aw a rd s C o u n c i l (FETAC); the Higher Education and Training Awards Council (HETAC); the Irish Universities Quality Board (IUQB) and the National Qualifications Authority of Ireland (NQAI). QQI was given responsibility for maintaining the ten-level National Framework of Qualifications (NFQ), is also an awarding body in its own right and sets standards for awards that QQI makes in the NFQ. QQI validates education and training programmes and makes extensive awards in the Further Education and Training sector including in the Education and Training Boards. They also make awards in Higher Education mainly to learners in private providers. The universities and Institutes of Technology (IoTs) continue to make their own awards in the main. Critically for the international context of educational qualifications the QQI provide advice on recognition of foreign qualifications in Ireland and on the recognition of Irish qualifications abroad. And finally a key part of the role of QQI is to communicate all this to learners, providers and consumers of educational qualifications and to publish a directory of providers and awards in the NFQ. Selling a new brand Dr Padraig Walsh has been the CEO of QQI since its inception and it has been his task and that of his board to make the transition and to mould the new organisation. So how is the transition going?

"It takes a while for a brand to be established and it takes a while to extinguish a brand and to build a new brand"

"We don’t allow people to call a programme something that we think would be very ephemeral, that three or four years later would be out of date"

"It takes a while for a brand to be established and it takes a while to extinguish a brand and to build a new brand. A lot of work was put in to the Fetac system in particular because there was lots of different bodies offering these awards and until Fetac came in place, really there wasn’t a nationally understood system for further education. So all the work that was put into that it takes a while to build a new brand around it," he says. "So it wasn’t until last year that we really launched the QQI award brand to replace what was previously Hetac and Fetac. We felt that we had to consolidate what we were doing internally before we were looking to push the new award brand. "There’s a lot of internal staff-type consolidation and process consolidation needed before you're ready to launch something new. The difficulty is obviously that further education has its own brand and higher education has its own private brand, but QQI awards spans all ten levels of the framework. "In one respect that makes it easier - that you’re trying to sell one brand - but it does take time to persuade people that the older brand is gone and that it has been replaced." Maintaining standards Setting standards is one part of the job but making sure that those standards are maintained is an equally important part of the work. If QQI validates a higher education programme they will expect three or four years later that learners will be asking for certification. "One of the things we would monitor on these occasions would be to see are people coming through and see what are the completion rates," he notes. "For the programmes that we validate we go through a periodic

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s you can carry

and's award qualifications carry their weight. Niall Gormley reports. validation process so you only get a five year licence to run the prog r a m m e a n d t h e n t h e r e ’s a revalidation. We also have a monitoring process that looks, year on year, at the programme in question. We would monitor the grade distribution and say ‘hang on, there seems a radically increasing number of first class honours’." QQI also has a system for bodies who have been with them over a long period of time and have demonstrated their competence and quality, so they can get more authority over their quality assurance. More or better? One of the issues with higher education that has arisen over the past few years is that of the proliferation of courses. The allegation has been that institutions are inventing courses, with either too broad or too narrow a remit, in order to attract students. Dr Walsh says that the QQI addresses the issue whether it occurs through proliferation of the same courses or of the institutions offering them. "As part of the programme validation, providers must prove that there’s a demand, that they have done some basic market research

and they must show that there are some unmet needs addressed by the proposed programme. The panels that we assemble to assess proposed programs would ask questions like ‘there are ten other providers of similar courses - why is another one required?’. "We also control the type of titles that can be used to describe courses. We don’t allow people to call a programme something that we think would be very ephemeral, that three or four years later would be out of date." Awards to go Once those awards are made, increasingly in a globalized world they must be fit to cross borders and speak to potential employers and educationalists around the world. Dr Walsh says that QQI has a role in both export and import of international education. For example they are required to follow Irish institutions that are operating overseas. For instance, UCD offers programmes in China, Singapore and Sri Lanka and when QQI does its external evaluation of UCD they also have to deal with how they run their programmes outside of Ireland. Similarly for institutions offering non-

QQI's Vision, Mission and Values - how QQI sees itself VISION Our vision is to seek extensive high-quality education and training opportunities with qualifications that are widely valued nationally and internationally. MISSION Our mission is to: • Promote the enhancement of quality in Ireland’s further and higher education and training; • Quality assure providers; and • Support and promote a qualifications system that benefits learners and other stakeholders. VALUES Learner-Centred: We promote a culture of access, responsiveness, flexibility, trust and quality in education and training and qualifications. We place the learner perspective at the centre of our work and also encourage stakeholders to do so. Improvement-Oriented: We are a learning, developing and evolving organisation, committed to continuously evaluating and improving the quality of our work. This underpins our approaches to assuring and promoting improved quality in further and higher education and training. Collaborative: We collaborate with our stakeholders to build confidence in, and improve the quality of education and training opportunities and the recognition of qualifications. Independent: Although we work within the broad framework of governmental policy, we are operationally independent in the performance of our functions and in our decision making. We operate with integrity and in a transparent, fair, equitable, impartial and objective manner. Professional: We treat all persons with respect, dignity and courtesy. We work to the highest standards of public service with regard to accountability, effectiveness, responsiveness and efficiency. Education 11

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Irish qualifications in Ireland, if they want their awards to be recognised within the Irish framework then QQI has an evaluation function in relation to those bodies. "We also work with our counterpart agencies. We have a memorandum of understanding with the quality assurance agency in the UK whereby they will look at their transnational education on a periodic basis and they will do a country based review. In fact, they intend doing a review in Ireland in the future," he says. And, of course, it's not just the international route that QQI must take but a journey into cyberspace. This is new territory for everyone in the educational sector and developments are coming thick and fast from blended learning to distance learn-

Number of awards at each level of the NFQ

ing, from apps to entire online degree and postgraduate courses. " We a l re a d y h a v e H i b e r n i a College as a provider. We have to validate them in much the same way as any other institution, says Dr Walsh. Big changes coming "We therefore have guidelines to cover what is called flexible and/or distributed learning. So although we have core quality assurance criteria that everyone has to fulfil, we also have topic specific areas as well. "But we do have to learn over time to work with online providers. There are big changes coming and big challenges for us. This includes an element of trust where learners are assumed to be doing the work but this is also the case in bricks-and-

mortar providers as well."

"There is a recognition in the legislation that students have a role as participants in learning. Education isn’t simply a product where you go in and buy something"

It's good to talk Another similarity of awards to currency is the broad recognition factor. So a big role of the QQI is to communicate what it does to users, learners, teachers as well as the general public. Dr Walsh reiterates the QQI's commitment: "We term it as informational products, so it’s not just telling people about what we do. We want to tell people about what is available for them and that it’s quality assured. "There is a requirement in our legislation around information that institutions are meant to say whether their awards are in the national framework or not. It’s not an option for institutions to say ‘this is what we do’ and leave it there. They also have to say whether their courses are in or out of the framework." He is also conscious that the biggest need in communication is with learners. There is a Student Engagement Programme is in relation to Higher Education. "There is a recognition in the legislation that students have a role as participants in learning. Education isn’t simply a product where you go in and buy something," he says. "You only get a qualification if you participate yourself within it. So student’s opinions on the programmes that they are studying are valued and there’s a requirement that students participate in quality assurance. So getting feedback from students and giving feedback to students is an important part of what we do." The future Dr Walsh notes the dynamic nature of education today where the need for formal qualification is spreading into across new areas such as childcare. "Staff now have to be qualified from the people running it with a Level 7 award and the people working in it would have a Level 5 or Level 6 award. So there’s a big development involved in a number of areas that weren’t regulated before. Similarly in the health care areas such as elderly care. On our website we have statistics showing the changes in recent years." "Another growing area is in green e n e rg y b e c a u s e t h e re a re b i g changes in the industry. So you have demand based changes and regulatory based changes." Education 13

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GMIT College of Tourism & Arts

Cooking up a career with GMIT Bachelor of Arts in Culinary Arts (3 years, part-time) (Level 7) Why study Bachelor of Arts in Culinary Arts? With Galway winning a bid to become Region of Gastronomy in 2018, there has never been a better time to pursue an advanced culinary degree at GMIT. The BA in Culinary Arts is a parttime degree (one-day per week) taken over a three-year duration. The primary aim of this part-time Culinary Arts degree is to develop higher technical and artistic knowledge amongst qualified chefs who are working in the industry. Chefs who enter into this degree course gather knowledge about the most up-to-date culinary topics, which include challenges and solutions that the culinary industry has to face on a daily basis. In short, the course is the best way forward for people working in the industry who are looking to further their advancement opportunities in the culinary trade. “I learned so much in GMIT. Not only did I develop my skills while still working full-time, but I also got to network and exchange ideas with like-minded professionals in my class.” What will I study? Year 1 • Culinary Leadership and Training • Advanced Pastry 1 • Gastronomy • Advanced Culinary Skills 1 Year 2 • Cost Management in Culinary Enterprises • Advanced Pastry 2 • Service Business Environment • Advanced Culinary Skills 2 Year 3 • Research Methodology • Synoptic Study

• Food Product Development & Concepts • F o o d P ro d u c t D e v e l o p m e n t Techniques What are my career opportunities? Students gain the advanced culinary technical skills and competencies required to develop creative teams. This helps facilitate the application of culinary art and innovation in an industrial context. This award offers a comprehensive range of subjects to those who wish to continue their studies in Culinary Arts, on a national and international basis, leading to senior positions such as Head Chef, Executive Chef or Kitchen Manager. Talk to us: Ulrich Hoeche, Department of Culinary Arts Tel: 091 742300 E-mail: Ulrich.hoeche@gmit.ie or Gerry Talbot, Head of Department of Culinary Arts and Service Industries Tel: 091-742320 E-mail: gerry.talbot@gmit.ie or www.gmit.ie/apply/apply-gmit to apply directly. STUDENT EXPERIENCE Ciaran Cooney, Executive Head Chef in Medtronic, Galway "Culinary Trends, innovations, modern technologies, and techniques change quickly within the industry and the BA in culinary arts programme offers the opportunity to keep up with these trends. The Course focuses on the skills and business elements of today in professional cookery. The Course has helped me reinforce my passion for cooking, learning the latest techniques, and greatly improving my abilities within the different kitchens.

■ Jóse Antonio Mansilla Yanguas-BA in Cul. Arts Graduate and participant in RTE's Taste of Success

"The Course has helped me reinforce my passion for cooking, learning the latest techniques, and greatly improving my abilities within the different kitchens.

Total Immersion Professional Cookery Programme This programme was designed in conjunction with Fáilte Ireland. The programme aims to provide learning and skills opportunities for those with a passion for culinary arts and who are considering a career change. Students spend three full days in college over 24 weeks developing new skills and knowledge and then two additional days working with industry colleagues. Examinations take place in May. During this course students will work in training kitchens and will follow an intensive course of study. All practical elements are backed up by theoretical classes. Upon successful completion of this programme students will receive an Advanced Certificate in Professional Cookery. ( F.E.T.A.C Level 6 )

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What will I study? • Food Safety • Culinary Skills • Classical European Cuisine Gastronomy and Menu French • Larder, Buffet and Breakfast Cookery • Exploring Cookery • Pastry • Learning Event, • Mediterranean • Restaurant Service • International Cuisine • Communications. Follow on Studies Students may progress to Higher Certification in Culinary Arts and on to the Bachelor of Arts in Culinary Arts (level 7). Entry Requirements: Entry is by scored interview and points will be awarded to applicants who demonstrate that they are selfmotivated and are willing to take on the rigor of this intensive programme of study. Applicants should bring a letter from their employer/prospective employer when they attend interview. Career Opportunities This course provides participants with the necessary skills to be employed in the hospitality industry in a culinary role. While some have gone on to open their own business, many are working as chefs in Restaurants, Hotels, Contract catering, Corporate catering, Food Product Development, As Private chefs, Various Government agencies such as Bord Bía. Talk to us: Frank O’Connor, Department of Culinary Arts Tel- 091 742293 Emai: frankx.oconnor@gmit.ie. or Gerry Talbot, Head of Department of Culinary Arts and Service Industries Tel: 091-742320 E-mail: gerry.talbot@gmit.ie or www.gmit.ie/apply/apply-gmit to apply directly.

The Professional Cookery Traineeship Programme The Professional Cookery Traineeship programme in GMIT is open to all (school leavers, or culinary staff looking to up-skill). The programme is based on a solid foundation of practical culinary skills and techniques reinforced by a formal academic qualification. By combining both work based learning along with one day a week in college, this programme has been developed with the needs of both the trainee and employer in mind. Importantly, it allows trainees to gain internationally recognised qualifications while enhancing employment prospects and career opportunities. When is the Programme run? This is a 2 year programme. The programme is run one day a week e a c h s e m e s t e r, a n d i s r u n o n Mondays for first years and on Tuesdays for second years. During the two years of this programme at GMIT trainees learn: • The theory and practice of professional cookery; • Menu design; cost control; food science • Health and safety Benefits to the trainee On successful completion of the programme students receive an Advanced Certificate in Professional Cookery FETAC Level 6. Trainees who successfully complete the Traineeship may also be eligible to progress to the B.A. in Culinary Arts. They also: • Gain internationally recognised qualifications • Continue to earn while they learn with an employer of their choice • Enrich their job immediately as you acquire more skills • Enhance their employment prospects and their career opportunities • Gain access to state-of-the-art training and learning facilities

College of Tourism & Arts, GMIT, Dublin Road, Galway Tel: +353 (0)91 742343 | Web: www.gmit.ie Cait Noone, Head of College T: +353 (0)91 742236 | E: Cait.Noone@gmit.ie Gerry Talbot, Head of Department: Culinary Arts Service Industries T: +353 (0)91 742320 | E: Gerry.Talbot@gmit.ie Gerry O’Neill, Head of Department: Heritage & Tourism Humanities & Languages T: +353 (0)91 742294 | E: Gerry.ONeill@gmit.ie Patrick Tobin, Head of Centre, Centre of Creative Arts & Media T: +353 (0)91 745418 | E: Patrick.Tobin@gmit.ie

By combining both work based learning along with one day a week in college, this programme has been developed with the needs of both the trainee and employer in mind.

Benefits to the approved employer Participating establishments also gain from the programme through securing a long term commitment from their staff, while at the same time producing increased skills and productivity. Further benefits include: • Enhanced image through recognition as an employer of choice for participation on this programme • Increased levels of productivity through greater staff commitment • Improved employee performance • Investing in the training and development of Food production personnel Over the past few years GMIT has produced a number of notable trainees who have gone on to have a fulfilling career in their culinary endeavours such as Stephen Leneghan, Head Chef Belleek Castle and Alexander Jaromin, Head Pastry Chef in The Lodge at Ashford, to name but a few. Talk to us: Eamonn Hoult Department of Culinary Arts Tel-091 742551 E-mail: eamonn.hoult@gmit.ie or Gerry Talbot, Head of Department of Culinary Arts and Service Industries Tel: 091-742320 E-mail: gerry.talbot@gmit.ie or www.gmit.ie/apply/apply-gmit to apply directly. Education 15

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NEWS ................................................................................................................................

Fitness to teach rules commence THE Minister for Education, Richard Bruton, has commenced the Fitness to Teach provisions of the Teaching Council Acts 2001-2015. This means that for the first time, any person, including a member of the public, an employer or a teacher will be able to make a complaint to the Teaching Council about a registered teacher. Complaints will be possible under a number of headings, including professional misconduct or poor professional performance. Making the announcement, Minister Bruton said that this transparent process will provide assurance to the public, including parents, students and other teachers and affirm confidence in the teaching profession in the long run. 'Good for teachers' "We are fortunate in Ireland to have such a professional and dedicated teaching profession in Ireland. The introduction of Fitness to Teach will be good for the teaching profession", he said. The Teaching Council’s fitness to teach processes are not intended to replace the

procedures that are already in place in schools to deal with issues of professional conduct and competence. Underperformance or misconduct will continue to be dealt with first at school level and while generally school procedures should be exhausted before any inquiry by the Teaching Council takes place the Council can proceed where there are good and sufficient reasons. An appropriate balance - INTO In response to the commencement of Fitness to Teach measures for the teaching profession Sheila Nunan, INTO General Secretary stated that she was confident that the new provisions would demonstrate the commitment and adherence of the profession to the highest standards of practice. The operation of the new Fitness to Teach provisions of the Teaching Council Act, she said, requires the Teaching Council to strike the correct and appropriate balance between professional standards and providing individual teachers with fair and due process. "This is critical," she said. In order to

engender and maintain the confidence of the public and the profession in the new provisions." Complaints under Fitness to Teach may ultimately proceed to an inquiry to be held by the Teaching Council. However, in order to reach this stage there will be several steps designed to exclude less serious complaints from a full inquiry including initial screening and, subsequently, consideration of the case by the Council’s investigating Committee. Inquiries will be held in public, unless the Council is satisfied it is appropriate to hold a hearing, or part of a hearing, in private. At the conclusion of an inquiry the Council may find that there is no case to answer. Alternatively there is a range of sanctions available ranging from the teacher’s removal from the register (and consequently removing the ability to be paid in a state funded teaching post) to the provision of advice to the teacher. Other than where the lowest level of sanction has been applied, the teacher may apply to the High Court for an annulment of the Council’s decision.

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................................................................................................................................ NEWS

IUA welcomes Report of the Expert Group on Future Funding of Higher Education THE Irish Universities Association has welcomed the publication of the report of the Expert Group chaired by Mr Peter Cassells. IUA Chair, Professor Don Barry said: “The report is an excellent example of evidence based policy making and clearly illustrates the crisis in higher education funding – and the pathway towards a solution.” "Do nothing" not tenable “The report comprehensively covers the options for achieving funding sustainability and makes it clear that a “do nothing” approach is simply not tenable. How we fund higher education requires choices to be made and it is appropriate that these matters be considered by the Oireachtas. "It is equally important that the issue is confronted immediately. The

Cassells group has spent a considerable amount of time and effort doing the necessary groundwork. It is essential that the work of the group is not duplicated and that the process now moves on to reaching a speedy conclusion” he said. IUA Chief Executive Ned Costello said: “Long term sustainability is essential but it is equally important that measures are taken in the upcoming budget/estimates to address the immediate crisis. "Many institutions are at or close to deficit conditions while student demand is continuing to grow. An immediate infusion of funds is needed: firstly just to ensure viability and secondly to begin to return our exceptionally high student staff ratios to normal levels.” See Education Funding - down to three options Page 18

NASA selects UCD alumnus for undersea mission UCD alumnus Dr Marc Ó Gríofa will join two astronauts and three other researchers on an undersea research station as part of the NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations programme (NEEMO). The NEEMO missions are used to test tools and techniques that could be applied during future missions into space. Crew members live in conditions and follow a daily schedule designed to replicate those onboard spacecraft. Dr Ó Gríofa will live on the Aquarius Undersea Reef Base for eight days. The NEEMO 21 Crew will complete underwater 'spacewalks' to collect samples for marine biology and geology studies during their mission. They will also test DNA and data devices onboard the craft. "If you imagine a small space station stuck on the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean, about 200 square feet. You have six people effectively crammed down into this tiny little space,” said Dr Ó Gríofa on RTÉ’s Morning Ireland.

New admissions law aimed for 2017 THE new Education (Admission to Schools) Bill has been introduced to Oireachtas. Among other things the new law will: • Ensure that where a school is not oversubscribed (80% of schools) it must admit all students applying • Ban waiting lists, thus ending the discrimination against parents who move in to a new area • Ban fees relating to admissions • Require all schools to publish their admissions policies, which will include details of the provisions for pupils who decline to participate in religious instruction • Require all schools to consult with and inform parents where changes are being made to admissions policies • Explicitly ban discrimination in school admissions • Provide for a situation where a child (with special needs or otherwise) cannot find a school place, and allow the National Council for Special Education or Tusla to designate a school place for the child The Programme for Government targets enactment of this legislation before September 2017. Minister Richard Bruton said: "I know that some schools are oversubscribed. They cannot be blamed for that. But they must be fair and transparent in deciding how to prioritise children for admission to the school. Every school must be welcoming of every young person –regardless of their colour, their abilities or disabilities. Education 17

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The future of education

Education funding down to three options The much anticipated report of the Expert Group on funding for higher education has been published. It is an excellent summary of the financial position of the Irish third level sector and the options open to the Government. Here we publish the chapter (5.3) on the funding options which explains the rationale for the alternatives. We have edited the text for clarity as it makes reference to various sections of the report which would reward a read in full. All that remains is for the Government to make a decision. THE review of international experience shows that various funding arrangements could be used to bring about this increase in investment. From its analysis, the Expert Group suggest that three funding options be considered now in Ireland. In each, the funding envelope for both higher education institutions and student support is increased to the same level. Each option also assumes a contribution from employers. But each involves a different approach to the role and nature of student contributions and as a result the level of additional state investment that will be required. It is worth recalling that Ireland has adopted a number of different approaches to student fees over the last 20 years. Prior to 1996, undergraduate education was not free and students were required to pay tuition fees of the order of €2,000 €3,000. At that time public funding accounted for 70 per cent of overall expenditure on higher education. The introduction of the Free Fees Initiative in 1996 brought in an era of free undergraduate education; tuition fees were abolished and students were only required to pay a nominal charge. Under this system, public funding accounted for 84% of overall expenditure.

This policy continued up until the recession. Since 2008, the level of fee has more than tripled, albeit it with a significant number of students excluded from paying this fee under the grant scheme. When considering core funding of higher education institutions and student supports only, the state is currently contributing 64 per cent of overall expenditure. Drawing on the spectrum of international funding models set the Expert Group recommends three funding options for consideration by the Minister for Education and Skills. Funding Option One: A predominantly state-funded system Funding Option One is modelled on the arrangements evident in many European countries, in which the state provides the vast bulk of the funding for higher education and higher education is free or subject to a nominal charge. This situation prevailed in Ireland following the introduction of the free fees initiative in 1996 and before the series of increases in the student contribution since 2008. Under this funding option, the

Under funding Option One the state would increase its core grant to institutions, existing student fees would be abolished and student income supports would be enhanced

Government would commit to an immediate and steep increase in state funding. Under funding Option One the state would increase its core grant to institutions, existing student fees would be abolished and student income supports would be enhanced. Higher education would be free at the point of entry for all first-time EU students, including part-time learners. There are two variations possible in this option. In one variant, found in the Nordic and some continental European countries, there would be no fees for either undergraduate or postgraduate education. In another the existing student fee would be abolished only for undergraduates. In both variations of funding Option One, the majority of the additional funding requirement will be met by the state. This will result in the proportion of total funding provided by the Irish state increasing from the current level 64 per cent to 80 per cent. The state’s contribution would continue to be funded from general taxation. The balance would be provided by fee income from post-graduate students, international students, employer contribution, and other privately raised income. The additional cost to the state of supporting higher education in Funding Option One, relative to the existing arrangements, is envisaged to be €1.3bn per year by 2030. F u n d i n g O p t i o n Tw o : Increased state funding with continuing student fees Funding Option Two is a continuation of the current Irish hybrid model of significant state funding matched with a moderate upfront student contribution for first-time EU undergraduate learners. Students from lower income backgrounds would continue to receive fee waivers under the student grant scheme. Under this funding strategy, stu-

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dents would continue paying a fee at close to the existing level of €3,000 with most of the necessary increase in funding being provided by the state. This would require a Government commitment to an immediate and steep increase in state funding. It is also recommended that consideration be given to treating first-time part-time students in the same manner as full-time students i.e. fees waived for those from lower income backgrounds. This model of upfront fees with no mechanism for deferred payment is quite unusual in developed countries. It is critical that there is a robust system of student supports and fee waivers to assist students from lower income families to participate. In addition to the enhancement of student supports outlined in Section 5.4, it is also advised that additional measures may be necessary to reduce the financial burden on middle income families, especially those just above the grant income thresholds. This could take the form of additional tapered fee waivers under the grant scheme or an extension of current tax reliefs. Under this model the proportion of total funding provided by the state would increase from 64 per cent to 72 per cent.

The additional cost to the state of supporting higher education in Funding Option Two, relative to the existing arrangements, is envisaged to be €1bn per year by 2030. It should be noted that any decreases in the fee level would need to be matched by additional increases in state funding. At current student numbers, a €250 reduction would require €16m in additional state investment. Funding Option Three: Increased state-funding with deferred payment of fees through income contingent loans Funding Option Three is centred on the introduction of a deferred payment system for student fees. This option envisages the continuation of significant state funding combined with the introduction of a deferred payment system as an alternative to the current upfront fee. Under this funding model all undergraduate students would be charged fees. However, a facility would be introduced to allow the payment of these fees to be deferred until after graduation. Consequently, no students - including a projected 25,000 part-time and 40,000 postgraduate students - would have to make an upfront payment or fee for

Payments would only be required when income is above a certain threshold, with the level and duration of repayment varying depending on income.

their higher education. H a v i n g e x a m i n e d d i ff e r e n t approaches to deferred payment, the Group favours an income contingent loan model. This approach ensures that higher education would be free at the point of entry for all students. Furthermore, it allows payment to be linked to future earnings and ability to pay. Graduates would pay for tuition later, but only if the education they received results in well-paying jobs. Payments would only be required when income is above a certain threshold, with the level and duration of repayment varying depending on income. In essence, the test of ‘means’ would shift from current family circumstances, as occurs with the existing fee waiver system, to the earnings achieved by graduates in later years. It is important to note that the option of paying upfront would be retained under this system. If this system is adopted the Group recommends that consideration be given to an increase in the level of student fee. This would allow for a greater sharing of the additional costs between the state and students, while the deferred payment system would ensure that the burden on students could be managed.

Funding Options Millions Euro

2015

2030

Existing

Option I

2030

2030

2030

Option II Option III A

Option III B

(ICL - 4k)

(ICL - 5k)

1,831

2,875

2,875

2,875

2,875

Direct state grants

923

2,255

1,765

1,557

1,370

Student/ Family and Other Fees

908

470

960

1,168

1,355

0

150

150

150

150

Fees/ ICL cost

180

0

227

149

188

Living Costs

187

295

295

295

295

1290

2,550

2,287

2,001

1,853

1,260

997

711

563

2,018

3,170

3,170

3,319

3,358

64%

80%

72%

60%

55%

Funding of Higher Education Institutions

Employer

Funding for Student Support

Total Cost to the State Additional State Investment Total Funding for Higher Education State Proportion

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However, the Group cautions that the level of undergraduate fees should remain moderate and would recommend that the cost sharing balance in Australia should be used as a guide. It is also recommending that an independent agency be given responsibility for the regulation of fee levels. Increased revenue from student fees must not be offset by reductions in state grants. Under this option, all first-time EU undergraduate learners, full-time and part-time, should be given access to the student loan scheme. The Group also recommends that the scheme is extended to postgraduates learners. It is considered essential for the successful implementation of this option that repayments are collected through the tax system. The Government would need to raise considerable monies to finance the loan scheme. There are a number of options that can be considered including revenues from the sale of state assets, NTMA raised finance, and the EIB. By their nature, income-contingent loan schemes generally entail some level of public subsidy and this should be factored in to costing considerations and viewed as an additional state investment in the system. As noted, there are a number of key design parameters in a system of income contingent loans including coverage, cost and affordability; funding and fiscal issues; income thresholds and arrangements to manage the income contingent loan. Appendix 3 of the report provides

an overview of work carried out by the Expert Group on a possible income-contingent loan system in Ireland. This looks at income contingent loans from three perspectives: affordability for students and families; the cost to the state; and the implications for the fiscal rules and future government debt and borrowing capacity. There are considerable uncertainties in estimating the costs to the public finances of providing income contingent loans. A range of cost estimates is provided. The cost of providing income contingent loans arises from two main sources. First, there is the cost of loans that are not repaid. Second, if the interest rate charged to students is lower than the cost to the state of raising this finance there is a second cost in the form of an interest rate subsidy. There would also be administrative costs, but the international experience of income contingent loans is that these are low. The calculations in Table 4 are based on the public subsidy being around 20 per cent of the loans issued. The exact level of subsidy can be designed by Government through the various loan parameters i.e. thresholds, interest rates etc. The report outlines two fee scenarios - each with a different level of student fee and associated student loan. In the first, students would make a deferred payment of €4,000 per year. In this scenario, the state would be envisaged to provide additional annual funding of €700m;

The Group cautions that the level of undergraduate fees should remain moderate and would recommend that the cost sharing balance in Australia should be used as a guide

bringing its share of total higher education funding to 60 per cent. With a higher deferred payment of €5,000 per year, the additional annual state funding requirement would be €548 per annum in 2030, amounting to a share of 55%. Under these scenarios, the proportion of overall funding for higher education provided by the state would be lower than it is currently; and significantly lower than under funding Option One and Two. This reflects the core feature and purpose of funding Option Three: to achieve an appropriate level of higher education funding and quality and to share the costs of this between the main beneficiaries—society at large, graduates and enterprise. However, both scenarios still require some additional state investment. In funding Option Three, the state investment would include a direct core grant of between €1,307m and €1,557m per year in 2030, depending on the level of deferred payment; and an indirect cost of between €150m and €190m based on the projected cost to the state of the system of income contingent loans. If Government decided to move to this funding model, it would take a period of time to define the parameters of the system of income contingent loans. For this reason, it is envisaged that some of the additional direct state funding and employer contribution would need to be front loaded to meet the higher education funding requirements over the immediate period.

Spectrum of Funding Arrangements: International Evidence High State Grant Funding

High State Grant Funding

Moderate State Grant Funding

Low State Grant Funding

Low State Grant Funding

No Student contribution

Moderate Student Contribution (€2,000)

Moderate to High Student Contribution (€6,000 - $10,000) (€4,000 - €7,000)

High Student Contribution (£9,000)/((€12,000)

High Student Contribution ($9,000/€9,000 - median)

Income contingent loan for tuition and living costs

Income contingent loan for tuition only.

Income contingent loan for tuition and living costs

Subsidised and unsubsidised mortgage-type student loans

High levels philanthropy (with tax incentives for individuals) Grants and Loans for Living Expenses

Recent removal of universal grants Grants for low incomes

Grants for low incomes

Recent proposal to remove maintenance grant

Grants for low incomes

Norway

The Netherlands

Australia

England

US

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CIVIL DEFENCE SERVING THE NEEDS OF THE LOCAL COMMUNITY

Are you up to the challenge? Students interested in becoming Volunteer members of Civil Defence should contact their local Civil Defence Officer

Volunteers are multi-skilled and the main programmes of activity undertaken by the organisation are:

✔ Casualty ✔ Search and Rescue ✔ Auxiliary Fire Service ✔ Welfare ✔ Radiation Monitoring

✔ Communications

Civil Defence supports the frontline emergency services in dealing with severe weather, flooding, major accidents, fire fighting and searching for missing people. Civil Defence supports hundreds of community events throughout the year. These include large events such as air shows, tall ships, concerts and festivals, sports events. We also support smaller local events such as parades.

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Reference Guide Briefing:

Financial support for students Student Grants WHAT DOES A GRANT COVER? Maintenance Grant A maintenance grant is a contribution t o w a r d s t h e s t u d e n t ’s l i v i n g c o s t s . Maintenance grants are available for approved courses below graduate level in Ireland and other EU states. Fee grants A fee grant can cover any of the following 3 elements: • All or part of the student contribution • Costs of essential field trips • All or part of a student’s tuition fees (unless

covered by the Free Fees Scheme) In general, if you qualify for a maintenance grant you will qualify for all elements of the fee grant. However, you will not get the tuition element of a fee grant if you already qualify for free tuition under the Free Fees Schemes. You may qualify for a fee grant, but not a maintenance grant, if you are a 'tuition student' under the Student Grant Scheme. Students doing Post-Leaving Certificate (PLC) courses do not get fee grants, but if you qualify for a maintenance grant you will be exempt from the PLC participant contribution.

The Susi system SUSI is the national awarding authority responsible for Student Grants. SUSI offers funding to eligible students in approved full-time third-level education in Ireland and also, in some cases, funding for students studying outside the State. SUSI is in its fifth year of operations, processed over 108,000 applications last year with 83,000 students (new and renewal) receiving funding for the 2015/2016 academic year. It is expected that the number of applications to SUSI for the 2016/2017academic year will surpass 110,000.

Elegibility criteria Who's eligible?

Grant values

RESIDENCY Applicants must be resident in Ireland or the EU, EEA or Switzerland for 3 of the last 5 years.

STUDENTS ATTENDING:

The different rates of Maintenance Grants, depending on household income, can be seen below.

NATIONALITY Applicants must be an Irish, EU, EEA or Swiss National or have specific leave to remain in the State.

✔ Approved Undergraduate courses in Ireland, or another EU member state

PREVIOUS EDUCATION If applicants have previously attended further or higher education courses, regardless of whether they received a grant, this will be taken into account when assessing their application to ensure that they meet the ‘progression’ criteria. BACK TO EDUCATION ALLOWANCE (BTEA) If applicants are in receipt of BTEA and are attending a PLC course they will not be eligible for funding. If they are attending a Higher Education course they may be eligible for the student contribution charge and tuition fees (in certain cases). INCOME Household income is assessed for the 2015 Tax Year and must fall between one of the specified thresholds in order to qualify for Grant funding. The thresholds may be adjusted depending on the number of dependents in the household and how many of those dependents are attending further or higher education courses.

✔ Approved Post Leaving Certificate (PLC) courses in Ireland;

✔ Approved Postgraduate courses in Ireland or Northern Ireland.

What Grants? POST LEAVING CERTIFICATE COURSES IN IRELAND: ✔ Maintenance Grant only. UNDERGRADUATE COURSES IN IRELAND: ✔ Maintenance Grant; ✔ Student Contribution Charge; ✔ Tuition Fees (in certain cases); and ✔ Compulsory Field Trips (in certain cases) UNDERGRADUATE COURSES IN THE EU, EEA OR SWITZERLAND: ✔ Maintenance Grant only. POSTGRADUATE COURSES IN IRELAND OR NORTHERN IRELAND: ✔ Postgraduate Fee Contribution OR ✔ Postgraduate Tuition Fees; and ✔ Compulsory Field Trips (in certain cases)

ADJACENT RATE Where travelling from within 45kms of college: 100% .................................. €1,215 75% ....................................... €910 50% ....................................... €605 25% ....................................... €305 NON-ADJACENT RATE Where travelling from over 45kms to college: 100% .................................. €3,025 75% .................................... €2,270 50% .................................... €1,515 25% ....................................... €755 SPECIAL RATE OF MAINTENANCE GRANT Payable to an applicant, whose household income is below €22,703, and contains an eligible Social Welfare payment on 31 December, 2015. Non Adjacent Rate: ............. €5,915 Adjacent Rate: ..................... €2,375 The information in this briefing is from SUSI. It should only be used as a guide. For further information, please visit www.susi.ie

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Dundrum College of Further Education

A real alternative and better outcomes for students THERE are very good reasons for students to consider undertaking a course in an FE College. The FE route provides a real alternative to Higher Education. While traditionally FE (PLC) colleges have been considered the Plan B for many students, there is a growing realisation that this option delivers better outcomes for those wishing to use it as a stepping stone to both higher education or direct entry to the labour market. Recent research from Higher Education institutes suggests that students progressing from FE are statistically more likely to complete certification than their counterparts coming directly from the Leaving Cert. FE College courses prepare students for assignment and project writing, research skills, team working and the personal responsibility students require to succeed in a college environment. Dundrum College of Further Education (Dundrum CFE) has a long established reputation for delivering excellent courses with strong progression links to Higher Education. The College provides certified training and educational opportunities to a diverse community of students in a supportive and professional environment. The College offers a wide variety

of full time courses leading to QQI validated awards at levels 5 and 6. Courses are available in the areas of Business, Computing, Nursing and Healthcare, Early Childhood Care and Education, Social Studies, Art Crafts & Design, and Horticulture. This year the College has added some exciting new courses to their prospectus, and has revamped existing programmes to reflect the latest developments in technology and the workplace. The College has established many links with Higher Education establishments over the years, including DIT, Blanchardstown IT, Botanic Gardens and a number of UK universities. Well known to employers The College is also well known to employers for their exceptional standards of training and development. Businesses in a variety of sectors have employed many of their graduates. These include companies such as Hewlett Packard, Intel, HSE, Cocoon, and many SME businesses. These positive links to the workforce and Higher Education allow them to maintain a first class service to students. Dundrum CFE provides quality educational opportunities to the community, from school leaver to mature learners. They provide finan-

"It is a real alternative for a school leaver, where they can expect a supportive, professional and quality educational experience

cial support to a number of students through the Student Scholarship Scheme, funded by Dundrum Credit Union. This Scholarship covers all College fees and material charges. They also support students in other ways, such as through their mentoring programme, career guidance service, innovative teaching methodologies and technology enhanced learning. The College is an approved Google Apps for Education centre, providing students with the best of learning technologies today, and links with SOLAS to provide quality technology based learning content and support. Students are invited into a learning partnership with teachers and support personnel helping them to achieve their goals. The College is proud of its students’ success. It is a real alternative for a school leaver, where they can expect a supportive, professional and quality educational experience. In a recent survey, the majority of this year’s graduating students responded that Dundrum CFE was better than or among the best when compared to other schools and Colleges they had attended.

FIND OUT MORE: Applications are open from January through to September and can be made online at www.cfedundrum.com.

COLLEGE OF FURTHER EDUCATION, MAIN STREET, DUNDRUM, DUBLIN 14. Situated in the heart of Dundrum Village, CFE Dundrum offers a wide variety of courses to suit individual interests. These courses are continuously revised to reflect the latest developments in the workplace and to provide a broad range of careers/study opportunities in the following areas: • BUSINESS / OFFICE ADMINISTRATION

• COMPUTING

• NURSING & HEALTHCARE

• EARLY CHILDHOOD CARE & EDUCATION

• SOCIAL STUDIES

• ART, CRAFT & DESIGN

• HORTICULTURE

For further information please visit our website www.cfedundrum.com where you can enrol on-line or phone 01-298 5412.

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St. Angela’s College Study for your university degree here in the North West ON the shores of Lough Gill, and still only minutes from Sligo Town, St. Angela’s College, Sligo offers a wide range of undergraduate degree programmes. A college of NUI Galway, the St. Angela’s College programmes are accredited by the University, offering the only university-level education in the region. Academic Departments include Nursing, Health Sciences and Disability Studies (offering programmes in Nursing Degrees; Health and Disability Studies; Disability Equality Studies) Education and Home Economics (offering programmes in Home Economics Teacher Education; Food and Business Management; Textiles, Fashion and Design with Business Management). With increasing student numbers, Dr Anne Taheny, President of St. Angela’s College, explains ‘Unprecedented growth over the last decade places the College in an excellent position to continue to offer the highest quality University-level programmes with modern campus facilities, small classes and a strong community spirit.’ She continues ‘As we focus on the year ahead, we invite prospective students to consider our innovative programmes, particularly in the areas of Health and Disability Studies, Food and Business Management and Textiles, Fashion and Design with Business Management. The College also offers a Diploma in Foundation Studies for school leavers and mature students who wish to study at third level. Participants who successfully complete this Access Course are eligible to apply for direct entry to full-time degree courses at St. Angela’s College or NUI Galway. HEAR/DARE routes also available. FIND OUT MORE: For more information on St. Angela’s College, Sligo contact Seán Kelly on 071 9195512 or schoolsinfo@stangelas.nuigalway.ie or visit www.stangelas.nuigalway.ie.

Shape a Future Courses:

Higher Certificate in Arts in Early Years Montessori Education (Level 6) BA in Montessori Education (Level 7) BA (Honours) in Montessori Education (Level 8)

Higher Diploma in Arts in Early Years Montessori Education (Level 8)

Go to www.snmci.ie Call 01-2806064 / 01-2300080 email: admissions@snmci.ie or visit us at 16 Adelaide Street, Dun Laoghaire, Co Dublin

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Saint Nicholas College

Shape a future with Saint Nicholas Montessori College Ireland SAINT Nicholas Montessori College Ireland (SNMCI) has been the source of many graduates in Montessori and early years’ education since 1984. The College’s programmes aim to develop educators of the highest quality, based on the Montessori principles of education. While many think of Montessori teaching as confined to 0 - 6 year old children, it is only part of the story. There are a number of Montessori schools providing the National Primary Curriculum to children up to the age of 12. Indeed, there is one such school on the College’s campus in Dún Laoghaire. Peers as a Role Model Montessori Education is based on the premise that children are best supported in a learning environment which meets all their needs. This in turn will assist them to become valued members of society. Key to this is the multi-aged groupings, which fosters children’s development as role models for their peers. Encouraged by this supportive environment, each child learns to co-operate. Furthermore, in the eyes of pedagogical experts, the Montessori Method is also strongly aligned to working in the field of Special Education. This is linked with the use of concrete, manipulative materials to support the cognitive development of the child. Montessori’s multi-sensory approach has, for example, been found to be successful for developing literacy and numeracy skills in children with learning difficulties in inclusive educational settings. SNMCI’s Programmes SNMCI’s programmes of study are accredited by Quality and Qualifications Ireland (QQI), so applicants can be assured of the quality of its programmes. Each of these programmes continues SNMCI’s strong tradition of developing educators of the highest quality, who will serve and support children within all sectors of Early Childhood Care and Education (ECCE) settings. Not only does the College deliver highly regarded undergraduate Level

7 and Level 8 Bachelor of Arts programmes, we have recently changed the format of our postgraduate programme, the Higher Diploma in Arts in Early Years Montessori Education, to meet changing demands within the Education Sector. Also, 2015 will see the introduction of a Level 6 Higher Certificate in Arts in Early Years Montessori Education, in response to a recognised need, from both learners and stakeholders, for the provision of a solid foundation programme for early years’ education. This year, school leaver enrolment onto SNMCI’s Level 6 and Level 7 programmes will be managed via the CAO Handbook. Applications for part-time provision, Recognition of Prior Learning or the Higher Diploma programme should continue to be made directly to the College. Part-Time Study Options Many school leavers choose to defer full-time study and opt to work instead. SNMCI’s Level 6 and Level 7 programmes are available on a parttime basis and have recently been reformatted in order to improve on their delivery. Financial Considerations Uniquely among private colleges, full time students of SNMCI are eligible to apply for financial assistance under the Higher Education Maintenance Grants scheme operated by SUSI. If school leavers don’t qualify for this, the College has an instalment plan in place to assist with the payment of fees. This plan is also available to those wishing to pursue SNMCI programmes on a part-time basis. Career Opportunities On successful completion of their programme, SNMCI graduates are ready to enter the workforce, with many pursuing careers in ECCE settings. Depending on the level of the qualifications, career opportunities include teaching in Montessori preschools, working as Special Needs Assistants and as expert practitioners in ECCE settings. Furthermore, Graduates of the

A Saint Nicholas Montessori College qualification will be a distinct advantage for educators.

Bachelor of Arts (Hons) in Montessori Education receive restricted recognition from the Teaching Council under Regulation 3 for working with children with special educational needs in recognised mainstream primary schools and in recognised special schools where Irish is not a curriculum requirement. (Please note that this is currently the subject of consultation). Many graduates opt to progress to Level 9 programmes in education, special education or other care, therapy, or education related programmes. They may also progress to Higher Diplomas in Primary Education in I re l a n d , o r t o a P o s t - g r a d u a t e Certificate in Education in the UK. Looking to the Future One message should be clear from recent Government publications such as the Right from the Start report and wider policy initiatives. There is an increased emphasis on professionalising the early years’ work force, including developing a graduate-led workforce in ECCE settings. While this may take some time to achieve, a Saint Nicholas Montessori College qualification will be a distinct advantage for educators. Full details of our programmes are available on our website at www. snmci.ie

FIND OUT MORE: The College welcomes requests for more information - email admissions@snmci.ie. Education 27

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SmartFutures.ie

How teachers can help inspire the next generation in STEM WITH Leaving Certificate results being issued and CAO offers circulating, Science Foundation Ireland, which manages the Smart Futures Programme in partnership with Engineers Ireland’s STEPS, is calling on teachers to help encourage their students to think differently about careers linked to STEM – science, technology, engineering and maths. Teachers, along with parents, are a significant support to young people making subject choices as they transition into post-primary education, and again from Junior to Senior Cycle, and can help break careerrelated stereotypes. Research commissioned by Science Foundation Ireland in 2014 found that how students see themselves ‘fitting in’ to a course, any course, is the most significant factor influencing their decisions (62%), when choosing study paths. So ‘fitting in’ ranks higher than career prospects (56%) or entry requirements (28%) for when students are considering what to do when they finish school. This highlights how any negative stereotypes students might hold about certain subjects or career paths can limit the potential career areas they’d explore. What are the opportunities? Approximately 70,000 people work in science and engineering in Ireland, along with over 100,000 working in the tech sector. The world is increasingly in need of problemsolvers, creative thinkers and people with a desire to make the world a better place. A person with a background in science, technology, engineering or maths will have a skillset that is not only in-demand across the globe, but that also makes them adaptable and analytical, and often ideal for senior management and consultancy roles. Despite misconceptions, STEM roles often require strong communications and language skills, and can often have a commercial or businessrelated focus.

With employment in the technology sector growing by more than 30% over the last ten years in Ireland (when overall employment grew by only 1%) and salaries in these companies at 29% above the national average, we need to encourage students to look beyond negative stereotypes. So, what is the problem? Students are still put off by negative perceptions when it comes to a careers in STEM-related areas, especially among girls. The Science Foundation Ireland survey found 51% of college students said their parents influenced their decision making, and that they’d advised their son or daughter to pursue something they (as parents) thought would suit their personality. So if a parent holds any stereotypes about science and maths themselves (“It’s too hard!” or “it’s not really for girls”) this can be picked up on. Teachers also play an important role here in not further perpetuating stereotypes and giving

Students can discover that all kinds of people work in STEM, in everything from designing video games, to addressing climate change

students the courage to explore all options before making an informed decision about the right career for them and making the most of their own abilities. Opportunities to meet real people working in research and industry is an important way to help students to do this. What can teachers do? Teachers of any subject area can register their school for free career talks from people working in science, technology and engineering in Ireland through Smart Futures. Students can discover that all kinds of people work in STEM, in everything from designing video games, to addressing climate change and even helping save lives through cancer research. Volunteers can even attend parent-teacher evenings as well!

Register now on www.SmartFutures.ie and request a career talk for Science Week (13-20 November), Maths Week (15th – 23rd) etc. or if you are a TY coordinator, or guidance counsellor…at any time! Education 29

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University of Wales Trinity Saint David (UWTSD)

Innovation and modern teaching methods in a new university STUNNING countryside, magnificent mountains, beautiful beaches and vibrant city life plus a proud cultural heritage. You could almost be in Ireland. Just a ferry journey or short flight away, UWTSD’s campuses in Wales can be a home away from home for Irish students and yet, as part of a country with its own language and style, they offer an engaging student experience with opportunities to try new things, explore new places and make new friends. If you fancy it, you could learn a new language too. As one of the newest universities in the UK, UWTSD prides itself on innovation and modern teaching methods, while its royal charter is the oldest in Wales and England, after Oxford and Cambridge, so it also has a rich history. A warm welcome Students from around the globe find a warm welcome at UWTSD’s three main campuses in South West Wales − Carmarthen, Lampeter and Swansea. Each offers a different kind of student experience, although each has the same friendly, community feel. With great transport links from the Ferry terminal in Fishguard, many students from Ireland choose to study at the beautiful locations UWTSD has to offer. UWTSD Swansea’s city-centre

campuses, dedicated to art and design, business and management, education, communities and performance as well as architecture, computing and engineering, give students easy access to shopping, recreation and relaxation opportunities, a glorious beach and the outstanding Gower coast just a few miles up the road. Great industry links UWTSD’s courses are renowned for having a strong focus on employability and developing great industry links. A recent development is a twoyear degree, BA International Hotel Management, offered in partnership with the Marriott Hotels, one of the world’s leading hotel brands. This unique collaboration combines vocational training at the Swansea Marriott Hotel with academic study on campus. Uniquely there are three entry points per year – September, January and April accepting 15 students per cohort. Students spend one third of their degree at the Swansea Marriott Hotel learning through a practical approach, whilst the other two thirds of the degree are taught at the Swansea Business Centre. Current building projects include the Swansea Waterfront Innovation Quarter, at the heart of the city and right by the sea, and Canolfan S4C

"An engaging student experience with opportunities to try new things, explore new places and make new friends"

Yr Egin, the new headquarters for Wales’ national broadcaster, on UWTSD’s Carmarthen campus. Both will offer students opportunities for study and engagement with employers in exciting new environments. UWTSD Carmarthen offers courses ranging from education and teaching, social studies and sport to performance, humanities and art, in a town with a wide variety of shops, excellent leisure facilities and good links to the coast and country parks. The Students’ Union has an active Irish Society as many students from Ireland study Primary Education teacher training and our popular sports courses, such as Outdoor Adventure Education, Physical Education and Sport Therapy. Beautiful campus UWTSD Lampeter, our main Humanities campus, is at the heart of a historic market town, with locally-run shops, cafes and scenic spots. In Lampeter you can study subjects ranging from Anthropology, Archaeology, Chinese and History to Philosophy, Theology and Creative Writing on a breathtakingly beautiful campus with an active students’ union. The first competitive rugby match to be played in Wales was played here too. Visit UWTSD. You won’t have too far to come, to Go Far with UWTSD. Education 31

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ETC Consult

Should we all be going to College? WHY does such a large percentage of Irish Students want to go to “College”? Because their friends are going? It is the norm? Because their parents think it is best for them? Because everybody knows that a college degree leads to a highly paid job? Because a college degree has “status”? A college education raises a person’s status and the more of it one has, the higher the status? We have met many people who have gone to college because of one or more of these reasons. Most wished that they had taken other options and not gone on to pursue courses that they did not find interesting; or that they found too difficult or that they did find interesting and on which they got excellent results but for which there were no relevant jobs. What are the options? Option 1 is to look at yourself – your interests, your aptitudes, your personality; your aspirations; your social and educational positives; look at the various courses on offer – college, PLCs, Apprenticeships; look at the jobs market – and match up the three; choose a course or a job or an employer that lines up best with what you have to offer or aspire towards, and go after it. Option 2: Get assistance from a qualified, experienced person or organisation with significant exposure to providing career guidance on the one hand and selecting job candidates for organisations on the other. ETC Consult has been doing so since 1983. ULJulyAug2016.qxp_Layout 1 13/06/2016 11:14 Page 1

FIND OUT MORE: www.careerfit.com | www.etcconsult.com

Why not study for your History Masters at the University of Limerick? The Department of History offers the following taught programmes: MA in History (one-year, full-time) MA in the History of Family (one-year, full-time or two-year, part-time, also available online)                                                         MA in Local History (two-year, part-time) Certificate in Local History (one-year, evening) Certificate in History of Family and Genealogical Methods (one year, evening, also available online) The Department of History is an award-winning vibrant department committed to excellence in research and teaching. Its members are acknowledged leaders in their respective fields and each contributes to postgraduate teaching and supervision. The MA programmes combine taught modules and a research dissertation of c.20,000 words. Students choose from a menu of core and optional modules including historical methods, gender history, public history (with an innovative short-term internship with a cultural institution), Irish, European and International history. Each programme will prepare you for a rewarding career in both the public and private sectors; if considering further research, you will have an excellent foundation for the Ph.D. degree.

Applicants for the MA should have, or expect to gain, a first class or a second class honours degree in history or in a cognate area. Applicants with approved equivalent qualifications, or substantial relevant professional experience may also be considered for admission.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION GO TO:

www.ul.ie/ULH/postgraduate-studies

For a brochure and application form contact: Postgraduate Admissions Office Graduate School, University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland Tel: +353-61-234377 Fax: +353-61-233287 Email: postgradadmissions@ul.ie

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Jack & Jill Lego Appeal

Families, pre-schools, schools and businesses - collect and donate your old Lego to Jack & Jill THE Jack & Jill Children’s Foundation is an Irish children’s charity that provides home nursing care and respite to families across the country who are caring for their sick child at home and the Foundation has done so for almost 20 years, supporting over 2,000 children since its establishment in 1997. These are precious babies up to the age of 4-years-old suffering from severe intellectual and physical developmental delay as a result of brain damage who may be tube fed, oxygen dependent, taking seizures and on very heavy medication and in need of around the clock care. Jack & Jill sources and funds home nursing care, giving parents a much needed break - to get a full night’s sleep, to go shopping, bring the other children to the park or to the school play, and all those ‘normal’ things that others take for granted. This nationwide service includes home visits, care, advice, information, lobbying and bereavement support, with the Foundation providing funding for up to 64 hours of home nursing care per month at a cost of up to €1,024 per family. Jack & Jill has no waiting list and operates 365 days a year, with the care plan designed around the sick child and the family’s requirements, never forgetting the brothers and sisters who may feel isolated or left out sometimes.

■ Pictured at DPD Ireland in Athlone making their Lego donation to the Jack & Jill Lego Appeal: Francis Bradley DPD Operations Team, Donagh Teirney (6) from Birr, Therese Farrell (9) from Athlone and Sorcha Tierney (9) from Birr.

The assignment for schools and teachers – T h e J a c k & J i l l C h i l d r e n ’s Foundation is asking teachers, pupils and parents to jump on board its Lego fundraising initiative which turns unwanted Lego bricks into home nursing care hours for sick children. The national and local charity wants schools to collect Lego in the classroom, loose Lego bricks, no boxes or instructions required. The Lego can be boxed or bagged and dropped off at one of 40 Jack & Jill Lego collection points around the country • The Lego can be sold via the Jack & Jill Charity Shops located in Arklow, Carlow, Newbridge, Naas, Crookstown and Wicklow, where bricks are being bought for €4 a kilo, or donated at these locations too. • Or donated via 5 Topaz and Re.Store locations in Clonshaugh & Kilmacanogue in Dublin, Kill in Co. Kildare or in Newcastle in Co. Galway and Douglas in Co. Cork. • Or via DPD Ireland’s 38 depots all across the country

There is a full listing of Lego drop off points on www.jackandjill.ie and every €16 raised through this campaign will fund 1 hour of home nursing care for a sick child. The charity is hoping that families, preschools, schools and businesses across the country will collect and donate their unwanted Lego to Jack & Jill between now and Christmas 2016. According to Jonathan Irwin CEO & Founder of Jack & Jill, “We know that if teachers and schools jump onboard, we’ll get a windfall of Lego in and taking part might suit schools as part of their environmental and community initiatives. "We’re asking teachers to start talking about this in the classroom and to encourage students to find that Lego hiding in cupboards, drawers, toy boxes or under the bed. We want to hear from as many teachers as possible and we’d love to discuss their ideas for collecting Lego through the schools and classrooms.” Full details about the appeal are on www.jackandjill.ie. Education 35

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Graduate

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ways

From 'An Analysis of the First Destination of University and College of Education Graduates' A report by the Higher Education Authority www.hea.ie

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First Destination of 2014 Graduates 1

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Your Locker Solution

Peter Cahill Engineering

Ireland’s Leading Locker Manufacturer

The Locker Specialist Laptop and iPad charging lockers Merrywell Business Park, Ballymount Road, Dublin 12

Tel: 01 450 0030 Web: www.pce.ie • Email: info@pce.ie

PETER Cahill Engineering is Ireland’s premier locker manufacturer. We have been supplying lockers to schools & businesses around Ireland for almost 30 years. We offer a locker solutions for almost any application (clean rooms, swimming pools, gyms, spas, schools, offices etc). Our lockers comply with the Dept of Education furniture specifications. We specialise in supplying to a broad range of industries which include education, fire and police services, hospitals, hotel and leisure facilities and retail to name but a few. If our extensive range of lockers does not have exactly what you are looking for, we can design a bespoke solution to suit your specific needs. Our lockers are fully welded (no rivets), independently tested to BS 4680 (Determination of Strength & Durability of Storage Furniture) and have added safety features such as reinforced doors, concealed hinges, door closing folds on 4 sides and sloping tops. We offer a full after sales service supplying spare parts for all our lockers including built in locker locks (butterfly / camlocks with keys), padlocks, spare keys, replacement doors, touch up paint etc. FIND OUT MORE: To speak to one of our experienced sales team, please contact us on 01-4500030 or email us on info@pce.ie

Griffith College Dublin

Become a music or drama teacher with the Leinster School of Music and Drama THE Leinster School of Music and Drama is now enrolling for both its Higher Diploma in Arts in Music Education and its Higher Diploma in Arts in Drama Education. These long established programmes are validated by QQI and enable learners in each discipline to become fully qualified teachers in their own right. These one year long courses are usually run part-time with a commitment of two nights per week along with seven teaching practice days throughout the year. If you are currently engaging in either music or drama, by completing a course with the Leinster School of Music and Drama you can open up a variety of new teaching opportunities and careers; or to further your own skills and expertise. Applications are now being accepted and you can apply online or find out more information at www.griffith.ie/lsmd or by calling 01 415 0415. FIND OUT MORE: www.griffith.ie/lsmd | 01 415 0415 38 Education

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Teagasc College of Amenity Horticulture

Horticulture as a career path THE Teagasc College of Amenity Horticulture is located in the National Botanic Gardens in Dublin’s northside suburb of Glasnevin. At this location we teach full time courses in Horticulture at Level 5 (Certificate, 1year), Level 6 (Advanced Certificate, 1 year) and Level 7 (Ordinary Degree, 3 years). We have approximately 200 students from all over the Dublin, greater Leinster area and beyond. Fantastic outdoor classroom Students who enter the courses have the ability to learn in the fantastic outdoor classroom which is the plant collection of the National Botanic Gardens complimented by the brand new state of the art college teaching facilities which were completed in 2014. All of our students spend time training on the National Botanic Gardens as part of their programme which is invaluable. We have the added benefit of students being taught by top class Teagasc and OPW staff of the Gardens who take students on practical work experience during their studies in the college. This is also emphasised by the fact that students partake in work based training as part of their courses which is organised through the college with different employers in the industry. Our qualifications are fully accredited and suit people who wish to follow the area of Horticulture as a fulltime career path. The basic science of horticulture is covered in all courses, soils, plant science and plant identification and then students can further study areas like Landscaping, Sportsturf, Nursery stock and Food Crop production. These subjects give people the foundation to build a strong career in the horticultural sector. There are lots of careers for horticulture graduates and opportunities are to be found in plant nurseries, landscaping companies, sportsturf facilities and other areas of horticulture involved in food production.

by applying directly to the college for the Certificate course or through the CAO for the level 7 degree course (WD097). We have a partnership w i t h Wa t e r f o rd I n s t i t u t e o f Technology for the delivery of the d e g re e c o u r s e i n t h e B o t a n i c Gardens. It is important to note that students spend all of their time on the degree programme based in the Teagasc College in Dublin. The pro-

All of our students spend time training on the National Botanic Gardens.

gramme is awarded by Waterford Institute of Technology. Students who wish to apply for the certificate course can do so directly to the college. Application forms are available directly from the college or on the Teagasc website www.teagasc.ie/botanicgardens . You are most welcome to come along to see our facilities and meet staff regarding course choices in Horticulture.

Situated in the National Botanic Gardens Glasnevin the Teagasc College of Amenity Horticulture offers the following courses in Horticulture. This wonderful setting provides the unique blend of the fi nest park setting in the Capital coupled with the experience of the staff of the gardens and the Teagasc staff. All students can avail of work experience in the Botanic Gardens as well as on parks around the city and other placements further afield. Botanic graduates are leaders in the field of Horticulture and develop clear career pathways. Careers in landscape design and construction, parks, garden centres and fruit and vegetable production are all followed by the graduates.

Teagasc are proud to have new state of the art classrooms to support the learning of the next generation of Horticulturalists in the National Botanic Gardens. ● QQI Level 5 Certificate in Horticulture ● QQI Level 6 Advanced Certificate in Horticulture ● QQI Level 7BSc in Horticulture in Partnership with WIT (WD097)

NEW Part time Component Awards at L5 and L6 Application procedure for Certificate and Component Award courses directly to the college Application for HETAC courses through CAO application process www.cao.ie Details on all courses can be found at www.teagasc.ie/botanicgardens or telephone 01 8040201 or email: botanic.college@teagasc.ie

Degree course Students can enter first year either Education 39

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Sallynoggin College of Further Education

Making the right choice WHETHER a school-leaver, or thinking about returning to education, making decisions about a future career can often be a nail-biting experience. It is not always obvious which will be the right path to take, and unfortunately there is no big LIKE button blinking at you on a course page, truthfully saying: “this will be the right course for you!” So, how can you know which is the right choice? Sallynoggin College of Further Education, each year helps with these choices by bringing students closer to their future careers. Here, students can study an area of interest and come away armed with a recognised and industry relevant QQI qualification after just one or two years. Options then open up, to continue to third-level degree courses, or, to progress directly into industry. Our Advanced Fashion Industry Practice students, for example, have achieved places in colleges throughout the UK and Ireland by applying through UCAS and CAO. They apply to diverse courses such as; Fashion Buying, Fashion Management, Fashion History, Fashion Journalism and Visual Merchandising. Our students each year, make confident decisions about which degree course to choose based on their learning and experiences while studying at Sallynoggin College. Most importantly, it’s about figuring out where your interests and capabilities are, then matching these with your career choices. At Sallynoggin College of Further Education we can help with these decisions through our industry related projects, work experience and events. With small class sizes, there is plenty of scope for independent learning, while also being offered support and personal tutor contact throughout the year. Once our students achieve their college places or secure jobs in industry, they are proving themselves to be well equipped both practically and academically. This was recently noticeable in the DIT Fashion Awards, 2016, when two past stu-

dents of Fashion Design at Sallynoggin College achieved both First and third place awards. You too can keep a watch out for our Sallynoggin students, they’re the people that you meet…. • When you crawl into the gym our Fitness and Leisure graduates will be there devising your training program and motivating you to keep going. • When you turn on RTE Super Garden, that’s our Art Portfolio graduate judging the talent. • When you send your child to a crèche you trust, our Childcare graduates will be there caring for your precious little one. • When you need a holiday…. our Travel and Tourism students will arrange your flights and make that vacation special. • When you go to the Salon, our Hair and Beauty graduates will pamper you and style you for that special occasion. • When you need the support of a

community organisation our Social Studies graduates will be at your side. • When you think Conor McGregor is looking especially good lately, oh yes, that’s because our Fashion Industry Practice graduate has styled him. Our Sallynoggin College students are proving themselves to be in a consistently strong position once they enter third level colleges and industry. They are able to achieve their by making informed choices. They have made the right choice. With advice and support on career choices, a broad range of courses, no tuition fees, free parking, a friendly environment, excellent library facilities, smaller classes, there is a lot going for this Further Education college, and for YOU!. FIND OUT MORE: To apply on-line or to get further information on courses at Sallynoggin College of Further Education, please visit us at www.scfe.ie Education 41

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REFERENCE GUIDE BRIEFING LEVEL 1 CERTIFICATE (NFQ LEVEL 1) Class of award-type: Major Volume: Small Level 1 and 2 Certificates are designed to meet the needs of learners, both young and old, including those with intellectual and other disabilities, adults returning to training, and learners with few or no previous qualifications, including those within the workforce. These awards provide certification for learners who may progress to higher levels and also for those whose principal achievements rest at these levels. Each certificate comprises a number of components, most often in basic literacy and numeracy, which the learner can achieve at their own pace and accumulate over time towards one of the named certificates above. QQI Award-Further Education & Training Award Awarded by: Quality and Qualifications Ireland. LEVEL 2 CERTIFICATE (NFQ LEVEL 2) Class of award-type: Major Volume: Medium Level 1 and 2 Certificates are designed to meet the needs of learners, both young and old, including those with intellectual and other disabilities, adults returning to training, and learners with few or no previous qualifications, including those within the workforce. These awards provide certification for learners who may progress to higher levels and also for those whose principal achievements rest at these levels. Each certificate comprises a number of components, most often in basic literacy and numeracy, which the learner can achieve at their own pace and accumulate over time towards one of the named certificates above. QQI Award - Further Education and Training Award Awarded by: Quality and Qualifications Ireland.

National Framew LEVEL 3 CERTIFICATE (NFQ LEVEL 3) Class of award-type: Major Volume: Large The Level 3 Certificate enables learners to gain recognition for, specific personal skills, practical skills and knowledge, basic transferable skills, the enhancement of individual talents and qualities and achievements and learning relevant to a variety of progression options. QQI Award - Further Education and Training Award Awarded by: Quality and Qualifications Ireland. JUNIOR CERTIFICATE (NFQ LEVEL 3) Class of award-type: Major Volume: Large The Junior Certificate is an award given to students who have successfully completed examinations from the junior cycle which is the first three years of secondary education. The Junior Certificate may lead to progression to a programme leading to the Leaving Certificate or to a programme leading to a Level 4 Certificate, or at a higher level. Awarded by: State Examinations Commission (Department of Education and Skills).

LEVEL 4 CERTIFICATE (NFQ LEVEL 4) Class of award-type: Major; Volume: Large The Level 4 Certificate enables learners to gain recognition for the achievement of vocational and personal skills, knowledge and understanding to specified standards, the enhancement of individual talents and qualities and the achievement and learning relevant to a variety of progression options, including employment at an introductory vocational level, and programmes leading to a Level 5 Certificate. QQI Award - Further Education and Training Award Awarded by: Quality and Qualifications Ireland. LEVEL 5 CERTIFICATE (NFQ LEVEL 5) Class of award-type: Major; Volume: Large The Level 5 Certificate enables learners to develop a broad range of skills, which are vocationally specific and require a general theoretical understanding. They are enabled to work independently while subject to general direction. The majority of certificate/module holders at Level 5 take up positions of employment. They are also deemed to meet the minimum entry requirements for a range of higher education institutions/programmes. QQI Award - Further Education and Training Award Awarded by: Quality and Qualifications Ireland

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ework of Qualifications LEAVING CERTIFICATE (NFQ LEVEL 4 AND 5) Class of award-type: Major Volume: Large Leaving Certificate and its various programmes is placed at Levels 4 and 5. It is the final course in the Irish secondary school system. It takes a minimum of two years preparation, but an optional Transition Year means that for some- students it takes place three years after the Junior Certificate Examination. This award may lead to progression to a programme leading to a further education and training award at Level 5 or at a higher level or to a higher education and training award at Level 6 or higher. Awarded by: State Examinations Commission (Department of Education and Skills). ADVANCED CERTIFICATE (NFQ LEVEL 6) Class of award-type: Major Volume: Large An Advanced Certificate award enables learners to develop a comprehensive range of skills, which may be vocationally specific and/or of a general supervisory nature, and require detailed theoretical understanding. Modules include advanced vocational/occupational skills, enabling certificate holders to work independently or progress to higher education and training. The majority of certificate/module holders at Level 6 take up positions of employment, some of whom may be self-employed. QQI Award - Further Education and Training Award Awarded by: Quality and Qualifications Ireland.

ORDINARY BACHELOR DEGREE (NFQ LEVEL 7) Class of award-type: Major Volume: Large The Ordinary Bachelor Degree is normally awarded after completion of a programme of three years duration (180 ECTS credits). Entry to a programme leading to an Ordinary Bachelor degree is typically for school leavers and those with equivalent qualifications. In addition, there are transfer arrangements in place across higher education and a number of programmes of one year duration leading to the Ordinary Bachelor Degree for holders of the Higher Certificate. The Ordinary Bachelor Degree is compatible with the Bologna First Cycle descriptor, though holders of this award do not generally immediately access programmes leading to Second Cycle awards in Ireland. Awarded by: Institutes of Technology, Quality and Qualifications Ireland, and Universities. HONOURS BACHELOR DEGREE (NFQ LEVEL 8) Class of award-type: Major Volume: Large The Honours Bachelor Degree is normally awarded following completion of a programme of three to four years duration (180-240 ECTS credits), although there are examples of longer programmes in areas such as architecture, dentistry and medicine. Entry is generally for school leavers and those with equivalent qualifications. In addition, there are transfer arrangements across higher education, and a number of programmes of one year duration leading to Honours Bachelor Degrees for holders of the Ordinary Bachelor Degree. The Honours Bachelor Degree is a Bologna First Cycle qualification. Awarded by: Institutes of Technology, Quality and Qualifications Ireland, and Universities. HIGHER DIPLOMA (NFQ LEVEL 8) Class of award-type: Major Volume: Large The Higher Diploma is normally awarded following completion of a programme of one year duration (60 ECTS credits). Entry to a programme leading to a Higher Diploma is typically for holders of Honours Bachelor Degrees but can also be for holders of Ordinary Bachelor Degrees. It is of note that the Higher Diploma is typically in a different field of learning than the initial award. The Higher Diploma is a qualification at the same level as completion of the Bologna First Cycle. Awarded by: Institutes of Technology, Quality and Qualifications Ireland, and Universities. MASTERS DEGREE (NFQ LEVEL 9) Class of award-type: Major Volume: Large There are two types of Masters Degree in Ireland: taught Masters Degrees and research Masters Degrees. The taught Masters Degree is awarded following the completion of a programme of one to two years duration (60-120 ECTS credits). Entry to a programme leading to a taught Masters Degree is typically for holders of Honours Bachelor Degrees. In some cases, entry to such programmes can be permitted for those with Ordinary Bachelor Degrees or equivalent. Research Masters Degree programmes are typically of two years duration (120 ECTS credits)

though not all such programmes are credit rated. The Irish Masters Degree is compatible with completion of the Bologna Second Cycle. Awarded by: Institutes of Technology, Quality and Qualifications Ireland, and Universities.. POST GRADUATE DIPLOMA (NFQ LEVEL 9) Class of award-type: Major Volume: Large The Postgraduate Diploma is normally awarded following completion of a programme of one year duration (60 ECTS credits). Entry to a programme leading to a Postgraduate Diploma is typically for holders of Honours Bachelor Degrees but can also be for holders of Ordinary Bachelor Degrees. The Post-graduate Diploma is an intermediate qualification within the Bologna Second Cycle. Awarded by: Institutes of Technology, Quality and Qualifications Ireland, and Universities. DOCTORAL DEGREE (NFQ LEVEL 10) Class of award-type: Major; Volume: Large Possession of an Honours Bachelor Degree is normally required for entry to a doctoral programme. In some disciplines, a Masters Degree is also preferred. Normally those entering a doctoral programme with an Honours Bachelor Degree initially register for a research Masters Degree or provisional doctoral candidature. Upon successful completion of this initial stage, the candidate acquires full doctoral candidature. Doctoral programmes are between three and four years in duration. ECTS credits are used in doctoral programmes for taught elements only. Varying doctoral programmes now exist, including professional and performance/practice based doctorates. The Irish Doctoral Degree is compatible with completion of the Bologna Third Cycle. Awarded by: Institutes of Technology, Quality and Qualifications Ireland, and Universities. HIGHER DOCTORATE (NFQ LEVEL 10) Class of award-type: Major; Volume: Large This award largely recognises excellent and distinguished contributions to learning. It may be used for career progression to advanced levels of academia and research. This award is never based on a provider’s programme and, as such, is not subject to validation but is assessed by the awarding body for each individual provider. Normally, the learner already holds a first doctorate or equivalent for some period of time prior to becoming a candidate for the higher doctorate. The Irish Higher Doctorate is compatible with completion of the Bologna Third Cycle. Awarded by: Institutes of Technology, Quality and Qualifications Ireland, and Universities.

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National Learning Network

NLN - a stepping stone between secondary school and further education ACROSS Ireland National learning Network provides personalised education and training courses to individuals with unique and particular needs including an intellectual disability, mental health needs, health conditi ons and illness, recovery from accident and injury along with people on the autism spectrum. The focus is on supporting each student to achieve their maximum potential in further or higher education, training and in accessing employment. We work with each person to establish their goals and overcome barriers to achievement of these goals. Our staff work as a team with each student to map out a personalised plan, identify supports and monitor progress. A range of supports including one-to-one supports, functional literacy and numeracy, access to psychological assessments and inputs, peer supports, ICT, are offered to facilitate each student progressing through arrange of QQI approved courses at level 3,4 and 5. These courses range across a broad range of potential work options including: information technology, catering and culinary skills, business studies, computer design, horticulture, performing arts, retail, office skills, employability skills, sport a n d l e i s u re m a n a g e m e n t a n d employer based training. Conor’s Story Conor Paybody (21), who is originally from England, moved to Kilkenny in 2003. When he finished school he knew he wanted to continue his studies but the idea of sitting at a desk all day didn’t appeal to him. Having Asperger’s Syndrome meant Conor needed some extra support with learning. The National Learning Network was the perfect solution for him as he could train three days a week in the centre in

Kilkenny focusing on his modules and then two days a week doing his work experience in Kingsriver in Stoneyford. 'A Great Fit for Me' “I started in the centre in September 2013 and studied loads of modules, like internet skills, word processing and the ECDL. These courses are a great fit for me because I love to write and learn about computers and technology. I’ve learnt far more than just this though, I have learnt really useful skills like cooking and budgeting. "I really enjoy coming to the centre because the teaching style really helps me and the staff are so friendly, helpful and trustworthy. I’ve also made really good friends in my time in the centre, one of my favourite parts of my time here has been the centre’s weekly lunch out. Me and all my friends get time to chat and relax on a break from our studies. "I also do work experience two days a week in Kingsriver in Stoneyford. They provide residential and day care services for people with disabilities. There I have gained experience in areas such as carpentry and arts and crafts but carpentry is my favourite part of my work experience. I love that I can do my work

"We work with each person to establish their goals and overcome barriers to achievement of these goals

FIND OUT MORE: To find out more about NLN, Call us on 1890 283 000 or visit www.nln.ie ■ Conor Peabody

experience and my studies at the same time, it’s what attracted me to the National Learning Network. "I really admire Michael O’Leary from Ryanair. I invited him to my 21st birthday party. He couldn’t come but he invited me to visit him in his Head Office in Dublin. It was a dream come true to meet him. "I’m due to finish in the centre in September but I’m looking forward to taking on the new challenge of working full time in Kingsriver which is where I did my work experience. I hope to develop my carpentry skills there because I really enjoyed this on work experience. I’m really sad to be leaving the centre and all my friends but I’m also looking forward to the change.” NLN courses are open to people who: • Are 18 years or older • Need extra supports • Have had an accident, illness or injury • Have a disability • Are registered with the Dept. Of Social Protection (DSP) or Health Service Executive (HSE) Education 45

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Reference Guid

Travelling with your ARE you thinking of working or studying in the UK or Ireland? You may be interested in the answer to one or more of these questions: ■ What do they call the qualification which compares most closely with mine? ■ Will I get some recognition for the qualifications I have? ■ What kind of job or course can I apply for with my current qualification? Recruiting people with Irish qualifications in the UK or people with UK qualifications in Ireland? You may be interested in the answer to these questions. ■ How do I know what a qualification from another country means in terms of level?

g

■ Which national qualification should I compare this qualification to? ■ Where can I find more detailed information about the content and level of qualifications?

a w E T e

Qualifications are different in different countries. However, there are some clear stages people move through in education, training and work that are common to most countries. Primary education is followed by secondary education and then initial entry into employment and/or further higher education or training. The main table gives an indication of how you can compare qualifications across national boundaries. Examples of major qualifications at each level are provided. For more detail of the current qualifications in each country, you will need to consult the website

H ■

Correspondences between UK and Irish frameworks with European qualifications frameworks

Thinking of working or studying in the UK or Ireland? You may be interested in the answer to one or more of these questions.

Within Europe, two overarching qualifications frameworks exist to which the national qualifications frameworks of the UK and Ireland relate: The European Qualifications Framework (EQF) and the Framework for Qualifications of the European Higher Education Area (FQ-EHEA) also known as the Bologna Framework.

n What do they call the qualification which compares most closely with mine? n Will I get some recognition for the qualifications I have? n What kind of job or course can I apply for with my current qualifi

Table 1 shows the correspondence of levels established between national qualifications frameworks and the EQF:

Recruiting people with Irish qualifications in the UK or people wit UK qualifications in Ireland? You may be interested in the answer to these questions.

European Qualifications Framework (EQF) 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

Qualifications and Credit Framework England/ Northern Ireland (QCF) 8 7 6 5/4 3 2 1 E3 E2 E1

Credit and Qualifications Framework for Wales (CQFW)

Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework (SCQF)

8 7 6 5/4 3 2 1 E3 E2 E1

12 11 10/9 8/7 6 5 4 3 2 1

The National Framework of Qualifications for Ireland (NFQ IE)

n How do I know what a qualification from another country means of level? n Which national qualification should I compare this qualification t n Where can I find more detailed information about the content an level of qualifications?

10 9 8/7 6 5 4 3 2/1

This leaflet helps you explore these questions.

Qualifications are different in different countries. However, there are clear stages people move through in education, training and work th common to most countries. Primary education is followed by secon education and then initial entry into employment and/or further high education or training.

Table 2 shows the outcome of verifying the compatibility of higher education frameworks for Scotland (FQHEIS/SCQF), for England, Wales and Northern Ireland (FHEQ) and for the NFQ for the Republic of Ireland (NFQ IE) with the FQ-EHEA as follows:

Doctoral degrees

FHEQ FQHEIS/ level SCQF level

NFQ IE level

8

12

10

7

11

9

10

8

Master’s degrees (including Integrated Master’s) Postgraduate diplomas Postgraduate certificates Bachelor’s degrees with honours/Honours Bachelor Degrees Irish Higher Diploma Bachelor’s degrees/ Ordinary Bachelor Degree Graduate diplomas Graduate certificates

6

Foundation Degrees (eg FdA, FdSc) Diplomas of Higher Education (DipHE) Higher National Diplomas (HND)

5

Irish Higher Certificate Higher National Certificates (HNC) Certificates of Higher Education (CertHE)

Third cycle (end of cycle) qualifications Second cycle (end of cycle) qualifications Intermediate qualifications within the second cycle First cycle (end of cycle) qualifications

7 9

4

Corresponding FQ-EHEA cycle

8

7

6

Intermediate qualifications within the first cycle Short cycle (within or linked to the first cycle) qualifications

Intermediate qualifications within the short cycle

For more information on compatibility with these frameworks see: http://ec.europa.eu/eqf/home_en.htm and www.enic-naric.net.

Typical higher education qualifications within each level

The main table gives an indication of how you can compare qualifica across national boundaries. Examples of major qualifications at eac are provided. For more detail of the current qualifications in each co you will need to consult the website given at the heading of each co Qualifications in each of these frameworks change from time to time you need to check the relevant websites for the latest versions (as w as for earlier versions of the framework where these are available). E requirements for jobs and courses often vary within a country. This you will need to check specific requirements with the employer or in for the job or course that you are interested in.

QAA Southgate House, Southgate Street, Gloucester GL1 1UB Tel: +44 (0)1452 557000 Fax: +44 (0)1452 557070 Email: enquiries@qaa.ac.uk www.qaa.ac.uk

Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework Partnership 39 St Vincent Place, Glasgow G1 2ER info@scqf.org.uk

CCEA Accreditation 29 Clarendon Road, Cla Dock, Belfast BT1 3BG Tel: +44 (0)28 9026 120 Email info@ccea.org.uk www.ccea.org.uk

Office of the Qualifications and Examinations Regulator Spring Place, Coventry Business Park, Herald Avenue, Coventry CV5 6UB Tel: +44 (0)300 303 3344 Fax: +44 (0)300 303 3348 Email: info@ofqual.gov.uk www.ofqual.gov.uk

CQFW, Welsh Government Ty’r Afon, Bedwas Road, Bedwas, Caerphilly CF83 8WT www.cqfw.net E-mail: cqfwenquiries@wales.gsi. gov.uk

Quality and Qualificatio (QQI) 26/27 Denzille lane Dublin 2 Tel: +353 (0)1 905 8100 www.qqi.ie

Fifth edition pu

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Guide Briefing:

ur Irish qualification

d

e k y r

e r t e

given at the heading of each column. Qualifications in each of these frameworks change from time to time and you need to check the relevant websites for the latest versions (as well as for earlier versions of the framework where these are available). Entry requirements for jobs and courses often vary within a country. This means you will need to check specific requirements with the employer or institution for the job or course that you are interested in. How to use the main table: ■ The table provides information that allows you to look at the ways qualifications are organised in the UK and Ireland. ■ It shows which qualifications in other countries are broadly comparable to your qualifications (or those that you are interested

You may be tions.

most closely

ve? urrent qualification?

r people with n the answer

untry means in terms

ualification to? he content and

ver, there are some and work that are ed by secondary or further higher

pare qualifications ations at each level ns in each country, ng of each column. time to time and ersions (as well available). Entry ountry. This means mployer or institution

in taking). ■ On the left side of the table you will find the main stages of education or employment - you can find where you are in these stages. ■ To the right of this you can see the nearest levels and similar kinds of qualifications that are used in each country. ■ This makes it possible to draw broad comparisons, rather than direct equivalences, between qualifications and their levels for each country. ■ The left table indicates how Irish and UK qualifications frameworks relate to qualifications frameworks in Europe. ■ These tables are updated periodically. Check one of the websites for the most up-to-date version.

Qualifications can cross boundaries A guide to comparing qualifications in the UK and Ireland How to use this leaflet:

This leaflet provides information that allows you to look at the ways qualifications are organised in the UK and Ireland.

It shows which qualifications in other countries are broadly comparable to your qualifications (or those that you are interested in taking).

On the left side of the principal table you will find the main stages of education or employment - you can find where you are in these stages.

The next column shows the qualifications framework for your country.

To the right of this you can see the nearest levels and similar kinds of qualifications that are used in the other countries.

This makes it possible to draw broad comparisons, rather than direct equivalences, between qualifications and their levels for each country.

The back page indicates how UK and Irish qualifications frameworks relate to qualifications frameworks in Europe.

This leaflet is updated periodically. Check one of the websites for the most up-to-date version.

A Accreditation larendon Road, Clarendon k, Belfast BT1 3BG +44 (0)28 9026 1200 il info@ccea.org.uk w.ccea.org.uk

lity and Qualifications Ireland I) 27 Denzille lane in 2 +353 (0)1 905 8100 w.qqi.ie Fifth edition published 2014

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Stillorgan College of Further Education

An enviable reputation for programme delivery STILLORGAN College of Further Education has been a specialist centre for Further Education/Post Leaving Cert courses since 1986. During this time it has developed an enviable reputation for its delivery of Further Education programmes. The college offers a range of practical courses that develop the necessary skills for the workplace or to progress to further study in the Institutes of Technology or Universities. The college is innovative in providing courses that meet the current needs of industry. For example, the college recently developed a very exciting and successful new course in Multimedia Production with Games Design. The interactive media and games sector has been identified as a priority area for training as there is currently a skills shortage in this growth industry. Excellent track record One of the longest established courses in the college is the Art

Foundation course. This course provides tuition in areas such as Drawing, Painting, Sculpture, Ceramics and Combined Materials. Graduates of this course leave with a very extensive portfolio that can be used to progress to Degree courses in colleges such as the National College of Art and Design (NCAD) and IADT, DĂşn Laoghaire. The well-established Photography course also has an excellent track record for students progressing into industry or further study. Also on offer is a Travel and Tourism course with Airline Studies. This course prepares students for work in all areas of the travel indust r y. S t u d e n t s o n t h e E v e n t Management course gain practical experience in organising a number of events during their course. Courses in Media Production, Journalism and Level 5 and 6 courses in Computer Skills for Business round off the extensive offering of courses in the college.

The college takes particular pride in the excellent success rate of students progressing to Degree courses in Higher Education

Excellent success rate The staff of the college have extensive industry experience in their respective fields and are dedicated to ensuring that, whether aiming to move to Higher Education or entering the employment market, students leave the college with every skill necessary for the future. Indeed, the college takes particular pride in the excellent success rate of students progressing to Degree courses in Higher Education. Sited close to Stillorgan Shopping Centre, the college is serviced by many bus routes and is also accessible via Dart and Luas networks. Car parking is available on the college grounds. The college is fully wheelchair accessible. Mature students are welcome on all courses. FIND OUT MORE: For more information about the college see www.stillorgancollege.ie.

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Reference Guide Briefing:

The education system in numbers Number of full-time students in institutions aided by the Department of Education, 2014/2015 Level ..........................................................No. of Students First Level.............................................................. 544,696 Primary Schools ..................................................... 536,747 Special Schools .......................................................... 7,949 Second Level (excluding PLC students) ................. 339,207 Secondary.............................................................. 190,587 Vocational ............................................................... 91,612 Community and Comprehensive.............................. 57,008 Second-level Students in PLC Courses .................... 33,089 Secondary..................................................................... 557 Vocational ............................................................... 31,466 Community and Comprehensive................................ 1,066 Third Level ............................................................ 169,254 University Sector...................................................... 93,023 Technology Sector ................................................... 66,490 Teacher Training Institutions ...................................... 6,703 Other Aided Institutions ............................................ 3,038 Total ................................................................... 1,086,246

School Size at First and Second Level in 2014/2015

Number of teachers/academic staff in institutions aided by the Department of Education 2014/2015 (full-time equivalent). Level

No. of teachers/academic staff 2013/14 2014/15 First Level 32,828 33,613 All Second Level 25,626 26,174 Second Level excluding PLC 24,455 24,455 PLC 1,719 1,719 Number of schools aided by the Department of Education 2014/2015 Level

No. of Schools

First Level.....................................................................3,277 Primary Schools ............................................................3,137 Special Schools ................................................................140 Second Level ...................................................................732 Secondary........................................................................375 Vocational .......................................................................262 Community and Comprehensive........................................95 Total .............................................................................4,009 The Pupil Teacher Ratio in National Schools 2013/14

First Level

Second Level

less than 50 .............................. 603.................................0 50 - 99 ..................................... 702...............................21 100 - 199 ................................. 823...............................59 200 - 299 ................................. 513.............................107

2014/15

Total enrolment in all National Schools at the start of each school-year...................... 536,317 ......... 544,696 Total number of teaching posts at the end of each school-year......................... 32,828 ........... 33,613 Pupil Teacher Ratio in all National Schools ......... 16.3 ............... 16.2

300 - 499 ................................. 378.............................185

Total enrolment in Mainstream Classes .......... 525,141 ......... 532,931

500+ ........................................ 118.............................360

Teaching Teachers of Mainstream Classes ........ 21,147 ........... 21,419

Total ........................................ 3,137 ............................. 732

Average class size in Mainstream Classes ........... 24.8 ............... 24.9

Number of Third-Level Colleges aided by the Department of Education, 2014/2015. Type Number Universities .......................................................................7 Technology Sector ..........................................................14 Teacher Training ...............................................................6 Other ...............................................................................4 Total ...............................................................................31

Public Examination Candidates

2013

2014

Junior Certificate Candidates ........................................59,822 .............60,328 Leaving Certificate Candidates......................................55,577 .............56,989 Of which Leaving Certificate School Candidates...........49,135 .............50,643 External Candidates .......................................................2,743 ...............2,578 VTOS/PLC Candidates .....................................................889 ..................804 Leaving Certificate Applied ............................................2,810 ...............2,964 Total Exam Candidates ................................................115,399 ...........117,317

Past Enrolments of Full-time Students in Institutions Aided by Department of Education & Skills Level 1974/1975 1984/1985 1994/1995 2004/2005 2014/2015 First Level 520,164 566,289 491,256 449,298 544,696 Second Level (includes PLC) 253,428 329,999 371,957 336,244 372,296 PLC n/a n/a 17,644 29,354 33,089 Third Level 29,911 50,836 89,693 133,691 173,649 Total (includes PLC figure) 803,503 947,124 952,906 919,233 1,090,641 Education 49

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Education REFERENCE GUIDE

Listings 2016-2017 Careers Information . . . . . . . . 50, 51 Government Departments . . . . . . . 51 Government Services . . . . . . . . . . 51 Education Institutes . . . . . . . . . . .52 Education and Training Boards . . .53 Education Centres. . . . . . . . . . . . .53

Careers Information AONTAS National Association of Adult Education 2nd Floor, 83/87 Main St, Ranelagh, Dublin 6. ☎ 01 4068220/1  www.aontas.com The Arts Council 70 Merrion Sq, Dublin 2. ☎ 01 6180200  www.artscouncil.ie Association of Advertisers in Ireland Ltd Fitzwilliam Business Centre 26 Upr Pembroke Street Dublin 2. ☎ 01-6373950  www.aai.ie Association of Chartered Certified Accountants 9 Leeson Park, Dublin 6. ☎ 01 4475678  www.accaglobal.com/ie Chambers of Commerce of Ireland 3rd Floor, Newmount House, Lower Mount St., Dublin 2. ☎ 01 4004300  www.chambers.ie Association of Consulting Engineers of Ireland 46 Merrion Sqr, Dublin 2. ☎ 01 6425588  www.acei.ie Association of Garda Sergeants & Inspectors 6th Floor, Phibsborough Tower, Dublin 7. ☎ 01 8303166  www.agsi.ie Association of Occupational Therapists of Ireland Suite 2.20, Smithfield Business Centre, Distiller’s Building, Smithfield, Dublin 7. ☎ 01 874 8136  www.aoti.ie

Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport 1 Fitzwilliam Plc, Dublin 2. ☎ 01 6763188  www.cilt.ie Chartered Institute of Management Accountants 5th Floor, Block E, Iveagh Ct, Harcourt Road, Dublin 2. ☎ 01 6430400  www.cimaglobal.com Chartered Institute of Personnel & Development Marine House, Clanwilliam Place, Dublin 2. ☎ 01 6780090  www.cipd.ie Computers in Education Society of Ireland c/o Drumcondra Education Centre, Drumcondra, D9.  www.cesi.ie Construction Industry Federation Construction House, Canal Road, Dublin 6. ☎ 01 4066000  www.cif.ie Design and Crafts Council of Ireland Castleyard, Kilkenny. ☎ 056 7761804  www.dccoi.ie Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies 10 Burlington Road, D4. ☎ 01 6140100  www.dias.ie Dublin Adult Learning Centre 3 Mountjoy Square, D1. ☎ 01 8743251  www.dalc.ie Economic and Social Research Institute Whitaker Square, Sir John Rogerson’s Quay, Dublin 2. ☎ 01 8632000  www.esri.ie

Association of Secondary Teachers of Ireland Thomas MacDonagh House, Winetavern Street, D8. ☎ 01 6040160  www.asti.ie

Education Research Centre St. Patrick’s College, Drumcondra, Dublin 9. ☎ 01 8373789  www.erc.ie

An Bord Altranais 18/20 Carysfort Ave Blackrock, Co Dublin. ☎ 01 6398500  www.nursingboard.ie

Engineers Ireland 22 Clyde Road, Ballsbridge, Dublin 4, Ireland ☎ 01 6651300  www.engineersireland.ie

Gorta Self Help Africa, 17 - 22 Parkgate Street, Dublin 8. ☎ 01 6615522  www.gorta.org

Institute of Public Administration 57/61 Lansdowne Rd, Dublin 4. ☎ 01 2403600  www.ipa.ie

Irish Fish Producers' Organisation 77 Sir John Rogersons Quay, Dublin 2. ☎ 01 6401850  www.ifpo.ie

Honourable Society of King’s Inn Henrietta Street, Dublin 1. ☎ 01 8744840  www.kingsinns.ie

Institute of Industrial Engineers 1 Boeing Ave, Airport Business Pk, Co. Waterford. ☎ 01 5252527  www.iie.ie

Irish Institute of Training and Development 4 Sycamore House, Millennium Business Park, Naas, Co Kildare. ☎ 045 881166  www.iitd.ie

Law Society of Ireland Blackhall Place, Dublin 7. ☎ 01 6724800  www.lawsociety.ie Accounting Technicians Ireland 47-49 Pearse Street, Dublin 2. ☎ 01 649 8100 accountingtechniciansireland.ie

Insurance Institute of Ireland 39 Molesworth St, Dublin 2. ☎ 01 6456600  www.iii.ie

Irish Insurance Federation Insurance House, 39 Molesworth Street, D2 ☎ 01 6761820  www.insuranceireland.eu

Irish Association of Social Workers 114 Pearse St., Dublin 2. ☎ 01 6774838  www.iasw.ie

Irish Management Institute Sandyford Road, Dublin 16. ☎ 1800 22 33 88  www.imi.ie

Society of Chartered Surveyors Ireland 38 Merrion Square, Dublin 2. ☎ 01 6445500  www.scsi.ie

NewsBrands Ireland (Formerly NNI) Clyde Lodge, 15 Clyde Road, Ballsbridge, Dublin 4. ☎ 01 668 9099  newsbrandsireland.ie

The Institute of Banking IFSC, 1 North Wall Quay, Dublin 1. ☎ 01 6116500  www.iob.ie

Irish Congress of Trade Unions 31/32 Parnell Sq, Dublin 1. ☎ 01 8897777  www.ictu.ie

Irish Medical Organisation 10 Fitzwilliam Place, D2. ☎ 01 6767273  www.imo.ie

Institute of Certified Public Accountants in Ireland 17 Harcourt Street, Dublin 2. ☎ 01 4251000  www.cpaireland.ie

Irish Council for International Students 41 Morehampton Road, Dublin 4. ☎ 01 6605233  www.icosirl.ie

Chartered Accountants Ireland Chartered Accountants House, 47 Pearse St, Dublin 2. ☎ 01 6377200  www.charteredaccountants.ie

Irish Dental Association Unit 2, Leopardstown Office Park, Sandyford, Dublin 18. ☎ 01 2950072  www.dentist.ie

Institute of Guidance Counsellors 17 Herbert Street, Dublin 2. ☎ 01 6761975  www.igc.ie

Irish Farmers Association Irish Farm Centre, Bluebell, Dublin 12. ☎ 01 4500266  www.ifa.ie

Irish Pharmacy Union Butterfield House, Butterfield Ave., Dublin 14. ☎ 01 4936401  www.ipu.ie

Institute of Professional Auctioneers & Valuers 129 Lower Baggot Street, Dublin 2. ☎ 01 6785685  www.ipav.ie

Irish Recorded Music Association IRMA House, 1 Corrig Ave, Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin.  www.irma.ie

Irish Professional Photographers Association 38/39 Fitzwilliam Square, Dublin 2. ☎ 01 401 6878  www.irishphotographers.com

Institute of Advertising Practitioners in Ireland 12 Clanwilliam Square, Grand Canal Quay, Dublin 2. ☎ 01 6765991  www.iapi.ie

Irish National Teachers Organisation 35 Parnell Square, D1. ☎ 01 8047700  www.into.ie Irish Nurses and Midwives Organisation The Whitworth Building, North Burnswick St, Dublin 7 ☎ 01 6640600  www.inmo.ie

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Careers Information (cont) Irish Society of Chartered Physiotherapists College of Surgeons St. Stephen’s Green, Dublin 2. ☎ 01 4022148  www.iscp.ie Irish Taxation Institute South Block, Longboat Qy, Grand Canal Harbour, Dublin 2. ☎ 01 6631700  www.taxinstitute.ie Education and Training Boards Ireland (ETBI) Piper's Hill, Kilcullen Road, Naas, Co Kildare Phone: 045-901070 / 045-901698  www.etbi.ie Marketing Institute of Ireland South County Business Park, Leopardstown, Dublin 18. ☎ 01 2952355  www.mii.ie

Meet in Ireland Amiens Street, Dublin 1. ☎ 1890 525 525  www.meetinireland.com The Olympic Council of Ireland Olympic House, Harbour Rd, Howth, Co Dublin. ☎ 01 8660555  www.olympics.ie Pharmaceutical Society of Ireland PSI House, Fenian Street, Dublin 2. ☎ 01 2184000  www.thepsi.ie Irish Photographic Federation C/o 53 Thornhill Gardens, Celbridge, Co. Kildare  www.irishphoto.ie

Public Relations Institute of Ireland 84 Merrion Square Dublin 2. ☎ 6618004  www.prii.ie Royal Institute of Architects of Ireland 8 Merrion Square, Dublin 2. ☎ 01 6761703  www.riai.ie Teagasc Oak Park, Carlow. ☎ 059 9170200  www.teagasc.ie Ashtown Food Research Centre Teagasc, Ashtown, Dublin 15 ☎ 01 8059500  www.teagasc.ie/ashtown Opticians Board 18 Fitzwilliam Square, Dublin 2. ☎ 01 6767416  www.opticiansboard.ie

The College of Progressive Education Wicklow House, 84-88 South Great George's Street, Dublin 2. ☎ 01 4884300  progressivecollege.com Society of Actuaries in Ireland Clanwilliam House Clanwilliam Place Dublin 2. ☎ 01 634 0020  www.actuaries.ie Society of the Irish Motor Industry 5 Upper Pembroke Street, Dublin 2. ☎ 01 6761690  www.simi.ie

Union of Students in Ireland Portview House, York Road, Dublin 4. ☎ 01 7099300  www.usi.ie USIT 19/21 Aston Quay, Dublin 2. ☎ 01 602 1906 Central Reservations ☎ 01 706 1071  www.usit.ie Veterinary Ireland 13 The Courtyard, Kilcarbery Park, Nangor Road, Dublin 22. ☎ 01 4577976  www.veterinaryireland.ie

Teachers Union of Ireland 73 Orwell Road, Rathgar, Dublin 6. ☎ 01 4922588  www.tui.ie

Vocations Ireland St. Mary's, Bloomfield Ave, Donnybrook, Dublin 4. ☎ 01 6689954  www.vocationsireland.com

Department of Finance Upper Merrion Street, Dublin 2. ☎ 01 6767571  www.finance.gov.ie

Department of Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation 23 Kildare Street, Dublin 2. ☎ 01 6312121/ LoCall 1890 220222  www.enterprise.gov.ie

Government Departments Dail Eireann Leinster House, Dublin 2. ☎ 01 6183000 /  www.oireachtas.ie Dept of Agriculture, Food & the Marine Kildare Street, Dublin 2. ☎ 01 6072000 / LoCall 1890 200510  www.agriculture.gov.ie Department of Arts, Heritage and Gaeltacht Affairs 23 Kildare Street, Dublin 2. ☎ 01 6313800 / LoCall 1890 383000  www.ahg.gov.ie Department of Children and Youth Affairs 43 - 49 Mespil Rd, Dublin 4. ☎ 01 6473000  www.dcya.gov.ie

Department of Communications, Energy & Natural Resources 29/31 Adelaide Rd, Dublin 2. ☎ 01 6782000 / LoCall 1890 449900  www.dcenr.gov.ie

Department of Social Protection Aras Mhic Dhiarmada, Store Street. Dublin 1. ☎ 01 7043000  www.welfare.ie

Department of Defence Station Road, Newbridge, Co. Kildare. ☎ 045 492000  www.defence.ie

Department of the Taoiseach Government Buildings Upper Merrion Street, Dublin 2. ☎ 01 6194000 / LoCall 1890 227227  www.taoiseach.gov.ie

Dept of Education and Skills Marlborough St, Dublin 1. ☎ 01 8896400  www.education.ie Department of the Environment, Community and Local Government Custom House, Dublin 1. ☎ 01 8882000  www.environ.ie

Department of Transport, Tourism and Sport 44 Kildare Street, Dublin 2. ☎ 01 6707444 / LoCall 0761 001 601  www.dttas.ie

Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade Iveagh House, 80 St. Stephen’s Green, Dublin 2. ☎ 01 4780822 / LoCall 1890 426700  www.dfa.ie Department of Health Hawkins House, Hawkins St, Dublin 2. ☎ 01 6354000  www.health.gov.ie

Department of Justice and Equality 94 St Stephen’s Green, Dublin 2. ☎ 01 6028202 Lo-Call 1890 221 227  www.justice.ie Department of of Public Expenditure and Reform Government Buildings, Upper Merrion St, Dublin 2. ☎ 01 676 7571  www.per.gov.ie

Government Services An Bord Pleanála 64 Marlborough Street, Dublin 1. ☎ 01 8588100 / LoCall 1890 275175  www.pleanala.ie Central Statistics Office Ardee Road, Rathmines, Dublin 6. ☎ 01 4984000 Skehard Road, Cork. ☎ 021 4535000  www.cso.ie

Courts Service 15/24 Phoenix Street North, Smithfield, Dublin 7. ☎ 01 8886000  www.courts.ie Data Protection Commissioner Canal House, Station Road, Portarlington, Co Laois. ☎ 057-8684800  www.dataprotection.ie

Garda Siochana Phoenix Park, Dublin 8. ☎ 01 6660000  www.garda.ie

Ombudsman 18 Lwr Leeson St, Dublin 2. ☎ LoCall 1890 223030  www.ombudsman.gov.ie

Passport Office Molesworth Street, Dublin 2. ☎ 01 6711633  www.dfa.ie/passport

HEAnet 5 George’s Dock, IFSC, Dublin 1. ☎ 01 6609040  www.heanet.ie

Ordnance Survey of Ireland Phoenix Park, Dublin 8 ☎ 01 8025300  www.osi.ie

Irish Prison Service IDA Business Park, Ballinalee Road, Longford. ☎ 043-3335100  www.irishprisons.ie

Met Eireann Glasnevin Hill, Dublin 9 ☎ 01 8064200  www.met.ie

Office of Public Works Head Office, Jonathan Swift Street, Trim, Co. Meath. ☎ 046 9426000 LoCall 1890 213414  www.opw.ie

Revenue Dublin Castle, Dublin 2. ☎ 01 6792777  www.revenue.ie

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Educational Institutes in Ireland All Hallows College Gracepark Road, Dublin 9. ☎ 01 852 0700  www.allhallows.ie American College Dublin 2 Merrion Square, Dublin 2. ☎ 01 676 8939  www.amcd.ie Athlone Institute of Technology Dublin Road, Athlone, Co. Westmeath. ☎ 090 6468000  www.ait.ie Burren College of Art Newtown Castle, Ballyvaughan, Co. Clare. ☎ 065 7077200  www.burrencollege.ie Church of Ireland Theological Institute Braemor Park, Dublin 14 ☎ 01 492 3506  www.theologicalinstitute.ie Cork Institute of Technology Bishopstown, Cork. ☎ 021 4326100  www.cit.ie

Dundalk Institute of Technology Dublin Road, Dundalk, Co. Louth. ☎ 042 9370200  www.dkit.ie Dun Laoghaire Institute of Art Design & Technology Kill Avenue, Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin. ☎ 01 2394000  www.iadt.ie Froebel Department of Primary and Early Childhood Education (NUIM) ☎ 01 2888520  www.nuim.ie/froebel Galway-Mayo Institute of Technology Dublin Road, Galway. ☎ 091 753161  www.gmit.ie Griffith College Cork Cove Street, Sullivan‘s Quay, Cork. ☎ 021 4507027  www.gcc.ie

CIT Cork School of Music Union Quay, Cork. ☎ 021 480 7307  cit.ie/csm

Griffith College Dublin South Circular Road, Dublin 8. ☎ 01 4150415  www.griffith.ie/dublin

CIT Crawford College of Art & Design Sharman, Crawford St, Cork. ☎ 021 4335200  cit.ie/ccad

Griffith College Limerick O'Connell Avenue, Limerick. ☎ 061-31 00 31  www.griffith.ie/limerick

University College Cork Western Road, Cork. ☎ 021 4903000  www.ucc.ie

Hibernia College 9-10 Fenian Street, Dublin 2. ☎ 01 6610168  www.hiberniacollege.com

Church of Ireland College of Education 96 Upper Rathmines Road, Dublin 6. ☎ 01 4970033  www.cice.ie

Institute of Technology, Blanchardstown Blanchardstown Road North, Dublin 15. ☎ 01 8851000  www.itb.ie

Marino Institute of Education Griffith Avenue, Dublin 9. ☎ 01 8057700  www.mie.ie Dublin Business School 13-14 Aungier Street, Dublin 2. ☎ 01 4177500  www.dbs.ie Dublin City University Dublin 9. ☎ 01 7005000  www.dcu.ie Dublin Institute of Technology 143/149 Rathmines Road, Dublin 6. ☎ 01 4023000  www.dit.ie

Institute of Technology, Carlow Kilkenny Road, Carlow. ☎ 059 9175000  www.itcarlow.ie Institute of Technology, Sligo Ash Lane, Ballinode, Co. Sligo. ☎ 071 9155222  www.itsligo.ie Institute of Technology, Tallaght Old Blessington Rd, Tallaght, Dublin 24. ☎ 01 4042000  www.it-tallaght.ie

Institute of Technology, Tralee Clash, Tralee, Co. Kerry. ☎ 066 7145600  www.ittralee.ie Letterkenny Institute of Technology Port Rd, Letterkenny, Co. Donegal. ☎ 074 9186000  www.lyit.ie Limerick Institute of Technology Moylish Pk, Limerick. ☎ 061 293000  www.lit.ie Mary Immaculate College South Circular Road, Limerick. ☎ 061 204300  www.mic.ul.ie Mater Dei Institute of Education Clonliffe Road, Dublin 3. ☎ 01 8086500  www.materdei.ie Milltown Institute of Theology & Philosophy Milltown Park, Sandford Road, Ranelagh, Dublin 6. ☎ 01 2776300  www.milltown-institute.ie National College of Art and Design 100 Thomas Street, Dublin 8. ☎ 01 6364200  www.ncad.ie National College of Ireland (NCI) Mayor Street, International Financial Services Centre, Dublin 1. ☎ 1850 221 721 www.ncirl.ie National University of Ireland, Galway University Road, Galway. ☎ 091 524411  www.nuigalway.ie National University of Ireland, Maynooth Maynooth, Co. Kildare. ☎ 01 7086000  www.maynoothuniversity.ie Portobello Institute 43 Dominick Street Lower, Dublin 1. ☎ 01 8920000  www.portobelloinstitute.ie Queens University Belfast University Road, Belfast BT7 1NN ☎ 0044 2890 245133  www.qub.ie Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland 123 St. Stephens Green Dublin 2. ☎ 01 4022100  www.rcsi.ie

St. Angela’s College Lough Gill, Sligo. ☎ 071 9143580  www.stangelas.nuigalway.ie Carlow College, College Street, Carlow. ☎ 059 9153200  www.carlowcollege.ie St. Patrick’s College Maynooth Co. Kildare. ☎ 01 7083964  www.maynoothcollege.ie St. Patrick’s College Drumcondra, Dublin 9. ☎ 01 8842000  www.spd.dcu.ie Shannon College of Hotel Management Shannon Airport, Co. Clare. ☎ 061 712210  www.shannoncollege.com LIT Tipperary Nenagh Road, Thurles, Co. Tipperary. Cashel Court, Clonmel, Co. Tipperary ☎ 0504 28072  www.lit.ie/tipperary Trinity College Dublin College Green, Dublin 2. ☎ 01 8961000  www.tcd.ie University College Dublin Belfield, Dublin 4. ☎ 01 7167777  www.ucd.ie University of Limerick National Technological Park, Limerick. ☎ 061 202700  www.ul.ie University of Ulster York Street, Belfast, Co. Antrim, BT15 1ED ☎ (048) 7012 3456  www.ulster.ac.uk Waterford Institute of Technology Cork Road, Waterford. ☎ 051 302000  www.wit.ie OTHER INSTITUTIONS Montessori Education Centre 41-43 North Great George's St, Dublin 1. ☎ 01 8780071  www.montessorieducation.ie Open University in Ireland Holbrook House, Holles Street, Dublin 2 ☎ 01678 5399 (ROI)  http://www.open.ac.uk/ republic-of-ireland

St. Mary’s University College 191 Falls Road, Belfast BT12 6FE, ☎ 048 90327678  www.stmarys-belfast.ac.uk St. Nicholas Montessori College of Ireland 16 Adelaide Street, Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin. ☎ 01 2806064  www.snmci.ie The College of Progressive Education Wicklow House, 84-88 South Great George’s Street, D2. ☎ 01 4884300  www.progressivecollege.ie Stranmillis University College Stranmillis Road, Belfast BT9 5DY. ☎ (048) 90381271  www.stran.ac.uk BUSINESS COLLEGES Quinn School of Business, UCD Belfield, Dublin 4 ☎ 01 716 4833  www.ucd.ie/quinn Smurfit School of Business, UCD Carysfort Avenue, Blackrock, Co Dublin, Ireland ☎ 021 716 8934  www.smurfitschool.ie DCU Ryan Academy for Entrepreneurship 3013 Lakedrive, Citywest Business Campus, Dublin 24 ☎ 01-7006786  www.ryanacademy.ie The Kemmy Business School University of Limerick ☎ 061 202 700  www.ul.ie/business AGRICULTURAL COLLEGES Ballyhaise College Ballyhaise, Co Cavan, ☎ 01 4338108  www.teagasc.ie/training/ colleges/ballyhaise/ College of Amenity Horticulture National Botanic Gardens, Glasnevin, Dublin. ✉ john.mulhern@teagasc.ie  www.teagasc.ie/ botanicgardens College of Agriculture, Food & Rural Enterprise (CAFRE) Levaghy, Enniskillen, Co Fermanagh. BT74 4GF ☎ 028 9442 6666  www.cafre.ac.uk Pallaskenry Agricultural College Co. Limerick ☎ 061-393100  www.pallaskenry.com

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Education and Training Boards Education and Training Boards Ireland (ETBI) Piper's Hill, Kilcullen Road, Naas, Co Kildare, Ireland Phone: +353 (0)45-901070 / (0)45-901698  www.etbi.ie Cavan & Monaghan Education & Training Board Cavan Office - 049 4331044 HQ: Monaghan (sub-office in Cavan Town).  cavanmonaghan.etb.ie Cork Education & Training Board 21 Lavitt's Quay, Cork 021 427 3377  cork.etb.ie City of Dublin Education & Training Board CDETB Administrative Offices,Town Hall, 1-3 Merrion Road Ballsbridge, Dublin 4 Ph: 01 688 0614  cityofdublin.etb.ie Donegal Education & Training Board Administrative Offices Ard O’Donnell Letterkenny Ph: 074 916 1600  www.donegaletb.ie

Dublin & Dun Laoghaire Education & Training Board 1 Tuansgate, Belgard Square East, Tallaght, Dublin 24 01 452 9600  www.ddletb.ie

Kilkenny & Carlow Education & Training Board Kilkenny Office 056 777 0966 Carlow Office 059 913 8560 HQ: Athy Road, Carlow.  kilkennycarlow.etb.ie

Galway & Roscommon Education & Training Board Head Office 091 874 500 Roscommon Office 090 662 6151  galwayroscommon.etb.ie

Laois & Offaly Education & Training Board Laois Office Ridge Road, Portlaoise 057 862 1352 Offaly Office Castle Buildings, Tara Street, Tullamore, Co. Offaly 057 934 9400  www.laoisoffalyetb.ie

Kerry Education & Training Board Centrepoint, John Joe Sheehy Road, Tralee, Co. Kerry Ph: 066 712 1488  www.kerryetb.ie Kildare & Wicklow Education & Training Board Kildare Office Áras Chill Dara, Devoy Park, Naas. 045 988 000 Wicklow Office Church Street, Wicklow Town, Co. Wicklow 0404 60 500  kildarewicklow.etb.ie

Limerick & Clare Education & Training Board Marshal House, Dooradoyle Road, Limerick. V94 HAC4. Tel: 061 442100  limerickclare.etb.ie Longford & Westmeath Education & Training Board Longford Office 043 3334000

Louth & Meath Education & Training Board Dundalk Office Chapel Street, Dundalk, Co. Louth 042 933 4047 Meath Office Abbey Road, Navan. 046 906 8200 HQ: Drogheda  louthmeath.etb.ie

Tipperary Education & Training Board Nenagh Office Office Church Road, Nenagh. 067 31250

Mayo, Sligo & Leitrim Education & Training Board Mayo Office Administrative Offices, Newtown, Castlebar 094 902 4188

Waterford & Wexford Education & Training Board HQ/Wexford Office Unit 1, Ardcavan Business Park, Wexford. 053 912 3799

Sligo Office Quay Street Sligo 071 914 5025 Leitrim Office Administrative Offices, St. George’s Terrace, Carrick-onShannon 071 962 0024

Clonmel Office Western Road, Clonmel, 052 612 1067  tipperary.etb.ie

Waterford Sub Office 30 The Mall, Waterford. 051 301 500 Dungarvan Sub Office Dungarvan Shopping Centre, Dungarvan, Co Waterford. 058 41780

 mayosligoleitrim.etb.ie  waterfordwexford.etb.ie

Westmeath Office 044 934 8389 HQ: Mullingar  longfordwestmeath.etb.ie

Education Centres Athlone Education Centre Moydrum Road, Athlone, Co. Westmeath. ☎ 090 6420400  athloneeducationcentre.com

Connemara Teacher Centre Aird Thiar, Cárna, Conamara, Co. na Gaillimhe. ☎ 087 791 6876  www.imchonamara.com

Dublin West Education Centre Old Blessington Road, Tallaght, Dublin 24. ☎ 01 4528000  www.dwec.ie

Limerick Education Centre 1st Floor, Marshal House, Dooradoyle Rd, Limerick. ☎ 061 585060  www.lec.ie

Tipperary Education Centre St Patrick's College, Thurles, Co. Tipperary. ☎ 086 - 6008860  www.tipperaryec.com

Blackrock Education Centre Kill Ave., Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin. ☎ 01 2365000  www.blackrockec.ie

Cork Education Support Centre The Rectory, Western Road, Cork. Tel: +353 21 4255600  www.cesc.ie

Galway Education Centre Cluain Mhuire, Wellpark, Galway. ☎ 091 745600  www.galwayec.ie

Mayo Education Centre Westport Road, Castlebar, Co. Mayo. ☎ 094 9020700  mayoeducationcentre.ie

Tralee Education Centre North Campus, Dromtacker, Tralee, Co Kerry. ☎ 066 719 5000  www.edcentretralee.ie

Gort A Choirce Education Centre Gort A Choirce, Leitir Ceanainn, Co. Donegal. ☎ 074 9165556 ✉ inmr@eircom.net

Monaghan Education Centre Knockaconny, Armagh Road, Monaghan. ☎ 047 74000  www.metc.ie

Tuam Education Centre St Patrick’s Primary School Dublin Road, Co. Galway. ☎ 093 25877  tuamec.ie

Donegal Education Centre Floor 2/3, Pier 1, Quay Street, Donegal. ☎ 074 9723487  donegaledcentre.ie

Kildare Education Centre Friary Road, Kildare Town, Co. Kildare. ☎ 045 530200  www.eckildare.ie

Navan Education Centre Athlumney, Navan, Co. Meath. ☎ 046 9067040  www.ecnavan.ie

Cavan Education Centre Co. Cavan ETB Administrative Offices, Church View Square, Cavan.☎ 049-4332259  www.cavanec.ie

Drumcondra Education Centre Drumcondra, Dublin 9. ☎ 01 8576400  www.ecdrumcondra.ie

Kilkenny Education Centre Seville Lodge, Callan Road, Co. Kilkenny. ☎ 056 7760200  www.eckilkenny.ie

Sligo Education Centre IT Sligo Campus, Ballinode, Sligo, Co. Sligo. ☎ 071 9138700  www.ecsligo.ie

Clare Education Centre Government Buildings, Kilrush Road, Ennis. ☎ 065 6845500  www.clareed.ie

Dundalk Education Centre 1 Brickfield Gdns, Newry Rd, Dundalk, Co. Louth. ☎ 086 7707400  www.dundalkec.ie

Laois Education Centre Block Road, Portlaoise, Co. Laois. ☎ 057 8672400  www.laoiseducationcentre.ie

Tarbert Education Centre Comprehensive School, Tarbert, Co. Kerry. ☎ 087 9310233  www.tarbertesc.ie

Carlow Education Centre Kilkenny Road, Carlow. ☎ 087 2079448  www.eccarlow.ie Carrick-on-Shannon Education Centre, Marymount, Carrick-on-Shannon. ☎ 071 9620383  www.carrickedcentre.ie

Dingle Education Centre An Chuillin, An Daingean, Co. Kerry. Tel: 066 9151866  kerryetb.ie/centre_dingle

Waterford Teachers' Centre Newtown Road, Waterford. ☎ 051 311000  www.wtc.ie West Cork Education Centre The Square, Dunmanway, Co Cork ☎ 023 - 8856757  westcorkeducationcentre.com Wexford Education Centre Milehouse Road, Enniscorthy. ☎ 053 9239100  www.ecwexford.ie

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Reference Guide Briefing:

Calendars for 2016 and 2017 January 2016 M 4 11 T 5 12 W 6 13 T 7 14 F 1 8 15 S 2 9 16 S 3 10 17

18 19 20 21 22 23 24

May 2016 M 2 9 T 3 10 W 4 11 T 5 12 F 6 13 S 7 14 S 1 8 15

23 30 24 31 25 26 27 28 29

16 17 18 19 20 21 22

September 2016 M 5 12 19 T 6 13 20 W 7 14 21 T 1 8 15 22 F 2 9 16 23 S 3 10 17 24 S 4 11 18 25

January 2017 M 2 9 16 T 3 10 17 W 4 11 18 T 5 12 19 F 6 13 20 S 7 14 21 S 1 8 15 22 May 2017 M 1 8 T 2 9 W 3 10 T 4 11 F 5 12 S 6 13 S 7 14

15 16 17 18 19 20 21

25 26 27 28 29 30 31

February 2016 M 1 8 15 T 2 9 16 W 3 10 17 T 4 11 18 F 5 12 19 S 6 13 20 S 7 14 21 June 2016 M 6 T 7 W 1 8 T 2 9 F 3 10 S 4 11 S 5 12

13 14 15 16 17 18 19

22 29 23 24 25 26 27 28

March 2016 M 7 T 1 8 W 2 9 T 3 10 F 4 11 S 5 12 S 6 13

14 15 16 17 18 19 20

21 22 23 24 25 26 27

28 29 30 31

20 21 22 23 24 25 26

July 2016 M 4 T 5 W 6 T 7 F 1 8 S 2 9 S 3 10

11 12 13 14 15 16 17

18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25 26 27 28 29 30 31

27 28 29 30

April 2016 M 4 T 5 W 6 T 7 F 1 8 S 2 9 S 3 10

11 12 13 14 15 16 17

18 19 20 21 22 23 24

August 2016 M 1 8 T 2 9 W 3 10 T 4 11 F 5 12 S 6 13 S 7 14

15 16 17 18 19 20 21

22 29 23 30 24 31 25 26 27 28

25 26 27 28 29 30

October 2016 M 3 10 17 T 4 11 18 W 5 12 19 T 6 13 20 F 7 14 21 S 1 8 15 22 S 2 9 16 23

24 31 25 26 27 28 29 30

November 2016 M 7 14 T 1 8 15 W 2 9 16 T 3 10 17 F 4 11 18 S 5 12 19 S 6 13 20

21 28 22 29 23 30 24 25 26 27

December 2016 M 5 12 T 6 13 W 7 14 T 1 8 15 F 2 9 16 S 3 10 17 S 4 11 18

19 20 21 22 23 24 25

26 27 28 29 30 31

23 30 24 31 25 26 27 28 29

February 2017 M 6 13 T 7 14 W 1 8 15 T 2 9 16 F 3 10 17 S 4 11 18 S 5 12 19

20 27 21 28 22 23 24 25 26

March 2017 M 6 T 7 W 1 8 T 2 9 F 3 10 S 4 11 S 5 12

20 21 22 23 24 25 26

April 2017 M 3 T 4 W 5 T 6 F 7 S 1 8 S 2 9

10 11 12 13 14 15 16

17 18 19 20 21 22 23

24 25 26 27 28 29 30

22 29 23 30 24 31 25 26 27 28

June 2017 M 5 T 6 W 7 T 1 8 F 2 9 S 3 10 S 4 11

19 20 21 22 23 24 25

July 2017 M 3 T 4 W 5 T 6 F 7 S 1 8 S 2 9

August 2017 M 7 T 1 8 W 2 9 T 3 10 F 4 11 S 5 12 S 6 13

14 15 16 17 18 19 20

21 22 23 24 25 26 27

28 29 30 31

December 2017 M 4 11 T 5 12 W 6 13 T 7 14 F 1 8 15 S 2 9 16 S 3 10 17

18 19 20 21 22 23 24

25 26 27 28 29 30 31

September 2017 M 4 11 18 T 5 12 19 W 6 13 20 T 7 14 21 F 1 8 15 22 S 2 9 16 23 S 3 10 17 24

26 27 28 29 30

25 26 27 28 29 30

12 13 14 15 16 17 18

October 2017 M 2 9 16 T 3 10 17 W 4 11 18 T 5 12 19 F 6 13 20 S 7 14 21 S 1 8 15 22

26 27 28 29 30

23 30 24 31 25 26 27 28 29

13 14 15 16 17 18 19

27 28 29 30 31

10 11 12 13 14 15 16

17 18 19 20 21 22 23

24 31 25 26 27 28 29 30

November 2017 M 6 13 T 7 14 W 1 8 15 T 2 9 16 F 3 10 17 S 4 11 18 S 5 12 19

20 21 22 23 24 25 26

27 28 29 30

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Located only 2 hours from Dublin, across the Irish Sea, close to Holyhead, students from Ireland could be eligible for a non-repayable tuition fee grant of up to £5,100 from the Welsh Government, and a tuition fee loan of £3,900. *Tuition fees are £9,000

• All Bangor LLB degrees have Qualifying Law Degree (QLD) status, meaning they are recognised by the Law Society of Ireland for professional purposes. • You can combine the study of Law with a range of subjects including Accounting & Finance, Business Studies, Criminology, History, Media Studies or a European language. • Bangor University LLB Law degree holders are eligible to take the Law Society of Ireland Entrance Exams. • Scholarships and bursary support available. • Bangor is considered one of the most affordable places in which to study in the UK. • Bangor University is top in Wales for student satisfaction and is placed in the top 10 in the UK* for overall student satisfaction (National Student Survey 2015). • Bangor University is rated no.1 in the UK for accommodation, 2nd for courses and lecturers and 3rd for student support (Whatuni Student Choice Awards 2016). *excluding 'specialist' institutions Education 55

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56 Education

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Education Reference Guide 2016